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Found 55 results

  1. Celiac.com 10/17/2012 - This article originally appeared in the Winter 2012 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. It’s estimated that of the 3 million Americans with celiac disease, an autoimmune disease triggered by exposure to gluten-a protein component of wheat, barley, and rye-only 3% have been diagnosed. The good news for celiac patients who have been diagnosed is that the treatment for their condition is simple and doesn’t require the ingestion of drugs--a gluten-free diet. Unfortunately, celiac patients must deal with several challenges in maintaining a diet free of gluten, specifically the expenses involved. Compared with “regular” gluten-containing foods, gluten-free alternatives are more expensive. In fact, a study has indicated that gluten-free foods cost more than double their gluten-containing counterparts. In a study by the Dalhousie Medical School at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, prices were compared between food products labeled as “gluten-free” with comparable gluten-containing food products at two large-sized chain grocery stores. Unit prices of the food items in dollars per 100 grams were calculated for this purpose. According to the study, all the 56 gluten-free products were more expensive than their corresponding products. The average unit price for gluten-free products was found to be $1.71, compared with $0.61 for the gluten-containing products. This means that gluten-free products were 242% more expensive than gluten-containing items. Fortunately, celiac patients can receive tax deductions for certain expenses related with their gluten-free diet. To receive these benefits, celiacs must provide a doctor’s note confirming their celiac diagnosis and save their receipts for all their gluten-free foods and other products they purchase. The difference between the prices of gluten-free items compared to those of regular items is tax-deductible. Products that don’t have a gluten-containing counterpart, such as xanthan gum and sorghum flour, are totally tax-deductible. Shipping costs for online orders of gluten-free items are also tax-deductible. In order to file your claim, you should fill out a 1049 schedule A for medical deductions. For more information, contact a qualified accountant. There are other ways to avoid spending loads of money on gluten-free foods. For instance, stay away from gluten-free processed and “junk” foods such as snack foods and desserts made with refined carbohydrates and sugar and lacking nutrients. Not only will you save money, but you’ll safeguard your health. I recommend making meals comprised of nutritious, naturally gluten-free whole foods at home such as fruits, vegetables, dairy products, poultry, fish, meats, nuts and seeds, and eggs. These foods are packed with vital nutrients and don’t carry any additional costs. Make sure that no gluten has been added to such foods and they are safe from cross-contamination. Another way to save money is to make your own gluten-free mixes yourself, such as the ones I recommend on my gluten-free website. Instead of buying expensive commercial gluten-free baking mixes, you can create your own gluten-free flour mixes for a variety of foods such as pancakes, pizza, rolls, and muffins and store them conveniently in your refrigerator or freezer. I also recommend purchasing gluten-free ingredients in bulk online, as many websites offer great deals. These are just a few of the ways to save money on the gluten-free diet. It is unfortunate that gluten-free foods are more expensive than “regular” food items, especially to such an extraordinary degree, however savvy gluten-free dieters can through tax deductions and smart shopping choices cut down on their expenses. Perhaps in the future we will see a decrease in gluten-free food pricing, but one thing is for sure-we should consider ourselves lucky that we have found an answer to our health problems. Even if the gluten-free diet is expensive, at least it’s the road to greater health and quality of life.
  2. Hello! My name is Jamie, I'm 31 years old and live in Norway. Since 2011, I left Vancouver after a year of study and have been in and out of hospitals in Norway, but nobody can give me the proper tests to find the problem with my body. I can't work, I can barely eat and I am laying completely flat in periods. The list of symptoms is extensive, but I will keep this message on the short side. I’m underweight, but have been extremely underweight in periods (49kg / 180cm). It doesn’t matter if I eat 2200 calories or not, the body isn’t absorbing nutrients properly, and it makes me feel awful and at times completely strange. My stomach has 0 beneficial bacteria, probably have leaky gut, and got inflammation (from what it feels like). Is there anyone I could talk to about my problems? I am looking for competent doctors, researches or places where I can possible get checked up in a more fast paced manner, as each visit to a hospital here includes a 6 month waiting period. Not sure how much more my body can handle as I’ve been ill for over 10 years and severely ill multiple times. Ps. I will travel the world to the right facility to get some proper help, because I am not living anymore. Thank you so much in advance. SIncerely, Jamie
  3. Celiac.com 02/13/2018 - It is perhaps unsurprising that processed gluten-free foods are less nutritious than their gluten-containing counterparts. We've had data showing gluten-free foods to be high in sugar. We've had studies that show us they contain more salt. And now, for the trifecta, we have a recent study that shows us they contain more fat, sugar and salt. A study by the University of Hertfordshire surveyed more than 1,700 products from five UK supermarket chains and found that gluten-free foods have more fat, salt and sugar than their gluten-including counterparts, despite consumer perception that they "healthier" options. Except for crackers, every gluten-free food in the survey had more saturated fat, sugar and salt than non-gluten-free counterparts. On average for gluten-free brown bread and white bread had more than double the fat of regular breads. Gluten-free products also had significantly lower protein content than their gluten-containing equivalents, and were generally lower in ï¬ber and protein. Gluten-free products were also more likely to break the budget. On average, gluten-free products were also more than 1½ times more expensive than their counterparts, while gluten-free brown and white bread and gluten-free white and wholegrain flour sold at more than four times the price of comparable regular breads, on average. Overall, gluten-free foods are likely to be less nutritious and more expensive than their non-gluten-free counterparts. Basically, people on a gluten-free diet need to be extra careful about getting nutritious food. Simply substituting gluten-free versions of a a standard non-gluten-free diet likely means more fat, sugar and salt in your diet, along with less fiber. If you don't have a medically diagnosed reason for avoiding gluten, then be mindful about four food choices.
  4. Celiac.com 10/30/2014 - I have always been a fan of Steve Rice and his Authentic Foods line of gluten-free products. Recently I had the opportunity to try out his new Steve's Gluten-Free Bread Flour Blend, and I must say that I'm very excited about this amazing new flour blend, and the many possibilities that if offers. When Steve told me that he had been working for 20 years to perfect this mix, I knew that I was in for something very special, and my experiences with it were amazing. In the past I have tried many products billed as all purpose gluten-free flour mixes, but none are quite like this one. The directions are straightforward, and I only needed my own yeast packet, sugar, egg, butter and oil to make the mix. I new something magical was happening at the point where you first begin to mix everything together...see below: I know that Steve recommends using a mixer, but I don't have one. However, after mixing and kneading it for only a few minutes by hand it came together with the look and feel of a real gluten bread dough...it was very easy to work with, and in a very short time it looked like this: I used the dough to make the outstanding pizza below, which had a spongy, delicate crust. When making it I found that I could easily pick up the dough and work with it to form the gluten-free pizza crust. My wife used the remaining dough to make a cake, which came out light and fluffy, and it held together extremely well: Be sure to give this great new product a try. I'm sure that you too will be blown away by how great it is, and how many things you will be able to make with it using Steve's many recipes offered on his Web site.
  5. Celiac.com 06/07/2016 - The world of nutrition is currently obsessed with "super foods". Super foods are loosely defined as foods that are extremely high in nutrients – particularly antioxidants and vitamins – and which everyone is heartily advised to add to their diet. The problem with this approach is that, while focused firmly on nutrients, we are ignoring anti-nutrients! According to Wikipedia, an anti-nutrient is a compound in food that interferes with your absorption of other nutrients from a food. Most foods have varying amounts of anti-nutrients, toxins and other problematic compounds. A truly healthy diet will include weighing the good against the bad, while maintaining as much variety as possible. Once we have a clearer picture of how a food helps to support our nutrition, we can then decide how to include it in our diet and in what amount. Obviously, certain health conditions mean that certain foods are no longer healthful. For those with celiac disease, this means that grains with gluten in them are damaging to their health. It really doesn't matter how healthy wheat bran is for some – for celiacs, wheat bran is harmful. For those with allergies, you have a similar issue. Foods that may be healthy for some may not be for others. Another issue with food and health can be related to anti-nutrients. For instance, in the vegetarian world, we now hear more about phytate – often found in legumes – and how to reduce it in a plant-based diet. Salicylate is another anti-nutrient found in plant foods, and more people are finding that they need to consider this when choosing foods. Plants may also contain toxins, which are totally natural to the plant, but not good for you. Wikipedia indicates that a toxin is a substance that is directly poisonous, and capable of causing disease. For instance, some foods may contain naturally occurring cyanide compounds, or even arsenic in various forms. While we may not get enough to cause immediate problems, we certainly don't want to consume a lot of these toxins! Oxalate is another toxin present in many otherwise healthy foods. Oxalate poses many challenges for human health. It's a free radical. It promotes inflammation in your body. Because of its biochemistry, oxalate can be stored throughout your body, and can be particularly concentrated at the sites of previous injury, inflammation or surgery. Fundamentally, oxalate can be stored in tissues wherever the cells have taken it up. As a result, if you are someone who is absorbing too much oxalate from your diet, you can be contributing substantial stress to your body. Reducing the amount of oxalate in your diet cannot hurt you – you are reducing a totally non-nutritive substance for which the human body has no need and which contributes directly to health issues. However, reducing too many food types or nutrients in your diet can have negative impacts. The greater the variety in your diet, the better the chance that you are getting all your needed nutrients. The good news is that you can have a nutritious, high variety diet, and retain "super foods" in your diet which are high nutrition, gluten-free and low oxalate. Get Your Fiber The preponderance of processed foods in our diets can often leave us with hardly any fiber in our diet! Many gluten-free options are very low in fiber, and this can affect gut health. Fiber is not a direct nutrient for us per se – but it is a needed component that contributes to better gut flora and better health overall. Insoluble fiber adds bulk to the stool and promotes regularity. Most of us are not getting enough of this fiber, and as a result, can develop poor motility and constipation. Given that many whole grains are not good alternatives for those on a gluten-free diet, and the bran of many grains are actually high in oxalate, how can we get more healthy insoluble fiber? The good news is that one nutritional powerhouse is not only full of healthy insoluble fiber – it's also a plant source of Omega 3's. So a great solution to lack of insoluble fiber is flax seeds. Flax seeds can be eaten whole – but to really get the best benefits from this super food, it's best to grind your flax. Keep whole flax seeds in the freezer to preserve their freshness, and don't grind until just before using them. The recommended daily serving (which will also provide some soluble fiber) is two tablespoons. According to the Mayo Clinic, the right fiber goes much further than just regularity. If you increase soluble fiber, it can help reduce both blood sugar and cholesterol. Soluble fiber creates a gel-like material in the gut, and some research indicates that it may help to feed our gut bacteria. The benefits of soluble fiber are well known when it comes to cholesterol. The recommended food to get more soluble fiber is oats. However, whole oats are high in oxalate, and the oat bran has confusing test data. The solution? Psyllium! Pysllium is the medicinal ingredient in the popular product, Metamucil. Psyllium contains both soluble and insoluble fiber – and research on it shows that it can help to reduce cholesterol as well as normalize blood sugar. You can add it to baked products (but adjust the liquids), or sprinkle on foods. It's virtually tasteless – although you might find it does add some thickness or texture to liquids or foods. Fruits and vegetables are also good sources of both soluble and insoluble fiber and many are lower oxalate. Cabbages, lettuces, onions, cucumbers (with the skin) red bell peppers, orange, mango and grapes are all good low oxalate sources of fiber in your diet. Fruits There is no shortage of healthy options in fresh fruits that are also low oxalate, but the blueberry holds a special place among even the healthiest fruits. Research shows that blueberries are one of the most antioxidant rich foods available, and are included in most lists of super foods. Blueberries are one of the highest rated foods on the