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Found 8 results

  1. Celiac.com 02/06/2019 - People with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivities can have strong opinions on topics from testing and diagnosis to various aspects of the gluten-free diet. Combine that fact with an explosive rise in gluten-free dieting as a lifestyle choice, rather than medical necessity, and we’re just one celebrity Instagram from a three-alarm social media fire. The former model and Miss England, Danielle Lloyd is the latest celebrity to feel the fire from her social media audience. Lloyd’s offense, according to fans, was testing her seven-year old son Harry at home for food allergies, and putting him on a gluten-free diet based on the results. Lloyd’s Instagram posts touted the results of the home food allergen tests and her decision to make her son eat gluten-free. In the post, the former Lloyd said in one post that she’s "starting the new year feeling great after finding out what was causing me bloating and pain after eating food, with @Lifelabtests at-home intolerance and allergy testing kit." The test kits, from Lifelabtesting.com, measure sensitivity to more than 40 common allergens, such as grains, eggs and meat. In another post, Lloyd adds that “The results were so good that my son Harry did a test, too, and since changing his diet to gluten free, he hasn’t been in any pain." Fans on her Instagram feed warned her of the possible dangers of cutting out entire food groups for young children. Home Allergy Tests are Just a Starting Point As numerous commenters pointed out, home allergy tests, including tests meant to detect food allergens, are just a starting point. If you get a positive result, please consult a doctor before making a major dietary change. Switching to a gluten-free diet before seeing a doctor can cause confusion in diagnosis, and may be unnecessary. Another commenter agreed, writing: "A child should not be put on a gluten-free diet unless prescribed by a specialist." The proliferation of home allergy test kits can be useful as a guideline for understanding your health, but it’s important to double check the results with a physician before making major health or dietary changes, especially for children.
  2. Celiac.com 01/21/2019 - A population-based survey study of more than 40,000 adults in the United States shows that just over one in ten people had an allergy to at least one food at the time of the survey. However, the same study reveals that nearly 20% of adults believed themselves to have a food allergy. Half of the adults with food allergies reacted to at least one food, while nearly 40% reported at least one food allergy-related emergency room visit in their lifetime. According to the US FDA, the most common food allergens are milk, peanuts, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, soy, tree nuts and wheat. How common are food allergies among adults in the United States? How severe are the symptoms, on average? Researchers Seek Accurate Estimates of Adults with Food Allergies A team of researchers recently set out to provide accurate estimates of the national distribution, severity, and factors associated with adult food allergies. The research team included Ruchi S. Gupta, MD, MPH; Christopher M. Warren, BA; Bridget M. Smith, PhD; et al Jialing Jiang, BA; Jesse A. Blumenstock, BS; Matthew M. Davis, MD, MAPP; Robert P. Schleimer, PhD; and Kari C. Nadeau, MD, PhD There have been numerous studies on food allergies in children, but very little is known about food allergy in adults. Food Allergy Can Start in Adulthood The team’s results indicate that more than 10% of US adults, more than 26 million people in all, are allergic to at least one food. That means that food allergies are both common and severe among adults in the United States. Moreover, food allergies often begin in adulthood, rather than in childhood, as is commonly believed. The team calls for greater scrutiny of adults with suspected food allergies, including proper testing and consultation to make sure patients are avoiding the correct foods, and not unnecessarily avoiding foods that are okay for them to eat. Source: JAMA Netw Open. 2019;2(1):e185630. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.5630 The researchers are variously affiliated with the Institute for Public Health and Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; the Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; Mary Ann & J. Milburn Smith Child Health Research, Outreach, and Advocacy Center, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital, Chicago, Illinois; the Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; the Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles; the Center for Innovation for Complex Chronic Healthcare, Edward J. Hines Jr Veterans Affairs Hospital, Hines, Illinois; the Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; the Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; and the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research, Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford, California.
