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Found 49 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/12/2019 - A team of researchers recently sat out to assess a new technology for reducing wheat flour toxicity for celiac disease patients using the in situ formation of gluten-chitosan interlocked self-assembled supramolecular architecture. The research team included Miguel Ribeiro, Stefania Picascia, Larbi Rhazi, Carmen Gianfrani, Jose Maria Carrillo, Marta Rodriguez-Quijano, Gérard Branlard, and Fernando M. Nunesa. The team found that an interlocked supramolecular architecture forms between gluten and chitosan, which makes for the formation of favorable dough. Rheological properties of dough depend on the protein to chitosan ratio. Dough with a 1.9:1 protein to chitosan ratio showed the best rheological properties. To better understand the architecture of this new molecular structure, and its effects on dough qualities, the research team assessed the small and large deformation rheological properties, along with the macromolecular aspects of gluten-chitosan polymers. A drop in gluten proteins levels, followed by spontaneous oxidation in the presence of the chitosan template, ranging from 7.5:1 to 1.3:1 protein to chitosan, changed the structure of the wheat flour proteins in the polymeric fraction from homogeneous spherical molecules to polymer molecules with random-coil conformation. The polymeric fraction increased with decreasing protein to chitosan weight ratio, and yielded the best results at 1.9 parts protein to 1 part chitosan. At this ratio, the dough kept its ability to form a network when wet and being kneaded. It also showed a higher elasticity and viscousity compared to the control flour and the other study flours. Lastly, it presented a significantly higher resistance to extension, didn't inhibit the fermentation process, and retained the original dough ball shape. The fact that it's possible to create wheat flour with reduced toxicity that also behaves like bread made with standard wheat flour is a major step forward. According to reports, the bread looks, tastes and feels like traditional bread. There's a way to go, but this early success bodes well for later improvement. If such products can be formulated under 20 ppm gluten, the result could mean high quality gluten-free or gluten-safe breads. That would be a huge development for people with celiac disease. Clearly, many bridges must be crossed to get there, but this will be welcome and interesting news for many people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance. Read more in Food Hydrocolloids Volume 90, May 2019, Pages 266-275 The researchers are variously affiliated with CQ-VR, Chemistry Research Centre, Food and Wine Chemistry Lab, Chemistry Department, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5000-801, Vila Real, Portugal; Institute of Protein Biochemistry-CNR, Via Pietro Castellino, 111, 80131, Naples, Italy; UniLaSalle, Unité de recherche "Transformations & Agro-Ressources", 19 rue Pierre Waguet – BP 30313 - F- 60026, Beauvais Cedex, France; the Unit of Genetics, Department of Biotechnology - Plant Biology, UPM, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040, Madrid, Spain; and the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique GDEC/UBP, UMR 1095, 63100, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
  2. Celiac.com 05/28/2019 - Denmark-based start-up Kaffe Bueno recycles used coffee grounds into oils for skin care products, but they are also suitable for use as sweeteners, natural colorings and preservatives in foods and beverages. The company also makes a flour from the coffee grounds, which can be used to fortify baked goods. They source used coffee grounds from cafes and hotels in Copenhagen, and then use a biotechnology process to extract the oils which leaves behind a naturally gluten-free coffee flour. According to the company, the oil extraction process removes most of the coffee flavor, resulting in a flour with a nutty, caramel, chocolatey taste that can complement many products. Kaffe Bueno claims its coffee flour contains three times the protein per gram than almond flour, less calories than buckwheat flour, less fat than coconut flour, more fiber than wholegrain wheat flour, and more potassium than a banana. The resulting flour is both green, and potentially lucrative. In 2018, people worldwide consumed nine billion kilos of coffee, yet just 1% of the beneficial compounds were used. The other 99% gets treated as waste, and usually ends up in landfills where it decomposes and creates methane. Used coffee grounds are packed with bioactive compounds that contain anti-proliferative, antioxidant, and antimicrobial effects.