ORAC scale. The ORAC scale was developed by researchers at Tufts University, and is the measure of Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (hence the abbreviation ORAC). What this really means for you is that the higher something ranks on the ORAC scale, the more antioxidants you are getting. Blueberries are stars on this scale, with an ORAC value of 4,669 per 100 grams, according to Superfoodly.com. Wild blueberries rank higher than cultivated ones – but you can't go wrong with any blueberry. Another fruit that ranks very high in ORAC is the lowly cranberry. While very tart (and difficult to eat raw), cranberries are second only to blueberries in antioxidant levels. To reduce the acidity of the fruit, and make them more palatable, cook with water and some honey. Cranberries are very easy to cook and make a lovely side dish for fattier meats like lamb. They aren't just for turkey anymore! Consuming these tangy fruits also help to contribute to bladder health. For nutrition on the go, turn to golden seedless raisins. While dark raisins are tasty treats, the golden seedless variety is both lower in oxalate and higher in antioxidants. In fact, golden seedless raisins actually have a higher ORAC score than fresh blueberries! Combine that with convenience and portability, and you have an easy way to get more antioxidants in your day. Raisins also make a great treat for kids, because of their sweetness. Is the apple a super food? Yes it is! Easy to purchase and pack for lunch, this popular fruit is full of quercetin, which protects cells from damage and is often recommended for those with allergies. Not only is it full of healthy antioxidants, it also has twice the fiber of other commonly eaten fruits, including peaches, grapes and grapefruit, according to the site EverydayHealth.com. Veggies When looking at veggies, many of the foods that are considered most healthy are also very high in oxalate. Everyone talks today about how healthy the sweet potato is for us: but did you know that a ½ cup of sweet potato can have over 90 mg of oxalate in it? For people trying to eat a low oxalate diet, a single serving would be more oxalate than they should consume in a whole day! However, while avoiding high oxalate foods, you do need to eat color and variety to get your needed nutrition. If you want a lower carbohydrate, orange veggie – consider the kabocha squash. Not only does this lower carb, low oxalate veggie work as a substitute for many recipes that require sweet potato, it also has a very good nutrient profile. Self Nutrition Data lists Vitamin A and Vitamin C as well as a good serving of Folate, in addition to good amounts of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium. Of course, you want other colors in your veggies as well – and green leafy veggies are particularly known for their nutrition. While spinach would be a bad choice because of extremely high oxalate, you have lots of other greens to choose from. Focus on lower oxalate varieties of kale, including purple kale. The website, The World's Healthiest Foods, lists kale as a food that can lower cholesterol (if steamed) as well as lower your risk of cancer. Of course, kale is part of the cruciferous vegetable family, and these foods have many anti-cancer benefits. Kale is an excellent source of Vitamin K (your blood clotting factor), as well as vitamin A, vitamin C, manganese, copper, B6 and others. Don't forget your other brassicas while you are focusing on kale! The cruciferous veggies also support our bodies natural detox processes, which is very valuable in today's world where we are exposed to many environmental toxins. Broccoli is another low oxalate brassica that is good for you, whether you are eating the mature broccoli heads, or feasting on broccoli sprouts. Note that broccoli sprouts do have an edge over their more mature cousins – they might just taste better, and given that they can be added to a sandwich for some satisfying crunch, might be easier to work into your daily diet. Research gives the sprouts a further edge in cancer risk reduction and some research indicates they may actually help to prevent stomach cancer. Another excellent leafy green is the lowly turnip green. Turnip greens are very high in calcium, and are even lower in oxalate than kale. A cup of cooked turnip greens will also get you more than 100% of the RDA for vitamin K. In addition, you'll get vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, copper, manganese, calcium, and vitamin E. Each serving will give you 15% of your daily requirement for B6. When thinking of deep red veggies, go for red cabbage. This versatile veggie is very low in oxalate, and that lovely red color means that it has even more protective phytonutrients, according to World's Healthiest Foods, than its green sibling! One serving of red cabbage delivers more than four times the polyphenols of green cabbage. Fats and Oils You can't read on super food nutrition anywhere and not run into the avocado. A great source of healthy monounsaturated fat, the avocado has also been linked to reduced risk of cancer, as well as lowered risk of heart disease and diabetes. While we think of avocados as a fatty food, they are actually a good source of fiber, with 11 to 17 grams of fiber per fruit! You'll also get a dose of lutein, an antioxidant recommended for eye health. Web MD says that lutein is a potent antioxidant, which is found in high concentrations in the eye. The combination of lutein and zeaxanthin (another antixodant) help to protect your eyes from damaging, high energy light. Some research indicates that a diet high in lutein and zeaxanthin may reduce the risk of cataracts by as much as 50%. Coconut oil is another excellent fat that can benefit our bodies in a host of ways. Doctor Oz lists a number of benefits, including supporting thyroid health and blood sugar control. This may be related to the form of saturated fat that is found in coconut oil, called lauric acid. Lauric acid is a medium-chain triglyceride. This kind of fat actually boosts immune system, and has antibiotic, antiviral and antifungal properties. It may also be a tool in your weight loss arsenal. A study in 2009 actually showed the eating 2 Tablespoons of coconut oil daily, allowed subjects to lose belly fat more effectively. Even better news for those who are following a low oxalate diet: both avocado and coconut oil have zero oxalate! Nuts, Seeds and Legumes Unfortunately, many foods in this category are high oxalate – and so won't qualify for our super food list. While you might be able to have a couple of walnut halves, or a similar amount of pecans, nuts are generally just to high to have in servings of more than 3-5 pieces. However, if you are looking for a superfood in this category, look no further than pumpkin seeds! Pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of vegetable-based protein, and are another portable food. A great snack for the health conscious can be made with raisins and pumpkin seeds – both are low oxalate, and the protein of the pumpkin seeds will help you to stay fuller longer. According to LiveStrong.com, a handful of pumpkin seeds will give you over 8 grams of protein. At the same time, pumpkin seeds are low in sugar, and provide you with fiber as part of the carbohydrate in them. You will also get vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin K, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, magnesium, calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, potassium, copper and phosphorus in that small and compact package! If pumpkin seeds don't qualify as a super food, it's hard to say what would! When it comes to legumes, many are stars for protein, but one of the best options is the red lentil. Lentils in general are easier to prepare than other types of legumes – they do not require the soaking and preparation time that many legumes do. At the same time, they are powerhouses of nutrition, with molybdenum, folate, fiber, copper, phosphorus and manganese all at more than 50% of your daily requirement. One cup of cooked lentils will also give you 36 % of your daily need for protein, according to World's Healthiest Foods. And all this nutrition is provided in a food that is virtually fat free and low in calories. You cannot go wrong! As an added benefit, some studies have found that eating high fiber foods like red lentils may reduce the risk of heart disease. The more fiber, the lower the risk of heart disease. Fish We are always hearing that we need to have more fish in our diets. It seems sometimes that not a week goes by when we are not hearing that we should be eating less meat, and getting less fat – with the suggestion that more fish would benefit us. When you think of the super food of fish, you have to think of salmon. Salmon is a fatty fish, and it's one of the best sources available for omega-3 fatty acids. In today's world of processed foods, omega-3's are one of the nutrients that we don't get enough of. Your best bet with salmon is to get wild-caught fish. Farmed salmon do not have the same nutrient profile, which may be related to the kind of food they are fed. Along with the decreased nutrient profile, studies have indicated that farmed salmon contains significantly higher concentrations of a number of contaminants (including PCBs, dieldrins, toxaphenes, dioxins and chlorinated pesticides) than wild caught salmon. World's Healthiest Foods states that a 4 ounce piece of Coho salmon will get you 55% of your daily requirements for omega-3 fats. On top of that, you'll get more than 50% of your daily requirement for vitamin B12, vitamin D, selenium, vitamin B3, protein and phosphorus, as well as other B vitamins and minerals. Omega-3 fatty acids will provide you a host of benefits, from reduction of inflammation, to better brain function. Omega-3 fat is also heart healthy, and can contribute to a reduced risk of heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease. Research indicates that eating salmon at least 2 to 3 times a week will give you the best benefits. Spice it up Spices can be a bit tricky, if you want to keep your oxalate low. Many spices – while tasty – are very high in oxalate! A great example of this is turmeric. A staple in most curry recipes, turmeric is extremely high oxalate – so while it has a reputation as a super food, it would not be a good choice if you are trying to keep your oxalate low. So what is your option if you love to eat foods spiced with turmeric? Well, the easiest approach is to stock your spice rack with a health food store supplement; cook with curcumin extract! While it may seem a bit odd at first, if you buy a curcumin extract (which is the extract from turmeric), you can get the flavor and leave the oxalate behind. While not technically a "food" when you cook with a supplement, you certainly get all the benefits of the original super food – turmeric – without the downside of oxalate. Another highly beneficial spice is cinnamon. Research clearly shows how helpful cinnamon is for managing blood sugar. However, ground cinnamon is an extremely high oxalate spice. So how can you get the flavor you want, while avoiding the oxalate? One solution is to cook with a cinnamon extract that you buy at the health food store! One brand known to be low oxalate is Doctor's Best. It is a dry extract in capsules – simply break open the capsules and use the contents in your dish. This allows you to get all the therapeutic benefits of the extract as well as the taste. You can also cook with essential oils and culinary oils – but use them carefully. Essential oils can be very strong and can irritate the tissues of the mouth and digestive tract. One drop of good quality essential cinnamon oil will replace as much as 1 tablespoon of ground cinnamon. Culinary oils are made for flavoring – follow the directions on the product that you buy. Either way, you will get the taste – and you avoid the oxalate. Enjoying Your Food! As with anyone who wants to eat a healthy diet full of super foods, the trick is to focus on the best nutrition, and get lots of variety. While some foods may not be as "super" as others, if you are making colorful meals, with healthful selections from across the spectrum, you'll be doing your body a favor with flavor! Where Does Oxalate Go? Once you have eaten oxalate, you have to excrete it through urine, feces or sweat. But what happens if you don't? A study on rats was able to trace where in the body a dose of oxalate remained. The scientists used a special carbon molecule – carbon 14 – in the oxalate they gave to the rats, so that they could find the oxalate wherever it went in the body. What they found is that if the oxalate was not excreted from the body, it was stored everywhere: 68% in the bones 9% in the spleen 8% in the adrenal glands 3% in the kidneys 3% in the liver 8% in the rest of the body These results are in direct opposition to conventional medical thinking, that oxalate only affects the kidneys. It clearly shows us that the whole body – but particularly the bones, key glands and detoxification organs – are all affected. This is another good reason to reduce the amount of oxalate in your diet! Is Spinach Really That Bad For You? A relatively simple study in the late 1930's looked at rats fed a diet that was only adequate in calcium. To bring the levels of calcium up, the rats were given spinach, equaling about 8% of their diet. While most of us think of spinach in terms of iron, it is also relatively high in calcium. The results of the study were shocking: 47. A high percentage of rats died between the age of 21 days and 90 days 48. The bones of the rats were extremely low in calcium (despite adding it to the diet through the spinach) 49. Tooth structure was poor and dentine of the teeth poorly calcified 50. For these animals, reproduction was impossible. Researchers concluded that not only did spinach not supply the needed calcium (because of the oxalate), but the spinach also rendered the calcium from other foods unavailable. What we know now is that oxalate is a mineral chelator – and rather than delivering minerals, it was robbing them from the rats. Getting Your Vitamin K Vitamin K is a very important nutrient. Life Extension indicates that new research from 2014 links vitamin K to longevity. In fact, the highest intakes of vitamin K reduced the likelihood of dying from any cause by 36%! So, you definitely want to get vitamin K in your diet. However, most of us think that we need to eat high oxalate greens – like spinach – in order to get good amounts of vitamin K. Nothing could be further from the truth! Kale, collards and turnip greens are all higher in vitamin K than spinach, and they have a fraction of the oxalate.
