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Found 2,185 results

  1. Celiac.com 08/25/2011 - This is a controversial topic. Elizabeth Hasselbeck’s book, The gluten-free Diet (1), has been attacked because it suggests that a gluten free diet can help some people lose weight. One celiac support group has condemned this book as misleading (2). However, I thought it was a pretty good book, and I’m grateful for the public attention that Hasselbeck has drawn to celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. There are at least two sides to the question of whether a gluten free diet is useful for weight loss. As with much other dietary advice, each of these conflicting views is sometimes presented in very strident voices. On one side there are numerous websites and newspaper articles, with an array of “experts” weighing in on this issue, decrying the use of a gluten free diet for weight loss. I even saw a segment of a television show called “Dr. Oz” where the gluten free diet was asserted to cause only weight gain. On the same show the diet was referred to as a “fraud” with respect to weight loss. Similarly, one group of researchers claim that an important side effect of the gluten free diet is weight gain. Even some very popular advocates of the gluten free diet insist that it is inappropriate for weight loss. Yet there are some individuals who advocate this diet as an effective weight loss tool and there is some evidence to back them up. There are even a couple of research reports of weight loss on a gluten free diet. In fact there is at least one study that provides some support for each paradigm. So who are we to believe? What information supports each side of the argument? And how can we evaluate that information? Before we get to the evidence, however, I’d like to say that I have listened to Ms. Hasselbeck express some of her political and economic opinions. I am now of the firm belief that she is one of the five people on this continent who may know even less about these issues than I do. So let’s leave out the politics and confine our discussion to the issue of the gluten free diet and whether it is suitable for weight loss. The first and most compelling piece of evidence (for me) is a personal observation. I watched my mom try to lose weight, starting when I was in elementary school. She tried just about every diet out there, from radical fringe to mainstream. She drank protein powders mixed with water instead of eating meals. She tried eating these “rye” crackers that I thought tasted like cardboard.... very crunchy cardboard. She tried a low sodium diet, then a low fat diet, then a sugar free diet, an all fruit diet, a raw food diet, or maybe that was just a single diet of raw fruit. I’m not sure. She probably tried a host of other diets that I don’t remember, but I think you get the idea. She sometimes lost weight only to gain it back as soon as she stopped the diet. More often, she gave up because she got tired of being hungry all the time. She eventually gave up on dieting altogether and accepted being overweight. Then, about fifteen years ago, in her early-mid 70s, she started a gluten free diet. It wasn’t aimed at weight loss. She was trying to reduce the pain caused by her arthritis. In the first year and a half or two years, she lost 66 pounds. From that time onward, her weight continued to gradually diminish to the point where she had lost about 100 pounds over about ten years of eating gluten free. She was not trying to lose weight. She had long since given up on that objective. Yet the excess pounds just melted away. If only because of its weight loss benefits, I suspect that the gluten free diet has extended her life substantially. At about 85 years of age, she started eating gluten occasionally. Part of her gluten consumption is wilful. She sees something that she thinks she might enjoy eating, and she requests a serving. Perhaps because of mom’s lapses into gluten, the staff at the home where she now lives have also become quite cavalier about her gluten free diet. They frequently serve her dishes that contain gluten. Still, her weight has remained fairly stable. My mom is not the only example of weight loss on a gluten free diet. There are other stories on the Internet. Just Google “gluten free weight loss diet” and you will see what I mean. But I can’t vouch for those stories. I didn’t observe their weight loss. All I saw was my mom’s. Currently, there are only a few formal studies that have explored body mass changes on a gluten free diet. One conducted in Ireland reveals that there are eight times as many overweight celiacs as underweight celiacs (Dickey & Kearney). That is quite surprising in light of the common perspective that celiac disease is one of under-nutrition, suggesting that underweight should be a more likely sign of celiac disease. For a long time, that was the dominant belief, but there is clearly a flaw in this paradigm. Suspecting celiac disease only in underweight patients is not the only complication of this issue. Dickey and Kearney also report that after two years of dietary compliance, eighty two percent of their 143 overweight and obese patients with celiac disease had gained yet more weight on a gluten free diet. This would seem to suggest that the gluten free diet is not a good bet as a weight loss tool. However, these results do not seem to have been replicated by other investigators. Another follow-up study, conducted in New Rochelle, NY, reports that ’’ 66% of those who were underweight gained weight, whereas 54% of overweight and 47% of obese patients lost weight’’ on a gluten free diet (Cheng et al ). Thus, on this side of the Atlantic, of the eighty one overweight and obese celiac subjects, about half lost weight following a gluten free diet. That is quite different from the findings in Ireland. Another, much smaller study of childhood celiac disease revealed that about half of the eight overweight children they studied also experienced weight loss (Venkatasubramani et al ). This research was conducted in Milwaukee and is congruent with the findings from New Rochelle. So, on this side of the Atlantic, about half of the overweight celiac patients studied experienced weight loss on a gluten free diet. Perhaps these differences are the result of variations between the versions of the gluten free diet in North America, as compared with the diet in the United Kingdom. The primary difference I am aware of is that gluten free in the UK includes wheat starch whereas most American organizations do not accept wheat starch as gluten free. However, the gluten free diet that includes wheat starch has been shown to reduce cancer risk and many other celiac-associated risk factors, and has therefore been deemed safe. Nonetheless, that same wheat starch may be a factor in the different body mass findings between Ireland and the USA. Or maybe the difference lies in variations in research methods. Without further research, it is difficult to guess.... and that is exactly what we would be doing. Without solid evidence, our beliefs are no more than just guesses. For instance, my mom’s weight loss could have been the result of some factor other than her gluten free diet. Perhaps the beginning of her weight loss just happened to coincide with when she started the gluten-free diet. I’m convinced by my observations of her experience, but that doesn’t mean that you should be. After all, I could be kidding myself. Or her weight loss could have been caused by some other factor that I’m not even aware of or recognizing. That is why many of us contribute our hard-earned dollars to research. We need something more than stories about my mom’s experiences. We need solid, peer reviewed research such as what is found in medical journals. However, even there we need to be cautious about reported findings. One good indicator that researchers are on the right track is when we see a convergence of results from very different studies. When one study produces a given result, and another study produces a similar result despite very different study designs and objectives, the results of the first study are said to have been replicated by the second study. The advantage, in the case of celiac patients experiencing weight loss following institution of a gluten free diet clearly goes to the two studies conducted in the USA. The studies looked at two different sub-populations of celiac patients yet produced approximately the same results. But both studies still have a problem with selection bias. One of the greatest difficulties in assessing research findings is that we are really just assuming that what we see in one or two small groups will be reflected in the general population. This is why, where possible, study subjects are picked randomly from the general population. However, this cannot happen in studies of celiac patients. They are a select group. This is partly because these subjects have celiac disease and partly because they have a diagnosis of celiac disease. I’m really not splitting hairs here. Please bear with me for a moment as I try to explain this important distinction. Unlike more than 95% of Americans with celiac disease, these study subjects have a diagnosis. And don’t be fooled. Clinicians are missing almost as many cases of celiac disease in Europe as they are in the USA. Thus, all three of these studies are looking at a sub-group (diagnosed with celiac disease) of a select group (celiac disease). And the lengthy delays to diagnosis, somewhere between five and eleven years, also occur in Europe and Canada, so the difference is probably not dependent on whether there is a socialist medical system in place, as some have suggested. The select group is formed by people with celiac disease. The sub-group is people drawn from the three to five percent of those who have been diagnosed with celiac disease. We know some of the ways that those with celiac disease differ from the general population. But we don’t know any of the ways, beyond the diagnostic criteria, that people with undiagnosed celiac disease differ from the general population or from the population of people whose celiac disease has been diagnosed. Studying a small sub-group of celiac patients who have a diagnosis, then assuming that the features observed will be present in all those with celiac disease, whether they have a diagnosis or not, is a flawed approach. Statisticians call this mistake ‘selection bias’. It is a well recognized type of statistical error. For instance, if you wanted to predict the buying habits of people living in Pennsylvania, you would not just observe members of the Amish community. Doing so would not only induce a selection bias, it would lead to very misleading information about the general population of Pennsylvania. While many Amish live in Pennsylvania, their buying habits probably do not reflect the buying habits of most people in Pennsylvania. Similarly, the selection bias driven by extrapolating from observations of sub-groups of people with diagnosed celiac disease and applying those principles to undiagnosed celiacs, leading us to either assume that weight loss will or will not occur on a gluten free diet is mistaken and likely to produce misleading information. In addition to selection bias, sample size is another important factor in predicting features of a larger population based on observations of a sub-population. The smaller the group, the less likely it is to reflect the variations present in the larger population of those with celiac disease. For instance, if the US population is currently about 311 million, and the rate of celiac disease is about one in every 133 people, then there should be about 2.3 million Americans with celiac disease. Only three to five percent of Americans with celiac disease are thought to be diagnosed with celiac disease. And the studies of overweight celiacs who gained or lost weight on a gluten free diet include about 89 Americans and 143 Irish people. Is it credible to imagine that we can predict the responses of 2.3 million Americans based on observations of a sub-group of 89 of their compatriots and 143 Europeans? I think that most readers will agree that leaping to such conclusions is unreasonable. Yet that is what we do if we insist on the exclusive correctness of either side of the question of whether the gluten free diet is an effective weight loss tool. I am convinced, both by my observations of my mom, and by the results of these two small studies, that some celiacs will lose weight on a gluten free diet. However, I would not presume to insist that it is the best, or even a good tool for all overweight celiacs. Neither would I insist it was a good weight loss tool for all diagnosed overweight celiacs. Given the US studies, that is clearly not the case. Equally, denial of anecdotal reports or the two US studies claiming that the gluten free diet is not an effective weight loss tool for anyone is also unreasonable. We can only say, with confidence, that these study results may apply to those who are diagnosed with celiac disease. Yet we have a fairly even split, with American researchers showing that about half of overweight celiacs lose weight on a gluten free diet, and Irish researchers asserting that eighty two diagnosed overweight celiacs gained even more weight on a gluten free diet. Yet these statistical problems are not insurmountable. If a group of researchers conducted random screening blood tests for celiac disease in a variety of settings and circumstances, confirmed the celiac diagnosis in a large group of these individuals, and followed up with those who were overweight and undertook the gluten free diet, then their observations might reasonably be applied to the celiac population in general, whether diagnosed or undiagnosed. There would still be a relatively minor statistical error induced by cases of sero-negative celiac disease, but the statistical problems would not be anywhere near as problematic as asserting that any or all of these three studies tell us much about weight loss on a gluten free diet, except that it sometimes happens in small sub-groups of diagnosed celiac patients. Since such research has not been conducted, it behooves all of us to take a moderate stance on either side of this debate. That does not mean that we can’t or shouldn’t make use of the available information. Each of us can draw our own conclusions based on our interpretations of the available data. If you believe that, in North America, a gluten free diet can induce weight loss in about half of overweight, newly diagnosed celiac patients, it does seem reasonable to suggest that the gluten free diet may be all that is needed for some diagnosed celiacs to lose weight. However, since we are missing more than 95% of cases of celiac disease, it is difficult to say whether it will help those undiagnosed, overweight celiacs to lose weight. Nonetheless, it is possible. Thus, if it will help some, perhaps about half of them to lose weight, those individuals might well consider this information, limited though it may be, very valuable. Anecdotal reports, such as my mother’s story, might also be considered very valuable by those who can lose weight on a gluten free diet. For those who do not lose weight on this diet, I suspect that many of them have walked the path my mother did, and it won’t be the first time that a diet failed to work for them. This, of course, raises the question of why some individuals and organizations have vigorously opposed and decried anecdotal claims that a gluten free diet may help some people lose weight. Clearly, there is hard scientific evidence to support this claim. The reverse is not the case. Nobody has, or can, prove that the gluten free diet is always ineffective at helping people lose weight. Meanwhile, we can hope for more research that will answer some of the many questions that arise from this relatively new information that there may be many more overweight people with celiac disease than there are underweight people with celiac disease. Several of the questions that remain include: What causes overweight and obesity in patients with celiac disease? It is, after all, a disease that is characterized by inadequate absorption of nutrients from the food that passes through the gastrointestinal tract. I have previously suggested that specific nutrient deficiencies may induce food cravings that cause some to continue to eat despite feeling ’’full’’ because their bodies continue to demand these missing nutrients. The new field of metabonomic research may soon shed more light on this area. It has already demonstrated that subjects diagnosed with celiac disease are not as efficient at metabolizing glucose (usually derived from carbohydrates) as those without celiac disease. Does wheat starch have any impact on nutrient absorption or appetite? If even small amounts of opioid peptides survive in wheat starch and are allowed access to the bloodstream and brain, they may well have an impact on appetite. Opioids or some other component of wheat starch might also alter ghrelin (a hormone that incites appetite) and/or leptin (a hormone that suppresses appetite). We just don’t know. Are there other dietary differences between Ireland and the USA? We are aware of the difference in wheat starch, but what other factors might contribute to these divergent research results? How does wheat starch compare with the 20 parts per million currently being put forward as the labelling standard for American legislation in the offing? Does wheat starch contain 20 ppm? Will the legislation in question change conditions for celiac patients? Just how much contamination from gluten grains is present in commercial oats? Even in the absence of contamination, how many people with diagnosed celiac disease experience cross-reactions with oats? This is where the selective antibodies are sensitized to protein segments found in oats as well as in gluten grains. What other differences between Ireland and the USA might explain these variations in research findings? Could variations in sunlight, or water-borne minerals, or even genetics contribute to the difference in findings? How representative are these groups of other groups of celiac patients? Do they reflect what is going on among all the other diagnosed celiacs in their region? And how do these findings apply to the undiagnosed celiacs? Is region a genuine factor in all of this? I remember when many researchers were quite willing to believe that there was some difference that had Italy showing a rate of celiac disease of one in 250 while in the USA and Canada it was thought to afflict about one in twelve thousand. We now know that was silly, but at the time, there were a lot of apparently intelligent people who were vigorously asserting the accuracy of those variations and postulating many creative explanations for them. I remember one, now prominent celiac researcher, admonishing me not to take the Italian findings too seriously. He was very confident that they represented a large overestimation of the true incidence of celiac disease in Italy and could not reasonably be suggested as reflecting anything about Canada or the USA. Now here is a really startling thought. Some of the overweight people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity might also be able to lose weight on a gluten free diet. If so, this could produce as much as a ten-fold increase in the number of people who might lose weight on our diet. Has anyone tested obese and overweight people for anti-gliadin antibodies? Could gliadin be a factor in some peoples’ weight problems? I wonder how many people might be helped to lose weight if pre-conceived notions about the gluten free diet could be relinquished in favour of a more open minded view.... one that recognizes that there is some evidence that some people can and do lose weight on a gluten free diet? The dogmatic certitude that abounds on the question of weight loss through the gluten free diet is profound and disturbing. As is pointed out by nutritionist, Brian Dean, in his article on gluten and heart disease in this issue of The Journal of Gluten Sensitivity, one long-standing dietary sacred cow has been killed. We now know that eating saturated fats is not a causal factor in heart disease. Equally, the emerging sacred cow that a gluten-free diet is not appropriate for weight loss is, as yet, supported only by flimsy evidence, all of which is contradicted by other research. So let’s avoid making rigid pronouncements about the gluten free diet until we have a better understanding of the complex and perplexing causes of obesity and overweight in the context of untreated celiac disease. And please, let’s remember that some people can and do lose weight on a gluten-free diet alone. My mother is an excellent but by no means unique example. Others have similar stories. My own experience on the diet was weight gain, and now I have to work at keeping from gaining any more. Only those who know all there is to know should speak in absolutes. The rest of us should constrain ourselves to offering opinions and perspectives. Sources: Hasselbeck E, The Gluten-Free Diet: A Gluten-Free Survival Guide. Center Street- Hatchette Book Group, NY, 2009. http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/2009/05/gluten-free-diet-opinion-from-elaine-monarch.html Dickey W, Kearney N. Overweight in celiac disease: prevalence, clinical characteristics, and effect of a gluten-free diet. Am J Gastroenterol. 2006 Oct;101(10):2356-9. Cheng J, Brar PS, Lee AR, Green PH. Body mass index in celiac disease: beneficial effect of a gluten-free diet. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2010 Apr;44(4):267-71. Venkatasubramani N, Telega G, Werlin SL. Obesity in pediatric celiac disease. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2010 Sep;51(3):295-7.