  3. Celiac.com 12/25/2018 - Recently, a bit of a dustup kicked off in New Zealand, literally, over what celiac shoppers see as the placement of gluten-free flours beside or beneath standard wheat flours that are not gluten-free. The news website Newshub recently ran a photo of shelves at Ponsonby Countdown that showed gluten-free flour beside the regular flour. "That's bad, because flour puffs everywhere, contaminating everything near it," one shopper told Newshub, asking to remain anonymous. A Countdown spokesperson told Newshub on Tuesday the store will be reviewing the placement of gluten-free flour. In all fairness, with store shelf space a scarce commodity, stores have a tough job. In general, customers overwhelmingly like similar products placed close together. So, the thinking goes, gluten-free flour and standard flour are both flour, so they belong together on the shelf. Of course, for people with celiac disease, the two products are distinct, and most celiac want the products separated for safety reason. "However,” said the Countdown spokeswoman, “we completely understand how the placement of gluten-free flour next to plain flour may concern some customers and we'll review this." It sounds like the company will be listening to their gluten-free shoppers and looking to find a way to place their gluten-free flour safely for people with celiac disease. Stay tuned to see how the story resolves. Read more at: Newshub.co.nz
  4. Celiac.com 08/23/2018 - With the market for gluten-free goods and ingredients going like gang-busters, the proliferation of new flours made from previously unavailable ingredients is helping to change the product manufacturing landscape and to open up whole new avenues of nutrition, health benefits and flavor for people with celiac disease. One of the latest gluten-free flours to hit the market is banana flour, an alternative to wheat flour that has gained popularity for its light, fluffy baking results. Made of 100% dried, ground green bananas, banana flour is not only gluten-free but also paleo, Whole30-approved, and vegan. Highly nutritious banana flour also touts numerous health benefits. In addition to being naturally gluten-free, banana flour is similar in calories to regular white flour, but is made from a completely different type of carbohydrate. While white flour is made from simple starches that are quickly absorbed and turned into energy, banana flour contains high levels of what is called “resistant starch.” Resistant starches are so-called, because they work a bit like soluble fiber, slowing the digestion of carbohydrates, and resisting absorption by the gut. Resistant starches are also found in foods such as whole grains, vegetables, and legumes. “Resistant starch has been found to be beneficial for colon health, increasing satiety levels, and lowering blood sugar,” said registered dietitian Amy Margulies. “Banana flour also contains high levels of phenolic acid, a type of phytochemical found in many plant foods, which works like an antioxidant and supplies both potassium and vitamin B6.” Banana flour not only produces light, fluffy baked goods with a good nutrition profile, it is also easy to use. When substituting banana flour for wheat flour in a recipe, simply use about 30% less banana flour.
  5. Celiac.com 08/09/2018 - Whatever one might say about crawfish, shrimp and crustaceans in general, Americans don’t typically eat bugs. Can a former Ralph Lauren marketing executive turn the world on to flour made from crickets? Over the last few years, Americans have been presented with a buffet of alternative proteins and meals. Robyn Shapiro’s company, Seek, has created all-purpose, gluten-free, and Paleo blended flours, which can be used cup for cup in any recipe calling for flour. The company, which makes pure cricket powder for smoothies, ice creams, and other liquid-based foods, is now selling cinnamon-almond crunch cricket protein and snack bites. To get the public interested in its cricket protein and cricket flour products, Shapiro has collaborated with famous chefs to create recipes for The Cricket Cookbook. The book’s cast includes La Newyorkina chef Fany Gerson, a Mexico City native known for her cricket sundaes; noted Sioux chef and cookbook author Sean Sherman; and former Noma pastry chef Ghetto Gastro member, Malcolm Livingston, among others. Other companies have sought to promote the benefits of insect protein, including Chapul, which makes cricket protein bars and powders, and Exo, which makes dairy- and gluten-free cricket protein bars in flavors like cocoa nut and banana bread. These companies, along with others in the business tend to aim their products at Paleo dieters by promising more protein and no dairy. Seek’s chef-focused approach makes it unique. By pairing with noted chefs who already use bugs and bug protein in their cooking, Shapiro is looking to make the public more comfortable and confident in using bugs to cook and bake. So far, the response has been slow, but steady. Seek has already raised nearly $13,000 from 28 backers, well on its way toward its $25,000 goal. Seek’s cricket flours and other products will initially only be available via Kickstarter. If that goes well, the products will be sold on Seek’s website. Early backers will get a discount and a chance for a signed copy of the book. Seek hopes to debut their products nationwide starting in the fall. Could gluten-free cricket flour and the new cookbook be the next big gluten-free Christmas gift? Stay tuned for more on this and other gluten-free stories. Source: grubstreet.com
  6. Celiac.com 11/15/2010 - Fermentation of wheat flour with sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases decreases the concentration of gluten in wheat. Depending on the level of hydrolyzation, gluten levels can be reduced as low as 8 parts per million. A team of researchers recently conducted a small study to assess whether people with celiac disease can eat baked goods made with wheat flour that is hydrolyzed via sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases during food processing. The team included L. Greco, M. Gobbetti, R. Auricchio, R. Di Mase, F. Landolfi, F. Paparo, R. Di Cagno, M. De Angelis, C. G. Rizzello, A. Cassone, G. Terrone, L. Timpone, M. D'Aniello, M. Maglio, R. Troncone, S. Auricchio. They are affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics and European Laboratory for the Study of Food Induced Diseases, University of Naples, Federico II in Naples Italy. The team evaluated the safety of daily administration of baked goods made from this hydrolyzed form of wheat flour for patients