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Found 9 results

  1. Celiac.com 01/16/2019 - Sales data from the EU show sales of free-from products rising steadily through 2017, in both Western and Eastern Europe. Euromonitor International reveals that total “free-from” food sales in those regions rose 11.7% and 8.7% respectively. Makers of free-from food products have typically targeted consumers suffering from dietary intolerances, and gluten intolerances. Indeed, dairy- and gluten-free foods led the 2017 growth figures, rising about 13% each, according to Euromonitor. Interestingly, though demand for free-from foods is expanding into new markets, Euromonitor’s 2017 data shows that most new consumers of free-from products do not suffer from a medical condition or food intolerance that requires specialized food. Rather, new consumers are overwhelmingly free from food allergies or intolerances. Meanwhile, even though growth in the allergen-free category, in general, stood at an anemic 1.3% in the combined region, the growth rate in the less developed markets of Eastern Europe stood out at 9.2%. Mintel notes that 12% of all UK food product launches in 2015 carried a gluten-free claim, more than double the 2011 rate of 7%. The data show that the public currently perceives free-from foods as generally healthier than their counterparts. This perception of health is a key market driver and has helped push the base of consumers beyond the traditional group of allergy or intolerance sufferers. Along with organics, health and wellness products have recorded the largest overall growth at a global level. However, this reality leaves the free-from food category vulnerable to changes in perception. Indeed, research from Mintel found that more than half of consumers who currently buy free-from products would stop doing so if they thought they were "less healthy" than standard offerings. To solidify and expand their product appeal, look for makers of free-from foods to improve the nutritional profile of their products, reducing sugars, fats, and salt, and to offer more grains, such as amaranth, quinoa, sorghum, buckwheat, millet and teff, among other strategies. Overall, look for new healthier, more nutritious breads, breakfast cereals, and snack bars to fill the shelves as consumers continue their quest for healthier, more nutritious foods. That’s generally good news for free-from consumers who do have food allergies or intolerances. It likely means more nutritious, better tasting, better quality gluten-free, dairy-free and other free-from products in the future. Read the full report at Mintel.com (Paywall).
  2. Celiac.com 10/16/2017 - In Europe many commercially available, nominally gluten-free foods use purified wheat starch as a base, but what's the best way to way to measure the gluten content of gluten-free foods, particularly those based on purified wheat starch? Currently, the only test for gluten quantitation certified by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is based on the R5 monoclonal antibody (MAB) that recognizes gliadin, but not glutenin. A team of researchers recently set out to determine the best way to measure the gluten content of nominally gluten-free foods, particularly those based on purified wheat starch. The research team included HJ Ellis, U Selvarajah and PJ Ciclitira. They are affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology, Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences at Kings College London, St Thomas Hospital in London. Celiac disease is treated with a strict Gluten-Free Diet (GFD). Gluten is comprised of gliadin, Low (LMWG) and High (HMWG). To estimate gluten content of gluten-free foods, the R5 works by multiplying the R5 gliadin value by two to yield a gluten value. The research team raised a panel of monoclonal antibodies to celiac disease toxic motifs. They then assessed the gluten content of three wheat starches A, B, & C that are supplied as standards for the Transia gluten quantitation kit, which is based on a MAB to omega-gliadin. They used separate ELISAs to measure gliadin, Low (LMWG) and High Molecular Weight (HMWG) glutenins. They found that the gliadin levels in all three starches were always higher, as measured by one of the antibodies, than the levels measured with the other, and that the ratio between measurements made by the 2 MABs varied from 3.1 to 7.0 fold. The team noted significant differences in glutenin to gliadin ratios for different wheat starches. Based on their results, the team suggests that the best way to measure the gluten content of nominally gluten-free foods, especially those containing purified wheat starch, is to first measure gliadin and glutenin, and to then add the values together. This is because measurement of gliadin alone, followed by multiplication by two to yield a gluten content, appears to be inadequate for measuring total gluten in processed foods. Source: Int J Hepatol Gastroenterol. 2017;3(1): 046-049.
