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Found 9 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/30/2018 - As most people know already, “al dente” is an Italian term that describes how pasta should be prepared—not too hard, and not too soft. Konjac Angel Hair Zero Calorie Pasta by Konjac Foods comes ready-to-eat in 8.8 ounce packages that are filled with water, so the noodles are kept wet and ready-to-eat within the package, and despite this, the Konjac noodles are still perfectly al dente—firm but not soft. Remarkably these noodles are marketed as “0 Calories,” and are free of sugar, fat, soy, and gluten. Their only ingredients are konjac glucomannan fiber, calcium hydroxide, and purified water. For those who don't know, konjac glucomannan (KGM) is “a water-soluable dietary fiber derived from the root of the konjac plant.” It is known as “moyu” or “juruo” in China, and “konnyaku” or “shirataki noodles” in Japan. Besides being a great noodle choice for those on a gluten-free diet, Konjac noodles are also ideal for people on weight-loss or diabetic diets, as they are high in fiber and contain zero calories. Amazingly, the shelf life of these individual serving-sized packages is one full year at room temperature, so you can feel free to stock up on them. Konjac Foods also makes “Konjac Gucomannan Powder” in 500g packages. One teaspoon of the konjac powder can be added to 8 ounces of your favorite drink, including in smoothies. The dietary fiber in konjac flour is also water soluble, and according to the maker it has: “a greater potential to reduce postprandial blood glucose, insulin, and serum lipid levels than insoluble fiber.” I tried both products, and found that the noodles were an excellent substitute for rice noodles in my homemade ramen. I also tried the noodles as a spaghetti replacement, and although they had a different texture than I'm used to, I really enjoyed it. The powder can be added as a fiber supplement to foods, drinks, and shakes, and I tried it in a smoothie. Anyone who is dieting to lose weight, on a gluten-free or diabetic diet, or just looking for a more healthy noodle substitute (that won't spike your blood sugar) will appreciate these Konjac Foods products. For more info visit their site.
  2. Celiac.com 11/09/2016 - I don't know about you, but I am totally getting into the holiday spirit! It has been getting a little chilly at night and the night seems to come sooner and sooner. That definitely means it's holiday season! These Hidden Fiber Holiday Spice Cupcakes won't make you gain the traditional 10 pounds of "Santa weight" though and they have the added benefit of helping to keep you regular. A lot of people associate the holidays with all sorts of sweets and treats. I am all for my sweets and treats but I don't like feeling like crap afterwards. That is why I find it so important to come up with healthier alternatives that handle my cravings and make my whole body happy. I hope you enjoy these as much as I do and I hope they help you veer away from the dessert table at your work holiday parties! Ingredients: 1¼ cup almond flour 1 tablespoon coconut flour ¼ cup tapioca flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 tablespoon ground chia seeds 1 teaspoon organic vanilla powder ¼ teaspoon ground cloves, or more to taste 4 eggs 1 tablespoon honey 1 teaspoon liquid Madagascar vanilla 2 tablespoons coconut oil (or ghee) 1 tablespoon almond milk 2 tablespoons Sweet Spreads Cinnamon Roll Coconutter ½ cup plus 4 tablespoons applesauce ½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar Coconut oil for greasing pans 2 TOPPING OPTIONS: My Maple Fluff Frostingor 4 tablespoons Sweet Spreads Vanilla Cupcake Coconutter ½ cup heavy whipping cream ¼ tsp vanilla 1 tablespoons cacao powder for dusting only Instructions: Preheat oven to 350F degrees. Grease mini-muffin pans with coconut oil. Combine all three flours, baking soda, baking powder, ground chia seeds, vanilla powder and cloves in a bowl. Mix well, sifting two times. In another bowl mix the eggs, honey, vanilla, coconut oil, almond milk and Sweet Spreads Coconutter or nut butter of choice. Whip on medium then on high with a hand mixer. Add in applesauce. Mix in apple cider vinegar. Scoop halfway full into well-greased muffin pans. Bake for 12-16 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a rack. Top with my Maple Fluff Frosting or whipped Sweet Spreads Vanilla Cupcake Coconutter. Sweet Spreads Vanilla Cupcake Coconutter Whipped Topping DIRECTIONS: Place cold whipped cream in a cold bowl and whip until very firm. Slowly drizzle the vanilla and Sweet Spreads Vanilla Cupcake Coconutter. It will drop a bit. Top your cupcakes with the frosting. Lightly dust with cacao powder. Enjoy!