  6. Updated list here new links, and composed in a more organized manner LOOK for * on links and you can order from them directly, at the bottom are some websites to purchase from Full Meal Options/Entrees, broad spectrum companies http://iansnaturalfoods.com/allergy-friendly-products/search-by-allergens/?tax_products_tags[]=gluten-free&wpas=1 ^Ians gluten-free options you will find sides, baked/fried snacks, onion rings, chicken strips, cheese sticks, fish sticks, pizza bread. etc from them that are good subs you can find where to buy them or even have your local grocer stock them on request. Best thing about Ians is you can go to their site and adjust the filter to find stuff free of other ingredients. http://udisglutenfree.com/product-catalog/ ^ Whole lot of food staples from this company (none safe for me) but all gluten-free alternative you can have, udi is like the cheap bargain gluten-free brand alot of there stuff seems lacking but they have a little bit of everything. From microwave dinners, pizzas, burritos, instant pasta dishes, granola's, and cookies. http://www.vansfoods.com/our-products ^ go to breakfast guys. Select Gluten free from dietary restrictions or other options you need, NOTE most products use oats. https://enjoylifefoods.com/our-foods/ ^All Free of the 8 top allergens, they have premade cookies, chips, and baking ingredients. http://www.namastefoods.com/products/cgi-bin/products.cgi?Category_Id=all ^ Free of top 8 allergens, they have everything from flours, mixes, and entrees, https://www.simplemills.com/collections/all ^Mixes, Crackers, and cookies, ALL GRAIN FREE https://knowfoods.com/collections/frontpage ^Low carb bread, muffins, waffles, cookies, etc. All low carb and keto friendly great for diabetics https://www.geefree.com/collections/all ^All gluten-free Pizza pouches, Meal bits, pastry puffs, Breads/Pizza Note some of the above spectrum companies also offer their own https://canyonglutenfree.com/buy-gluten-free-bread-products/ ^Raved by most people I talk to as some of the BEST gluten-free breads/bagels/buns available, several of my customers talk about using them with artisan nut butters all the time. https://julianbakery.com/shop/?fwp_product_categories=bread *^Grain Free Corn free low carb bread, The seed bread toast just like gluten breads, The almond and coconut each have their own niche. Bread is best used toasted, PS the coconut bread makes awesome french toast https://cappellos.com/collections/pizza *^Grain Free Pizza crust to make your own with using eggs, coconut and arrowroot for a base crust blend. The Naked pizza crust is dairy free. Order frozen by the case and they ship them to you. https://realgoodfoods.com/productpage/ *^Grain Free Pizza They use Dairy Cheese blended with chicken breast to form personal pizza crust. You can order them frozen and shipped to you. NEW PRODUCTS they do Enchiladas NOW https://www.califlourfoods.com/collections *^ This is the only one I buy, grain free, low carb crust, and the plant based one is great, NOTE these make a New york style flat crust, I use 15 min prebake before adding toppings to make them extra crispy http://glutenfreedelights.com/our-sandwiches/ ^Gluten free hot pockets? YES they make them for when you need the old instant hotpocket, odd craving but I know they hit sometimes. CRUST MIXES Grain free https://www.simplemills.com/collections/all/products/almond-flour-pizza-crust-mix https://julianbakery.com/product/paleo-pizza-crust-mix-gluten-grain-free/ Baking Mixes https://julianbakery.com/shop/?fwp_product_categories=mixes\ *^Grain Free low carb mixes have pancakes, bread, pizzia https://www.simplemills.com/collections/almond-flour-baking-mixes ^Grain Free Mixes http://www.bobsredmill.com/shop/gluten-free/gluten-free-mixes.html ^Major Staple provider of baking mixes and flours for the gluten free https://www.bettycrocker.com/products/gluten-free-baking-mix ^Your old Favorites, note these are loaded with starches and can cause some issues (Note a specialty gluten-free company) http://www.kingarthurflour.com/products/gluten-free-mixes/ ^More classic starchy mixes (Note a specialty Gluten Free company) Chocolate https://phikind.com/collections/all ^Gluten Free, Dairy Free, and Sugar Free Truffles! https://www.lakanto.com/collections/sales-title/products/box-of-lakanto-sugar-free-55-chocolate-bar ^Gluten Free, Sugar Free, Dairy Free, Soy Free bars OMG better then a Hershey bar https://www.lindtusa.com/gluten-free-chocolate--sc4?utm_source=eean&utm_medium=affiliate_loyalty&utm_campaign=lindtaffiliate#facet:&productBeginIndex:0&facetLimit:&orderBy:&pageView:grid&minPrice:&maxPrice:&pageSize:& ^Various gluten free truffles, and chocolate bars http://lilyssweets.com/ ^Chocolate Bars, Baking Chips etc. all gluten, dairy, and sugar free. Might contain Dairy in some and soy Bars https://julianbakery.com/shop/?fwp_product_categories=protein-bar&fwp_per_page=100 ^High protein low carb, meal bars, take some getting used to with the texture but great for diabetics and those sensitive to sugars. https://www.kindsnacks.com/products/kind-nut-bars ^Good nut bars and snacks they also make granola https://theglutenfreebar.com/ ^Gluten free food bars, contain oats in many. https://enjoylifefoods.com/our-foods/grain-seed-bars/ ^Allergen Free Bars Snacks/Chips/Crackers/Wraps https://www.mygerbs.com/ *^They have pumpkin seeds, hemp seeds, sunflower seeds, granola, etc. all free of the top 8 allergens, Also they offer various spices, etc. https://eatprotes.com/products/protes-protein-chips?variant=24971155656 *^Grain free low carb, vegan protein chips, bit of a acquired taste http://beanitos.com/#snacks ^Corn free tortilla chips, taste like a high end restaurant chips, they also make corn free puff snacks. http://www.beanfieldssnacks.com/ ^More Corn free tortilla chips note these also have vegan options, they are a bit lighter and crispier. http://www.lundberg.com/products/snacks/ ^Rice and Quinoa Chips, crackers, etc. https://sietefoods.com/collections/tortilla-chips *^Cassava based chips grain free bit high in starch but light and crisp https://sietefoods.com/collections/tortillas *^Cassava based grain free tortillas http://www.nucoconut.com/coconut-wraps/ *^Coconut wraps, I love to use these, you have to warm them up a bit to make them pliable. https://www.bluediamond.com/brand/nut-thins ^Almond based crackers https://bakeryonmain.com/shop/ ^Oat based granola snacks, bars, etc. https://www.wildwayoflife.com/ ^Gluten free, Grain Free, Hot Cereal, granola and smoothie bases https://www.goraw.com/shop/sprouted-flax-snax/ ^These flax crackers are great...the pizza is addicting Fries/Hashbrowns/Tatertots http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/Categories/French-Fries http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/Categories/Hash-Browns http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/Categories/Tater-Tots ^Go to company for most of is with this disease, NOTE most other companies will use wheat flour in fries/tots/hashbrowns http://iansnaturalfoods.com/products/organic-crispy-potato-puffs/ Cooking Ingredients/Rice/Flours/Condiments https://www.pacificfoods.com/broths-and-stocks ^Many of use this brand in our cooking https://www.spicely.com/collections/organic-spices-seasoning *^Gluten free, Organic, Non GMO spices #1 go to for safe spices for many of us http://www.lundberg.com/products/ ^Great and safe Gluten Free Rice company, they make many instant rice entrees, rice crackers, and rice cakes http://www.lotusfoods.com/#products ^Another option for various rice products https://cappellos.com/collections/pasta ^Grain Free FRESH soft pasta options EXPENSIVE but some of the highest end stuff you can get http://www.glutenfreeoats.com/ *^ONLY true Gluten free oat company that I would trust, it is owned by a celiac family https://miraclenoodle.com/collections/miracle-noodle-rice-products *^Carb Free/Low Carb, Grain free noodles, rice, and instant meal kits. https://www.waldenfarms.com/ ^Gluten Free, Sugar Free, Carb Free. Dairy Free, Soy Free for cravings when you can't have them, bit overly processed but helps out when your limited They have coffee creamers, topping syrups, dessert dips, savory dips, salad dressings, condiments etc. CAREFUL if you have issues with highly processed foods and xantham gum http://natureshollow.com/index.html ^Sugar Free jams, honey, and maple syrup using xylitol for a sweetener instead of of a bunch of crud. Stuff takes awhile for your gut to adjust to but honestly They have the only Honey I can use http://www.polanerspreads.com/polaner-products/ ^ All their products are gluten-free and their jams are good I love using their sugar free products with fiber, I also use some of smuckers SF products https://www.coconutsecret.com/products2.html ^gluten-free and soy free teriyaki sauces, soy sauce subs, garlic sauce, cooking sauces, and they make knock off granola bars without oats http://sirkensingtons.com/products ^Great source for mayo, vegan mayo, mustard, ketchup, and SECRET SAUCE. all gluten and corn free with NO artificial preservatives, My main condiment when cooking for others, as a chef I trust it quite a bit. http://www.nucoconut.com/products/coconut-vinegar/ ^These are vinegar made from coconut, great for cooking with and over salads http://www.eatparma.com/store ^Awesome Vegan Parmesan options the bacon one is a GOD SEND https://www.nutilight.com/ ^OMG You need to try this, dairy free, and sugar free Nutella substitute Meat/Meat Alternatives http://beyondmeat.com/products ^ Meat alternative using Pea Protein, I love the beefy crumbles as they have the texture and flavor of ground beef. Low carb and good for ketogenic diets. MUCH easier to digest then actual beef while having the same amount of protein and less fat. https://www.jennieo.com/products ^look for the gluten-free label, you can get all kinds of sausage, bacon, burger patties etc from them all from turkey. I like using the bacon and sausages for soup stocks, and seasoning myself https://skinnygirllunchmeat.com/ ^Love the deli meats from this company I use them in my catering sometimes https://www.mccormick.com/thai-kitchen/products ^I love using the curry paste from the Thai Kitchen, Noodle kits, Soup kits, stir fry kits, even Chinese take out kits. some even instant microwaveable. All gluten-free from what I have found gluten-free Thai/Chinese food. http://new.organicvillefoods.com/category/products/ *^gluten-free sauces like sriracha, BBQ, mustard, ketchup, ect. Good line up of products. http://www.authenticfoods.com/ *^Great source for flours, baking ingredients etc. all you basics https://store.nutiva.com/coconut-flour/ ^Coconut flour, I use this brand in my baking alot Dairy Free Alternatives to Dairy Foods https://www.bluediamond.com/brand/almond-breeze ^ Almond, cashew, coconut, blends etc. https://silk.com/products ^ More Almond, cashew, coconut, blends, they also offer yogurt and icecream alternatives. http://sodeliciousdairyfree.com/products ^ They offer many coconut options, Yogurt, cheese, milks, icecream pints, icecream bars. http://malkorganics.com/products/ ^VERY high end minimally processed almond milk, one the the best https://www.ripplefoods.com/products/ ^ NUT FREE, Dairy Free options of a rich milk alternative from yellow peas (legumes) http://goodkarmafoods.com/products/ ^Flax Based milk alternatives http://www.leafcuisine.com/raw-vegan-food-dairy-free-probiotic-cashew-spreads/ ^ BEST and least processed cheese spreads, cream cheese etc. I can eat these without any issues https://daiyafoods.com/ ^Offers Vegan cheese slices, cheese blocks, cheese shreds, pizza, CHEESE CAKES!, yogurt, s https://followyourheart.com/products/ ^ Diary free and vegan, cheese, spreads, dips, dressings, condiments https://winkfrozendesserts.com/collections/wink-frozen-desserts-pints *^ICE CREAM by the pint AND THEY SHIP IT TO YOU, Dairy free, soy free, sugar free, PERFECT bliss I suggest getting the gluten free pastry pack Flavors/Extracts https://www.capellaflavors.com/13ml ^Great flavors for any dessert you might desire, you add 1 drop to each oz of liquid base in smoothies, icecream, and drinks....great way to kick cravings, Needs Sweeteners http://www.lorannoils.com/1-ounce-larger-sizes ^Baking Extracts Coffee/Tea https://www.christopherbean.com/collections/flavored-coffee *^ DESERT Flavored Coffee all gluten-free and safe, I called the company and even tested most of the coffee flavors myself using testing kits. Sounded too good to be true but most of these taste dead on like the deserts they are supposed to , just add sweetener. Also try their plain coffee http://www.republicoftea.com/ *^Great tea company, all gluten-free certified teas, both bulk and bags. Hard Ciders/Liqours While Most Hard Liqours are gluten free due to the distilling process these are ones I have contacted the company on. https://austineastciders.com/ ^Local cider here in Texas, I keep these for guest, good alternative to the "Beer Can Chicken" http://www.acecider.com/ ^Suggested by someone else I was talking to https://www.captainmorgan.com/ ^Old Staple for many and company says they are gluten free http://admiralnelsonsrum.com/ ^I use this in cooking, goes great finishing off veggie saute http://www.titosvodka.com/ ^Corn Based Vodka https://www.ciroc.com/ ^Grape Based Vodka EMERGENCY MEAL Supplies for long term survival http://www.glutenfreeemergencykits.com/gluten-free-emergency-kits-1/ ^All gluten free meal options dedicated company https://www.wisefoodstorage.com/emergency-food-kits-supplies/gluten-free-food-storage.html ^Gluten Free Options from a Wise company http://www.thrivelife.com/all-products/thrive-foods-161/gluten-free.html ^Various Freeze Dried foods, great for not just emergency foods but the dehydrated veggies give options for soups and always having veggies in stock without refrigeration. Places to order From Check these for most the the above products, these are the best pricing options, Always cross check and look for sells. https://www.luckyvitamin.com ^Really good place for supplements, protein powders, and some gluten-free foods and snacks, Cross check with amazon for best pricing and sometimes Luckys will price match. http://thrv.me/gf25 ^Thrive Market, like a online grocery store that ship to you so you do not need to go out and buy stuff, has alot of brands just search under Gluten Free. https://www.amazon.com/ ^The go to everything store. Found a UPC list from Several Grocery stores, you can takes these to your local grocery store manager and have items ordered. https://www.heb.com/static/pdfs/Gluten-Free-List.pdf ^HEB/Central Market http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/service/gluten-free-products-list ^Whole Foods select location and store and you can even see what they have in stock. https://www.kroger.com/asset/541b1c6a84ae4e0350fcace0?data=1 ^ Kroger http://www.traderjoes.com/PDF/tjs-gluten-free-dietary-list.pdf ^Trader Joes
  7. Celiac.com 12/21/2017 - After a lot of trial and error we celiacs learn, often the hard way, to eliminate foods that are poisonous to our bodies. Sadly, we often forget about what "goes onto" our skin. Since the skin is the living outer layer of our bodies it absorbs not only water and oils, it also absorbs cosmetics that can be poisonous to our celiac bodies, most specifically those of us afflicted with dermatitis herpetiformis (often called celiac disease of the Skin). Men, before you set this article aside, thinking it's only for women and you are exempt, please read on. One of 133 Americans has a wheat-related allergy according to CNN.com. We have a tendency not to group toothpaste and lip-glosses with cosmetics, and we usually ignore vitamins and medications when researching celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis. We forget to ask our hairdresser what products they are using and whether they contain wheat or gluten, and glibly apply night creams (to absorb into our skin as we sleep) and mud packs that promise similar benefits. Inquiring into the gluten content of cosmetics, I contacted more than twenty leading companies, then I waited. I was discouraged, particularly by the blatant rudeness of some of the responses I received. Meanwhile, I had to learn whether gluten could be absorbed through the skin. Some websites answered that question with a direct "no". Even some physicians responded saying "no". However, since the skin is the largest living organ in the body and it does absorb various oils and emollients, listing gluten-containing components of medicinal and non-medicinal ingredients allows consumers with celiac disease (celiac disease) or wheat allergies to make informed choices when purchasing and/or consuming natural health products. It enables them to avoid gluten in quantities that may trigger adverse reactions. There are numerous articles on dermatitis herpetiformis and celiac disease making claims so contradictory that it is no wonder we are confused. And I'm not talking about accidental ingestion of gluten. Some such articles claim that trace amounts of gluten One article insists that the skin is not going to absorb gluten, even though our skin is a living organism that can absorb suntan lotions, trans-dermal drugs, etc. It is so susceptible to absorption that when you place a slice of onion in your sock you will taste it in your mouth the following day. How can these websites make such contrary claims? The skin absorbs flavors as well as creams containing gluten. On the other hand, "Glutino" had an article on record, written on September 14, 2010, regarding "Hidden Gluten in Health and Beauty Products". It states that if you apply hand lotion that contains gluten and then prepare food you are exposing yourself to accidental ingestion and your food to cross contamination. They suggest a site called: naturallydahling.com, a site that lists gluten-containing ingredients commonly used in cosmetics. Research proving the full extent of how much your skin absorbs is still unavailable, but to those who believe that "what goes on, goes in", the cosmetic industry is full of unknowns. The size of gluten molecules suggests that they may not be able to pass through the skin, but chemicals and technology designed to enhance skin absorption are already present, if not prevalent, in the cosmetic industry. These chemicals are potentially dangerous and often go untested for negative health effects, yet are widespread in lotions, antiperspirants, perfumes and the "Great Mother Market" anti-wrinkle cosmetics. Since the cosmetic industry is self-regulated it is more important than ever to carefully read labels and use natural or organic products whenever possible. If you find yourself reacting to a particular cosmetic, it is possible that you may have an increased sensitivity to gluten, an allergy or even dermatitis herpetiformis. But wait a minute! Aren't we told that gluten cannot pass through the skin? I suffered terribly from the use of an "Anti-Frizz" product for my hair that caused a massive outbreak of dermatitis herpetiformis. I should have read the label all the way down to the end. I would have found, in very small print, "wheat germ oil". When researching for this article, I wrote to the company and mentioned my problems with their product. I received an apology and a sample of their "new and improved" "Frizz-Ease" product. They obviously do not know their own products and the fancy names they use are as confusing to them as they are to me. The "new and improved" product contained Avena Sativa, the Latin name for OAT. I was also told that I likely just had "hives" on the back of my scalp, as oats are still somewhat controversial. Some research suggests that oats in themselves are gluten free, but that they are virtually always contaminated with other grains during cultivation, harvest, distribution or processing. Recent research indicates that a protein naturally found in oats (avenin) contains peptide sequences closely resembling some peptides from wheat gluten. The oat peptides caused mucosal inflammation in significant numbers of celiac disease sufferers. Some examination results show that even oats that are not contaminated with wheat particles may be dangerous. Again, I was told not to introduce oats into my diet, or use oatmeal as a facial mask until I had been free of a dermatitis herpetaformis outbreak for at least a year. Thus far I have not been able to get relief for that long. It seems the celiac or those who suffer from dermatitis herpetiformis {and let's face it, most people suffering from dermatitis herpetaformis have celiac disease} have to apply the rule of "caveat emptor" - Let the buyer beware. Tolerance to gluten varies among individuals with celiac disease and there are limited clinical scientific data on a threshold for the amount of gluten required to initiate or maintain an immunological reaction in celiac disease patients. "Therefore there is no clear consensus on a safe gluten threshold level." The Dermatologist I see at The University of British Columbia Hospital has told me to tell people in restaurants that gluten is poison to my system and I can become very ill from ingesting gluten. They are a little more careful before telling me a dish is gluten free, and hopefully through education the cosmetic industry is going to improve its testing and cease glibly stating things as "fact" when they simply do not know. Industries that produce over-the-counter medications and vitamin supplement, especially those that may contain gluten as a binding agent, should also be scrutinized. We have come a long way, but large challenges are still ahead. One of our biggest challenges is reading the labels on these products. One almost needs to carry a magnifying glass when shopping. Cosmetics, which include hair products, soaps, perfumes and toothpastes also run us into problems, often big, "itchy" problems. The male celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis experience can also include outbreaks from any product that comes into contact with the skin and particularly those that "stay" on the hair or skin. Who would have known that sun tan lotions could contain wheat germ oil? It is difficult enough to eliminate words such as "triticum vulgare" the Latin name of wheat or "wheat germ" containing ingredients! In preparation for this article, I contacted the following companies: Avon, Clairol, Clarins, Clinique, Coty, Covergirl, Estee Lauder, Garnier, John Frieda, John Paul Mitchell, L'Oreal, Mabelline, Marcelle, Neutrogena, Olay, Pantene, Revlon, and companies that go under general all-encompassing headings such as "Life Brand". This can be a daunting task, and "gluten free" and "wheat free" are not the same thing. Some of the things that I learned in this rather massive undertaking include the rule of "Pac Man". Companies are sometimes taken over by bigger companies and when this occurs their rules change. A company that at one time did not test on animals or use machines that were cleaned prior to using products claiming to be gluten free are now glibly adopting the "new bigger and better". I was shocked to find out that some of the containers from the smaller company were still being used after these PAC MAN take-overs, to save on manufacturing costs. And, remember, once several ingredients are combined the "organic" ingredient probably ceases to be "organic". Some women (and men, you are not exempt here) expect to pay a higher price for a luxury brand assuming that the gorgeous bottle of eye cream sold at Saks for $60.00 is going to work better than the $1.99 tube on the clearance rack of a local store. Just ensure the product has not reached its "sell by" date because it may all be psychological. What you have to concern yourself about, as a celiac patient or a person with dermatitis herpetiformis, is whether there is gluten or wheat in that product. Before you splurge on an expensive product take the time to compare it to a similar product from one of their sister brands. Usually an online store (like Drugstore.com) will list the ingredients. Or you can check on a site like "Makeup Alley" which is a great resource, offering numerous reviews and you can ask questions of the extremely knowledgeable posters on this message board. Another great resource is a large paperback book, titled "Do not go to the Drugstore Without Me" written by Paula Begoin. When I purchased the books in 2001 it was in its 5th Edition. NB: This