with celiac disease. Patients who volunteered for the study were assigned at random to consume 200 grams per day of baked goods from one of three groups. The did so every day for 60 days. The first group of six patients ate natural flour baked goods (NFBG), with a gluten content of 80,127 ppm gluten. The second group of 2 patients ate baked goods made from extensively hydrolyzed flour (S1BG), with a residual gluten content of 2,480 ppm. The third group of patients ate baked goods made from fully hydrolyzed flour (S2BG), with just 8 ppm residual gluten. In the first group, two of the six patients consuming baked goods made with natural flour (NFBG) discontinued the challenge because of adverse symptoms. All six patients in this group showed increased levels of anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies and small bowel deterioration. The two patients who ate baked goods made from extensively hydrolyzed flour (S1BG) had no clinical complaints, but biopsy showed intestinal damage in the form of subtotal villous atrophy. The five patients who ate baked goods made with made from fully hydrolyzed flour (S2BG), at just 8 ppm residual gluten had no clinical complaints. Also, they showed no increase in anti-tTG antibodies, and Marsh grades of their small intestinal mucosa showed no adverse change. Evidence with this small 60-day dietary study shows that people with celiac disease can safely consume baked goods made from fully hydrolyzed wheat flour, manufactured with sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases. This flour shows no toxicicity to patients with celiac disease. The team notes that a combined analysis of serologic, morphometric, and immunohistochemical parameters is the most accurate method to assess new therapies for this disorder. The results need to be borne out by further study, but, in the future, baked goods made with fully hydrolyzed wheat flour, manufactured with sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases may become another option for people with celiac disease. Source: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Oct 15. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2010.09.025
  7. Celiac.com 10/21/2014 - Insects offer one of the most concentrated and efficient forms of protein on the planet, and they are a common food in many parts of the world. So, could high-protein flour made out of crickets change the future of gluten-free foods? A San Francisco Bay Area company is looking to make that possibility a reality. The company, Bitty Foods, is making flour from slow-roasted crickets that are then milled and combined with tapioca and cassava to make a high-protein flour that is gluten-free. According to the Bitty Foods website, a single cup of cricket flour contains a whopping 28 grams of protein. So can Bitty Foods persuade gluten-free consumers to try their high protein gluten-free flour? Only time will tell. In the mean time, stay tuned for more cricket flour developments. What do you think? Would you give it a try? If it worked well for baking, would you use it?
  8. Celiac.com 03/09/2017 - It's cheaper, more nutritious, and properly delicious. Will gluten-free flour made from cockroaches change the way bread is made? There's a great article over at Munchies. It's about two scientists from the Federal University of Rio Grande in Brazil, who have developed flour made from ground cockroaches that contains 40 percent more protein than normal wheat flour. Oh, and it happens to be gluten-free. Excited yet? Grossed out? As part of their research, food engineering students Andressa Lucas and Lauren Menegon discovered a new way of producing cheaper, more nutritious food with the cockroach flour, since it contains a large amount of essential amino acids and some lipids and fatty acids as well—the keys for a balanced and healthy human diet. These cockroaches are not the ones we find running or flying in city sewers or drains. They are a particular species, Nauphoeta cinerea, to be precise, and procured from a specialized breeder, where they are hygienically produced and fed on fruits and vegetables to meet all hygiene requirements required by ANVISA, the Brazilian health surveillance agency. So, these are certified clean cockroaches, okay? And not only is the flour itself gluten-free, it's extremely high protein. Lucas and Menegon found that a bread containing just 10% cockroach flour presented a protein increase of 49.16 percent, when compared to bread made only with wheat flour. Also, at that ratio, the cockroach flour bread loaves keep the same flavor as their non-insect counterparts. So, given the high protein, and the desirable elastic qualities, it seems a natural for someone to test out some gluten-free breads that use cockroach flour. We promise you updates on these and other gluten-free stories. Meantime? Tell us what you think. It obviously sounds gross, but what if cockraoch flour makes good gluten-free bread? Are you in or out?
  9. Celiac.com 10/30/2014 - I have always been a fan of Steve Rice and his Authentic Foods line of gluten-free products. Recently I had the opportunity to try out his new Steve's Gluten-Free Bread Flour Blend, and I must say that I'm very excited about this amazing new flour blend, and the many possibilities that if offers. When Steve told me that he had been working for 20 years to perfect this mix, I knew that I was in for something very special, and my experiences with it were amazing. In the past I have tried many products billed as all purpose gluten-free flour mixes, but none are quite like this one. The directions are straightforward, and I only needed my own yeast packet, sugar, egg, butter and oil to make the mix. I new something magical was happening at the point where you first begin to mix everything together...see below: I know that Steve recommends using a mixer, but I don't have one. However, after mixing and kneading it for only a few minutes by hand it came together with the look and feel of a real gluten bread dough...it was very easy to work with, and in a very short time it looked like this: I used the dough to make the outstanding pizza below, which had a spongy, delicate crust. When making it I found that I could easily pick up the dough and work with it to form the gluten-free pizza crust. My wife used the remaining dough to make a cake, which came out light and fluffy, and it held together extremely well: Be sure to give this great new product a try. I'm sure that you too will be blown away by how great it is, and how many things you will be able to make with it using Steve's many recipes offered on his Web site.