  3. Celiac.com 06/25/2003 - The Neuropathy Association -- On May 27, 2003 a link between Peripheral Neuropathy and Celiac Disease was reported by physicians at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University and New York Presbyterian Hospital, according to The Neuropathy Association. Peripheral Neuropathy, which affects up to 20 million people in the U.S., can cause pain, numbness and weakness in the arms and legs and, when left untreated, can progress to debilitation. In an article published in todays Neurology, five percent of all patients with neuropathy were found to also have celiac disease, which results from an allergy to gluten in bread and other wheat products, and is estimated to affect one out of every 150 people. Based on the diagnosis, we are now able to treat a substantial number of patients with neuropathy who previously could not be helped, said Dr. Russell Chin, the first author of the paper. In addition, patients with celiac disease tended to have a type of neuropathy called small fiber neuropathy which often causes severe burning, stinging, and electric-shock like pains, but is often misdiagnosed as it is undetectable with routine tests used by neurologists to diagnose neuropathy. Approximately 16% of all patients with small fiber neuropathy were found to have celiac disease. Many of our patients were told that there was nothing physically wrong with them, and were advised to seek psychiatric care for presumed anxiety or depression, noted Dr. Norman Latov, Medical and Scientific Director of The Neuropathy Association, and senior author of the study. You too would be anxious and depressed if you were in constant pain, and no-one believed you or offered to help. Celiac disease is known to run in families, and in several of the cases, other family members were affected. Some were erroneously diagnosed with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, an inherited form of neuropathy due to genetic mutations. Not all familial cases of neuropathy are due to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, noted Dr. Latov. Peripheral neuropathy can also occur in association with other causes for neuropathy that run in families, such as diabetes or autoimmunity, for example. The article also notes that one third of the celiac neuropathy patients did not have any gastrointestinal symptoms such as malabsorption, abdominal pain or diarrhea, which are associated with celiac disease. What many people dont realize, notes Dr. Peter Green, Director of the Celiac Disease Center at the New York Presbyterian Hospital, and co-author of the paper, Is that 50% of adults with celiac disease have few or no gastrointestinal symptoms, and present with other manifestations such as anemia, or as in this case, peripheral neuropathy. Treatment consists of eliminating gluten or wheat containing foods in the diet. At present, patients with neuropathy are not routinely tested for celiac disease. Based on the new study, however, patients and physicians should be aware that anyone with unexplained neuropathy or pain should be tested for celiac disease regardless of whether or not they have the classic gastrointestinal symptoms. About The Neuropathy Association: The Neuropathy Association is a public, non-profit, charitable organization, founded by patients with neuropathy and their friends and families, whose mission is to provide support and education, and fund research into the causes and treatments of neuropathy. It is a rapidly growing, broad based organization, with over 70,000 members, and over 200 support groups and chapters throughout the US. For more information about peripheral neuropathy and The Neuropathy Association, visit our web site at http://www.neuropathy.org, or contact us at 60 E. 42nd St, Suite 942, New York, N.Y. 10165, Tel: 212-692-0662, e-mail: info@neuropathy.org. Contact information: Media Contact: Jeanne Abi-Nader Tel: 212-484-7954 E-mail: jabi-nader@rlmnet.com Norman Latov, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, and Medical and Scientific Director, The Neuropathy Association. Tel: 212-888-8516 E-mail: nol2002@med.cornell.edu.