  2. What is Gluten? Gluten is a huge molecule held together by smaller molecules linked together called amino acids. A very tiny part of the gluten molecule can initiate a response. If each amino acid that makes up gluten is represented as a single letter that very tiny part would be: SGQGSFQPSQQ. There are other sequences of amino acids that cause a reaction in gluten sensitive individuals, but the point is, as tiny as this fragment is with respect to the entire gluten protein, it is still HUGE with respect to the size of ethanol (the stuff you are drinking). What is Alcohol? The alcohol you drink is ethanol. Ethanol is smaller than the size of the smallest amino acid in the smallest fragment of gluten that has been shown to initiate an autoimmune reaction. More specifically, ethanol is about 10 atomic mass units smaller than just the G in the sequence shown above. What are Amino Acids? The G is glycine, and by the way, each of these amino acids (represented by letters) by themselves is safe, and sold at most health food stores. For example Q = glutamine (yes, “L-glutamine,” the same amino acid mentioned in a recent post and used to heal intestinal damage). If the protein is viewed as beads on a string, then one of those beads might be good for you, but certain sequences strung together can initiate an allergic reaction of many types from acute peanut allergy to less-than-obvious gluten sensitivity. What is Distillation? When a distillation is performed, pure ethanol is separated away from all of the other “stuff” that forms as a result of fermentation. This is because ethanol is volatile (meaning it becomes a gas in the distillation process). Imagine a vat of fermentation products, you heat it, and only the volatile molecules like ethanol enter a tube attached to the vat. This tube is not just any tube - it is a curved condensation tube! Here is what it does: While the heated gas form of ethanol floats into it (because that is what gases do), the molecules are cooled and condense back into a liquid, and fall into a new sparkling clean vessel containing the stuff that intoxicates you and any other volatiles. So the fancier distillation columns that are actually used industrially also purify the ethanol away from other volatiles. Gluten does not stand a chance of “crossing over” because it is not volatile. Here is a simplified analogy. Let's say you put some sand in the bottom of your tea kettle. If you take the spout off your tea kettle, and attach a condensing tube to the opening (a curved tube would be the simplest type of condensing tube but there are many elaborate types), you could distill your water away from the sand. The condensing tube would be curved so as to open into a new clean pot. Let us pretend that the sand is gluten and the water is ethanol. When you heat to the boiling point, the liquid becomes gas so it travels into the condenser, cools and becomes liquid, then falls into the clean pot. Now having read that, is there any way that the new clean pot would contain any sand? No, and distilled alcohol (ethanol) does not contain any gluten. Remember, gluten is not volatile. Another non-volatile compound is table salt. So you could perform a distillation at home, with salt water. Has anyone ever inadvertently done this? Boiled a pot of salt water, perhaps to make some Tinkyada pasta, and walked away to do something else. You came back to find your pot almost empty with white crusty stuff (salt) all inside the pot. So the gluten is left behind in a distillation process. If malt is added to the distilled product it will be disclosed on the ingredients label. What is Vinegar? Vinegar is formed by fermentation in a similar way that ethanol is formed by fermentation. The process is to take ethanol and ferment it with bacteria. Later, there is a filtration to remove the bacteria. Rarely, vinegar is fermented from wheat-based alcohol. “Distilled vinegar,” gets its name from the fact that it was fermented from distilled alcohol. Why is Vinegar Still Questioned? The answer could be, perhaps, because so many people report a reaction to it and vinegar-based products. The never-ending fear is that cross-contamination during the fermentation process is leading to barely detectable amounts of gluten in the finished product (by barely detectable, I mean in terms of commercially available tests). Since the vinegar is rarely distilled post fermentation from the ethanol, the “messy” nature of the second fermentation step could pose a problem, especially for highly sensitive individuals. If the alcohol gets all used up by the bacteria, the bacteria go on to form carbon dioxide and water from the vinegar. So alcohol is periodically added in the fermentation process. Conceivably, one “shortcut” would be to just add beer at this juncture. Adding beer or some other form of cheap malted alcohol would keep the culture alive, and increase the “quality” and yield of the vinegar. Another fear is that the bacterial “mother” as it is called, contains trace gluten through cross-contamination. Claims that these practices actually take place are unsubstantiated by evidence. Why are Distilled Spirits Still Questioned?That is a good question, I do not know.Take a Short Quiz on this Topic: You bought mustard and pickles at the grocery store. These products contain “distilled vinegar” according to the ingredients labels, and the label does NOT say “contains: wheat.” Are the mustard and pickles gluten-free? Rum, gin, whiskey, and vodka are distilled beverages. If they are not flavored with something that contains wheat (would be declared on the label), rye, or barley (usually in the form of “malt”), are they gluten-free? What is wrong with the following statements (they have all been cut and pasted from various blogs and forums on the topic of celiac disease)?a. “Most alcohols are distilled in such a way that any wheat gluten is no longer present.”b. “Even trace amounts of gluten that make it past the filter system can be harmful.”c. “It seems improbable to me, too, that gliadin could survive the distillation process.” Answers: Yes, unless you have reason to believe otherwise, in which case you should simply avoid them. Yes. 3a. All alcohols, if distilled, have been removed from any type of gluten. 3b. Distillation is nothing like a filtration. We are not separating small from large, there is no filter. Filtration would be like how your coffee pot separates water from the coffee grains. A tear in the filter would result in a big problem, right? Filtration is a separation based on size, distillation is a separation based on volatility. 3c. Do we care whether gliadin (a name given to part of wheat gluten) “survives” the process or not? No, because it has been left behind to stew in its own juices in the distillation pot. Your stuff (the ethanol) has floated away, and entered a new, clean pot. Some people have this idea that we heat the fermented mixture to smithereens and it somehow decomposes the molecules of gluten. Clearly, such a process would be ineffective or else we could simply “cook,” “roast,” “fry,” or “burn” the gluten out of our foods, and we know that we cannot do that.
  3. In my house, fall and winter cooking means lots of stews, soups and casseroles. Beef stew is one of my true favorites, and one that I can almost never order at a restaurant, because it almost always contains wheat, either as a thickener, or to dredge the meat for browning. Beef stew is a dish that goes well by itself, or which can be served over rice or gluten-free noodles for a heartier meal. Here is a recipe that will deliver a delicious gluten-free stew that will keep your hungry eaters coming back for more. Ingredients: 2 pounds stew beef 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 cups water 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 gluten-free beef bouillon cube (I often use Celifibr's Vegetarian) 5 tablespoons Just Like Lipton's Gluten-Free Soup Mix (Recipe below) 3 whole cloves garlic, peeled 2 bay leaves 1 large onion, sliced 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon pepper ½ teaspoon paprika ¼ teaspoon ground allspice 4-5 large carrots, sliced 3-4 potatoes, cubed 3 celery stalks, chopped 2 tablespoons cornstarch Directions: Heat oil in a large stew pot. Stir in meat and cook lightly until meat browns. Add water, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, bay leaves, onion, salt, sugar, pepper, paprika, soup mix, bouillon cube, and allspice. Cover and simmer on low heat for 1½ hours. Remove bay leaves and garlic cloves. Add potatoes, carrots and celery. Cover and cook another 30 to 40 minutes. To thicken gravy, get a large bowl, and mix ¼ cup water and the cornstarch until smooth. Slowly whisk in 2 cups of liquid from the stew pot. Slowly stir mixture into the stew pot. Stir and cook until it reaches desired thickness. Gluten-free Dry Onion Soup Mix Ingredients: 1½ cups dried minced onion ¼ cup beef bouillon powder (gluten-free) 2½ tablespoons onion powder ½ teaspoon crushed celery seed ½ teaspoon sugar Directions: Combine all ingredients and store in an airtight container. About 5 tablespoons equals a single 1¼-ounce package of Lipton's mix.