is not a book specifically for celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis, but it was in this book that I found out about "Glutamic Acid". It is derived from wheat gluten and is an amino acid that can have water binding properties for the skin. It also explains glycerylesters that form a vast group of ingredients that are a mixture of fatty acids, sugars, and non-volatile alcohols. These fats and oils are used in cosmetics as emollients and lubricants as well as binding and thickening agents. At the back of this book is a list of the companies that do not test on animals and those that do, but again, the PAC MAN Rule applies. I purchased the book for myself, my daughter, and daughter-in-law, specifically because when my daughter was in her twenties she seemed to think she simply must buy her shampoo from the hairdresser because only $45.00 shampoo was good enough for her hair. It was a big eye opener when she moved out of home and had to purchase it herself! I believe that the more we know about beauty products and the beauty industry the wiser our purchases will be. Consider, for instance, the cost of research and development for say, L'Oreal who develop formulas that can be used in Garnier Shampoos ($3.99) and Kerastase shampoo ($29.99) It doesn't take long to realize that it is a good idea to compare products at different ends of the price scale. Sometimes, two products from two different brands will have the same patent number. The difference is in the non-active ingredients, which give it a unique texture, scent and/or color. Also, it is wise to photo-copy, and even apply plastic covering to lists of "safe" beauty products, just as it is wise to keep a copy of "safe" and "unsafe" foods on hand when you go shopping. When you cannot even pronounce some of the words used in foods and beauty products how can you be expected to remember what is safe to apply to your hair and skin? I received a very nice letter from Teresa Menna, Manager at L'Oreal in Quebec who told me that L'Oreal has abolished gluten in the composition of L'Oreal products. However, on reading more literature I find that Garnier is a mass market cosmetic brand of L'Oreal, and L'Oreal is part of the Group P&G. P&G stands for Proctor and Gamble and P&G Beauty brands can be found on the site:_ http://pgbeautygroomingscience.com/product.php {The Company Garnier Laboratories was started in 1906 and acquired by L'Oreal in the 1970's}. I was unaware prior to researching this article that L'Oreal owned Kerastase, or that L'Oreal had purchased the MAC Cosmetic line, or that the KAO Brands Company owns Ban, Biore, Jergens and John Frieda. Here are some of the ingredients you might find in cosmetics that could indicate wheat or gluten: Avena Sativa {Latin name of oat, or "oat" term containing ingredients Hordeum distichon {Latin name of barley, or "barley" term containing ingredients} Hydrolyzed malt extract Hydrolyzed wheat protein Hydrolyzed vegetable protein Wheat germ Vitamin E Cyclodextrin Barley extract Fermented grain extract Oat (Avena sativa) Samino peptide complex Secale Cereale (Latin name of rye, or "rye" term containing ingredients) Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Phytosphingosine extract Triticum vulgare {Latin name of wheat, or "wheat" term containing ingredients} Dextrin Dextrin palmitate Maltodextrin Sodium C8-16 Isoalkylsuccinyl Wheat Protein Sulfonate Yeast extract Anything with wheat in the name Thoughts: Some cute person gave the warning to ensure your lipstick is gluten free even if you don't have any skin issues. You could swallow some lipstick and get gluten in your system! Another person adds at the bottom of their e-mail to be sure to check guidelines regularly because company policies can change yearly and the list is only to be considered as "guidelines" and make-up ingredients can change each time a company changes or the scientists within that company decide to add to or delete certain products. {Makes you feel very safe as a celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis person doesn't it?} Another e-mailer suggested that mascara labeled as a "thickening agent" should be fearfully evaluated by the celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis person because the thickening agent is often "flour" and can sometimes cause eyelashes to fall out! Who knew? Noted on one e-mail, ‘So-called luxury brands can be laden with synthetic ingredients that do not cost more than their not so luxurious counterparts. True natural products that do perform, and there are a few such brands on the market, are authentic natural products that actually deliver what they promise and they truly do cost more to make because raw ingredients are much higher in cost. In fact, the cost is significantly higher when pure high grade ingredients are used. Letter received: " We have compiled a list of gluten free beauty products available on sephora.com. These products do not contain any wheat, rye or barley derivatives, and they were made in gluten-free laboratories so there is no chance of cross-contamination. But since you cannot be too careful, discontinue use of any product that triggers an attack." Letter received from Clairol:- "Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Although it is not added directly to our product, it may be present in fragrances. Due to the difficulty of tracing the source ingredients for the variety of fragrances used in manufacturing our products, we cannot provide specific levels of gluten content for any of our fragrance blends. Be aware that even products labeled "unscented" will still contain masking scent, therefore they may potentially contain gluten." Advertisement: World's Top Ten Cosmetic Companies : "Beauty begins on the inside, check out our post on ‘The Top Five Foods for Amazing Skin'" - Posted by The Greenster Team "I finally got up the nerve to go through my own (their) personal care products and look them up on "SKIN DEEP" and was very disappointed. The Company that makes my mascara (L'Oreal) tests on animals as does the company that makes my eyeliner (Covergirl) and my under eye concealer (Made by Physician's Formula) contains parabens" THE GREENSTER TEAM creates great articles, list the top ten cosmetic companies, what portion of the world's market they share and their hazard range. Letter received from Mabelline:- "Please find below most ingredients containing gluten (wheat and other grains). We invite you to take this list and compare it to our ingredient listings every time you buy a new product. When in doubt, do not hesitate to do your own research or contact your doctor." {Caveat Emptor} REMEMBER:- The truth is that there is no such thing as gluten free. The FDA has proposed a less than 20 ppm gluten -free standard in 2006. That was its first attempt to define the term gluten free, but the agency has yet to finalize it. The USDA is awaiting the FDA's decision before moving ahead. STILL WAITING. With the number of products making unregulated gluten free claims on the rise, the marketplace can be scary for consumers with gluten sensitivity and wheat allergies. Why hasn't the FDA finalized its 2006 definition of gluten free? As part of sweeping legislation known s FALCPA the Food Allergen Labelling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004, Congress ordered the FDA to define and permit the voluntary use of the term gluten free on the labeling of foods by August 2008. As directed, the FDA issued proposed gluten-free regulations on schedule but seems to have failed to follow through with a final ruling. There has been no explanation for the delay. Since the Cosmetic Industry is a self-regulating body it seems {appears, is assumed} that we the consumers are on our own as far as researching what goes on our skin and in our hair, because some of the letters I have received leave it to the celiac or dermatitis herpetiformis sufferer to research their own products. Even a letter from Avon states:- "Although Avon sells quality products, there is always possibility of contamination during manufacturing or changes/substitutions of ingredients. As with everything related to celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and gluten Intolerance, products, ingredients and preparation may change over time. Your reactions to a specific product, ingredient may be different from the reactions of others. Like eating at a restaurant, you have to make a choice whether to consume/use a product. The list is meant to be a "guide" and does not guarantee that a product is 100% free of gluten. Dacia Lehman, Avon and GIG assume no responsibility for its use and any resulting liability or consequential damages is denied." LETTER: - Proctor and Gamble "The WHMIS rating is designed to rate raw materials and not formulated products such as ours. Nor are our consumer products required to be labeled under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard. Thus labelling of our products with WHMIS ratings or any other hazard rating should not be required by any state health and safety regulatory agencies." That letter is signed by Asela for the Pantene Team. LETTER:- May 2, 2012 - xyz@ca.loreal.com - "We have received your message and we will get back to you as soon as possible. Web Sites: Gluten-free Lifestyle: glutenfree-lifestyle.com (Gives gluten free products by type and by company) i.e.: deodorants, face & body wash, make-up, suntan lotion, toothpaste, moisturizer, lotion, shampoo & conditioner, shave cream, gels, after shave, laundry products, cleaners, soap, etc. Beauty Industry: Who Owns What? Glutino - Hidden Gluten in Health Products - Glutino & Gluten Free Pantry Blogs: www.gluten-free-cosmetic-counter.org Beauty Blogging Junkie Ebates Shopping Blog In The Makeup Lipstick Powder n'Paint Shop With a Vengeance Smarter Beauty Blog The Beauty Brains Sephora Sephora's iGoogle Beauty Portal References: Codex Standard for Foods for Special Dietary Use for Persons Intolerant to Gluten. Codex STAN 118 - 1979 ROME Government of Canada 2008 - Regulations Amending the Food and Drug Regulations (1220- Enhanced Labeling for Food Allergen and Gluten Sources and Added Sulphites) Health Canada 2007 - celiac disease and the Safety of Oats Labeling of Natural Health Products Containing Gluten - Health Canada Notice 2010
  8. Celiac.com 11/08/2017 - Gluten-free diets are popular lately, and not just with people who have celiac disease or other gluten-sensitivities. In fact, the vast majority of people who eat gluten-free food do not have celiac disease, or any other clear reason to avoid gluten. Going gluten-free has also become popular among various sports figures and athletes. Some athletes do claim to have celiac disease or other sensitivities to gluten. Others embrace a gluten-free diet based on beliefs that the diet can help to improve their performance or recovery times. To that latter group, we can now add New England Patriots quarterback, Tom Brady. In a recent interview, the Brady family's personal chef, Allen Campbell, provided details about Brady's personal dietary preferences, especially the foods he avoids. The foods tom Brady avoids include: Coffee—Again, concerns of inflammation lead Brady to avoid coffee. Dairy—The entire Brady avoids milk and dairy products. Fresh fruits—Concerns over too much sugar lead Brady to generally avoid fresh fruits, though he does partake in an occasional fruit smoothie. Gatorade—CBS Sports reports that Brady uses lots of lemons to make his own sugar-free electrolyte drink for games. Gluten—Concerns that gluten could cause inflammation and mess up his digestion lead Brady to avoid gluten, even though he does not have celiac disease. Nightshades—Brady avoids fruits and vegetables that may promote inflammation, such as nightshades. Common foods in the nightshade include potatoes, tomatoes, bell peppers, hot peppers, eggplants, pimentos, huckleberries, tomatillos, paprika, ground cayenne pepper and hot sauce. Processed oils—Campbell cooks with coconut oil instead of olive oil. Brady will eat olive oil if it is raw and uncooked. White sugar—Concerns of inflammation lead Brady to avoid white sugar. White flour—Concerns of inflammation lead Brady to avoid white flour.