  4. Celiac.com 12/29/2015 - Regular Girl is a gluten-free prebiotic fiber with a probiotic blend that is specifically designed "for the woman on the go." The beautiful and highly-functional packaging that it comes in makes this point clear—15 convenient serving sized packets are included in an athletic-style, non-breakable plastic bottle—which makes it very easy to take with you to the office, on vacation, or anywhere else you want to go (it is also available in 30-day supply bulk powder). Each Regular Girl serving packet contains 6 grams of the company's proprietary "Sunfiber," which is designed to eliminate any gas or bloating that can be caused by other dietary fiber supplements. This supplement is unique because it also contains 8 billion CFU of Bifidobacterium lactis to help normalize bacterial gut flora and improve calcium absorption. Regular Girl packets are very easy to use—just mix one with 6-8 ounces of water or any non-carbonated beverage. What I really liked about them is that they aren't flavored, so they don't contain any artificial flavors or colors, which makes them very easy to drink by themselves or with your favorite beverage or smoothie. Overall, this is the perfect dietary fiber supplement for anyone with celiac disease, and especially for women who appreciate well-designed packaging which allows you to take them with you wherever you want to go. For more info visit: www.regulargirl.com.
  5. For several days now I've been using SunFiber, which is a proprietary gluten-free invisible fiber made by Tomorrow's Nutrition, and the effects are noteworthy. My doctor recently recommended that I increase my daily fiber intake to help reduce my total cholesterol levels, and at around the same time some samples of SunFiber arrived for me to try out. Going on the assumption that the timing of these two things may not be a coincidence, I decided to begin using SunFiber for this purpose. According to information about the product provided by Tomorrow's Nutrition, SunFiber contains 6 grams of clinically proven, clear and grit-free soluable fiber, and it is also a proven prebiotic. It also helps to control the glycemic index of foods, which is an added bonus. What I really like about SunFiber is that it is totally tasteless, and is a superfine powder that quickly seems to dissolve in any liquid, and it doesn't change the flavor or color of the drink. I really dislike all of the artificial colors and flavors contained in many common fiber supplements, and SunFiber doesn't contain anything except their fiber and guar gum. I've already seen a vast improvement in regularity, and expect to see an improvement on my next cholesterol check. I'd recommend SunFiber for many reasons, but especially because it is a very clean and easy to take fiber supplement. For more info visit: www.tomorrowsnutrition.com. Review written by Scott Adams.
  6. Connie Sarros

    Foraging for Gluten-Free Fiber

    This article originally appeared in the Spring 2004 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. Celiac.com 10/08/2014 - The one condition that accounts for almost half of the patients who seek out gastroenterologists is IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome). Many celiacs suffer from this ailment. IBS is a ‘functional’ disorder, meaning that there is no damage to the digestive tract. Only the bowel’s function, not its structure, is disturbed. Here is Where the Irony Begins Patients suffering from constipation are encouraged to consume a lot of dietary fiber (non-digestible carbohydrates and lignin from plants) because it acts as a mild laxative and promotes bowel evacuation. A ‘mild laxative’ is the last thing someone with diarrhea needs, right? Wrong! It is recommended that IBS patients go on a high-fiber diet. Studies