  4. Celiac.com 10/02/2008 - Whole grains are good sources of B-Vitamins and minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, and selenium, but one of their most important nutritional benefits is the fiber they bring to our diets. Whole grains such as wheat, brown rice, and oats include both soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber is easy to remember – it is water soluble, and as such can be assimilated into the body, where it plays an important role in blood sugar regulation and cholesterol balance. Soluble fiber also helps provide a sense of fullness or satiety. Insoluble fiber is - you guessed it - insoluble in water, and is not assimilated into the body, but passes through the digestive tract and is eliminated. That does not mean insoluble fiber has a less important nutritional role to play. Insoluble fiber is very important in keeping our digestive and elimination systems regular. Fiber aids the transit of toxic substances out of the body, and in doing so, helps to reduce the incidence of colon and rectal cancers. In eliminating gluten grains from your diet, have you wondered what you are missing nutritionally? Are you able to get adequate replacements for the nutrients in wheat, barley, rye, and oats, from the other nutritional components of your diet? The answer is a qualified yes. We know this on several levels. For tens of thousands of years, entire cultures have thrived without growing or consuming any of the gluten grains. We also know, from looking at what nutrients gluten grains provide, that there are more than adequate sources of these nutrients in alternative grains, and from vegetable sources. Fiber is something we do need to be aware of, though. Studies have shown that standard gluten-free diets are low in fiber, especially when baking with the “white” alternative products like white or sweet rice flour, tapioca starch, and potato starch. We can remedy this by eating alternative grains in whole, unprocessed states, and by including nuts, seeds, and other sources of fiber such as dried coconut and legumes in our diets. Wheat is an excellent source of Vitamin E, so those on gluten-free diets might want to supplement with a good brand of Vitamin E. Some commercial gluten-free flour blends seek to duplicate white flour, and are made primarily of white rice flour, tapioca starch, and potato starch (see the nutrition comparisons on the next page). These products are nearly devoid of nutrition and contain almost no fiber. Using these types of products result in baked goods that are the nutritional equivalent of wonder-bread. If you didn’t eat wonder-bread before going gluten-free, why should you attempt to duplicate it now? When making your flour blends, coming up with new recipes, and altering traditional wheat-flour recipes, try to include alternative grain products (and sometimes nut flours) that contain substantial amounts of fiber, protein, calcium, and iron, all nutrients found in whole grains, but in much smaller amounts in highly processed grains. Quinoa, sorghum, teff, amaranth, brown rice and millet flour are all good products to try. See the chart attached to this article (the link to it is in the "Attachments" section below) for the nutrient content of the many gluten-free alternative grains, starches, and nut flours. The highest levels of nutrients in each category are noted, and you can see what nutritional powerhouses grains like teff, quinoa, sorghum, and amaranth are compared to white rice flour, tapioca starch, and potato starch.
  5. Celiac.com 11/03/2015 - Many people today are dealing with the need to be gluten-free, whether from allergies, intolerance or celiac disease. Being gluten-free can be the difference between being healthy and having chronic, potentially debilitating, symptoms. However, sometimes being gluten-free is not enough. The challenge with a gluten-free diet is that many of the most popular gluten-free flours are actually high in oxalate! Oxalate is a toxin that occurs naturally in most plant foods, but at very different levels, some relatively safe, and some not. Oxalate can even kill at high enough doses. The scientific challenges in the oxalate field, as well as oxalate's potential relationship to celiac sprue, were discussed in the feature article by Susan Costen Owens which appeared in the Spring issue of this journal. In this follow up article, you'll find the practical advice on how you can reduce the level of oxalate in your gluten-free diet. A great example of a popular high oxalate gluten-free flour is almond flour. Almonds are one of the very highest oxalate foods, with about 300 mg of oxalate for one half cup of whole nuts. Given that you will actually have more nuts in a half cup of flour than you will in a half cup of whole nuts, you could have 400 or more milligrams of oxalate in that single half cup of flour. So, your daily morning muffin made with almond flour could be 200-250 mg of oxalate. This means that you may not feel as good on your gluten-free diet as you might expect because your digestive tract can be suffering with ongoing inflammation from a new source – oxalate. Now 250 mg of oxalate might not seem so bad – unless you consider that a low oxalate diet is defined as 40-60 mg of oxalate per day! That makes your morning muffin the equivalent of 4-5 days worth of oxalate, for someone who is eating a typical low-oxalate eating plan. If you've been eating a lot of nut flours, you might be wondering what you can substitute instead? The one nut flour that is low oxalate is coconut flour. This can be a great option, if you like the density of nut flours, and want a flour with higher nutrition. All other nut flours are high; most seed flours are high too. Nuts themselves are some of the highest oxalate foods in nature. Baked products made with nut flours will be particularly high in oxalate – and if you add chocolate, you compound the problem. Unfortunately, this is more bad news for lovers of chocolate baked goods. Chocolate is another extremely high oxalate ingredient: cocoa has more than 35 mg of oxalate per tablespoon and the substitute carob, is no better! Given that many baked goods could easily have 1-2 tablespoons of chocolate or carob per serving, you can see how your oxalate intake could really add up. Of course, this doesn't include the fact that many baked goods – like brownies – will combine both cocoa and nuts, for a double hit of oxalate. The same problem arises with many of our common gluten-free baking flours and spices. They can often add an overload of oxalate to each serving, with the potential for problems later as oxalate accumulates in the body. So, how can you avoid gluten, and not introduce more of a known toxin into your body? The trick is knowing enough about oxalate to avoid it effectively. The first thing to learn is how to get flavor in your food without the oxalate. Oils and extracts are typically much lower in oxalate than the whole herb or spice, and yet retain the flavor for baking and cooking purposes. The process by which oils are pressed and extracts are made appears to leave the oxalate behind. This rule of thumb gives us a way to get the taste we want, and avoid oxalate. For instance, to get a chocolate taste without too much cocoa, you can carefully craft a recipe that balances the use of cocoa with chocolate extract, chocolate flavoring and even a bit of coffee. Using food grade cocoa butter, which has zero oxalate, in place of butter or oil, is another way to boost that chocolate flavor. If you use the lowest oxalate flours as well, you leave some room for a bit more cocoa because you are not adding a lot of oxalate in the flour. By doing this, you can get the flavor you want while avoiding the oxalate. Another example of baking smart is an almond flavored cookie. You can actually make a cookie with almond oil as well as almond extract for extra taste – while almonds themselves are extremely high, both the oil and the extract have almost no oxalate at all! This concept of using oils and extracts is particularly important if you like the sweet taste of cinnamon. Cinnamon is a very high oxalate spice with over 38 mg of oxalate for just one teaspoon! Choose instead cinnamon oil or cinnamon extract. Cinnamon oil is available from various outlets that sell culinary oils. You can get cinnamon extract in the supplement section of your grocery or health food store – generally, it is sold in capsules. When cooking with it, you simply open the capsules and put the powdered extract into your dish. Substitute about the equivalent amount of dry extract for ground cinnamon. The second thing to learn is how to pick low oxalate flours. While many of the gluten-free flours are high in oxalate, the process of picking appropriate flours may not be as hard as it first appears. Oxalate is often present in the "bran" of a grain. As a result, most whole grain flours are actually high in oxalate. This seems strange to us because we are told to get more fiber and eat whole grain. But the truth is that not all whole grains are good for us and we can get our fiber in other ways not so tied to oxalate. Interestingly, most starches are low oxalate (even if they come from high oxalate whole foods), in the same way that oils are low oxalate. This means that starches are our friends when we want to cook! Most starches (including potato, corn, green bean and sweet potato) are low in oxalate, and can be used as part of the flour combination in a baked good to get a lighter, fluffier result. Again, the explanation is similar to the explanation regarding oils and extracts: when we remove the starch from even a high oxalate food, we appear to leave the majority of the oxalate behind. But be careful to get starches and not flours when you are dealing with high oxalate whole foods – items like potato flour or sweet potato flour are extremely high in oxalate, and should be avoided. Only the starches are safe on a low-oxalate eating plan. You can consume some medium oxalate foods, and still remain low oxalate overall. This expands the possible flours that you can use. Good options include white masa (which is a corn flour), green pea, lupin, sorghum, and sweet rice flours. While buckwheat and quinoa are also common in gluten-free foods, these grains are very high in oxalate. You should ideally avoid them. So what do you do if you are used to baking with nut flours? If you want high nutrition flours that are much lower in oxalate than nut flours, look to legume flours. Consider black-eyed pea flour (also called cowpea bean flour), garbanzo bean flour, or yellow pea flour. All of these legume flours are low in oxalate. However, because legume flours can be heavy, combine them with low oxalate starches, like corn, rice, green bean, potato or sweet potato starch to get the right texture in your baked goods. When we combine the lowest oxalate flours with others that are medium (and sometimes small amounts of higher oxalate flours), we can get the right kind of flavor and texture, yet remain low in oxalate per serving. A great example is a flour mix that contains a variety of flours. One easy combination of flours is ½ cup of sweet rice flour (medium oxalate), with ½ cup of coconut flour (medium oxalate), ½ cup of potato starch (low oxalate) and ½ cup of cornstarch (low oxalate). This particular flour combination can be used in crepes, and results in a crepe that has the same kind of stretch that you have with gluten flours, because of the properties of the various flours used in the combination. While some of us will be experimental and will like the idea of playing with flours and starches to develop our own recipes, others will not. If you are looking for a good quality gluten-free flour mix that you can use at home, consider Orgran. Another great option for baking (as well as pancakes) is gluten-free Bisquick. So far we've presumed that you are baking or making your own gluten-free items. But what if you are buying packaged gluten-free foods? When looking at baked goods, look for starches in the first five ingredients. So, you should see low oxalate flours early in the ingredients, because these will be the largest components of your baked good. Avoid items with buckwheat flour, hemp, quinoa, sesame seeds, and teff in general. All of these ingredients are so high in oxalate, that even small amounts would be a problem. While tapioca starch and white rice flour are high in oxalate, in smaller amounts, they should be fine. If you are considering reducing oxalate in your diet, the best way to do that is slowly! When you reduce oxalate too quickly, you can experience stressful symptoms as the oxalate that is stored in your body leaves too quickly. The process of oxalate moving out of your tissues and into your blood, seeking then a site of secretion, is called "dumping" by our project since it is a very common experience. This can be the culprit behind digestive symptoms, fatigue, brain fog, rashes and other symptoms. Ideally, you would slowly phase high oxalate foods out of your diet. So rather than completely abandoning your morning muffin made with almond flour, you would slowly reduce your portion by ¼ of a muffin per week, until you were no longer eating an almond flour muffin after 4 weeks. During those 4 weeks, you slowly introduce your new morning muffin, ¼ at a time, which is now made with coconut flour. You would also want to remove only one food at a time in this way – so that oxalate is very slowly phased out, and you can also use up some of the high oxalate foods that you have in your home. It's not only easier on your body to do this change slowly, but it's also easier on your pocket book! Oxalate is not just an issue with grains and flours – it can also be an issue with other foods. So while this article has focused more on the specific issues with gluten-free baking and cooking, there are other high oxalate foods that you need to be aware of if you want to reduce oxalate in your overall diet. You may have heard or seen information that points at leafy greens as high oxalate foods. While such common staples as spinach, beets and Swiss chard are extremely high in oxalate, you can enjoy other greens in a healthy diet. Consider other leafy greens like arugula, turnip greens, mustard greens or certain varieties