  9. Celiac.com 10/16/2017 - In Europe many commercially available, nominally gluten-free foods use purified wheat starch as a base, but what's the best way to way to measure the gluten content of gluten-free foods, particularly those based on purified wheat starch? Currently, the only test for gluten quantitation certified by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is based on the R5 monoclonal antibody (MAB) that recognizes gliadin, but not glutenin. A team of researchers recently set out to determine the best way to measure the gluten content of nominally gluten-free foods, particularly those based on purified wheat starch. The research team included HJ Ellis, U Selvarajah and PJ Ciclitira. They are affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology, Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences at Kings College London, St Thomas Hospital in London. Celiac disease is treated with a strict Gluten-Free Diet (GFD). Gluten is comprised of gliadin, Low (LMWG) and High (HMWG). To estimate gluten content of gluten-free foods, the R5 works by multiplying the R5 gliadin value by two to yield a gluten value. The research team raised a panel of monoclonal antibodies to celiac disease toxic motifs. They then assessed the gluten content of three wheat starches A, B, & C that are supplied as standards for the Transia gluten quantitation kit, which is based on a MAB to omega-gliadin. They used separate ELISAs to measure gliadin, Low (LMWG) and High Molecular Weight (HMWG) glutenins. They found that the gliadin levels in all three starches were always higher, as measured by one of the antibodies, than the levels measured with the other, and that the ratio between measurements made by the 2 MABs varied from 3.1 to 7.0 fold. The team noted significant differences in glutenin to gliadin ratios for different wheat starches. Based on their results, the team suggests that the best way to measure the gluten content of nominally gluten-free foods, especially those containing purified wheat starch, is to first measure gliadin and glutenin, and to then add the values together. This is because measurement of gliadin alone, followed by multiplication by two to yield a gluten content, appears to be inadequate for measuring total gluten in processed foods. Source: Int J Hepatol Gastroenterol. 2017;3(1): 046-049.
  10. Celiac.com 08/29/2017 - The popularity of gluten-free products has soared, despite little evidence that gluten-free products are beneficial for people who do not have celiac disease. The number and range of gluten-free products continue to grow at a rapid pace, and manufacturers are adding more all the time. The proliferation of gluten-free products is inviting the scrutiny of nutritionists, some of whom are arraigning the alarm about questionable nutrition of many gluten-free foods and snacks. Recent products tests show that the vast majority of gluten-free snacks tested are far saltier than their non-gluten-free alternatives, say researchers. Just how much saltier? Researchers surveyed a total of 106 products, and found that many gluten-free snacks have up to five times more salt than non-gluten-free counterparts. And only a third of these products have proper warnings on their labels, according to a separate study by health campaigners. The team also compared salt content for each product in a particular category to the salt content (per 100g) of a randomly chosen gluten-containing equivalent product of that category. Notable differences in salt content include: Schar Gluten Free Pretzels (3.0/100g), twice the salt of Sainsbury's Salted Pretzels (1.5g/100g) Mrs Crimble's Original Cheese Crackers (3.5/100g), 2.5 times the salt of Ritz Original Crackers (1.38/100g) The Snack Organisation Sweet Chilli Rice Crackers (2.6/100g), 3 times as salty as Aldi's The Foodie Market Crunchy Chilli Rice Snacks (0.84/100g) These revelations invite questions about whether health-conscious shoppers are being misled. Nutritionists are urging shoppers to look past clever packaging, and to not automatically assume that "gluten-free" foods are healthy. Full Survey Data: Actiononsalt.org
  11. Celiac.com 08/04/2017 - Industry analysts are projecting the global market for gluten-free pet foods to enjoy growth of up to 25% a year over the next decade. Across numerous industries, a shift from products containing gluten to gluten-free products is creating major potential for manufacturers. The latest market report from Persistence Market Researchers, titled Global Gluten-free Pet Food Market: Drivers and Restraints, projects double-digit growth in gluten-free pet food markets through 2025. The report offers market information and analysis on all segments of the global gluten-free pet food market broken down by type, flavor, specification, form, and distribution channel. Types include natural and added additives, while flavor types are further divided into chicken, beef, fish, and other red meat and white meats. Specification covers the type of pet, such as food for cats, for dogs, for birds, for pocket animals, and others. The report breaks down each of these categories. In terms of distribution channel, the global gluten-free pet food market report includes information on e-commerce, supermarkets, retail shops, exclusive pet shops, and others. Form type includes information on dry and wet pet food market segments. Gluten-free pet food is a new segment in the pet food industry, and has strong potential to displace regular pet foods. North America currently leads the world in gluten-free pet food production. Currently, there are no gluten-free pet food manufacturers in Europe. Meanwhile, North America and Europe are currently the largest consumers of gluten-free pet food products followed by Asia Pacific. A Sample of this Report is Available Upon Request at: PersistenceMarketResearch.com
  12. Celiac.com 07/14/2017 - Dietary phosphorus occurs naturally in foods like dairy products, animal meats and legumes. The institute of Medicine recommended dietary allowance (RDA) is 700 mg/day while the NHANES data indicates that the typical American consumes more than twice that every day. Phosphorus is considered an essential nutrient but it is increasingly being added to processed foods via additives (anti-caking agents to preserve moisture and color) or as a stabilizer, leavening agent or acidifier. Since it is not required to be listed on the label, it is difficult to know how much is being added and consumed. High levels of phosphorus is now being considered an independent predictive factor in mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular, kidney, and osteoporosis disorders. People with celiac disease need to be considering how many processed foods they are consuming as food manufacturers continue to offer increasing numbers of gluten-free processed foods. According to Packaged Facts 2012, breads, cereals and grains comprise 53% gluten-free purchases; snack foods 44%; sweet baked goods (cookies) 30%; frozen/refrigerated meals and entrees 27%; baking mixes 26% and packaged dinner/side dishes 24%. Phosphates in the form of food additives contribute to the increasing health implications when not consuming a fresh foods diet. Avoiding carbonated beverages is the best way to reduce phosphorus levels in the diet. Aside from that, the person with celiac disease must pay attention to ingredient statements that may include these declarations: tricalcium phosphate, trimagnesium phosphate, disodium phosphate, dipotassium phosphate. According to current regulations, these ingredients are safe when used in good manufacturing processes but the more one consumes prepared foods, the more elevated the blood phosphorus levels can rise. The Institute of Food Technology in its December 2012 journal states," It has been difficult for consumers to find gluten-free alternatives that taste good and have desirable texture properties. Consequently, manufacturers are looking for different ingredient solutions that will address these problems". Phosphate additives have provided that solution without consumers being aware of the health implications. Yes, the food world offers a wider array of gluten-free foods than ever before but just because it states "gluten-free" on the label does not mean it is a healthy food for everyday consumption. Remember: Fresh is Best! Here is a guide I use to help those choosing processed foods to be wiser consumers: Baked Goods: cake mixes, donuts, refrigerated dough = pyrophosphates for leavening and dough "improver". Beverages: phosphoric acid in colas for acidulant, pyrophosphate in chocolate milk to suspend cocoa, pyrophosphate in buttermilk for protein dispersion, tricalcium phosphate in orange juice for fortification, tetrasodium phospahte in strawberry flavored milk to bind iron to pink color. Cereals: phosphate in dry cereals to aid flow through extruder and fortification. Cheese: phosphoric acid in cottage cheese to set acidification, phosphate in dips, sauces, cheese slices and baked chips for emulsifying action and surface agent. Imitation Dairy Products (non-dairy products): phosphate as buffer for smooth mixing into coffee and as anti-caking agent for dry powders. Egg Products: phosphate for stability and color/foam improvement. Ice Cream: pyrophosphate to prevent gritty texture. Meat Products: tripolyphosphate for injections into ham, corned beef, sausage, franks, bologna, roast beef for moisture and color development. Nutrition Bars & Meal Replacement Drinks: phosphates for fortification and microbiological stability. Potatoes: phosphate in baked potato chips to create bubbles on surface, and pyrophosphate in French fries, hash browns, potato flakes to inhibit iron induced blackening. Poultry: tripolyphosphate for moisture and removal of Salmonella and Campylobacter bacterial pathogens. Puddings & Cheesecakes: phosphate to develop thickened texture. Seafood: tripolyphosphate in shrimp for mechanical peeling, pyrophosphate in canned tuna and crab to stabilize color and crystals, surimi ("crab/sea sticks") triphosphate and pyrophosphate as cryoprotectant to protein. For those not having food composition tables available, here is a comparison of common snack foods to show how phosphorus levels quickly can add up. Many food companies do not provide analysis information on phosphorus because it is not required for the nutrition label. Hershey Bar with Almonds - 116 mg Cola Beverage (12 oz) - 44 mg M&M Peanuts (1.74 oz pkg) - 93 mg Yogurt (1 cup) - 300 mg Total Cereal (1 cup) General Mills - 200 mg Peanuts (1 oz) - 150 mg Apple, raw (1 med) - 10 mg
  13. Celiac.com 03/29/2017 - The March news regarding new gluten-free eateries shows that the most impactful news coming out of US colleges is about more than just basketball. The gluten-free eating scene at US colleges is enjoying a surge of popularity, as more schools are catering to the dietary needs of students with food allergies and sensitivities with dedicated facilities and inspired food offerings. With the recent reopening of Risley Dining hall, Cornell University welcomes the second certified gluten-free college eatery in the U.S., following Kent State. After working for two years to remove gluten from their dining hall menu, slowly adding items like rice noodles, gluten-free biscuits and brownies, Cornell's main eatery is now certified 100% gluten-free, peanut free, and tree-nut free. University of South Carolina recently debuted not one, but two new campus eateries for students, staff and visitors looking for gluten-free dining. Campus staple, Naturally Woodstock, now offers exclusively gluten-free food options, while Plan-It-Healthy also offers an entirely gluten-free menu. Meanwhile, Tulane University's Bruff Commons dining hall debuted a new, dedicated food prep station that serves fresh allergen-free food. Called Simple Servings by Sodexo, the allergen-free serving line features two fresh meals twice a day — usually a meat with a vegetable and a gluten-free carbohydrate, said company dietitian Kelsey Rosenbaum. The eateries at University of South Carolina and Tulane are working with Sodexo, a quality of life services company to provide gluten-free food services. Sodexo says that Tulane's cafeteria is the first allergen-free fresh food option at a Louisiana university. As more and more colleges emulate the success of programs such as these, look for gluten-free, allergen-free options to become the norm, rather than the exception. Read more: theadvocate.com 14850.com satprnews.com
  14. After years of dreaming about such a device, a pocket-sized home gluten sensor is finally here! I received mine and immediately began testing products that I eat often, just to make sure that they are really gluten-free. It is well known that even products that are labeled gluten-free sometimes test positive for gluten. After opening a fairly large box that it was beautifully packaged in, I was surprised to see that it is indeed pocket-sized! The quick start guide allowed me to run a test almost immediately, and the first product I tested was a can of re-fried black beans that I eat regularly on corn tostada shells. The test was very simple to run: I took a pea-sized sample of the beans and put them in the one-time-use capsule, inserted the capsule into the sensor, pressed start and waited about 3 minutes. The sensor made some noises while running, and then I saw a smiley face appear, which meant that my beans were safe and below 20 ppm (if the wheat icon shows up it isn't safe). Another key feature Nima offers is their smartphone app that allows you to share and upload test results with other Nima users. If you are looking for the ultimate peace of mind, I highly recommend Nima Sensor! For more info visit their site.