show that IBS patients on a high fiber diet report a reduction in pain; those on a low fiber diet do not. Bowel habits improve in about half of IBS patients on the high fiber diet. Even for people who do not have IBS, doctors recommend that we all include more fiber in our diets. So How Much is ‘Enough’ Fiber? The daily recommendation is 25 to 35 grams of combined soluble fiber (dissolves in water) and insoluble fiber (‘roughage’ that does not dissolve in water). Peas, beans and apples contain soluble fiber, which slows digestion and helps the body absorb nutrients from food. Flax seeds and nuts provide insoluble fiber, which helps foods pass through the stomach and intestines and adds bulk to the stool. Fiber is found in plant foods and cannot be digested by humans. It may also help control weight because it makes you feel full sooner. The total grams of fiber you should ingest depends on your digestive system’s sensitivity. Just a warning: A high-fiber diet causes gas because the carbohydrates in high-fiber foods cannot be completely digested in the stomach and small intestine. It is best to increase the amount of consumed fiber slowly to allow your body to get used to it gradually. Additionally, it is vital to increase water consumption in proportion to the increased intake of fiber. Where Do You Find Fiber? Fiber is found in vegetable gums (konjac gum, gum Arabic, carrageenan, guar gum, locust bean gum, petin vegetable gums, xanthan gum). It is also found in nature, in the foods we harvest from the ground. The following list shows some of the foods that are high in fiber: 1 oz. dry almonds (3g) 1 oz. roasted pumpkin seeds (10.2g) 1 oz. sunflower seeds (4g) 1 unpeeled medium apple (3.7g) 1 unpeeled pear (4.5g) 1 kiwi (5g) 4 oz. dried, sulfured apricots (8.8g) 4 oz. dried figs (10.5g) 10 dried prunes (6.1g) 1 cup raspberries (9g) ¾ cup blackberries (7g) ½ cup baked beans (7g) ½ cup chick peas (7g) 1 cup boiled lentils (15.6g) ½ cup canned lima beans (5.8g) ½ cup navy beans (6.7g) ½ cup pinto refried beans (11g) 1 corn on the cob (5.9g) 1 cup white corn (11.2g) 3 ½ cups air-popped popcorn (4.5g) 2 oz. corn pasta, cooked (7.9g) ½ cup frozen peas, cooked (4.2g) 1 cup spinach (4g) You may have to eat 50 stalks of celery each day to get your recommended amount of fiber, or you may prefer to incorporate the suggestions below: Add nuts and seeds (sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds) to salads and casseroles, sprinkle them over vegetables, or add them to a stir-fry. You can also sprinkle them with seasonings and roast them slowly in the oven for a healthy snack. Add cooked dried beans and shredded carrots to everything from salads to soups, stews, casseroles, meatloaf, or even rice (Note that cooking vegetables does not change their fiber content). Eat plenty of fruits (especially citrus fruits), berries, prunes, figs or apricots. Keeping the skins on fruits (and vegetables) will add a small amount of extra fiber, but the skins are the part that are most exposed to pesticides, so unless you are buying organic fruits and vegetables, you may be better off peeling them first. Snack on popcorn (Air-popped is the healthiest). Sprinkle raisins on salads, puddings, canned fruit, baked apples, sweet potatoes, cereal, or just eat them plain as a snack. Add shredded cabbage and peas to salads, soups, wraps, stir-fries, and stews. Use brown rice or quinoa in place white rice. Add shredded apples to pancake batters, quick breads, and yam dishes. Serve a baked apple for dessert instead of cookies. Eat a fresh apples, apricots, prunes or oranges instead of drinking their juice. Add dried cranberries to cereal, quick breads, muffins, cookie batter, yam dishes, and salads. Make up a bowl of nuts, raisins and dried cranberries for a snack.