of kale, like dino / lacinto or purple, to get leafy veggies in your diet. Most lettuces are low in oxalate and high in nutrition, including romaine and leaf lettuce. Eating low oxalate does not have to mean removing whole food groups from your diet, nor losing all your high nutrition options! Many of the common fruits are lower in oxalate and can be incorporated in your diet – including berries. Many people have mistakenly heard that all berries are high oxalate. Testing done by Dr. Michael Liebman of the University of Wyoming shows this is not true! According to test results from his lab, both blueberries and strawberries are low oxalate, and raspberries are medium oxalate. So while you might want to avoid blackberries (which are very high in oxalate), you can safely eat other healthy berries. However, other fruit can be extremely high in oxalate. Citrus can be tricky because it's important to know not just which fruit you are eating, but which parts. Many citrus juices, like grapefruit, orange, lemon and lime, are low oxalate per serving, so you can still get the taste of these items when cooking with the juice. But don't eat a lot of grapefruit – the whole fruit is high oxalate. Similarly, if you use citrus zest for extra flavor, you'll find that it's a problem: the oxalate levels are too high. Sometimes you need to know the variety of a food, or need to watch your serving size. Pears are a great example. Some varieties of pears have tested low; others have tested high. When choosing pears, go for Bartlett (also called Williams pear). Many exotic and tropical fruits are high, including kiwi, figs, papaya, gauva, and pomegranate. Some are so high that they could be dangerous to consume in a single serving! Star fruit has this dubious distinction: it is so high that people have had seizures and even died from eating star fruit when their kidneys were in trouble. It is important to recognize that many of the foods that we think of as being the healthiest may also contain a lot of oxalate. Vegans can be particularly susceptible to eating a very high oxalate diet, as they may be getting their protein primarily from high oxalate legumes, including soybeans. If you want to include legumes in your diet for the fiber and nutritional benefits, focus on the low and medium oxalate legumes. That list includes red, green, brown and yellow lentils, green peas, red kidney beans, tofu, garbanzo beans, yellow and green split peas, lima beans and black-eyed peas. Note that tofu is okay – but whole soybeans are not. This is one of the most challenging aspects of the diet. Some foods are okay in the right form, or with the proper processing. So much as extracts, oils and starches are lower in oxalate than the whole foods they come from, some processed forms of foods are lower than the whole, unprocessed food. So you can eat tofu – but don't eat edamame. A last point that can help you to reduce oxalate in your diet is to consider how a food is cooked. When a food is boiled, you may actually reduce the amount of oxalate in the food. Oxalate can be soluble, and so it will leach into the cooking water, and can then be thrown away. There is no other cooking method that can reliably reduce oxalate, other than cooking or soaking in water. However, this flies in the face of current nutritional advice, which focuses on eating as many foods as possible raw. While you don't have to boil everything you eat – there are a number of very low oxalate veggies and fruits that can be eaten and enjoyed raw – boiling can be a valuable strategy to reduce this known toxin, and leave you with a more nutritious end result. If you have more questions about oxalate and your diet, please see the website www.lowoxalate.info. There is also an associated support group, which is currently at Yahoo, called Trying_Low_Oxalates. In addition, we have a Facebook group with the same name. On Facebook, we also have two additional recipe groups, one of which is focused specifically on vegan eating. These support groups can help you to make lower oxalate choices part of your diet and can also help you gain a perspective on how oxalate may have been affecting other issues in your health. Lower Oxalate Flours, Starches and Products Potato starch Cornstarch Green Bean starch Sweet Potato starch Flax meal / seed White masa corn flour Green pea flour Lupin flour White rice flour Sweet rice flour Coconut flour Black-eyed pea (cowpea) flour Garbanzo bean (chickpea) flour Water chestnut flour Yellow pea flour Low Oxalate per serving General Mills Corn Chex (1/2 cup) General Mills Rice Chex (1/2 cup) Arrowhead Mills gluten-free Popcorn (1 cup) Eden Kuzu Pasta (1/2 cup) Thai Kitchen Rice Noodles (1/2 cup) Annie's Homegrown Macaroni and Cheese, gluten-free (1/2 cup) Tinkyada White Rice Spaghetti (1/2 cup) Lotus Foods Bhutan Red Rice (1/2 cup cooked) Higher Oxalate Gluten-free Products Medium oxalate per serving Udi's White Sandwich Bread (1 slice) Nabisco Cream of Rice (1/4 cup dry) Envirokids Gorilla Munch (1 cup) Orville Redenbacher's Popcorn (1 cup) Mission Yellow Corn Tortillas (1) Tinkyada Brown Rice Spaghetti (1/2 cup cooked) Tolerant Foods Red Lentil Rotini (1/2 cup cooked) Lundberg Brown Jasmine Rice, boiled (1/2 cup) Extremely High Oxalate foods Beans (Anasazi, Black/Turtle, Cannellini, Great Northern, Navy, Pink, Pinto, Red, Soy, White) Cactus/Nopal Carob Cocoa Powder/dark and milk chocolate Fruits (Apricot, Blackberries, Figs, Guava, Kiwi, Pomegranate, Rhubarb, Star Fruit/Carambola) Grains (Amaranth, Buckwheat, Quinoa, Teff) Nuts (Almonds, Cashew, Brazil, Hazelnut/filberts, Macadamia, Peanuts/Spanish Peanuts, Pine) Seeds (Caraway, Chia, Hemp, Poppy, Sesame) Herbs/Spices (Allspice, Cinnamon, Clove, Cumin, Curry Powder, Ginger, Onion Powder, Turmeric) Potatoes (Russet, Burbank, Idaho, Fingerling) Vegetables (Artichoke, Beets, Eggplant, Hearts of Palm, Jerusalem Artichokes, Okra, Plantain, Swiss chard, Spinach, Sweet Potato/Yam) Guide to Lower Oxalate Substitutions (chart on substitutions is used by permission from: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Low-Ox-Coach/551330634959001/) High Oxalate Ingredient(s) What it's used for Lower Oxalate Substitution Spinach Greens in a stir fry Cooks down for sauces / dips ARUGULA. Similar flavour and consistency. Substitute one for one. Beets Greens in a stir fry Sweet root veggie Used for detox For stir-fries, try other greens, like turnip or kohl rabi. You can also use red cabbage for a red veggie (if you need something red). Try boiled carrots or parsnip for dishes that need a root veggie. If you want a gentle detox, try lemon juice in water to start your day. Swiss Chard Greens in a stir fry Steamed Boiled Dino / Lacinto Kale. Lowest ox when boiled. Can also try mustard greens or dandelion greens. Almonds Snack Baking Gluten free crusts For snacks, try pumpkin seeds. For baking, either go to coconut flour (rather than almond flour) or use a lower ox nut and smaller quantities. For bread, try pumpkin seed butter or sunflower seed butter. Pecans or walnuts are the lowest ox nuts. Almond or peanut butter Spread for bread Sunflower seed butter, macadamia nut butter, pumpkin seed butter, golden pea butter (golden pea is the lowest oxalate) Sesame seeds Used for both flavour and as the whole seed While sesame seeds are high, the oil is zero oxalate! So, try using either plain or toasted sesame seed oil to flavour dishes. Most dried beans, including red beans, adzuki beans, black beans, etc Chili Savory dishes Dips Try subbing lower ox legumes like black-eyes peas, red lentils, green and yellow split peas, garbanzo beans and lima beans. Brown rice Side dish Casseroles Stir-fries Sub with either brown rice that is soaked, drained and cooked like pasta (in lots of water), or use white rice. Uncle Ben's is one of the lowest rices. Chocolate / Cocoa Desserts of all kinds! Try lesser amounts of chocolate, or a combination of cocoa and chocolate flavoured stevia. Also, can sub white chocolate in many applications, like white chocolate chips for cookies. In a recipe, sub food grade cocoa butter in place of other specified oils / butter. Tomato sauce Sauces Casseroles Pastas Instead of 100% tomato sauce, sub with 1-2 tablespoons of tomato paste, ½ cup pumpkin or butternut squash puree and water to thin as required. Add appropriate spices for the dish. Black tea Beverages Decaf green tea, many herbal teas or coffee Nutmeg Spice Mace Black pepper Spice White pepper Sweet potatoes Dishes of all kinds Butternut squash or other suitable squash with the right texture and flavour. Onion, carrot and celery to use to start soup One of the most common combinations to start soup or stir fry Garlic, shallot and red pepper is a favourite. You can also use garlic, shallot and green cabbage. Lemon or orange rind Dishes of all kinds Lemon or orange juice, with a thickener. In some cases, lemon or orange extract. Cinnamon Dishes of all kinds Cinnamon extract (purchased in a dry capsule supplement at the health food store. Break open capsules and put contents in your dish). Regular potatoes Boiled, or used in dishes Baked You can boil new, red-skinned, white-fleshed potatoes and then add to dishes. You can also sub cauliflower or radishes, 1 to 1. (Radishes are great cooked!) To sub for a baked potato or for a dish that uses potato raw, try rutabaga or turnip (which can be scalloped or turned into a baked fry.) Regular pasta Usually for main dishes or side dishes Zucchini "noodles", or cornstarch noodles, or other tested and low ox pasta like Shiritaki noodles (which are also low carb and zero calories). You can get cornstarch "angel hair" pasta or Shiritaki noodles at Asian food markets. Oatmeal Breakfast Baking Sub with ½ oatmeal and ½ flax meal for cooked cereal with the same texture but lower oxalate. Turmeric Baking Flavor Sub with curcumin extract. This can be purchased as a health supplement in capsules. Capsules can be opened and the contents added to food and beverages. Ground ginger Baking Flavor Sub with fresh ginger or ginger root extract. From the author: If you have ever been diagnosed with an autoimmune disease and have been trying to lower oxalate, will you participate in the development of this science by filling out a survey? We would also like to find out whether reducing oxalate has affected your autoimmune condition. The link to our survey is here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/CMN5KK7
  6. A Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum) Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types) Atta Flour B Barley Grass (can contain seeds) Barley Hordeum vulgare Barley Malt Beer (most contain barley or wheat) Bleached Flour Bran Bread Flour Brewer's Yeast Brown Flour Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts) Bulgur Wheat C Cereal Binding Chilton Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum) Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Cookie Crumbs Cookie Dough Cookie Dough Pieces Couscous Criped Rice D Dinkle (Spelt) Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate Durum wheat (Triticum durum) E Edible Coatings Edible Films Edible Starch Einkorn (Triticum monococcum) Emmer (Triticum dicoccon) Enriched Bleached Flour Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour Enriched Flour F Farik Farina Farina Graham Farro Filler Flour (normally this is wheat) Freekeh Frikeh Fu (dried wheat gluten) G Germ Graham Flour Granary Flour Groats (barley, wheat) H Hard Wheat Heeng Hing Hordeum Vulgare Extract Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein K Kamut (Pasta wheat) Kecap Manis (Soy Sauce) Ketjap Manis (Soy Sauce) Kluski Pasta M Maida (Indian wheat flour) Malt Malted Barley Flour Malted Milk Malt Extract Malt Syrup Malt Flavoring Malt Vinegar Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Matza Matzah Matzo Matzo Semolina Meripro 711 Mir N Nishasta O Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum) Orzo Pasta P Pasta Pearl Barley Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum) Perungayam Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum) Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum) R Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used) Roux Rusk Rye S Seitan Semolina Semolina Triticum Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Small Spelt Spirits (Specific Types) Spelt (Triticum spelta) Sprouted Wheat or Barley Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Strong Flour Suet in Packets T Tabbouleh Tabouli Teriyaki Sauce Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii) Triticale X triticosecale Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil U Udon (wheat noodles) Unbleached Flour V Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Vital Wheat Gluten W Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum Wheat Amino Acids Wheat Bran Extract Wheat, Bulgur Wheat Durum Triticum Wheat Germ Extract Wheat Germ Glycerides Wheat Germ Oil Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Wheat Grass (can contain seeds) Wheat Nuts Wheat Protein Wheat Starch Wheat Triticum aestivum Wheat Triticum Monococcum Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract Whole-Meal Flour Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim) Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides) The following items may or may not contain gluten depending on where and how they are made, and it is sometimes necessary to check with the manufacturer to find out: Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein2 Artificial Color2 Baking Powder2 Clarifying Agents2 Coloring2 Dry Roasted Nuts2 Emulsifiers2 Enzymes2 Fat Replacer2 Gravy Cubes2 Ground Spices2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch2 Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate2 Hydroxypropylated Starch2 Miso2 Natural Juices2 Non-dairy Creamer2 Pregelatinized Starch2 Protein Hydrolysates2 Seafood Analogs2 Seasonings2 Sirimi2 Soba Noodles2 Soy Sauce2 Soy Sauce Solids2 Sphingolipids2 Stabilizers2 Starch1, 2 Stock Cubes2 Suet2 Tocopherols2 Vegetable Broth2 Vegetable Gum2 Vegetable Protein2 Vegetable Starch2 Vitamins2 1) If this ingredient is made in North America it is likely to be gluten-free. 2) Can utilize a gluten-containing grain or by-product in the manufacturing process, or as an ingredient.
