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Found 6 results

  1. Hi guys. I've had three blood tests for celiac, all negative, and one biopsy that I'm still waiting for the results of. I have a lot of the symptoms, and my body has been breaking down and getting sicker over the past year. I have gut pain, constipation, piles, sometimes loose stools, gas, muscle pain, bone pain, a fuzzy/light head, noise and light sensitivity, bleeding gums and mouth ulcers. But the worst is chronic acid reflux, which has been resistant to treatment. The endoscopy I had on April 30th found a hiatal hernia, which I didn't have when I had my first endoscopy in 2015. The area was full of acid and bile, which I have always been able to feel, 24/7. For the last 6+ years I've been on the IBS and the acid reflux diet. No FODMAPS (which seems to be everything), and nothing with acid in, like citric acid. I've decided to go gluten-free now, without waiting for my results, and my father has just found out that his last blood test had raised transglutaminase and was "strongly suggestive of coeliac," which has motivated me even more. But finding gluten-free alternatives is proving difficult, especially bread. The problem isn't so much taste, as acid and IBS triggers in the ingredients. All the gluten-free breads I can find contain acids like citric acid, honey, vinegar, and apple, and others contain possible IBS triggers like bamboo fibre (?) and Quinoa, which the jury seems to be out on in regards to IBS. I suspect I have to continue avoiding these ingredients as my gut is very painful and sensitive, and I'm worried about worsening gut symptoms instead of healing. Are these ingredients actually safe when the problem is (or could be) gluten? Or do they tear through the gut if the gut is damaged? I wouldn't bother with bread, but I'm 10 pounds underweight and I get a lot of flak about it, and honestly I've been getting most of my calories through bread, and don't know how to get calories without it. There is so much food I have to avoid, if not "IBS" triggers, then acidic foods. I won't touch something acidic with a barge pole! I don't really know what my question is, I feel stumped here! But any ideas would be much appreciated. Also, I live in the UK, so some brands aren't available here. I wondered if supermarket-own gluten-free bread is OK for celiacs, as although it has the crossed grain symbol, isn't it manufactured in the same place, and therefore possibly contaminated? I thought I had this gluten-free-thing figured out months in advance (I've done a lot of reading since my doctor suggested celiac last year), but turns out, I haven't the foggiest what to do. I'm thinking of quitting food, to be honest with you. Thanks for any replies!?
  2. Celiac.com 05/23/2018 - Yes, we at Celiac.com realize that rye bread is not gluten-free, and is not suitable for consumption by people with celiac disease! That is also true of rye bread that is low in FODMAPs. FODMAPs are Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols. FODMAPS are molecules found in food, and can be poorly absorbed by some people. Poor FODMAP absorption can cause celiac-like symptoms in some people. FODMAPs have recently emerged as possible culprits in both celiac disease and in irritable bowel syndrome. In an effort to determine what, if any, irritable bowel symptoms may triggered by FODMAPs, a team of researchers recently set out to compare the effects of regular vs low-FODMAP rye bread on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and to study gastrointestinal conditions with SmartPill. A team of researchers compared low-FODMAP rye bread with regular rye bread in patients irritable bowel syndrome, to see if rye bread low FODMAPs would reduce hydrogen excretion, lower intraluminal pressure, raise colonic pH, improve transit times, and reduce IBS symptoms compared to regular rye bread. The research team included Laura Pirkola, Reijo Laatikainen, Jussi Loponen, Sanna-Maria Hongisto, Markku Hillilä, Anu Nuora, Baoru Yang, Kaisa M Linderborg, and Riitta Freese. They are variously affiliated with the Clinic of Gastroenterology; the Division of Nutrition, Department of Food and Environmental Sciences; the Medical Faculty, Pharmacology, Medical Nutrition Physiology, University of Helsinki in Helsinki, Finland; the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University, Hospital Jorvi in Espoo, Finland; with the Food Chemistry and Food Development, Department of Biochemistry, University of Turku inTurku, Finland; and with the Fazer Group/ Fazer Bakeries Ltd in Vantaa, Finland. The team wanted to see if rye bread low in FODMAPs would cause reduced hydrogen excretion, lower intraluminal pressure, higher colonic pH, improved transit times, and fewer IBS symptoms than regular rye bread. To do so, they conducted a randomized, double-blind, controlled cross-over meal study. For that study, seven female IBS patients ate study breads at three consecutive meals during one day. The