  7. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2004 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. Celiac.com 10/09/2014 - Note: Dried beans will not cook through if the salt is added too early. This recipe serves four people. Ingredients: 2 cups dried lentils 3 cups water 1 cup carrots, sliced thin 1 large onion, sliced 1 cup celery, sliced 2 bay leaves 3 tablespoons parsley, chopped ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper 1 ½ tablespoons gluten-free apple cider vinegar 3 cans (8 oz. each.) salt-free tomato sauce 1 teaspoon olive oil 4 bone-in chicken breasts, skin removed Directions: In a medium saucepan, cover lentils with water; bring to a boil, then rinse and drain. Return lentils to pan. Add 3 cups water and next 5 ingredients; bring to a boil. Lower heat; simmer 45 minutes or until lentils are tender, adding more water if needed. Stir in salt, pepper, vinegar and tomato sauce; simmer 5 minutes more. Spray a large skillet with gluten-free nonstick spray. Add oil and sauté chicken pieces over high heat until browned on both sides. Spoon lentil mixture over chicken, lower heat to medium, cover pan and simmer 40 minutes or until chicken is fork tender, adding more water if needed to keep lentils moist. Calories: 359; Total fat: 6g; Saturated fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 96mg; Sodium: 359mg; Carbohydrates: 30.5g; Fiber: 9.7g; Sugar: 8.2g; Protein: 45.7g
  8. Celiac.com 12/17/2013 - One of the biggest hurdles for those who have celiac disease is finding a way to get enough fiber in their diets. Removing wheat from the equation also eliminates a huge amount of roughage. Wheat provides the fiber in many breads, pastas, crackers and other staples of the American diet. Replacing that fiber is crucial, since the added bulk moves the food through your digestive system and keeps you regular. You should be aiming to consume between 25 and 35 grams of fiber per day. Here are a few ways to ensure you’re getting enough fiber in your diet, whether you’ve been living with celiac disease your entire life or just for a few weeks. Bulk Up Your Food There are plenty of fiber-rich foods that do not contain gluten. For example, fruits and vegetables are a great, all-natural source of fiber. You can add them to soups and sauces for a flavorful kick that will also provide a few extra grams of fiber. Skip the croutons on your salad — most contain gluten anyway — and sub in raisins for a sweet, filling treat. Flaxseed and chia seeds are two superfoods that are naturally gluten free and contain a hefty dose of fiber. Stir them into smoothies, sprinkle on your breakfast cereal, or shake them over yogurt to give it a bit of a crunch. With several grams of fiber per serving, nuts are also a great addition to just about any main or side dish. Kidney beans or chickpeas can be stirred into soups to increase the fiber count. Use Supplements Adding a supplement to your diet can be an excellent way to make up for the fiber you’re losing by not eating wheat. You’ll want to find natural supplements that mimic the way fiber found in food breaks down in your gut. One smart option is a prebiotic, such as Prebiotin — a plant fiber that also provides good bacteria to the colon, further aiding in digestion. Make Adjustments It’s possible to increase the fiber content in your diet by making simple substitutions. Perhaps you have always eaten white rice, which is easier on your sensitive stomach than brown. Well, now’s the time to give fiber-rich brown rice another try. Since your celiac diagnosis has probably cleared up most of your GI issues, you should be able to eat brown rice now without issue. Or try fiber-laden quinoa, a rice substitute that’s rich in both fiber and protein, as well as millet or amaranth as a white rice fill-in. Keep a Tally Before your celiac diagnosis, you may not have paid any attention to your daily fiber intake. But now it’s essential to track it for at least a few weeks to make sure you’re getting enough fiber. Aim for 20 grams at first, until you get the hang of searching out non-wheat fiber sources. Eventually, you’ll want to get to 25 or more grams per day, and you may find it’s not as hard as you expected.
  9. Adding fiber to your diet is important for a number of reasons, including dieting, lowering blood cholesterol, or managing or preventing diabetes or heart disease. That being said, I recently came across psyllium fiber from Konsyl that is not only gluten-free, but also happens to be one of the most effective means of adding concentrated extra fiber to your diet. I also appreciate the fact that Konsyl Original Psyllium Fiber doesn't contain artificial flavors or additives, and is also sugar-free. When I first tried Konsyl I have to say that I was impressed with the purity of the ingredients in comparison to other brands that I've tried in the past. Just after a light lunch I mixed up one teaspoon of Konsyl fiber with 8 ounces of water and drank it, and followed this up with another cup or two of water. I noticed that I felt full until dinner, as psyllium fiber is not digested by the body and gives one the sensation of feeling full without adding any extra calories. No matter what your reason may be to add extra fiber to your diet, Konsyl provides a simple and effective way to do it that is worth trying out. I am now hooked on Konsyl's Original Psyllium Fiber! For more info visit their site at: http://www.konsyl.com/c-61-gluten-free.aspx. Note:Articles thatappearin the "Gluten-Free Food & SpecialtyProduct Companies" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. Formoreinformation about this seeour AdvertisingPage.
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