  10. Celiac.com 10/18/2013 - Buckwheat, sometimes referred to as kasha, is often billed as a “tasty alternative to wheat.” That’s all well and good, but is it really gluten-free, and generally considered safe to eat for those who suffer from celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity? Whether or not buckwheat is tasty is a matter of opinion. However, with so much conflicting information available today, it can be hard to tell what’s gluten-free and what isn’t. Here’s the skinny on buckwheat. The Facts Good news! With its non-wheat status, buckwheat is safely gluten-free. Buckwheat and wheat are, come to find out, actually from completely different botanical families. Derived from the seeds of a flowering plant, buckwheat is not considered a grain or a cereal (though it may be called a pseudo-cereal—don’t let that scare you). Buckwheat, in all of its gluten-free glory, is actually closely related to rhubarb. In addition, it is an excellent source of fiber and nutrients. In particular, buckwheat groats (the small, triangular seeds), when cooked, offer 17 grams of dietary fiber or 68% of the daily requirement for a 2,000 calorie per day diet, as well as 22 grams of protein. Nutritionally beneficial and sometimes used in treating symptoms of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, buckwheat contains rutin. Rutin, a glycoside, has been known to strengthen capillary walls and improve circulation. Like many grains, buckwheat can sometimes be cross-contaminated with wheat during processing, transportation or if it is used as a rotational crop with wheat, so it is important to find non-cross contaminated source of buckwheat—make sure the one you use is certified gluten-free. Culinary Uses Buckwheat groats make a healthy side dish. Also, if you grind the small seeds of the buckwheat plant, you can make buckwheat flour for use in noodles, crepes, and many other gluten-free products. Using buckwheat flour in your cooking will give a strong nut taste to your dishes. You can also contribute raw buckwheat groats to recipes for cookies, cakes, granola, crackers, or any other gluten-free, bread-like item. If you’re feeling more creative, buckwheat makes a good binding agent, and becomes very gelatinous when soaked. If you soak, rinse, and then re-dry the groats you can produce a sort of buckwheat chip that is crunchy and can act as a nice side dish. When toasted, buckwheat becomes kasha. You can pick out kasha—vs. raw buckwheat—by the color; it’s a darker reddish-brown. In addition, kasha has a strong toasted-nut scent. Conversely, raw buckwheat groats are typically light brown or green and have no aroma. Buckwheat So, there you have it. You can use buckwheat and kasha safely as a nutritional, gluten-free alternative to wheat, or to create fun and tasty side dishes with buckwheat groats. If you’re looking to stock your pantry with all kinds of gluten-free wheat alternatives for your side dishes or even your main dishes, you can safely go for buckwheat in addition to cornmeal, millet, amaranth, cornstarch, garbanzo beans, arrowroot, quinoa or brown rice. Eating a gluten-free diet doesn’t mean you have to rely on the same old wheat alternative for every dish!
  11. Celiac.com 03/17/2017 - Want a super healthy gluten-free alternative to grain flour that is packed with natural fiber and protein, and tastes great? There is power in coconut flour! The amazing benefits of coconut products are astonishing and coconut flour is so versatile. It can be used to cook or bake or even to thicken sauces and gravies! Coconut flour is naturally gluten-free and considered hypoallergenic. It contains the highest amount of dietary fiber found in any flour! According to the Livestrong article by Jane Jester Hebert, one quarter cup of coconut flour is equal to about 14g of fiber! An adequate amount of fiber is essential in a healthy diet to promote a healthy digestive tract. It also lowers your risk of heart disease and diabetes, and helps you to maintain a healthy weight. Coconut flour is rich in lauric acid which promotes good skin health and manganese which is an essential trace mineral used in the body for energy production. It is also low in carbohydrates and low on the glycemic index making it a great choice for diabetics and people wanting to maintain a healthy blood sugar level. Coconut flour is a good source of coconut oil which also has amazing benefits such as being antiviral, antifungal, antimicrobial, antibacterial and antiparasitic. Coconut products are so healing that according to a Natural News article by Megan Rostollan, the Pacific Islanders are calling coconut the "Tree of Life" and believe it can heal almost any illness. She goes on to say that, "In many traditional cultures around the world the coconut has been used to heal: abscesses, asthma, baldness, bronchitis, bruises, burns, colds, constipation, cough, dropsy, dysentery, earache, fever, flu, gingivitis, gonorrhea, irregular or painful menstruation, jaundice, kidney stones, lice, malnutrition, nausea, rash, scabies, scurvy, skin infections, sore throat, swelling, syphilis, toothache, tuberculosis, tumors, typhoid, ulcers, upset stomach, weakness, and wounds." (1) What is coconut flour, you may be wondering? Coconut flour is the natural byproduct in coconut milk production. The coconut meat left over is dried at a low temperature and then ground up to make soft powdery flour, similar to wheat flour in texture; however, it does require special techniques in order to yield success. For example, you cannot substitute the same amount of coconut flour for