  15. Celiac.com 07/18/2016 - Dietary phosphorus occurs naturally in dairy foods, animal meats, and legumes but according to the Institute of Medicine, high levels of phosphorus can be a contributor to cardiovascular, kidney and osteoporosis disorders. While phosphorus is considered an essential nutrient, the increased amounts found in processed foods via additives like anti-caking agents, stabilizers and leavening agents or acidifiers does not have to be stated on the nutrition label. Individuals following a gluten-free diet need to consider the health implications of phosphates found in processed foods eaten regularly in their diet. Reducing carbonated beverages is the best way to reduce phosphorus levels in the diet. Extra attention needs to be paid to the ingredient statement on foods. Ingredient statements may include these declarations: tri-calcium phosphate, tri-magnesium phosphate, disodium phosphate, di-potassium phosphate. Just because the label states "natural" or "organic" does not mean it is a healthy food for daily consumption. Fresh is best! Here is a guide to where phosphates can be found in gluten-free processed foods: Baked goods- cake mixes, donuts, refrigerated dough (pyrophosphates are used for leavening and as a dough "improver") Beverages- phosphoric acid in colas (acidulant), pyrophosphate in chocolate milk to suspend cocoa, pyrophosphate in buttermilk for protein dispersion, tri-calcium phosphate in orange juice for fortification, tetra-sodium phosphate in strawberry flavored milk to bind iron to pink color Cereals- phosphate in dry cereals to aid flow through extruder, fortification of vitamins Cheese- phosphoric acid in cottage cheese to set acidification, phosphate in dips, sauces, cheese slices and baked chips for emulsifying action and surface agent Imitation Dairy Products (non-dairy products)- phosphate as buffer for smooth mixing into coffee and as anti-caking agent for dry powders Egg Products- phosphate for stability and color + foam improvement Ice Cream- pyrophosphate to prevent gritty texture Meat Products- tri-phosphate for injections into ham, corned beef, sausage, franks, bologna, roast beef for moisture Nutrition Bars & Meal Replacement Drinks- phosphates for fortification and microbiological stability Potatoes- phosphate in baked potato chips to create bubbles on the surface, pyrophosphate in French fries, hash browns, potato flakes to inhibit iron induced blackening Poultry- tri-phosphate for moisture and removal of salmonella and campylobacter pathogens Pudding & Cheesecakes- phosphate to develop thickened texture Seafood- tri-phosphate in shrimp for mechanical peeling, pyrophosphate in canned tuna and crab to stabilize color and crystals, surimi (crab/sea sticks) tri-phosphate and pyrophosphate as cryoprotectant to protein {surimi contains gluten and is not recommended for gluten-free diets] Hyperphosphate levels can contribute to muscle aches, calcification of coronary arteries and skeletal issues. Many food companies do not provide phosphorus analysis information because it is not required on the label but here is a representative sample of phosphorus levels in some commonly consumed on a gluten-free diet. Peanuts (1 ounce) 150 mg Yogurt (1 cup) 300 mg M&M Peanuts (1.74 oz pkg) 93 mg Rice Krispies Cereal (1 cup) 200 mg Dietary recommendations for an adult for Phosphorus is 800 to 1000 mg.
  16. Celiac.com 06/28/2016 - My latest obsession is creating new quinoa recipes, since my eight year old daughter absolutely loves it! Her favorite is warm quinoa with crumbled turkey sausage, broccoli, and lots of cumin. She also loves it with oil and balsamic vinegar. I like it cold with chopped veggies, garlic, and fresh squeezed lemon juice. Just a few weeks ago I tried amaranth for the first time. It seems to be the new craze these days. It cooked up very similarly to quinoa, and had a similar taste and texture. I would say the only noticeable difference is that amaranth does not get as fluffy when cooked. It seems like it would be great in soup! Now for a little history. Amaranth is estimated to have been domesticated between 6,000 and 8,000 years ago, and was a staple food crop of the Aztec's. The common name, amaranth, represents over sixty different plant species called amaranthus.(1) The amaranth plant is a full, broad leafed plant that has vibrant colors. Amaranth's name comes from the Greek name, amarantos, meaning "one that does not fade." This is due to the plant retaining its vibrant colors even after harvesting and drying. The amaranth plant can contain up to 60,000 seeds. Amaranth is gluten-free and it contains about thirty percent more protein than rice, sorghum, and rye.(2) Amaranth flour can be made from the seeds and is a excellent replacement for those suffering from celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Amaranth flour has a unique chemical composition with a predominance of albumins and globulins and a very small prolamins content with total absence of alpha-gliadin. This makes it very comparable to wheat protein(2). It also has a relatively high content of calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and fiber and an almost perfect amino acid profile. It's particularly high in lysine, which is abundantly lacking in wheat and corn.(3) Another benefit of amaranth is that it is a natural source of folic acid, and in some countries, amaranth is used alleviate birth defects. Amaranth is not a true grain, as it does not come from the Poaceae family, but is considered a pseudo-cereal like it's relative quinoa. Both amaranth and quinoa belong to a large family that also includes beets, chard and spinach.(3) Quinoa is a broad-leafed plant that produces a small seed. It's a member of the Goosefoot family that is native to South America.(4) Quinoa is considered a complete protein that contains all nine of the essential amino acids necessary to human physiology, and it is the only plant-based source for these nutrients.(5) Quinoa cooks up like a grain, but it is actually a seed, and is an excellent source of protein for vegans and people following a gluten-free diet. According to the American Journal of Gastroenterology, it is also safe for celiac patients.(6) Like amaranth, quinoa can be ground into a flour and used in cooking or baking. Quinoa is rich in manganese which is vital to activating enzymes crucial to metabolizing carbohydrates and cholesterol. It is also essential to bone development. Quinoa is rich in lysine, an essential amino acid, and helps with the absorption of calcium and the production of collagen and is low on the glycemic index.(5) Both amaranth and quinoa are great gluten-free options, both as a flour or grain substitute, and have a nutty taste and texture. They readily absorb the flavors they are cooked with, but are also tasty on their own. They can be made hot or cold, combined with other foods, added to soups or baked goods, and made into hot porridge or cereal. They are both versatile, easy to work with, and have a high nutritional content. If you're looking for an easy, healthy, gluten-free option, why not try amaranth or quinoa? It's a staple in our home! References: www.wholegrainscouncil.org Vopr Pitan. 2014;83(1):67-73., Amaranth flour: characteristics, comparative analysis, application possibilities. Howard, B. C. (August 12, 2013), Amaranth, Another Ancient Wonder Food, But Who Will Eat It?, Retrieved from www.nationalgeographic.com. Laux, M. (June 2012). Iowa State University. Agricultural Marketing Resource Center. Retrieved from www.agmrc.org. Norek, Danna. (June 15, 2010), Quinoa Gives the Perfect Protein Source to Vegetarians and Vegans. Retrieved from www.naturalnews.com. Victor F Zevallos PhD1, L Irene Herencia PhD2, Fuju Chang MD, PhD3, Suzanne Donnelly PhD1, H Julia Ellis PhD1 and Paul J Ciclitira MD, PhD1 (January 21, 2-14). Gastrointestinal Effects of Eating Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) in Celiac Patients. Am J Gastroenterol 2014; 109:270–278.
  17. Jovial Foods offers organic gluten-free pasta, cookies and ancient grain flours. Finding healthy gluten-free foods shouldn't be a struggle. Jovial takes simple ingredients and turns them into healthy, wholesome foods you feel great eating and serving to your family. Jovial is introducing a completely new way to bake gluten free. Jovial Gluten Free Flours are made with real flour, and no added starches. Did you know that most gluten free flours contain up to 40% added starch, even though gluten free grains have as much starch as wheat? We challenged the notion that added starch is needed in gluten free flours and discovered that these unhealthy ingredients actually create the off-flavors and strange textures that are so common in gluten free bread. Our flour is made with an abundance of protein and fiber-rich ancient grains, for bread & pastries with true texture and flavor. Now offering Gluten Free Bread Flour & Whole Grain Bread Flour, Pastry Flour & Whole Grain Pastry Flour. Here's to a new and healthier future of delicious gluten free bread. Made with ancient grains Truer flavors and textures, your breads & pastries will stay fresh longer. 3g of protein and 1g of fiber per 30g serving of flour. Made in a facility completely free of all major allergens. Jovial also carries a complete gluten-free pasta, cookies, glass-packed tomatoes and extra virgin olive oil that are all certified gluten-free! As parents whose child struggled with gluten sensitivities, Carla and Rodolfo, the founders of Jovial Foods, only create products that they feel safe giving to their daughters, which is why so much thought is put into the making of these products starting from the seed. To encourage gluten-free cooking and baking, jovial also hosts Culinary Getaways in Italy, where Carla herself teaches a number of hands-on classes to the guests. It's a great opportunity to cook authentic Italian food- without the gluten, but with all the flavor! For more info visit our site
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    My name is Steven Rice and I am the President and Founder of Authentic Foods. I started Authentic Foods in 1993 when I heard about a group of people who had Celiac Disease and could not eat wheat or gluten. With a great deal of experience in the food industry and a background in biochemistry, I realized that I could develop baked goods that could help Celiacs get the proper nutrition in their diets with gluten-free baked goods that taste as close to, if not better than the same baked good with gluten. Since starting the company in 1993, my daughter has joined me in expanding Authentic Foods. We work hard to make sure all of the Authentic Foods baking mixes and flours are not just like any gluten free baking mix or flour, but that they’re better. Our goal is to make baking mixes that will keep you from wishing you could eat gluten again. We want you to be able to enjoy your baked goods like anyone else who is not on a gluten-free diet. We love food just like you. We want to share our love for baked goods with you. For more info visit our site.