  7. Celiac.com 02/20/2015 - Here is Celiac.com's most up-to-date list of gluten-free beers and alcoholic beverages. The gluten status of the products listed below is accurate at the present time. However, as product formulations can change without notice, it is best to verify gluten-free product status by checking the ingredients yourself, or by contacting the manufacturer. Unless gluten is added after distillation, all distilled alcohols are gluten-free. However, US labeling laws prohibit beverages that use cereal grains at any point in the manufacturing process from advertising themselves as 'gluten-free.' Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid distilled beverages that use cereal grains in the manufacturing process, while many others drink them with no adverse effects. So, when you do see a 'gluten-free' label on a distilled beverage, it means that no gluten ingredients have been used at any point in the production process. A List of Naturally Gluten-free Beers Anheuser-Busch Redbridge Bard's Gold Bard's Tale Beer Brasserie Dupont Forêt Libre Brasseurs Sans Gluten Glutenberg Blanche Brunehaut Bio Ambrée Brunehaut Blonde Bio Brunehaut Blanche Burning Brothers Brewing Coors Peak Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales: Tweason'ale Drummond Gluten Free Epic Brewing Company: Glutenator Ghostfish Brewery Glutenberg American Pale Ale Glutenberg Blonde Glutenberg Belgian Double Glutenberg India Pale Ale Glutenberg Rousse Green's Discovery Amber Ale Green's Endeavour Green's Enterprise Dry-Hopped Lager Green's India Pale Ale Green's Quest Tripel Blonde Ale Ground Breaker Corsa Rose Gold Ale Ground Breaker IPA No. 5 Ground Breaker Dark Ale Holidaily Brewing Company Ipswich Ale Brewery: Celia Saison Joseph James Brewing Fox Tail Lakefront New Grist Ginger Style Ale Lakefront New Grist Pilsner Style Minhas Lazy Mutt Gluten Free Mongozo Premium Pilsener New Planet Belgian Style Ale New Planet Blonde Ale New Planet Pale Ale New Planet Raspberry Ale New Planet Seclusion IPA New Planet Tread Lightly Session Ale Nickel Brook Gluten Free Nouvelle France La Messagère Nouvelle-France Messagère Aux Fruits Nouvelle-France Messagère Red Ale Schnitzer Bräu Hirse Lemon Schnitzer Bräu Hirse Premium Sprecher Brewing Company's Shakparo Ale Steadfast Beer gluten-free Blonde and Pale Ales Steadfast Beer Company's Oatmeal Cream Stout To Øl Reparationsbajer Gluten Free Whistler Forager A List of Gluten-Removed Beers Alley Kat Scona Gold Kölsch Brunehaut Bio Tripel Estrella Damm Daura Estrella Damm Daura Marzen Lammsbräu Glutenfrei Lager Beer Mikkeller American Dream Gluten Free Mikkeller Green Gold Gluten Free Mikkeller I Wish Gluten Free IPA Mikkeller Peter, Pale And Mary Gluten Free New Belgium Glutiny brand Golden and Pale Ales Short's Brewing Space Rock Stone Delicious IPA Sufferfest Brewing Company Pale Ale and Lager Widmer Omission Lager Widmer Omission IPA Widmer Omission Pale Ale Wold Top Against The Grain Wold Top Marmalade Porter Wold Top Scarborough Fair IPA Gluten-Free Hard Cider Most ciders are fermented from apples or other fruits. Most are safe, however, some add barley for enzymes and flavor. Read labels! Gluten-free hard cider brands include: Ace Pear Cider Angry Orchard Blue Mountain Cider Company Blackthorn Cider Bulmer's Hard Cider Crispin Cider (including Fox Barrel products) Gaymer Cider Company Harpoon Craft Cider J.K. Scrumpy's Organic Hard Cider Lazy Jack's Cider Magner's Cider Newton's Folly Hard Cider Original Sin Hard Cider Spire Mountain Draft Cider Strongbow Cider Stella Artois Apple and Pear Hard Cidre Woodchuck Woodpecker Cider Gluten-Free Wine All wines, including brandy, champagne, cognac, port wine, sherry, and vermouth are safe for celiacs. Gluten-Free Wine Coolers The majority of wine coolers are made from barley products. Gluten-free versions include: Bartle & Jaymes - all EXCEPT malt beverages Boones - all EXCEPT their malt beverages Other Gluten-Free Alcoholic Brews, Wines and Spirits Include Brandy Campari Champagne Cognac—made from grapes Cointreau Grappa Midori Prosecco Khalua Coffee Liquer Kirschwasser (cherry liqueur) Old Deadly Cider Sambuca Vermouth Gluten-Free Distilled Alcohols Unless gluten is added after distillation, all distilled alcohols are free of gluten. However, US labeling laws prohibit beverages that use cereal grains at any point in the manufacturing process from advertising themselves as 'gluten-free.' So, when you do see a 'gluten-free' label on a distilled beverage, it means that no gluten ingredients have been used at any point in the production process. Gluten-Free Gin Most gins are made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final distilled product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid these beverages, while many others drink them with no adverse effects. Gluten-free gin brands include: Cold River Gin—distilled from potatoes Brands of standard gin include: Aviation American Gin Beefeater Bombay Bombay Sapphire Boodles British Gin Booth's Gin Gordon's Leopolds Gin New Amsterdam Gin Seagram's Tanqueray Gluten-Free Rum Distilled from sugar cane, most rums are gluten-free and safe for celiacs. Beware of pre-made drink mixes, such as those intended for piña coladas — many of these contain gluten ingredients as flavoring. Gluten-free rum brands include: Appleton Estate Jamaica Rum Bacardi—only Gold, Superior, 151, and flavored Bayou Rum Bundaberg Rum Captain Morgan Rum Cruzan Rum Malibu Rum Mount Gay Rum Meyer's Rum Gluten-Free Sake Fermented with rice and Koji enzymes. The Koji enzymes are grown on Miso, which is usually made with barley. The two-product separation from barley, and the manufacturing process should make it safe for celiacs. Gluten-Free Tequila Made from the agave cactus, all tequilas are gluten-free and safe for celiacs. Gluten-free tequila brands include: 1519 Tequila 1800 Tequila Cabo Wabo Cazadores Chimayo Don Julio El Jimador Herradura Hornitos Jose Cuervo Patron Sauza Gluten-Free Vodka Vodkas distilled from potatoes, gluten-free grains or other gluten-free ingredients contain no gluten ingredients and can be labeled as gluten-free. Gluten-free vodka brands include: Corn Vodka—Deep Eddy, Nikolai, Rain, Tito's, UV Grape Vodka—Bombora, Cooranbong Potato Vodka—Boyd & Blair, Cirrus, Chase, Chopin, Cold River Vodka, Cracovia, Grand Teton, Karlsson's, Luksusowa, Monopolowa, Schramm Organic, Zodiac Rice Vodka—Kissui Sugar Cane—Downunder, DOT AU Vodkas distilled from cereal grains include: Many vodkas made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid these beverages, while many others drink them with no adverse effects. Barley Vodka—Finlandia Grain Vodka—Absolwent, Blavod, Bowman's, Fleischmann's, Orloff, Polonaise, SKYY, Smirnoff, Stolichnaya, Wheat Vodka—Absolut, Bong Spirit, Danzka, Grey Goose, Hangar One, Ketel One, P.i.n.k Vodka Rye Vodka—Belvedere, BiaÅ‚a Dama, Platinka, Sobieski, Starka, Wisent, Wyborowa, Xellent Swiss, Å»ubrówka Gluten-Free Whiskey Nearly all whiskeys are made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid whiskey, while many others drink it with no adverse effects. Gluten-free whiskey brands include: Queen Jennie Whiskey, by Old Sugar Distillery is made entirely from sorghum Whiskeys distilled from cereal grains include: Bourbon—Benjamin Prichard's, Booker's, Buffalo Trace, Jim Beam, Early Times, Ezra Brooks, Jefferson's Bourbon, Knob Creek, Makers Mark, Old Crow, Old Forester, Old Grand-Dad Canadian Whiskey—Alberta Premium, Black Velvet, Canadian Club, Crown Royal, Tenesse Whiskey—Jack Daniels, George Dickel. Irish Whiskey—Bushmills, Jameson, Kilbeggan, Redbreast, Tullamore Dew Japanese Blended Whiskey—Hibiki, Kakubin, Nikka, Japanese Single Malt Whiskey—Hakushu, Yamazaki, Yoichi Rye Whiskey—Alberta Premium, Bulleitt Scotch Whiskey Blends—Ballentine's, Bell's, Black Grouse, Chivas Regal, Cutty Sark, Dewar's, Famous Grouse, Johnnie Walker, Teacher's, Whitehorse Scotch Whiskey Single Malts—Bowmore, Glenfiddich, Glen Grant, The Glenlivet, Glenmorangie, Highland Park, Knockando, Lagavulin, Laphroaig, Macallan, Monkey Shoulder, Singleton, Talisker Taiwanese Whiskey—Kavalan Classic Gluten-Free Drink Mixes Club Extra Dry Martini (corn & grape) Club Vodka Martini (corn & grape) Coco Casa and Coco Lopez Brands: Cream of Coconut Jose Cuervo Brand: Margarita Mix and All Jose Cuervo Blenders Master of Mixes Brand: Tom Collins, Whiskey Sour, Strawberry Daiquiri, Sweet & Sour Mixer, and Margarita Mix Mr. & Mrs. T—Except Bloody Mary Mix TGI Friday's Brand: On The Rocks, Long Island Ice Tea, Margarita, Mudslide, Pina Colada, and Strawberry Daiquiri. TGI Friday's Club Cocktails including: Gin Martini, Manhattan, Screwdriver, Vodka Martini, and Whiskey Sour mix. Other Gluten-free Beverages Mixes & Cooking Alcohol Club Tom Collins—made with corn Diamond Jims Bloody Mary Mystery Holland House - all EXCEPT Teriyaki Marinade and Smooth & Spicy Bloody Mary Mixes Mead—made from honey Mistico: Jose Cuervo Mistico—agave and cane Ouzo - made from grapes and anise Spice Islands - Cooking Wines - Burgundy, Sherry and White Also Godiva products contain gluten as do Smirnoff FMB's, Twisted V, and Smirnoff Ice.
  8. Celiac.com 08/12/2018 - Receiving a celiac disease diagnosis or being told you need to be on a gluten-free diet can be an overwhelming experience, and it is certainly not for the faint of heart. Most people get frustrated with the transition, and many don't know where to begin. While eating gluten-free can improve your health, I must emphasize that it is not recommended to attempt a gluten-free diet without a doctors supervision, as there are many potential health risks involved with making drastic changes to your diet, which can be avoided with assistance of a qualified doctor and/or nutritionist. If you suspect gluten-intolerance to be the culprit for your health problems, get examined by a doctor and get tested for celiac disease before initiating a gluten-free diet. It is very important to continually consume gluten while you are undergoing testing for celiac disease because many of the tests require you to be consuming gluten to get accurate results. Prescription: A Gluten-Free Diet Now that you have your diagnosis and need to eliminate gluten, you can make the transition to a gluten-free diet with confidence. The following information is a guideline of what you will need to know to get started. I must emphasize that this is only a guideline, and you will need to do your own research and consult with your doctor for more detailed information on a gluten-free diet. It is also a great idea to get involved in local support groups. Support groups will have members that understand what you are going through and they can help direct you to beneficial resources: Celiac Disease Support Groups, Organizations & Contacts Create New Habits To begin, if you are accustomed to doing things your own way, you will have to throw out many of your old habits. To avoid gluten poisoning you must keep all gluten away from your mouth. You will need to evaluate everything you ingest very carefully. Gluten can come in a variety of unexpected ways, including a kiss from a loved one, and any gluten that comes into contact with your mouth is a potential source of contamination. Cross-contamination can occur when a meal is prepared on cooking equipment shared with gluten-containing foods. It can also come from touching anything that has come into contact with gluten. It is therefore important to gluten-proof your house and to keep everything you eat separate from gluten and gluten residue. If you eat at restaurants, it is important to only eat at places that you know are safe. To help you avoid accidental gluten ingestion, please follow your instincts and use the following guidelines and avoid potential health hazards. Please remember that these are only guidelines--if you still have questions, please consult with a medical professional. What does "Gluten-Free" Actually Mean? Since gluten is found in wheat, rye and barley, it is obvious that you will need to avoid these grains. Less obvious however, are the myriad of products that contain gluten as a hidden ingredient. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently regulated the use of "gluten-free" on a food label, and there was already an FDA regulation that requires manufacturers to declare wheat if it is used as an ingredient in a product. Products that don't use "gluten-free" on their label unfortunately don't have to disclose ingredients that are made from barley or rye, which requires you to learn to read and understand ingredient labels. Many additives, natural or artificial, can contain gluten. Sometimes companies label products as "gluten-free" or the ingredients are naturally gluten-free, but the product may have be contaminated if it was manufactured on shared equipment. You will have to decide if you want to include such products in your diet. It is also important to remember, for reasons just mentioned, that “wheat-free” does not mean “gluten-free.” Batch Testing: According to current FDA proposals, products testing at less than 20 parts per million (PPM) for gluten will likely be allowed to be labeled "gluten-free," and, according to them, are considered safe for people with gluten-intolerance or celiac disease. There are several organizations that offer gluten-free certification for companies who follow their guidelines and batch test their products. Check out the link below for more information on gluten-free certification and labeling. Gluten-Free Food Certification Program by the Gluten Intolerance Group Gluten-Free Shopping Shopping will likely take much longer for you than it used to. Don't rush. It is important to read all ingredients carefully. If you are in a hurry, you run the risk of overlooking a key ingredient that might contain gluten. I find it helpful to plan my meals in advance. There is nothing worse than coming home from work hungry and realizing that you have nothing to eat (and it isn't like you can go to the first drive-thru you find). So planning my meals on the weekend and doing my shopping in advance, cuts my stress level down considerably and keeps me from going hungry. Check your products against your gluten-free guidebooks, and contact the manufacturer if you are unsure about something. The following links will help you take the guess work out of shopping for gluten-free products: Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) As mentioned, there are also many products that are naturally gluten-free that are not labeled "gluten-free," and there are some very helpful books that