wheat flour. Coconut flour is super absorbent and can produce a very dry end result when not properly paired with the right amount of liquid or binder such as eggs. When starting out with coconut flour it is best to strictly follow a tried and true recipe to yield good results. Above is a favorite shared by Megan Rostollan! As you can see, with the vast and amazing benefits of coconut flour and coconut products, and being naturally gluten-free, you can definitely indulge and, "have your cake and eat it too!" Lemon-Coconut Pound Cake by Megan Rostollan Ingredients: 3/4 c. organic coconut flour 1 tsp aluminum free baking powder 3 tbsp xylitol, divided 1/2 tsp sea salt 6 pastured eggs 8-10 tbsp organic butter, softened 3 droppers full of liquid stevia 2 organic lemons (juice and zest) Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease an 8X4 loaf pan and set aside. Sift together dry ingredients (2 tbsp xylitol). Zest and juice lemons. Whisk together eggs, butter, lemon juice, stevia, and zest. Combine wet and dry ingredients, whisking until smooth (batter will become quite thick - if too thick to combine well, add a little water). Spread in pre-prepared pan with hands or spoon as needed, sprinkle with remaining xylitol and bake for 40 minutes. References: naturalnews.com livestrong.com
  12. Celiac.com 12/09/2016 - Can the high fiber waste from coffee production be used to create an environmentally friendly gluten-free flour? Coffee cherries are the fat, pulpy coating around the famous coffee bean. When coffee is harvested, the cherry is removed and discarded before the beans are processed and roasted. Given that more than 17 billion pounds of coffee beans are harvested, fermented and dried each year, that's a great deal of coffee cherry waste. Too much, in fact, for farmers to merely plow back into their fields, as is commonly done. Formulated by former Starbucks executive Dan Belliveau in 2012, coffee flour is transforms that leftover waste into a high quality flour that not only happens to be free of wheat, rye or barley proteins, it happens to have high levels of natural gluten that makes it ideal for baking. Belliveau's patent-pending process collects the cherries and converts them into a nutrient-dense, gluten-free flour. Coffee flour contains five times more fiber than wholewheat flour, three times the protein of fresh kale, and twice potassium of bananas. The final product does not taste anything like coffee, but has a mild flavor of burnt sugar due to its high sugar content. It is also low in caffeine. Founded to commercialize coffee flour, CF Global Holdings contracted Ecom Ago Industrial Inc and Mercon Coffee Group to collect and process coffee cherries from farmers and millers in Nicaragua, Guatemala, Vietnam, El Salvador, Papua New Guinea, Brazil, Costa Rica and Mexico. The latest yield was about 2 million pounds of dried coffee cherry pulp from the 2015/2016 crop, double the previous harvest yield. The company employs a multistep milling process to grind the cherries into flour of sufficient quality for commercial use. The process can be taken further to produce a flour with the consistency of icing sugar consistency. Carole Widmayer, VP of marketing told Bakeryandsnacks.com that "Coffee flour can [already] be found in muffins, cookies and brownies at Sprouts, brownies and cookies in cafes at Google and HSBC operated by Compass, as well as in Seattle Chocolate chocolate bars and Earnest Eats energize cereals. So, will coffee flour be the next big gluten-free, environmentally friendly big thing? It looks to be well on its way. Read more at bakeryandsnacks.com.
  13. Scand J Gastroenterol 1999 Feb;34(2):163-9 Kaukinen K, Collin P, Holm K, Rantala I, Vuolteenaho N, Reunala T, Maki M Dept. of Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, Finland. BACKGROUND: We investigated whether wheat starch-based gluten-free products are safe in the treatment of gluten intolerance. METHODS: The study involved 41 children and adults with coeliac disease and 11 adults with dermatitis herpetiformis adhering to a gluten-free diet for 8 years on average. Thirty-five newly diagnosed coeliac patients at diagnosis and 6 to 24 months after the start of a gluten-free diet and 27 non-coeliac patients with dyspepsia were investigated for comparison. Daily dietary gluten and wheat starch intake were calculated. Small bowel mucosal villous architecture, CD3+, alphabeta+, and gammadelta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes, mucosal HLA-DR expression, and serum endomysial, reticulin, and gliadin antibodies were investigated. RESULTS: Forty of 52 long-term-treated patients adhered to a strict wheat starch-based diet and 6 to a strict naturally gluten-free diet; 6 patients had dietary lapses. In the 46 patients on a strict diet the villous architecture, enterocyte height, and density of alphabeta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes were similar to those in non-coeliac subjects and better than in short-term-treated coeliac patients. The density of gammadelta(+)cells was higher, but they seemed to decrease over time with the gluten-free diet. Wheat starch-based gluten-free flour products did not cause aberrant up-regulation of mucosal HLA-DR. The mucosal integrity was not dependent on the daily intake of wheat starch in all patients on a strict diet, whereas two of the six patients with dietary lapses had villous atrophy and positive serology. CONCLUSION: Wheat starch-based gluten-free flour products were not harmful in the treatment of coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis.