diet was similar for both study periods except for the FODMAP content of the bread consumed during the study day. The team used SmartPill, an indigestible motility capsule, to measure intraluminal pH, transit time, and pressure. Their data showed that low-FODMAP rye bread reduced colonic fermentation compared with regular rye bread. They found no differences in pH, pressure, or transit times between the breads. They also found no difference between the two in terms of conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. They did note that the gastric residence of SmartPill was slower than expected. SmartPill left the stomach in less than 5 h only once in 14 measurements, and therefore did not follow on par with the rye bread bolus. There's been a great deal of interest in FODMAPs and their potential connection to celiac disease and gluten-intolerance. Stay tuned for more information on the role of FODMAPs in celiac disease and/or irritable bowel syndrome. Source: World J Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 21; 24(11): 1259–1268.doi:  10.3748/wjg.v24.i11.1259
  3. Hello guys this is my first post forgive the long post but my situation is complicated. I just got out of bed as I had to cause of Night Sweats, I hate them, I did go with my wife and kids to the centre of town (London) to see a chinese TCM doc and so we went to China town to a restaurant, its been cold also and the stress of the kids having tantrums I think sent me overboard. I must say though for 3 nights have had terrible night sweats BUT the previous 3 days I ate wheat and dairy which I usually avoid, I had ricotta cheese and Italian wheat bread, gluten free lasagna but has cheese/ and my wife made chinese food with soy sauce, chinese restaurant food. My symptoms are sneezing, roof of the mouth hurts and when I sneeze its as if Ive just torn a layer of skin or something from the roof of the mouth, night sweats, mucus in the mornings. I suppose the stress I have in my life doesnt help, Im lowering my medication (Paxil) and hope to reduce and stop Prilosec also as I believe it maybe the reason I have a damaged intestine or leaky gut seeing as chronic low stomach acid could allow bad bacteria to migrate from the stomach to the duodenum etc, low stomach acid food arriving in the duodenum doesnt have the acid trigger that you need to send a message to the pancreas to digest the food and so partially digested food feeds the bad bacteria, right? I also did coffee enemas for 9yrs daily an this may have damaged my duodenum/small intestine cause bile is released each time and bile is slightly corrosive? I stopped doing them now but not sure which diet to follow, Ive heard of FODMAPs diet, SCD (Specific Carbohydrate Diet), Mcdoughall high starch low fat/oil diet, Keto, low carb, Mediterranean. Im confused which diet to follow cause I have a few issues, fatty liver, gallbladder polyps, GERD/Hiatal Hernia, depression/Anxiety all diagnosed but the leaky gut, or Gluten intolerance hasn't been diagnosed, maybe I should get an allaergy test, I think I'll test positive even for water at least it seems this way, that my body is becoming intolerant to many foods and the list seems like its growing. I wasn't gluten intolerant from birth, this is what the Chinese doc said to me yesterday, she said I doubt if your Gluten problem started 4 yrs ago, usually people have it from birth, i thought what is she talking about, I', Italian and I ate mamas lasagna, spaghetti, bolognese, minestrone etc as Italians we ate a paste based meal everyday and this was for decades I ate wheat, I ate bread as well and processed foods, surely I would have known sooner and reacted sooner? I started reacting 4 yrs ago and intially was going nuts cause I thought I had dust allergy and thought |I was allergic to my home, to mold, insects, the air, I just didnt make the food connection, until I read about Gluten, then i started to avoid Gluten and started to eat Gluten free bread (took some getting used to), finally after 3 to 4 yrs some relief, now I cannot eat Gluten and even Dairy, sometimes I find sugar/stress and potato skins gives me auto immune problem symptoms like red hot ear (Relapsing polychondritis?) This is just my intro I have written a longer letter to give to a doc, but not sure which doc could help me, I will send it in a few minutes once Ive finished it, the chinese doc I saw says we cannot shrink the polyp and is too expensive with her herbs but will try for a few weeks to see if I feel better, the reason why I like the chinese approach is that they treat you whole-istically cause I have too many things going on for a one size fits all approach, one remedy or diet may harm or worsen another problem that I have. Thankyou guys for reading any help or advice will be much appreciated, thanks. Gerald