can help you find these foods when you are shopping. A Gluten-Free Kitchen A gluten-free kitchen is very important. If you can have an entirely gluten-free kitchen, that is ideal, but it may not be an option for many households. Therefore it is especially important to keep your house clean and free of gluten contaminates. It is also important to dedicate special kitchen supplies for gluten-free cooking. I bought a new cutting board that is dedicated only to gluten-free cooking. You may also want to have separate kitchen utensils such as sponges, toasters (a dedicated gluten-free toaster is highly recommended), sifters, bread machines, etc. This is especially important if you use utensils that are made of wood, plastic, or other porous materials that could harbor gluten and possibly contaminate your gluten-free food. If possible use an electric dishwasher to clean your dishes. If everyone in your household is going gluten-free it is important to clean out and empty all of the gluten products from your kitchen. If you share a kitchen with gluten eating family members, it is a good idea to store their food products separately from your gluten-free products, and to clean off all surfaces before you prepare your gluten-free food. Dedicating gluten-free cupboards and refrigerator shelves is a great way to start. Here are some important links that will help you cook gluten-free meals with ease: Gluten-Free Cooking Gluten-Free Recipes Kitchen Checklist - Possible Sources of Contamination: Bread-machine Toaster Sponges & cleaning pads All kitchen supplies & utensils Colanders Cutting boards Door handles Soaps For more information on maintaining a safe kitchen environment, click the link below: What You Need If You Can't Have A Gluten-Free Kitchen Dining Out Gluten-Free Dining out presents a challenge for most people on a gluten-free diet. Depending on your level of sensitivities, you may have difficulty eating out at all. Even if the restaurant offers a gluten-free menu, it is always important to find out what safety precautions the restaurant uses to avoid cross-contamination, and to make sure all the ingredients in your food are gluten-free. This may require you to modify your order, and also may mean talking with the chef about their kitchen practices. You may also benefit from utilizing a guide to safe restaurants. Here is an additional article that may be helpful to your situation: Take Charge of Your Meal When Eating Out A Gluten-Free Bathroom Believe it or not, your bathroom is another place where you might be getting sick from gluten contamination, and not even know it. There are many products in your bathroom to watch out for as many body products contain wheat and/or hidden gluten ingredients. Most celiacs can use body products without a negative reaction, though some people experience rashes and other unsavory reactions from gluten body products. However, if you are using face or body products that contain gluten, it is very important not to ingest them. I find it difficult to avoid getting shampoo or makeup near my mouth, so I don't take any chances. I use gluten-free soap, shampoo, conditioner, face-cleaner, toner, make-up, toothpaste; basically nothing goes onto my body that contains gluten. Using gluten-free body products allows me the freedom to worry less about accidental contamination, and gives me more time to enjoy my life. Many gluten-free body products are not labeled gluten-free, so it is important to read ingredient labels carefully and check with the manufacturer if necessary. Bathroom Checklist: Toothpaste Shampoo/conditioner Make-up Lip-stick, lip-liner, lip-gloss, cosmetics, etc. Lotion Sunscreen Gluten-Free Medications (Prescriptions and Supplements) Most people with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance also suffer from malabsorption and sometimes malnutrition. Your doctor may prescribe pain, anti-inflammatory, digestive or other medications or supplements to help assist with your recovery. It is very important to note that some medications and supplements can contain gluten. Do not assume that just because your doctor knows you have celiac disease or gluten intolerance that the medications or supplements they may prescribe for you are gluten-free. Be your own advocate and read the ingredients and contact your pharmacist and/or the manufacturer and find out if your prescriptions, vitamins and supplements are gluten-free. Gluten-Free Medications List Additional Concerns Children with Celiac Disease Raising children with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance is no easy feat. Your kids will have to deal with immense peer pressure and there will be a great deal of temptation for them to eat gluten-containing foods. Talk to the staff at their school and help them to understand your child's special needs. The more support you have, the better off your child will be. There are many support groups that advocate for children with celiac disease, and it is important to get involved and learn everything you can to help support your child. Raising our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K) Support Group Pets Your pets present another source of potential contamination, especially if you have pets like mine that love to smother you with unexpected kisses, sometimes on the mouth. What your pet eats can affect you too. Handling your pet's food, cleaning your pet's dishes and having young celiac children in a house where they may eat dog or cat food are all legitimate concerns. I decided to switch my pets to gluten-free pet food. Most pet food is not labeled gluten-free, so it is important to read ingredients carefully. I found grain-free, all natural pet food to be a great alternative to gluten-containing pet foods, that way I don't have to worry about accidental contamination or getting kisses from my pets--and it's healthier for them too! It is also important to check all other pet products that you come into contact with for hidden gluten ingredients, like shampoos and soaps. It is of course always important to talk to your veterinarian before making any dietary changes for your pet. Other Food Sensitivities Most people who begin a gluten-free diet experience almost immediate relief from their symptoms. However, many people experience gluten-like reactions to other foods, and often suspect that their food was contaminated by gluten. As it turns out, many people who experience such reactions may in fact have additional food sensitivities. Some of the most common food sensitivities include, dairy/casein, soy, corn, sugar, nuts, shell-fish and processed or fatty foods. While many people report that they are able to add these foods back into their diet after they have established a gluten-free diet for many months, and after their intestines have had time to heal, it is up to you and your doctor or nutritionist to determine which foods may be causing you trouble. The 'elimination diet' is often recommended for determining what additional food sensitivities you may have. Ask your doctor if the elimination diet is right for you. Food Diary It is important to keep a food diary, especially when first initiating a gluten-free diet. Making notes of the foods you eat and the reactions you have to the foods you eat, and how you feel that day, can give you more insight as to which foods are hurting you and which foods your body can easily digest. Final Thoughts Be Picky Having a gluten intolerance means taking pride in your body, but not being too proud to say, "no, thank you." Don't worry about appearing too picky to others, you simply can't take care of yourself and worry what others think of you at the same time. You have the right to eat what you want; if something doesn't look, smell or taste right to you, or if you just don't feel right about eating something, don't eat it! It is better to come across as too finicky, than to spend the night in the bathroom or worse yet, the emergency room. Everyone has a different level of gluten sensitivity and you will have to find out through trial and error what works best for you. Be Prepared As a former Boy-Scout, my high-school teacher used to always say, "Be prepared". I cannot emphasize enough the importance of this statement. It is important to be prepared and think ahead. Keep gluten-free snacks on hand at all times, because you never know when you are going to get hungry somewhere that doesn't offer gluten-free food. Keep shelf-stable snacks in your car, office, purse, and anywhere you spend time. It is better to have gluten-free snacks on hand, then to get hungry and make a bad decision to eat something you might later regret. Gluten-Free Quick-Check: Read all labels carefully Call the manufacturer whenever necessary Avoid cross-contamination at all times Keep your hands clean Check personal-care products for hidden gluten Check all vitamins, supplements and RX prescriptions for hidden gluten Make sure your pets are gluten-free Maintain a food diary Get involved-join a support group Rule of thumb-if you think it's possibly contaminated, don't take any chances. It's better to go hungry than to suffer later. Above all, trust your body Additional Resources: Gluten-Free Forum Celiac Disease Support Groups Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  9. Scott Adams

    White Bread (Gluten-Free)

    This recipe has been modified from Bette Hagemans Butter Basted White Bread (More From the Gluten-Free Gourmet, page 38). Here it is: Combine 2 cups white rice flour, ½ cup potato starch flour, ½ cup tapioca flour, 2 ½ teaspoon xanthan gum, 2/3 cup dairy milk powder, 1 ½ teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon sugar and 2 ¼ teaspoon saf-instant yeast granules thoroughly. In a separate bowl, combine 4 tablespoons melted butter, 1 cup warm water, 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar. Slowly add to dry mixture, then add 3 room temperature eggs, one at a time (the mix should feel a little warm). Beat on high for 2 minutes. Cover with plastic wrap and a towel, and rise until doubled (time varies). After the first rise, beat the dough again for 3 minutes on high. Fill a large loaf pan 2/3 full (can use extra dough in muffin tins) Let rise until slightly over top of pan; bake at 350 for 30-45 minutes, covering with alum foil after the first 10 minutes. Delicious, and freezes pretty well. This recipe comes to us from Marne L. Platt in New Jersey.
  10. Like barbecue, greens can be a touchy subject. Sweet? Tart? Savory? Ham? Bacon? Some people prefer mustard greens, others prefer collards. I'm one of those who prefer a mix of the two. Maybe that's equally sacrilegious, I don't know. But, in the interest of harmony, here's an easy recipe for an easy, delicious mix of mustard and collard greens. Ingredients: l pound of bacon 6 cups mustard greens 6 cups collard greens 1 cup chicken broth 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar 1 teaspoon of sugar ½ teaspoon pepper few dashes of red pepper hot sauce, such as Crystal or Trappey's salt and pepper to taste Directions: Rinse greens several times to remove all grit. Remove and discard thickest parts of stems. Chop greens coarsely. Brown bacon in a cast iron pot. Once bacon is brown, place on paper towels to drain. In the same pot, heat 2-3 teaspoons of bacon grease and olive oil to medium-high. Add the greens, chicken broth, sugar, pepper, hot sauce and vinegar. Put a tight fitting lid on the pot. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, and simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve immediately. Season individually with salt and pepper, hot sauce, or more sugar or vinegar, to taste.
  11. Celiac.com 01/12/2017 - Good gluten-free news for burger fans, especially those with celiac disease. Popular burger franchise Shake Shack has announced that they will be offering gluten-free buns in all locations, except stadiums and ballparks, for just $1 extra. The company made the announcement via Twitter. We got gluten-free buns, hun! You can now snag your burger with a gluten-free bun at all Shacks 'cept stadiums & ballparks. pic.twitter.com/5ZtrCAlmJi — SHAKE SHACK (@shakeshack) December 19, 2016 The buns are made by BellyRite Foods Inc., and taste similar to their Martin's potato rolls currently served on all Shake Shack burgers. So, if you're gluten-free and craving Shake Shack, you can jump in line with everyone else. This is just another example of popular restaurants trying to make their food available for gluten-free eaters. Been to Shake Shack? Tried a gluten-free bun? Let us know how it went.
  12. ChildLife Essentials® provides a complete line of nutritional supplements designed specifically for infants and children. ChildLife Essentials® are made from the highest quality natural ingredients. Their products are all Gluten Free, Alcohol, Casein, and Dye, Free, No artificial, Sweeteners, Colorings or ingredients. No detectable levels of Mercury, Aluminum, Heavy Metals, Dioxins, PCB’s, Pesticides, Environmental Toxins and they are all GMO FREE. All have been 3rd party tested. Dr. Murray Clarke, the leading Holistic Pediatrician in the U.S., is the founder, and formulator of the CHILDLIFE ESSENTIALS complete line of Children’s nutritional supplements. Dr. Clarke has specialized in pediatrics in his homeopathic and nutritional clinic for the past twenty years. The ChildLife Essentials® line is literally the product of this experience. The sixteen products we offer are those, which have proven to be the most important, and the most effective in supporting healthy development and promoting natural immune strength in infants and children. Dr. Clarke is known for his work, and attention to children with challenging situations, which include: Autism, Allergies, Gluten Sensitivities, Environmental Allergies, ADHD, ADD, to name a few. The great taste of the products makes taking nutritional supplements an easy part of a child’s daily routine. These products are sold in natural stores, health food stores, pharmacies and online throughout America. Internationally, they are distributed throughout Asia, Europe Australia, and New Zealand in the South Pacific. We are very proud of this product line and are deeply committed to promoting improved nutrition for children as a foundation for good health and well-being. Some of the products recommended are: Multi Vitamin & Minerals Vitamin C Cod Liver Oil- Probiotics with Colostrum Aller-Care Liquid Calcium with Magnesium For Immune Support: First Defense, Echinacea, Formula 3 Cough Syrup Probiotics with Colostrum For more info visit: Visit Our Site.