  3. Celiac.com 10/12/2017 - Despite the economic downturn, the cost of healthy products has not diminished. Sales have continued to grow in this sector thanks to the many information campaigns aimed at raising consumer awareness of the health benefits of consuming gluten free products. Manufacturers have responded to the growing demand by expanding the variety of products they offer. Many consumers, including those that cannot eat gluten, do not want to give up eating products specially designed for them although they cost even more than traditional food. The demand for products that address food intolerance continues to grow. In Poland, the number of people who are on special diets because of their health problems and food allergies is still growing. More and more people suffer from intolerance to different nutrients. This creates market conditions that encourage developing products that are safe for this group of consumers. Demand, among one sub-set of this market - gluten-free products, is growing among many consumers. Even manufacturers of standard food products have entered this market segment because they see a large and growing potential. The gluten-free food market is growing steadily. The causes, in addition to the increasing number of diagnosed patients, is an increasing awareness among doctors and patients. Celiac disease affects not just children. Currently 60% of diagnosed cases are adults, of which 15-20% are over 60 years of age. Coeliac disease is diagnosed in Europe in 1:200 and in 1:250 people in the U.S. Approximately 70% of those diagnosed are women. Celiac disease is a non-allergic food hypersensitivity, which is caused by a genetic intolerance to gluten, a protein found in cereals such as wheat, rye, and barley. It is estimated that celiac disease affects around 1 percent of the population and this number is likely to grow in the future. In some European countries, patients with celiac disease form more than 2 percent of population. Yet, the most developed market for gluten-free foods is in the United States. The number of newly introduced gluten-free packaged foods and beverages in the U.S. increased by 80% from 2005 to 2010. This trend is expected to continue through the years 2011-2014. Market analysis suggests that gluten-free food sales will grow at least until 2014. Companies producing food should therefore take advantage of the growing trend of food consumption in this category. Traditional gluten-free products such as bread, biscuits, crackers, cereals and pasta products are still in the development stage. In their group, in recent years, producers have continued to introduce new choices. However, we have also seen many innovations among the products in categories such as snacks, dairy products, sauces, spices, desserts and confectionery. Some of these products may already be free from gluten. However, to attract consumers they are now being labeled as gluten-free products. In the United States between 2008-2010 about 300 products in the category of gluten-free snacks were introduced. The U.S. achieved the highest number and value of sales in 2010. In Poland, only some of the really sick people are the diagnosed cases. Associations of people with celiac disease, such as the Polish Association of people with celiac disease and gluten-free diet is trying to raise public awareness of more aspects of the disease. This is another factor that will lead to increased demand for gluten-free foods. Such activities are already producing effects in the West, where preventive information campaigns have been widely carried out. The current emergence, in the Polish market, of western gluten-free food manufacturers and their products, demonstrates both the development of this branch of the food industry and growing awareness among people in other parts of Europe and the USA. For now, Polish brands dominate in our home market. This is due to lower prices compared to imported products. The quality of Polish products is also competitive. The current political situation allows distribution within the country and also for export. Competitive prices offered by Polish companies may be attractive for residents of other countries. Entering into foreign markets, managers should also take into account local eating habits and preferences. For foreign companies it is harder to attract customers, not only because of the price difference, but also because of the taste and form of food. Eating habits are also a strong factor, which influences customers' purchasing choices. So this factor must be included in designing process and entering new markets. Invariably, the problem of much higher priced gluten-free products arises. Gluten-free products are generally much more expensive than wheat-based products. This is due to less demand for them and the continuing refinement of this kind of food, which, so far, offers an inferior taste. A survey conducted by the Gluten-Intolerance Group of North America, estimates that people buying gluten free products spend about 30% of their monthly expenditures on food. This is still a big barrier to overcome for gluten-free food producers. The difference stems from the fact that the materials are non-standard and not as widely available as conventional ingredients. The development of new production technologies also generates additional costs. Furthermore, innovative products will be subjected to laboratory tests. Still, domestic products are cheaper by significant margins compared to products from abroad. Gluten-free food is specially marked by the manufacturers. The characteristic feature is the sign of the crossed head of grain, which indicates that product contains less than 20 ppm of gluten, which corresponds to 20 mg per 1 kg. Use of clear and legible labels will encourage customers to choose these products. The symbol tells the customer what to expect from the product. He can quickly and easily identify what he needs. Many leading companies monitor development of this branch of the food industry. They emphasize packaging and eye-catching labels. They also consider opening separate production lines to produce only this kind of products. Even companies not currently engaged in production of gluten-free food are starting to invest in development of these technologies. Much depends on the purpose of a producer who has to remember that gluten free food is a specialized product. If its purpose is mass production, entry into the gluten-free market may not produce the desired financial results. On the other hand, the advantage, in this case, is the extended offering of products at more competitive prices, which makes the products more attractive in the eyes of customers. At the same time, retailers will appreciate manufacturers that offer a wider choice of products. Financial planning should take into account the above factors and consider investing in new technologies. Access to the widest choice of gluten-free products is the best at Internet stores or health food stores. Supermarkets are not able to provide as wide a choice as the online stores. Potential clients are not just city dwellers who have easy access to health food stores. A package ordered from an online store reaches into every area of the country, and they are open at all hours and on all days. These store types are worth keeping in mind as they pose increasing competition. However, from a price perspective, they cannot compete with supermarkets. The demand for gluten-free foods is growing from year to year, among other reasons, because it also fits with the current trend of preventive health care. The gluten-free food market is characterized by outstanding performance over many years. Even during the recession in 2009, it grew by 11% in global sales (calculated on the basis of USD 2009 exchange rate), compared to the more sedate level of 3% for products in the category of health and wellness. In 2004-2009, gluten-free products reached a 15% annual growth rate (data Euromonitor). In 2009, global sales reached $ 2.3 billion for gluten-free products which represents 27% of food sales from food intolerance groups. Half of those sales were generated by bread, traditionally the most important category. According to Euromonitor analysis, a wide media campaign about celiac disease symptoms such as fatigue, weight gain, skin rashes and lack of concentration, also increased its sales in this category, turning gluten into the "enemy" of good health. As of today, many of the gluten-free product buyers are people who have not been diagnosed with the disease, and who consider themselves to be people sensitive to gluten. They believe that eating gluten-free products improves their health. According to Euromonitor analyses, retail markets around the world, are not only responding to this trend, but also actively helping to increase growth in sales by offering a number of gluten-free products. Researches predict that the market for gluten-free foods will continue to grow over the next five years, although at a slower pace. Forecasts predict that the U.S. market of gluten-free foods and beverages in 2015 will reach sales of $ 5.5 billion.