  14. Celiac.com 11/01/2016 - Is flour made from mangoes the hot new gluten-free alternative to wheat flour? A Filipino pastry chain is hoping to woo health-conscious consumers with their gluten-free flour made from mangoes. You heard right. Flour from mangoes. Philippine-based bread and pastry chain, Magic Melt Foods Inc., is introducing a gluten-free product line they hope will appeal to people with celiac disease, and with growing numbers of nutritious-minded consumers. Magic Melt's "healthilicious" mango flour is milled from mango peel and mango seeds, instead of wheat. Based in Cebu, Philippines, Green Enviro Management Systems Inc., manufactures and holds the patent for mango flour. The company's product as gained attention from far and wide, and recently drew a visit from government officials of Johannesberg in South Africa, who sent workers to learn the process. Like many gluten-free flours, mango flour lack the stickiness common to gluten flours. To work around that, the company turned to egg whites and other "healthy" alternatives. The resulting mango flour is suitable for some muffins, bread, energy bars, and sandwiches. So, will mango flour be making an appearance in gluten-free products at your store? Stay tuned for more developments on this and other gluten-free stories. Source: freshplaza.com
  15. This recipe comes to us from the McMartins. ½ cup rice flour ½ cup potato flour 1/3 cup cornstarch ½ teaspoon Salt 1-2 tablespoon Vegetable Oil Optional: 2 eggs, lightly beaten Sift dry ingredients into a bowl...repeat 3 - 4 times...make a well in the center and add the oil and the eggs or enough water to equal 2 eggs. Gradually draw dry ingredients from the edges of the bowl into the liquid to form a stiff dough. Use hands to knead the dough into a smooth ball. Generously dust board and rolling pin with rice flour. Roll out the dough as thin as possible. Cut into noodles. The pasta is now ready to cook or freeze uncooked for future use. Cook in boiling salted water for about 10 minutes or until al dente. Notes: Dough is fragile and needs gentle handling. It is not suitable for use in a pasta maker. Vegetable oil is variable...add enough to make a smooth ball. Noodles require longer cooking time then wheat pasta does. Food processors are not recommended in this recipes preparation.
  16. Celiac.com 05/12/2016 - What is the impact of locally formulated gluten-free flour on the dietary pattern of Pakistani celiac patients? A research team recently set out to introduce indigenously formulated gluten free flour (GFF) in the diets of selected Pakestani celiac patients, and to investigate the impact of formulated gluten-free flour on the dietary pattern of those patients. The researchers included Samia Kalsoom and Saeed Ahmad Nagra of the Government College of Home Economics in Lahore, Pakistan, and the Institue of Chemistry, University of the Punjab in Lahore, Pakistan. The flour used in the study was formulated using indigenous sources of rice, corn and daal mung. The researchers then selected fifty diagnosed celiac patients from Sheikh Zayed Medical Complex, and the Mayo Hospital in Lahore, Pakistan, and provided those patients with gluten-free flour for a period of four months. The researchers conducted pre- and post treatment assessments of food intake, compliance, appetite, meal patterns and meal satisfaction of the study participants. Both before and during the feeding trial, the study participants received caloric and macronutrient levels above the recommended dietary guidelines. Mean carbohydrate exchanges of all age groups were higher than standard recommended values for their respective age groups. Before the feeding trial, participants of 19 to 30 years of age reported the highest gluten consumption. These levels fell significantly with GFF induction. Meanwhile milk, meat, fruit and vegetable intake of the study participants was less than the recommended intake levels. Study participants of 9-13 years had the highest flour consumption, but there was no significant difference was found in the food intake from starch, milk, meat and fruit groups during the treatment phase. A significant increase in vegetable intake was observed with GFF administration. All age groups showed improved compliance, appetite, meal regularity and meal satisfaction, with children showing the most pronounced changes. Source: Pakistan J. Zool., vol. 48(2), pp. 415-422, 2016.
  17. Gluten-Free Flours Celiac.com 01/11/2005 - Gluten-free flours are generally used in combination with one another. There is not one stand alone gluten-free flour that you can use successfully in baked goods. Be sure to know the procedures your flour manufacturers use, cross contamination at the factory can cause diet compliance issues for the gluten intolerant. Arrowroot Flour can be used cup for cup in place of cornstarch if you are allergic to corn. Bean Flour is a light flour made from garbanzo and broad beans. To cut the bitter taste of beans, replace white sugar with brown or maple sugar in the recipe(or replace some of the bean flour with sorghum). Brown Rice Flour is milled from unpolished brown rice and has a higher nutrient value than white rice flour. Since this flour contains bran it has a shorter shelf life and should be refrigerated. As with white rice flour, it is best to combine brown rice flour with several other flours to avoid the grainy texture. Ener-G Foods and Bobs Red Mill produce a finer, lighter brown rice flour that works well with dense cakes such as pound cake. Cornstarch is similar in usage to sweet rice flour for thickening sauces. Best when used in combination with other flours. Guar Gum, a binding agent, can be used in place of xanthan gum for corn sensitive individuals. Use half as much guar gum to replace xanthan gum. Guar gum contains fiber and can irritate very sensitive intestines. Nut Flours are high