  13. Celiac.com 10/17/2012 - This article originally appeared in the Winter 2012 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. It’s estimated that of the 3 million Americans with celiac disease, an autoimmune disease triggered by exposure to gluten-a protein component of wheat, barley, and rye-only 3% have been diagnosed. The good news for celiac patients who have been diagnosed is that the treatment for their condition is simple and doesn’t require the ingestion of drugs--a gluten-free diet. Unfortunately, celiac patients must deal with several challenges in maintaining a diet free of gluten, specifically the expenses involved. Compared with “regular” gluten-containing foods, gluten-free alternatives are more expensive. In fact, a study has indicated that gluten-free foods cost more than double their gluten-containing counterparts. In a study by the Dalhousie Medical School at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, prices were compared between food products labeled as “gluten-free” with comparable gluten-containing food products at two large-sized chain grocery stores. Unit prices of the food items in dollars per 100 grams were calculated for this purpose. According to the study, all the 56 gluten-free products were more expensive than their corresponding products. The average unit price for gluten-free products was found to be $1.71, compared with $0.61 for the gluten-containing products. This means that gluten-free products were 242% more expensive than gluten-containing items. Fortunately, celiac patients can receive tax deductions for certain expenses related with their gluten-free diet. To receive these benefits, celiacs must provide a doctor’s note confirming their celiac diagnosis and save their receipts for all their gluten-free foods and other products they purchase. The difference between the prices of gluten-free items compared to those of regular items is tax-deductible. Products that don’t have a gluten-containing counterpart, such as xanthan gum and sorghum flour, are totally tax-deductible. Shipping costs for online orders of gluten-free items are also tax-deductible. In order to file your claim, you should fill out a 1049 schedule A for medical deductions. For more information, contact a qualified accountant. There are other ways to avoid spending loads of money on gluten-free foods. For instance, stay away from gluten-free processed and “junk” foods such as snack foods and desserts made with refined carbohydrates and sugar and lacking nutrients. Not only will you save money, but you’ll safeguard your health. I recommend making meals comprised of nutritious, naturally gluten-free whole foods at home such as fruits, vegetables, dairy products, poultry, fish, meats, nuts and seeds, and eggs. These foods are packed with vital nutrients and don’t carry any additional costs. Make sure that no gluten has been added to such foods and they are safe from cross-contamination. Another way to save money is to make your own gluten-free mixes yourself, such as the ones I recommend on my gluten-free website. Instead of buying expensive commercial gluten-free baking mixes, you can create your own gluten-free flour mixes for a variety of foods such as pancakes, pizza, rolls, and muffins and store them conveniently in your refrigerator or freezer. I also recommend purchasing gluten-free ingredients in bulk online, as many websites offer great deals. These are just a few of the ways to save money on the gluten-free diet. It is unfortunate that gluten-free foods are more expensive than “regular” food items, especially to such an extraordinary degree, however savvy gluten-free dieters can through tax deductions and smart shopping choices cut down on their expenses. Perhaps in the future we will see a decrease in gluten-free food pricing, but one thing is for sure-we should consider ourselves lucky that we have found an answer to our health problems. Even if the gluten-free diet is expensive, at least it’s the road to greater health and quality of life.
  14. Celiac.com 10/21/2014 - Insects offer one of the most concentrated and efficient forms of protein on the planet, and they are a common food in many parts of the world. So, could high-protein flour made out of crickets change the future of gluten-free foods? A San Francisco Bay Area company is looking to make that possibility a reality. The company, Bitty Foods, is making flour from slow-roasted crickets that are then milled and combined with tapioca and cassava to make a high-protein flour that is gluten-free. According to the Bitty Foods website, a single cup of cricket flour contains a whopping 28 grams of protein. So can Bitty Foods persuade gluten-free consumers to try their high protein gluten-free flour? Only time will tell. In the mean time, stay tuned for more cricket flour developments. What do you think? Would you give it a try? If it worked well for baking, would you use it?
  15. I miss biscuits more thananything. Before going gluten-free, I loved to eat biscuits andgravy, strawberry shortcake (on homemade biscuits) and warm biscuitswith honey! There is nothing that compares with the satisfaction ofeating a warm homemade biscuit. Which is why the following recipe isso exciting. This is a recipe that can be manipulated to cater tospecific dietary restrictions-even mine! There are dairy-free,soy-free and egg-free options included. It might take a couple triesfinding the right combination for you, so spend a day making somedelicious gluten-free home-style biscuits. Home-style Drop Biscuits(Gluten-Free) Servings: 16 largebiscuits Ingredients: 1 ½ cup brown rice flour 2 cup corn starch orpotato starch or tapioca starch ½ cup soy flour orsorghum flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 ¾ teaspoons salt 1½ teaspoons teaspoons baking soda 2 teaspoons xanthan gum 1 stick of butter or gluten-free butter substitute(chilled in the freezer) 1 ¼ cup soy milk 1 ¼ cup water 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 1 egg, beaten (or the equivalent amount ofyour favorite egg replacement) To Make: *Note: 1. If you’re not vegan or dairy free, feelfree to use 1 c. buttermilk in place of the soy milk and vinegar. Ifyou’re allergic to soy, try using your usual milk substitute andkeep the vinegar in the recipe. Also reduce the liquid if necessary, you don't want the batter to be too runny. Preheat your oven to 350F degrees. In a large mixing bowl thoroughly combine the flour (a fork works well for this), bakingpowder, salt, baking soda, and xanthan gum. For an easiertime working with the butter, grate the butter into the flour usingthe small holed side of a box grater. Mix the butter into the flourso that there are no large balls of grated butter. Add the soy milk, water, vinegar and beaten egg to the flourand stir until the dry and liquid ingredients are combined. Using a large spoon, drop the dough onto agreased pan to make 16 biscuits. Cook at 350F degrees for 15 minutesor until golden brown.
  16. Celiac.com 07/27/2010 - Many businesses contact us here at Celiac.com, wanting to know how to start a gluten-free business. There are many important things to consider before you open your gluten-free business to celiac and gluten intolerant customers. The following information is intended to help those looking to comply with celiac standards of gluten-free food. Start-Up: To begin, it is important to take take inventory of celiac contamination requirements. Will your gluten-free business also sell gluten-containing foods? If so, cross contamination will be an issue. If your company will be solely a gluten-free accommodating business, it will make your challenges fewer, but there are other important factors to consider such as contamination, suppliers and certifications. Before you begin your journey into providing gluten-free products, it is important to think like a celiac. Contamination & Cross-Contamination: Cross-contamination occurs when a gluten-free product comes into contact with other gluten based products. Cross contamination can occur in a variety of ways, but it usually begins where food is prepared and packaged, such as with the supplier or the manufacturer. However, cross-contamination can occur from other sources as well. If you plan to sell gluten containing pizza and gluten-free pizza, for example, then you will have an entirely new set of concerns. If you make the pizza dough in-house, there is a very good chance that gluten flour will permeate in the air for hours after using, coating your surfaces and creating a health hazard for the gluten-free folks. And if you bake the gluten and non-gluten pizza's in the same oven, then you will also need to take that into consideration, as that is also a source of cross-contamination and can render your gluten-free pizza inedible for sensitive celiacs. If your gluten-free food is stored in the same place as the gluten-containing food, you may have also a health hazard on your hands. Basically, it's a good rule of thumb to follow the celiac guidelines set for keeping a gluten-free kitchen. There are many considerations to take into account when supplying gluten-free food and while keeping a pristine business will be your best friend, sometimes even that isn't enough. Suppliers: Suppliers are a very important factor when starting a gluten-free business. It is important to research the product sources before using an ingredient source. If an ingredient source is contaminated by gluten, then your products could also be contaminated by gluten. So if you are looking to buy gluten-free rice flour for example, the reliability of your rice flour to be gluten-free will depend greatly on your supplier. It is important to carefully research the product supplier before using them. There is nothing worse than buying large quantities of food labeled “gluten-free” that actually contain gluten. Remember, it is up to a product's manufacturer to guarantee that their products are gluten-free. They must research their ingredient suppliers, and follow-up with them periodically, as sources and ingredients can change at anytime without notice. Gluten-Free Certification: If you plan to operate a gluten-free business then getting your products certified gluten-free is the best way to go. Not all gluten-free certifications are created equal. There are various gluten-free labels ranging from legitimate to not so legitimate, so it is important to research the most reliable, and best gluten-free label for your products. Getting your product 'gluten-free' certified will put your consumers at ease and increase your sales. It will also put you at ease knowing that you are providing the best gluten-free product you possibly can.
  17. This recipes comes to us from Melissa Boucher. 4 ½ cup gluten-free flour 1 ¾ cup sugar 7 teaspoons baking powder 2 teaspoons salt ½ teaspoon nutmeg ½ teaspoon cinnamon 3 eggs 2 teaspoons gluten-free vanilla 2 cup milk or water 1 cup oil Mix dry ingredients together. At medium speed beat eggs and vanilla. Add rest of wet ingredients. Add dry mixture. Makes about 2 dz. donuts. These freeze well and can be put in the microwave--80% power for 20-30 seconds.
  18. The following gluten-free carrot cake recipe is truly a traditional cake. Full of some of the most common allergens like, dairy, eggs and nuts. I tend to experiment with new recipes by replacing ingredients I can't tolerate, with ingredients I can. For example, many recipes allow you to substitute eggs with applesauce. The nuts can be left out-for those allergic to nuts, and the cream cheese can be substituted for dairy-free cream cheese. When substituting however, ratios will be different and it is a good idea to know what ratio of applesauce (for example) equals 4 eggs. Ratio quantities will also greatly depend on your taste buds, but if this recipe is okay for your diet, dig in and enjoy! Cake Ingredients: 1 cup pecans - toasted and finely chopped 2 ½ cups carrots - finely grated 2 cups gluten-free all purpose flour 1 tsp. baking soda 1 ½ tsp. baking powder 2/3 tsp. salt - finely ground 1 ½ tsp. cinnamon 4 large eggs - room temp 1 ½ cups granulated sugar 1 cup vegetable or canola oil 2 tsp. vanilla Cream Cheese Frosting Ingredients: 1/4 cup unsalted butter - room temperature 8 ounces cream cheese - room temp 2 cups powdered sugar 1 tsp. vanilla 1 lemon - finely grated lemon zest only To Make: Start by toasting the pecans in the oven at 350 degree F for 6-8 minutes. Remove from the oven, allow to cool and chop finely. Next, finely shred 2 ½ cups of carrots. Finally, combine the gluten-free flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon in a bowl, set aside. Beat the 4 eggs on medium speed for about 1 minute, reduce the speed and slowly pour in the granulated sugar. Once the sugar and eggs are combined (about 3-4 minutes) slowly pour in the oil and vanilla. Next, add the flour mixture and beat just until combined. Finally, use a spatula to fold in the carrots and toasted pecans. Divide the batter between two well greased 9 inch round cake pans. Bake at 350 F for 25-30 minutes. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes before inverting onto a cooling rack. Baking Directions: Divide batter between 2 well greased 9 inch round cake pans. Bake at 350 degrees F for25-30 minutes. Allow to cool in the pan for 10 minutes before inverting onto a cooling rack. * Note: This cake can also be made into a single layer 9x13 cake, simply increase baking time to 30-40 minutes. While the cake is cooling, beat together the butter and cream cheese. Next, add the powdered sugar, vanilla, and lemon zest. Beat until thoroughly combined. Place one layer of cake on a platter, spread an even layer of frosting on top of the cake. Add the second layer of cake. Use the remaining frosting to cover the top and sides of the cake. *Idea: Use remaining or extra pecans to decorate the outside of the cake.
  19. Celiac.com 02/08/2017 - "What if the kid you bullied at school, grew up, and turned out to be the only surgeon who could save your life?" --Lynette Mather If you ask any high school senior what in their life has changed the most since kindergarten, statistics show that many would answer moving from one school to another. However, the more drastic of changes are seen such as illnesses diagnosed during these critical school ages. In 2009 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, and that diagnosis has impacted my life in both positive and negative ways for my past, present, and future time at Indiana Area High School and beyond. Personally I have had to deal with bullying because of my disabilities. Bullying by definition is the use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others. I along with 20% of my peers nationwide in grades 9-12 (The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System) experience bullying in many different forms. Bullying can be teasing, hitting, leaving someone out, whispering behind backs, online harassment, shoving, remarks about race, sexuality, and disabilities. Before my diagnosis I was considered "normal" but as a result of my illness and "strange" dietary needs therefore I have been bullied. However, looking back on my experience I am happy to have dealt with the resistance because it has made me a better, more confident individual. I, like three million fellow Americans nationwide (National Celiac Disease), must deal with the stress of having celiac disease. I was diagnosed in 2009 after having lost my eyesight to a migraine. Celiac Disease is an often under-diagnosed autoimmune disease wherein the person cannot eat wheat, rye, barley, or oats, otherwise known as gluten, because their antibodies will attack their own system leading to other serious health issues such as cancer. Celiac Disease is spread through genes; my entire family, including my father, mother, and sister, has this disease. However, even with the growing awareness of celiac disease, there is also a growing skepticism. "Critics" of my disease claim that the gluten free diet is a fad. Many celebrities have tried to lose weight and failed to stay on this difficult diet. Restaurant chains are coming out with new gluten free menus every day to raise prices and profits, though they refuse to educate their servers about what someone with a gluten "allergy" cannot eat. While some people are sympathetic and know the outstanding facts about celiac disease, most of the population stays in the dark about this ailment. This causes frustration for people with celiac disease, like me, to have to deal with the resulting brick wall of resistance. In my small community it is very rare for someone to have such a disease that the public knows little about. This can cause doubt and disbelief, especially at a high school where everyone is just trying to "fit in". When I was diagnosed in 2009, I had just started ninth grade and I had also started playing two high school sports, softball and tennis. For the softball team it was a well-known fact that after every away game the softball boosters would buy each girl a twelve inch sub from a local deli to eat on the way home. Whenever my parents and I contacted the booster president to explain the situation with my disability and that I simply would like to have a salad, we were met with backlash. I did not understand at the time why a parent would refuse to supply another child with food after a physical activity when everyone else was getting a meal. This quickly made me an outcast on the softball team as the "strange girl with the made up disease", causing me to feel stressed and awful about myself over something that I could not control. I would have loved to have been able to "fit in" and eat the subs like my teammates rather than being different, especially after growing up able to eat gluten! It was a hard transition to make. I went from being able to eat the subs, donuts, pizza, and any other fast-food product to a strict dietary regime. After my long process through the education system, I finally got the meal I had a right to have. Unfortunately, the boosters' actions, forced us to go through the school system to "prove" I had a legitimate excuse not to eat the subs. I was distanced from other members of the team and, in subsequent years, had to deal with backlash from my teammates. They do not understand that it is not a personal choice to avoid gluten. I have a disability. I simply cannot eat it. Instead, they go back to the first year when I was eating the same foods they ate, and I get blamed for wanting to be "special" and get the more expensive food. I know that I am not alone in my struggle and that people with celiac disease around the world deal with what I deal with everyday - just like others who are bullied for being different. The after effects from my being bullied have shown themselves even in everyday situations. I have learned a great deal about myself and respect for other individuals' differences. I believe that if I had not been bullied I would not have the self-confidence, integrity, sense of right and wrong, or leadership skills that I have now. It has allowed me to go above and beyond in tough situations, knowing that I can overcome them. I know that even though the times are tough with my disability, and that while others may never understand mine, I can certainly understand and respect theirs. I respect and do not judge others simply based on what they can or cannot eat. I also know that just because someone does not "look" ill on the outside does not mean they are not dealing with something awful on the inside. This allows me to make friends easily and to understand others more effectively. Being bullied has also allowed me to learn new leadership skills that I use in my volunteer work. I am confident in myself that I can go forward into the world of higher education and succeed because of the values I now hold dear. The most drastic change I have encountered in my high school career is the diagnosis of celiac disease in 2009. This diagnosis has impacted my life in both positive and negative ways, in the past, present, and future at Indiana Area High School and beyond. I have had to deal with bullying because of my disabilities. Bullying, by definition. is the use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others. I along with 20% of my peers nationwide in grades 9-12 (The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System) experience bullying in many different forms. After dealing with the effects of my being bullied, I know that it has made me a better person. I can travel the world and make lasting relationships based on acknowledging and respecting differences in every person I encounter.