  4. Celiac.com 09/05/2017 - Did you know that it's not uncommon for many McDonald's stores in Europe to offer gluten-free buns? If you're lucky enough to find yourself in Europe any time soon, here's a quick list of European countries where you can get Gluten-Free McDonald's Buns. Remember, not every McDonald's location offers gluten-free options, so always check first. Numerous McDonald's restaurants in these countries offer gluten-free bun options: Austria Denmark Finland Hungary Italy Norway Portugal Spain Sweden Switzerland The Netherlands The bigger question is when will they offer gluten-free buns in the USA?
  5. Hi all, I used to post here quite a bit but have been off the boards for a while. I have a question. I am leaving for Poland in about a month. It will be the first time I've travelled overseas since my diagnosis. I am flying Lufthansa and have ordered my gluten free meal. I also plan on packing some snacks to carry on the plane. Do you think I should get a note from my doctor in case airport security gives me a hard time about my snacks? The rules about what they accept on board seem to change daily and I have seen some personnel be much stricter than others about carry on items. I've heard good things about Lufthansa's gluten-free meals, but I am worried that there could be a mix up. And I don't want to be stuck on a plane without food. DH doesn't want me to be stuck without food either, as I become very, very grumpy Do you think having a doctor's note would help me, or should I even bother? I'm not worried about the food when I get over there, as we'll be staying with some friends who can give us the skinny on where to eat. Plus the Polish Celiac Society has a free restaurant card in Polish on the English version of their website for visitors and I've printed a bunch of copies to hand to waiters. It's mostly the plane ride that worries me. What do you guys think? Do you get a note from your doctor before you travel? Or am I just being paranoid?
  6. Celiac.com 01/29/2008 - If the results of a recent study are any indication, the Greeks might be among those least affected by celiac disease. The study on the prevalence of celiac disease in Greece shows that the people of Thessaly have a prevalence of celiac disease that is among the lowest of all the European populations. Recent discoveries point to a greater prevalence of celiac disease than previously expected in a number of European populations, and the availability of new, accurate serological tests has made screening in the general population possible. These facts, coupled with the reality that no data exist regarding the prevalence of celiac disease in Greece, recently sparked a team of researchers to use a novel diagnostic algorithm to examine the general population of Thessaly, in central Greece, in an effort to determine rates of prevalence for celiac disease. Led by doctors Roka V, Potamianos SP, Kapsoritakis AN, Yiannaki EE, Koukoulis GN, Stefanidis I, Koukoulis GK, Germenis AE, the researcher team selected 2230 participants (1226 women, 1004 men, median age 46 years, range 18-80 years) by a random sampling from the adult general population of Thessaly. The researchers took blood samples and checked them for total immunoglobulin A (IgA)-serum levels, to eliminate IgA deficiency. The research team then examined samples that showed total IgA within the normal range for IgA antibodies compared to native human-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG); the researchers then tested samples that were anti-tTG positive for IgA antiendomysial antibodies (EmA). The researchers then examined samples from participants with selective IgA deficiency for IgG antigliadin antibodies. They referred for biopsy and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) typing those participants that showed EmA-positive or antigliadin antibody-positive. No participant with selective IgA deficiency was detected. Four individuals tested positive for EmA, all of whom were biopsy-proven coeliacs. Therefore, the prevalence of celiac disease within this general population sample is 1: 558 or 1.8 per 1000 (SE 0.13). The two men, two women that did show abnormal histology were between the ages of 18 and 35. Two of them were considered to be asymptomatic and two presented with a sub-clinical course. All four showed the heterodimer HLA-DQ2. The evidence indicates that the people of the central Greek area of Thessaly have a prevalence of celiac disease that is among the lowest of all the European populations. Eur. J. Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2007 Nov;19(11):982-7.