  3. Aluviel

    Drinking Tea

    Hello everyone, I just relaized that I need to get tested asap for Celiac Disease. I have the rash on my fingers, the gas, stomach pain from anything wheat and sugar related. even when eating a clear diet, I get symptoms. One thing That might be the culprit is this tea from Taiwan and china. I tutor a Chinese lady, that is always giving me exotic teas. When I go to her house she has 3 kinds of tea ready. Im curious.. Tea is a plant just like oats, wheat etc.. Has anyone else heard of green tea or Chinese tea causing symptoms? The Chinese can be very easily insulted so if I refuse to drink the tea when I go over there I might hurt her feelings.
  4. Hi, I've posted on here before and everyone's input was definitely helpful so I thought I'd do it again. I'm 22 and I was diagnosed with celiac via an endoscopy biopsy a year ago. After a couple of months of going gluten free, I was feeling really great and, dare I say, pretty close to being back to "normal." So from about January to July I was feeling well, other than once or twice when I was accidentally glutened. However, around July this past summer, I started having stomach problems again, including cramps, diarrhea, bloating and heartburn (which I never had heartburn until I got celiac). These symptoms are milder than when I had undiagnosed celiac, occurring 1 to 3 times a week, rather than almost every day like before. But still, they are pretty similar symptoms. I take immodium and bentyl pretty regularly, maybe overuse of the meds is messing me up. I got another round of labs done about 2 months ago, and everything came back normal. Thinking it might be another food allergy, I visited an allergist and they did skin tests and did not find anything. I am not having any histamine reactions, either, but I never really have from the get go. Of course, the allergist said that he could not really do much testing, otherwise, as blood work would not detect anything food related. He pretty much advised to take foods out of my diet to see how I'm feeling and try to narrow it down. As careful as I am, I know there is a risk of cross contamination. However, I didn't think I was THAT sensitive, as back in the winter I accidentally drank a sip of regular beer thinking it was my own, and felt fine the net day. So I figured that a teeny tiny amount did not really affect me. I am slightly frustrated in that I was feeling really well and out of nowhere I started slipping back again. I have read articles that say that a celiac's stomach is never fully healed, but they always seem gimmicky and promote a really specific diet. I am skeptical when reading things like, "gluten free diets alone don't work." But, I can't deny that I am still having issues. I am definitely willing to alter my diet in terms of eating more clean, but realistically I don't think I could ever go 100% clean. I eat pretty well already but, like everyone, I enjoy junk food once in a while and love dining out once a month or so. At this point, the next step is for me to go back to the gastro, but I wanted to see if I was maybe missing something or not thinking about something else that may be causing this. Basically I am wondering if anyone else has experienced something similar to this and if it was due to diet, or maybe another related gastrointestinal disorder. I am also not sure about which foods to test out removing from my diet. I went dairy free for a while and I was still having the same issues. Has anyone had their sensitivity increase after being gluten free for a few months? Is there a factor I could be neglecting to take into consideration? Any input would be greatly appreciated! Thanks.
  5. I'm 18. On top of having celiac I also have a million other food allergies and intolerances. I am... Lactose intolerant Egg intolerant (So I'm basically a forced vegan because I'm also a vegetarian) Allergic to... All nuts, oats, pears, peaches, plums, celery, sesame, and a variety of other things. I carry an epipen.. many of these allergies are anaphylactic. I basically only eat rice, beans, and various veggies with that. I eat fruit for breakfast or a rice cereal with either rice milk or coconut milk. I may have the opportunity to do a study abroad program in France for my senior year of high school (this fall). I'm a year behind because of all of the complications of celiac disease, they caused me to miss a LOT of school before we realized what it was. I've been homeschooling for a year now... but I'm still in touch with my old friends. They all graduated and will be going off to college in the fall and, obviously, I am VERY bummed out about having to stay at home and do another year of high school. At the moment the plan is just for me to complete my high school courses at a community college that is nearby and then go to university in the fall of 2015. HOWEVER.. getting to study abroad would be compensation for not getting to go to college when all of my friends are! The idea is just awesome and something that I could totally be excited about. Obviously the issue is the food... and the language barrier. I took French 1 in 9th grade but didn't retain much and the teacher wasn't that great. Obviously I'd learn as much as I could before going.. and I could try to learn how to explain my food issues to people... But how well is that sort of thing handled in France? I believe this program covers the whole school year. I REALLY want to do it.. so how do I get around the food issues?