in protein and, used in small portions, enhances the taste of homemade pasta, puddings, pizza crust, bread, and cookies. Finely ground nut meal added to a recipe also increases the protein content and allows for a better rise. Ground almond meal can replace dry milk powder in most recipes as a dairy-free alternative. Potato Flour has a strong potato taste and is rarely used in gluten-free cooking. Potato Starch Flour is used in combination with other flours, rarely used by itself. Sorghum Flour a relatively new flour that cuts the bitterness of bean flour and is excellent in bean flour mixes. Soy Flour is high in protein and fat with a nutty flavor. Best when used in small quantities in combination with other flours. Soy flour has a short shelf life. Sweet Rice Flour is made from glutinous rice (it does not contain the gluten fraction that is prohibited to the gluten intolerant). Often used as a thickening agent. Sweet rice flour is becoming more common in gluten-free baking for tender pies and cakes. It has the ability to smooth the gritty taste (that is common in gluten-free baked goods) when combined with other flours, see Multi Blend recipe. Tapicoa Starch Flour is a light, velvety flour from the cassava root. It lightens gluten-free baked goods and gives them a texture more like that of wheat flour baked goods. It is especially good in pizza crusts where it is used in equal parts with either white rice flour or brown rice flour. White Rice Flour is milled from polished white rice, best to combine with several other flours to avoid the grainy texture rice flour alone imparts. Try to buy the finest texture of white rice flour possible. Xanthan Gum is our substitute for gluten, it holds things together. See usage information on Multi Blend recipe page. Xanthan gum is derived from bacteria in corn sugar, the corn sensitive person should use guar gum (using half as much guar gum to replace xanthan gum). Alternative Flours The national patient support groups agree that the following flours are fine for the gluten intolerant providing you can find a pure source (grown in dedicated fields and processed on dedicated equipment). These flours greatly improve the taste of gluten-free baked goods. To incorporate into your favorite recipe, replace up to 50% of the flour in a recipe with an alternative flour and use the Multi Blend mix for the balance. Pizza crust and bread proportions dont follow this rule. Amaranth a whole grain from the time of the Aztecs- it is high in protein and contains more calcium, fiber, magnesium, Vitamin A and Vitamin C than most grains. Amaranth has a flavor similar to graham crackers without the sweetness. Buckwheat is the seed of a plant related to rhubarb, it is high in fiber, protein, magnesium and B vitamins. Dark buckwheat flour turns baked goods purple, I only use light buckwheat flour. Millet a small, round grain that is a major food source in Asia, North Africa and India. I havent used millet and dont know much about the grain. Quinoa (keen-wah) A staple food of the Incas. Quinoa is a complete protein with all 8 amino acids, quinoa contains a fair amount of calcium and iron. Teff an ancient grain from Ethiopia, now grown in Idaho. Teff is always a whole grain flour since it is difficult to sift or separate. High in protein, B vitamins, calcium, and iron.
  18. Celiac.com 12/18/2015 - Flour is a major global business, and flours of all kinds constitute a major part of the growing global food industry. Global flour markets are directly impacted by the growing processed food industry. Recent years have seen a notable expansion of the global flour market in terms of increased global demand and production capacity. Fueled by changing customer preference, increased health concerns related to high-protein flours, rising urbanization, and per-capita income of the global population, Transparency Market Research expects the global flour market, valued at USD 182.66 billion in 2013, to reach 183,100.0 kilo tons in the next five years, growing at a CAGR of 3.8% to top USD 245.82 billion by 2020. One of the big drivers of flour market growth is the rise in consumption of bread and bakery products and ready-to-eat (RTE) products in developing economies. Also, rising health concerns over high-protein flour provides an opportunity for flour millers to promote gluten-free, and low-protein variants of flours. The market for gluten-free products includes products such as breakfast cereals, gluten-free flour, snacks, and bakery products, among others. Considering that the demand for gluten-free variants of flour such as corn flour, soya flour, maize flour and rice flour is significant in the global market, analysts are projecting a strong rise in the popularity of gluten-free foods in the 2014-2020 forecast period. Browse Market Research Report of Flour Market.
  19. This recipe comes to us from Maria Oostveen. Her comments about it: My goal is to develop an all-purpose flour, that can be used for most baking purposes. I have not tested this version yet on anything else but bread and it compares 100% with regular light wheat bread. The first thing I made with it was the cheese sandwich I so badly craved and it was like heaven!! No comparison with ANY gluten-free bread I tried before, and I tried them all!!!!!! Marias Bread Flour Mix (makes 9 cups = 3 loaves). 2 cups garfava or garbanzo-bean flour 1 cup sorghum flour 2 ¼ cups tapioca flour 2 ¼ cups arrowroot flour (starch) 1 cup rice flour 1 tablespoon potato starch 2 tablespoons potato flour 2 tablespoons xanthan gum 2 packages gelatin (unflavored) ¼ cup sugar 1 ½ teaspoon salt Mix well and keep in an airtight container. You can use cornstarch instead of arrowroot. This was originally designed to bake at an altitude of 5000+ feet so you may need to make adjustments. Click here to see her Maria's Real gluten-free Light Wheat Bread recipe.