  4. Celiac.com 06/06/2016 - Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common types of functional bowel disorder. As researchers attempt to unravel the mysteries behind IBS, they have payed increasing attention to the possible impact of food and diet. For many people with IBS, certain foods seem to trigger or worsen symptoms, such as abdominal pain and bloating. Wheat is suspected as a major IBS trigger, although which exact aspects of wheat might be involved is not yet known. Gluten, and other wheat proteins, such as amylase-trypsin inhibitors, and fructans, which belong to fermentable oligo-di-mono-saccharides and polyols (FODMAPs), have been identified as possible factors for triggering or worsening IBS symptoms. A research team recently set out to examine the issue, especially with respect to gluten and FODMAP sensitivity. The research team included Roberto De Giorgio, Umberto Volta, and Peter R Gibson. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Centro di Ricerca Bio-Medica Applicata (C.R.B.A.) and Digestive System, St. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital at the University of Bologna in Bologna, Italy, and the Department of Gastroenterology Alfred Hospital at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. The researchers suspect that sensitivity occurs through different mechanisms, including immune and mast cell activation, mechanoreceptor stimulation and chemosensory activation. The lack of certainty regarding the actual triggers has opened a scenario of semantic definitions favored by the discordant results of double-blind placebo-controlled trials, which have generated various terms ranging from non-coeliac gluten sensitivity to the broader one of non-coeliac wheat or wheat protein sensitivity or, even, FODMAP sensitivity. The role of FODMAPs in eliciting the clinical picture of IBS goes further since these short-chain carbohydrates are found in many other dietary components, including vegetables and fruits. In their review, they assessed current literature in order to unravel whether gluten/wheat/FODMAP sensitivity represent 'facts' and not 'fiction' in IBS symptoms. This knowledge is expected to promote standardization in dietary strategies, especially gluten/wheat-free and low FODMAP diets, as suitable ways to manage IBS symptoms. Read more at: Gut. doi:10.1136/gutjnl-2015-309757
  5. I'm beginning to suspect that I may have an issue with high FODMAPS foods after a run in I had with Brussel sprouts this weekend. It caused tremendous gas, bloating, some pain and of course D...my favorite(not). I had the same type of reaction when I tried broccoli, cauliflower and watermelon. All are also high FODMAPS. I realize it could be something else, but I feel like it's worth investigating. I've already given up soy, dairy and legumes...so if I have to give up some fruits and veggies next I will. I'm wondering if anyone out there follows this and if so what your experience has been. Thanks!
  6. Celiac.com 02/13/2015 - Food intolerance is non-immunological and is often accompanied by gastrointestinal symptoms. What can a review of scientific literature teach us about the causes, diagnosis, mechanisms and clinical evidence regarding food intolerance and gastrointestinal symptoms? Researcher M. C. E. Lomer recently set out to critically analyze the scientific literature related to etiology, diagnosis, mechanisms and clinical evidence as it relates to food intolerance. To do so, Lomer searched Pubmed, Embase and Scopus for the terms and variants of food intolerance, lactose, FODMAP, gluten, food chemicals. He restricted his search to human studies published in English. Lomer also conducted a physical search for references to these terms from relevant papers and appropriate studies. By Lomer’s assessment, food intolerance affects 15–20% of the population and may be due to pharmacological effects of food ingredients, non-celiac gluten sensitivity or defects in enzyme and transport. One area researchers now have a bit more solid scientific data about is the role of short-chain fermentable carbohydrates (FODMAPs) in causing gastrointestinal food intolerance. Food exclusion followed by gradual food reintroduction is the best way to diagnose such food intolerance, and to relieve symptoms. There is increasing evidence to support the use of a low FODMAP diet to manage gastrointestinal symptoms in cases of suspected food intolerance. A low FODMAP diet is effective, but changes gastrointestinal microbiota, so reintroducing FODMAPs to the point of tolerance is part of the overall management strategy. Exclusionary diets should be as brief as possible. They should be just long enough to induce symptom improvement. They should then be followed by gradual food reintroduction to establish individual tolerance. This will help to increase dietary variety, ensure nutritional adequacy and minimize impact on the gastrointestinal microbiota. Source: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. Volume 41, Issue 3, pages 262–275, February 2015. DOI: 10.1111/apt.13041 More info on the FODMAP diet from Stanford Univerisity.
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