  7. Celiac.com 05/27/2011 - Refractory Celiac Disease (RCD) is exactly what it sounds like: persistent malabsorption symptoms and intestinal villous atrophy even after following a gluten free diet. It is divided into two subtypes. RCDI has normal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) while RCDII has abnormal IELs. RCDII is by far the more severe - there is no effective treatment, and it is often fatal within five years. Recent studies in Amsterdam and Paris have reported that RCDII can account for 28-75% of RCD patients. A group of researchers led by Ciaran Kelly at the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, the only specialized celiac center in New England, set out to determine if the same was true in the United States. They found a much lower incidence, 17%, of RCD patients with RCDII. An editorial by Malamut and Cellier accompanying Kelly's report in the American Journal of Gastroenterology suggests a number of factors that could account for the difference. Primary among them is the different methodology used to diagnose RCDII. In the US study only one method, immunohistochemistry, was used to ascertain whether the IELs were normal or not; in Europe they used three independent experimental techniques to confirm this data. The American researchers note that if they had in fact underdiagnosed RCDII they should have seen more severe cases of RCDI, and they did not. Malamut and Cellier point out that the Boston study may also have overdiagnosed RCDI by examining biopsy samples done only six months after institution of a gluten free diet, when villous atrophy may not have completely healed. An inflated number of RCDI cases would generate an erroneously low percentage of RCDII cases. But the Americans note that only four of the thirty-four cases of RCD they examined were from patients who had been on a gluten free diet for less than a year. Alternatively, the relative dearth of RCDII cases in the US as compared to Europe could be attributed to the different genetic backgrounds of the populations involved - the "melting pot" present in the US rather than the older stocks that may be in Europe. It has been reported that RCDII correlates with HLA-DQ2 homozygosity, and in fact, the HLA-DQ8 allele was found to be more common in celiac patients in New York than in those in Paris. It is also possible that an environmental factor, such as the amount or type of gluten consumed before diagnosis, could account for the discrepancy, but this remains to be investigated. Therapeutic options for the aggressive RCDII are still severely limited; research into it should certainly continue, on both continents. Sources: Roshan et al. The Incidence and Clinical Spectrum of Refractory Celiac Disease in a North American Referral Center. The American Journal of Gastroenterology 2011; 106: 923-928. Malamut and Cellier. Is Refractory Celiac Disease More Severe in Old Europe? The American Journal of Gastroenterology 2011; 106: 929-932.
  8. Celiac.com 04/08/2011 - A medical research team recently conducted an epidemiological review of celiac disease in Iran. The team included M. Rostami Nejad, K. Rostami, M. H. Emami, M. R. Zali, and R. Malekzadeh. They are associated variously with the Research Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, with the Digestive Disease Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, both in Tehran, Iran, with the Poursina Hakim Research Institute (PHRI), Isfahan University of MedicalSciences (IUMS), Isfahan, Iran, and with the School of Medicine, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. Celiac disease has been traditionally believed to be a chronic enteropathy, almost exclusively affecting people of European origin. The use of new, simple, very sensitive and specific serological tests has revealed shown that celiac disease is as common in Middle Eastern countries as in Europe, Australia and New Zealand, where wheat is a major dietary staple. Celiac disease was presumed to be rare in Iran because of low awareness and a low index of suspicion. However new epidemiological data show that celiac disease is a common disorder in Middle Eastern countries, particularly Iran. In fact, studies have shown Iran to have high rates of celiac disease, in both the general population and the at-risk groups, i.e. patients with type 1 diabetes or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In developing countries, doing blood tests on at-risk groups is necessary for early identification of celiac patients. Clinical studies show that patients in the middle east present with non-specific symptoms or a lack of symptoms as often as in Europe. Since wheat is a major component of the Iranian diet and exposure to wheat proteins induces some degree of immune tolerance, leading to milder symptoms that may be mistaken with other GI disorders. Getting patients on a gluten free diet is a major challenge for both patients and clinicians in Iran, mainly because commercial gluten-free products are simply not available. Since it is possible that there is some variable frequency celiac disease in different parts of Iran, as is the case for India, the study team suggests the need for a more uniformly designed evaluation of celiac disease for the entire country, a mapping of HLA DQ in the same areas, together with a gluten consumption assessment. Celiac disease rates are quite low in some areas of Iran, such as Shiraz Province, while a summary of the reviewed studies suggests a prevalence of 1% in the remaining areas of Iran, a rate similar to that found in Western European countries. SOURCE: Middle East Journal of Digestive Diseases/ Vol.3/ No.1/ March 2011
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