  6. I'm 18 and I was diagnosed with SOME sort of gluten issue early this year. It's probably celiac though the blood test came back negative.... my doctor didn't want to explore further and just told me to take gluten out of my diet anyway. Before I was having migraines, feeling tired all the time even though I was exercising and eating a pretty clean, healthy diet. I haven't gotten a migraine since getting gluten out of my system, I haven't been bloating as badly, etc. Here's the thing... Now there is very very little that I can eat. I'm a vegetarian by choice and I have been for 10 years. I don't really intend to go back. I am very clearly lactose intolerant.. my doctor suspects this too, I just kept missing the test due to scheduling issues.. so I'm not diagnosed but it's clear. When I have lactose I get horrible gas, bloat, all of that lovely stuff. It has gotten worse lately and I've started eating less of it but that was really my main source of protein and calcium. ADDITIONALLY.. eggs make me extremely ill. I'm not one to throw up, I haven't thrown up in exactly two years.. but eggs are what will do it. For some reason the people around me think that it's because I'm disgusted by them but I'm not.. the sunny side up egg that my dad makes in the morning looks delicious. I can eat egg as an ingredient with little to no issue.. as long as it's a very very small amount. Extremely egg based gluten free breads make me sick.. there's this one brand that tastes really good, it's called Against the Grain and they have this english muffin that is extremely egg-y and that makes me really sick to my stomach. We even have chickens! We raise them for eggs! The eggs are totally fresh and amazing but I still can't eat them. Because of all these intolerances to animal products.. I feel that it might be a good idea for me to go vegan. Not the whole lifestyle but just the eating style lol. Probably not for my whole life but for a while.. bodies change and I'm sure that these particular intolerances may not always be an issue. But wait, there's more.. Going vegan is hard enough as it is.... and even more so when you're gluten free... I also have a life threatening nut allergy. This is something that I'll have for my whole life. It isn't something that I can force myself to get over.. it's really unfortunate really. I get tested every so often and so far, there has been no improvement. Surprisingly enough.. the ONLY nut that I can SUPPOSEDLY eat are walnuts.... which I won't. I absolutely will not eat them ever because I was allergic to them in the past and they landed me in the ER. It's like being put in a small cage with a lion and being told that it's well behaved and won't hurt you.. you still don't want to be put in that situation. So nuts are out. IN ADDITION TO ALL OF THAT... I'm allergic to oats, they've sent me to the ER three times, I'm also allergic to quinoa (wahh I used to eat it all the time, loved it!), peaches, pears, celery, probably avocados, corn and every corn derivative, probably cucumber (?), and a few other seeds. I also have oral allergy syndrome to a lot of uncooked fruits and veggies... like apples.. I can eat them cooked though because the proteins change. It's sort of a nightmare and going vegan is going to be extremely difficult but the thing is that I really need to stop eating eggs and dairy for now because they're making me miserable. Here are the things that I CAN eat: Bananas, blueberries, strawberries, grapes, pineapple, mango, kiwi Oranges, clementines, etc. Tomatoes Broccoli (my favorite!) Asparagus (also my favorite!) Rice Black beans Basil, thyme, (your common spices basically) Peppers Potatoes Lettuce, spinach, kale??, most if not all leafy greens Carrots (steamed) Soy Tapioca Onions Peas Coconut Olives Things like xanthan gum or whatever are probably fine as long as they aren't nutty or anything of that nature. To be honest.. that's basically it... if you take out dairy and eggs. Can I live off of those things? I suppose rice and beans can be my go-to for protein.. they pretty much are already anyway. I don't want to be unhealthy. I like to be fit and active, in fact, I'm just getting back into working out after healing from a knee injury that I sustained during ski season. So I need a good base of food that will give me the right amount of everything I need on a daily basis. I really need to avoid processed food in general because it's bad but it's also very difficult to find anything that I can eat. What do I do? Does anyone else have issues that are this extensive?? I probably can't do the raw vegan thing because of the oral allergies but I could do just basic vegan.. obviously with serious restrictions. How do I make sure that I'm getting everything that I need to survive?
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