  19. Celiac.com 12/05/2014 - To remain healthy, people with serious gluten intolerance, especially people with celiac disease, must avoid foods containing gluten from wheat, barley, and rye. Accordingly, gluten detection is of high interest for the food safety of celiac patients. The FDA recently approved guidelines mandating that all products labeled as “gluten-free” contain less than 20ppm (20mg/kg) of gluten, but just how do products labeled as “gluten-free” actually measure up to this standard? Researchers H.J. Lee, Z. Anderson, and D. Ryu recently set outto assess the concentrations of gluten in foods labeled "gluten free" available in the United States. For their study, they collected seventy-eight samples of foods labeled “gluten-free,” and analyzed the samples using a gliadin competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. They then calculated gluten content based on the assumption of the same ratio between gliadin and glutenin, testing gluten levels down to 10ppm (10mg/kg). They found that forty-eight (61.5%) of the 78 samples labeled gluten-free contained less than 10ppm (10 mg/kg) gluten. Another 14 (17.9%) of the 78 samples contained less than 20ppm (20mg/kg) gluten, in accordance with the guidelines established by the Codex Alimentarius for gluten-free labeling. However, 16 samples, over 20%, contained gluten levels above 20 mg/kg, ranging from 20.3 to as high as 60.3 mg/kg. Breakfast cereal was the main culprit, with five of eight breakfast cereal samples showing gluten contents above 20ppm (20 mg/kg). The study does not name specific brands tested, nor do they indicate whether tested brands are themselves monitored by independent labs. Still, the results, while generally encouraging, show that more progress is needed to make sure that all products labeled as “gluten-free” meet the FDA guidelines. Until that time, it’s a matter of “caveat emptor,” or “buyer beware,” for consumers of gluten-free foods. Source: J Food Prot. 2014 Oct;77(10):1830-3. doi: 10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-14-149.
  20. Celiac.com 03/22/2016 - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has extended the period for public comments on a proposed rule for fermented and hydrolyzed foods, or foods that contain fermented or hydrolyzed ingredients, and bear a "gluten-free" claim. FDA is extending the comment period for the proposed rule on gluten-free labeling for fermented or hydrolyzed foods by 60 days. The agency originally introduced the Proposed Rule for Gluten-Free Labeling of Fermented or Hydrolyzed Foods on November 18, 2015. The original public comment period was set to end on February 16, 2016. The new closure date for public comments will be 60 days after a notice appears in the Federal Register. The new rule's Federal Register Docket Number is FDA-2014-N-1021, and the relevant Federal Register Docket Name is: "Food Labeling; Gluten-Free Labeling of Fermented or Hydrolyzed Foods." The proposed rule does not require or establish standards for "gluten-free" labeling. Instead, it establishes compliance methods for fermented and hydrolyzed foods, or foods that contain fermented or hydrolyzed ingredients that bear a voluntary "gluten-free" labeling claim. Source: Lexology.com
  21. Celiac.com 02/09/2016 - The top 8 food allergies in Canada are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, seafood, sesame, soy and wheat. If you have a food allergy and feel limited by it, it's a good idea to explore plant-based options. Plants offer so many benefits—they alkalize your body, reduce inflammation, beef up your vitamin, mineral, phytonutrient, antioxidant and fiber intake, and much more! And if you think that plant-based foods lack protein to get you going and keep you satisfied, guess again! Certain plant-based foods contain all of the essential amino acids we need and can completely replace animal protein. Here are four choices that are high in protein and loaded with additional nutrients. Enjoy each one in their whole form in a variety of ways—they are also available in flour form for baking! Amaranth Amaranth—a gluten-free grain that is high in fiber, manganese, magnesium and calcium—is a complete protein, containing all of the essential amino acids. It actually has more protein than quinoa, gram for gram—one cup of raw amaranth contains 28.1 grams of protein. Another benefit is that it can lower hypertension and cholesterol. Amaranth can be enjoyed as breakfast porridge, in muffins or as a side dish. Buckwheat Groats Buckwheat is the seed of a fruit in the rhubarb and sorrel family. Another complete protein that does not contain wheat or gluten despite its very misleading name, buckwheat is a great source of folate and zinc, which have both been shown to support fertility/virility in women and men. Both of these nutrients are also excellent for our immune system. Buckwheat is a good source of fiber and magnesium. It can be enjoyed for pancakes, as porridge or a side dish replacement to rice. One cup of raw buckwheat contains 22.5 grams of protein. Quinoa Quinoa functions like rice. Like amaranth and buckwheat, quinoa is also a complete protein. And like buckwheat, quinoa is technically not a true grain or member of the grass family either. Referred to as a "chenopod," quinoa is related to species such as beetroots, spinach and tumbleweeds. In addition to protein, quinoa contains many nutrients, including fiber, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, folate, iron and zinc. Quinoa can be served in its whole form as a main or side dish, and quinoa flour is great in baked goods. One cup of raw quinoa contains 24 grams of protein. Teff Good things come in small packages! Last but not least, teff is the smallest grain in the world. Teff contains many amino acids and is high in protein—it just isn't a complete protein. It contains an excellent source of calcium, magnesium, zinc and iron, which are all important for immune function. Teff can be eaten as a hot cereal and is also available as tortilla wraps. One cup of raw teff contains 25.7 grams of protein.
  22. Celiac.com 02/03/2016 - Gluten-free foods are more popular than ever, higher in quality, and increasingly seen as worth premium prices paid by consumers, according to a new research report by Mintel. The report shows that, despite widespread skepticism of gluten-free diets, more people are consuming gluten-free foods than ever before; with an increasingly positive attitude toward such foods. Mintel's latest numbers show that 25 percent of consumers surveyed report that they consume gluten-free foods regularly, a whopping 67 percent increase from 2013. At the same time, the report also suggests that nearly 50 percent of consumers surveyed feel that the explosion of gluten-free foods is basically a fad, compared with just 31 percent in 2013. Mintel's report also shows that the vast majority of those who do consume gluten-free food are happy with existing gluten-free options, and that 35 percent feel that gluten-free foods quality are of higher than in the past. The greater availability and higher quality of gluten-free foods has resulted in a greater willingness on the part of consumers to pay premium prices for gluten-free products. The survey reflects this, with 26 percent of consumers who reporting that gluten-free foods are worth their higher prices. All of these figures are higher than those reported in a similar 2013 survey by Mintel. For those seeking to keep tabs on the gluten-free food industry, both in the US and beyond, Mintel compiles a wide variety of market reports.
  23. Celiac.com 12/15/2015 - The FDA is proposing a new rule for naming and labeling fermented and hydrolyzed foods, or foods with these ingredients, claiming to be gluten-free. Called "Gluten-Free Labeling of Fermented or Hydrolyzed Foods," the rule covers gluten-free labeling of foods like yogurt, sauerkraut, pickles, cheese, green olives, vinegar, and FDA-regulated beers. This is a follow-up to the FDA's final 2013 gluten-free foods rule, which highlighted uncertainty in gluten test results when dealing with intact gluten. This new rule is meant to serve as an alternative method for the FDA to vet compliance through records from manufacturers. The agency will accept comments starting Wednesday. Under the new rule, the FDA proposes the following manufacturer requirements: The food meets the requirements of the gluten-free food labeling final rule prior to fermentation or hydrolysis; The manufacturer has adequately evaluated its process for any potential gluten cross-contact, and where a potential for gluten cross-contact has been identified, the manufacturer has implemented measures to prevent the introduction of gluten into the food during the manufacturing process. The agency says the proposed rule will address distilled foods compliance through scientific methods that confirm protein's absence (including gluten).
  24. One of the biggest complaints I have about the gluten-free food industry is that corn is usually brought in to fill the gaping whole left by the removal of wheat. Corn tastes great and all, but personally, I prefer a more nutritious wheat alternative whenever possible, so long as it still tastes good (which many do, e.g. quinoa and buckwheat). With Erewhon Buckwheat and Hemp Cereal, Attune Foods has crafted something of a gluten-free 'corn flakes' alternative (just to be clear, corn flakes are NOT gluten-free), which is made from two superfoods that we should all eat more of: buckwheat and hemp seed. Buckwheat is commonly found in top superfood lists because of its low glycemic index and high protein content. Hemp seed is a little less common in top superfood lists, perhaps because people associate it with cannabis (no, it will NOT get you high), but it is incredibly good for you. In fact, hemp is one of the only significant sources of gamma linoleic acid (a relatively rare essential fatty acid that helps boost metabolism). It is also worth mentioning that both buckwheat and hemp contain complete proteins, something that very few plants can boast (part of the beef I have with corn is that its protein is exceptionally low in lysine and tryptophan, making it a particularly incomplete protein). This mean vegetarians and vegans in particular need to start eating more hemp and/or buckwheat in order to maintain a healthy amino acid ratio. Since this is a product that clearly focuses on nutritional value, it is worth emphasizing that I enjoyed eating it. I love buckwheat, but I haven't eaten hemp seed in this quantity before, so I wasn't exactly sure what to expect. I'm not sure if it was the hemp seed, but something about this cereal had a really pleasant taste and aftertaste. I found that it went particularly well with coconut milk. The texture is a little bit 'tougher' than a product like corn flakes, but that is partially because buckwheat is so rich in insoluble fiber, and it really doesn't take anything away from the overall taste. Bottom line, this is one of the healthiest breakfast cereals you could be eating right now, gluten-free or not, and it tastes good! For more information and a $1 off coupon valid through 12/31/12, visit their website. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  25. Celiac.com 10/07/2015 - The number of Americans who say they include gluten-free foods in their diet has hit a whopping 20%, while 17% say they avoid gluten-free foods altogether. However, nearly 60% of adults say they don't think about gluten-free foods either way. In the July, as part of its annual Consumption Habits poll, Gallup asked just over a thousand Americans about foods they include or avoid in their diet. The was the first year the poll included questions about "Gluten-free foods." Demographic differences in those who seek out gluten-free foods are fairly minor. One in three non-white Americans say they actively include gluten-free foods, compared with 17% of whites. Age seems to influence the purchase of gluten-free foods, with 25% of adults under 50 buying gluten-free, compared with 17% of those aged 50 and older. Men and women bought gluten-free food at about the same rates. Interestingly, more educated and wealthier Americans tend to be less likely to include gluten free-foods in their diet than Americans with no college experience and lower-income Americans, respectively, though the differences were fairly small. The report's overall bottom line is that the gluten-free food market has grown substantially in the past five years, as has the introduction of more foods that do not contain gluten. With one in five Americans now seeking to include these products in their diet, the prevalence goes well beyond the roughly 1% of Americans with celiac disease, who have a serious medical reason to avoid gluten. Many Americans say they eat gluten-free foods as part of an attempt to lose weight, a version of a no-carb diet, while others claim it improves their well-being. Though it's unclear how healthy a gluten-free diet is for people who do not have celiac disease, the percentage of Americans who say they are attempting to include gluten-free food in their diet shows how widespread the practice is. Source: Finchannel.com
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