  20. When I started eating gluten-free food I discovered a flour mix in a book called Living Healthy with Celiac Disease, Wendy Wark (AnAffect, 1998). In addition to the standard gluten-free flour mix of tapioca starch flour, potato starch flour and rice flour she added cornstarch and sweet rice flour. The addition of these two flours make a huge difference in the texture, flavor, and moisture content in gluten-free baking. I couldnt understand why more people werent using this superior flour mix so I made it my mission to distribute this recipe around. (If you cant tolerate corn, just substitute the cornstarch with equal parts of sweet rice flour and tapioca starch flour.) While Wendy gave me permission to use the flour mix and many of her recipes I failed to tell her I was naming the flour mix after her in my book. She has since told me that she found it on the internet and doesnt know the source of the recipe, she doesnt feel that she should take credit for the mix. Recently Authentic Foods decided to mix these flours in their factory and sell it as the Multi Blend Gluten-Free Flour, now available at The Gluten-Free Mall. Multi Blend Gluten-Free Flour (Wendy Warks Gluten-Free Flour Mix) 1 cup brown rice flour (requires refrigeration) 1¼ cup white rice flour ¼ cup potato starch flour 2/3 cup tapioca starch flour ¾ cup sweet rice flour 1/3 cup cornstarch 2 teaspoons xanthan or guar gum I often use only brown rice flour in the mix as it is healthier and better tasting. I buy at least 5 pounds every time I order (from manufacturers that sell a lot of brown rice flour). I keep it refrigerated and highly recommend it over white rice flour. This flour mix is the basis of many of my sweets, breadsticks, tortillas, waffles etc. I also like to use pure buckwheat, amaranth, and quinoa flour to increase the flavor and healthfulness of certain items. It is important to buy these alternative flours from pure, gluten-free sources. Pure in the sense that they are grown in fields that are not adjacent to wheat fields and that they are processed in a 100% gluten-free environment from the field to your table. Triple this flour mix recipe and keep it on hand for all of your baking needs. Once you have the flour mix together you are ready for about a months worth of gluten-free baking. The Multi Blend Gluten-Free Flour mix is used cup for cup in recipes such as tortillas, pancakes/waffles, and cookies. If you plan to use this flour mix for cakes, sweet breads or brownies add an additional ½ teaspoon of xanthan gum per cup flour mix. I dont use this flour mix for bread, pizza crust, breadsticks, etc. as they require specific flour combinations for the best results (see Cooking Gluten-Free! A Food Lovers Collection of Chef and Family Recipes Without Gluten or Wheat Celiac Publishing, 2002).
  21. The following two formulations were created by Cory Bates. Formulation 1: White Rice Flour 32% Brown Rice Flour 32% Potato Starch 15% Tapioca Flour 12% Corn Starch 6% Xanthan Gum 3% Formulation 2: White Rice Flour 23% Brown Rice Flour 23% Garbanzo Bean Flour 18% Potato Starch 15% Tapioca Flour 12% Corn Starch 6% Xanthan Gum 3%
  22. Celiac.com 11/01/2010 - American Key Food Products (AKFP) has announced a patent application for the production process for a gluten-free cassava flour. The company also announced that it has begun initial production of this new gluten-free flour at its manufacturing facility in Brazil. Gluten is the protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten provides the structural elasticity in kneaded dough products, permits leavening, and supports the crumb structure and chewy texture of traditional baked goods. In the last few years, a number of manufacturers have produced gluten-free flour and starch products for gluten-free baking. However, creating baked goods without gluten is challenging, and the resulting baked goods can often be dry, crumbly, or gummy products. Cassava, or tapioca flour, has been one of the more promising ingredients for gluten-free baking. However, most traditional cassava flours have a coarse texture, similar to corn meal. According to AKFP technical sales director Carter Foss, the company has spent more than a year developing the flour to have baking characteristics that closely mimic wheat flour in structure, texture and taste. The result of the AKFP process, which uses the complete root, is a fine, soft flour that contains both protein and fiber. The patent application covers various aspects of the manufacturing process, including particular milling and drying procedures, as well as the resulting flour itself. “During the processing of it, we have to get the physical characteristics made correctly or the flour fails. It over-bakes and turns to dust,” Foss said. Foss says that AKFP cassava flour can replace combinations of flours, starches and hydrocolloids in gluten-free baked goods, allowing for a simpler ingredient statement. After the pilot runs are completed at its new Brazilian facility, AKFP intends to have continuous production on line by the beginning of 2011. Source: http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Financial-Industry/AKFP-applies-for-patent-for-gluten-free-cassava-flour
  23. This recipe comes to us from Kaye Worthington. It is from an Australian magazine called The Australian Womens Weekly. When making them, you must remember that Australians use metric measurements e.g. 1 cup = 250 ml, etc. Also, with sponge cakes, eggs should be at room temperature, not straight from the fridge. Corn flour Sponge 4 eggs ½ cup castor sugar 1 cup corn flour Lightly grease a deep 23 cm round cake pan. Beat eggs in a bowl with electric mixer for about 7 minutes or until thick and creamy. Gradually add sugar, beating well after each addition. Sift corn flour three times, then sift corn flour over egg mixture. Gently fold flour into egg mixture. Spread mixture evenly into prepared pan, bake in moderate oven (180c) for about 40 minutes or until cooked when tested. Turn sponge onto a wire rack to cool. Split cold cake in half, spread halves with cream, jam, or icing. I prefer to spread raspberry jam on the bottom half and then either spread icing or cream and top with strawberries on the top half.
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