  20. This recipe comes to us from Fiddle-Faddle in the Gluten-Free Forum. This is an adaptation of Robyn Ryberg's biscuits, found here on celiac.com. Ingredients: 1/3 cup shortening ½ cup potato starch ¾ cup cornstarch 1 ¾ teaspoon xanthan gum 1 tablespoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon sugar ¾ cup milk ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese ¼ cup butter, softened (optional--makes a very fattening biscuit!) ********************************** Another ¼ cup butter, melted, mixed with ¼ - ½ teaspoon garlic powder Directions: Preheat oven to 375F. In medium bowl, blend all ingredients except for last two. Mix very well to remove any lumps. Dough will be quite soft and a bit sticky. Roll or pat our dough on a lightly floured (cornstarch) surface. Dough should be about ½ inch thick. Cut out biscuits with 2 ½ inch cookie cutters. An inverted glass will also do the job. Place biscuits on lightly-greased baking sheet. Bake for 12-15 minutes, until lightly browned. As soon as they come out of the oven, brush with melted butter/garlic combination. Makes 6-8 large biscuits.
  21. Celiac.com 03/20/2015 - Mexican food and tacos are one of my most consistent gluten-free food options. If I'm on the road, or pressed for time, sometimes fast food chains are the only option. But not all Mexican fast food chains are created equal when it comes to gluten-free options. Some do a good job, others do not. So here is a list of Mexican fast food chains that do a good job with gluten-free food options. As always, your individual experience at any of these restaurants may vary, so observe, ask questions about any item you're not sure about, and gauge your comfort level accordingly. If you have feedback, or know of any other Mexican fast food chains that offer good gluten-free food options, be sure to tell us in the comments below. Best Mexican Fast Food Chains: #1: Chipotle Chipotle gets high marks for gluten-free options. Pretty much everything that is not served with a flour tortilla is gluten-free. So, at Chiptole, that means all soft and hard corn taco shells, all meats, beans, vegetables and sides are gluten-free. #2: El Pollo Loco El Pollo Loco is another chain where you can get a good, healthy meal without thinking too hard about gluten. El Pollo Loco gluten-free menu includes their flame grilled Mexican chicken, corn tortillas, pinto beans, refried beans, avocado salsa, Cotija Cheese, mixed vegetables, and flan. Basically, avoid any flour tortillas, and you can easily eat gluten-free at El Pollo Loco. #3: Jimboy's Tacos Jimboy's has long been a favorite of mine, because they prepare all their food fresh from scratch and offer a pretty robust gluten-free menu that includes Jimboy's original tacos, including bean, ground beef, chicken, steak, and carnitas, Tacoburgers, Taquitos in both ground beef, and chicken, Tostadas, including bean, ground beef, chicken, and steak, Ground Beef Kid's Taco, Ground Beef Pepper Poppers, and Jimboy's Guacamole & Sour Cream. #4: Baja Fresh Baja Fresh offers a pretty good range of options for gluten-free eaters. Gluten-free options include Baja Tacos made with corn tortillas, any “Bare style” burrito, and any Baja Ensalada with choice of steak, chicken, or grilled shrimp, as well as grilled vegetables, carnitas, rice, and both varieties of beans. All Baja Fresh dressings and salsas are gluten-free. #5: Qdoba Qdoba is another fast Mexican food chain that offers a solid eating experience for gluten-free diners. Qdoba's gluten-free menu options include all Chicken, Chorizo, Flat Iron Steak, Ground Sirloin, Pork, and Seasoned Shredded Beef. Also gluten-free are their Soft White Corn Tortilla, Cilantro Lime Rice, Black Beans, Tortilla Soup, all Salsas and Dressings, 3 Cheese Queso and Guacamole. #6 Taco Cabana I had the good fortune of trying Taco Cabana on a trip to Albuquerque a while back. I was not disappointed. Taco Cabana does gluten-free eaters right with a wide variety of gluten-free options, including their Black, Borracho, and Refried beans, their Barbacoa, Chicken Fajita Meat, Rotisserie Chicken, Shredded Chicken Taco Meat in their Crispy Tacos, Chorizo, Chalupas or Nachos Steak Fajita Meat, Ground Beef Taco Meat (Crispy Tacos, Chalupas or Nachos), and Street Tacos in both Chicken & Steak. As with most places on this list, diners can substitute corn tortillas for flour tortillas in all tacos, fajitas, & plates. Other gluten-free options include Guacamole, Hash Brown Potatoes, Pico de Gallo, Rice, and Salsas – Fuego, Roja, Verde, Ranch, and Sour Cream. #7: Mighty Taco Mighty Taco makes it easy on gluten-free eaters by offering any taco with a corns shell, and most anything else on their menu except flour tortillas. Mighty Taco's gluten-free menu includes: Mighty Taco with Seasoned Ground Beef or Chicken, Mighty Pack with Seasoned Ground Chicken, Refried Bean and Cheese, Meatless Mighty, Veggies and Cheese, Seasoned Ground Chicken, Seasoned Ground Beef, Fajita Chicken, Buffito Chicken, and the Taco Beef Salad, Mighty Chicken Salad, Chicken Fajita Salad, and the Chicken Buffito Salad.
  22. I have an immensely difficult time finding gluten-free, vegan, sugar-free, yeast-free bread products, so the ingredient list for this recipe couldn't be more ideal for a celiac. The only ingredients: teff, salt, and water. Injera is the bread staple of Ethiopia and is eaten by most households everyday. Injera is traditionally made solely with teff grain, although some modern recipes call for yeast or all-purpose flour as well. The high iron content of teff makes it a perfect choice for a bread substitute. This recipe is very easy however, injera requires advanced planning and will not work for a last minute meal, as it can take up to three days for the teff to ferment before cooking is possible. Traditional Ethiopian Teff Injera (Gluten-Free) Servings: 20 Ingredients: 3 cups ground teff 4 cup distilled water Himalayan salt to taste Olive oil for the skillet Note: This is a large batch, as I like to have left-overs. Also, the fermentation process takes a while, so it's nice to have some injera for later. For a smaller batch, cut the ingredients in half. Mix ground teff with the water and let stand in a bowl covered with a dish towel at room temperature until it bubbles and has turned sour. The fermentation process will take approximately 1-3 days. The fermenting mixture should be the consistency of a very thin pancake batter. Stir in the salt, a little at a time, until you can barely detect its taste. Lightly oil a skillet 8 inches minimum but you can also use a larger one. Heat over medium heat. Pour in enough batter to cover the bottom of the skillet; About 1/4 cup will make a thin pancake covering the surface of an 8 inch skillet if you spread the batter around immediately by turning and rotating the skillet in the air; This is the classic French method for very thin crepes; Injera is not supposed to be paper thin so you should use a bit more batter than you would for crepes, but less than you would for a flapjack pancakes. Cook briefly, until holes form in the injera and the edges lift from the pan; Do not let it brown, and don't flip it over as it is only supposed to be cooked on one side. Remove and let cool. Place plastic wrap or foil between successive pieces so they don't stick together. To serve, lay one injera on a plate and ladle your chosen dishes on top. Serve additional injera on the side. Guests can be encouraged to eat their meal without utensils, instead using the injera to scoop up their food. Important: Please use caution when eating with your hands. To avoid contamination make sure your hands are very clean with gluten-free soap before eating.
  23. Looking for a benadryl I can take thats soy and gluten free, about to take some antibiotics, like to have something to ease the side effects if I have any allergic reactions to it.
  24. Celiac.com 10/11/2012 - Would you be surprised to learn that a number of naturally brewed soy sauces are technically gluten-free? I was. I was recently doing some research for a catered even and needed to make a decision about what kind of soy sauce to use in the food preparation. Since the Korean food being served required a great deal of soy sauce for marinating purposes, the hosts were concerned that gluten-free tamari might end up costing too much. However, the event included a number of folks who eat gluten-free, and the hosts did want to provide food that everyone could eat. So, what to do? The restaurant making the food uses Kikkoman. Is Kikkoman safe to serve to people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance? In an effort to answer that question, I did a bit of research. I was a bit surprised when my research led me to an interesting article on the naturally fermented soy sauce made by Kikkoman and Lima Foods, which are two major manufacturers of soy sauce. There are two ways to manufacture soy sauce. The first uses natural fermentation. The second uses chemical hydrolysis. Both methods will break down the complex proteins including gluten into smaller components such as amino acids and polypeptides. However, the soy sauces tested for the article were produced using natural fermentation. That's because chemically produced (or artificial) soy sauce is may contain toxic and carcinogenic components produced by hydrochloric acid hydrolysis. The article said that the soy sauces made by these companies actually met Codex Alimentarius standards for gluten-free foods, and that tests show their gluten content to be well under the 20ppm required for gluten-free products. The people who produced the article sent samples out to a major laboratory in the Netherlands for gluten analysis, and the results were surprising. Gluten content in both samples was well under the acceptable detection limit of 5ppm (see report). According to a new European laws, any product labeled gluten-free must contain less than 20 ppm gluten. The FDA has proposed the same 20 ppm level for their rule, which they look set to implement very soon. That means that the naturally fermented soy sauces that were tested meet gluten-free standards, and will likely not trigger adverse reaction in gluten sensitive individuals, especially considering the small daily quantities of soy sauce consumed. Anyone who does not trust this can, of course, choose soy sauces that do not contain any wheat to start with. Tamari soy sauces are typically produced without wheat, but some brands do not follow this tradition and are not wheat-free, so: Buyer beware. As for the catered event, after talking with the gluten-free guests, the hosts decided to go with traditional Kikkoman. They have not received any reports of illness or adverse reactions, even in the several people with high gluten-sensitivity. I'm sure there are plenty of gluten-free eaters who have plenty to say about soy sauce. What's your take on the test results? Source: Soya.be LAB RESULTS
  25. Celiac.com 11/24/2014 - Following a strict gluten-free diet is the only way to treat celiac disease. However, researchers have been lacking clear agreement on how and when to assess gluten-free dietary adherence in celiac patients or how to determine its effectiveness on villous atrophy. To address this reality, a team of researches conducted a prospective study to determine patient adherence to a gluten-free diet, and its effect on histological recovery after 1-year of gluten-free diet. The research team included G. Galli, G. Esposito, E. Lahner, E. Pilozzi, V. D. Corleto, E. Di Giulio, M. A. Aloe Spiriti, and B. Annibale. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Digestive and Liver Disease, the Department of Haematology, the Department of Pathology, and the Department of Digestive Endoscopy at Sant'Andrea Hospital Sapienza University Rome in Rome, Italy, and with the Centro Ricerche S. Pietro, Ospedale S. Pietro in Rome, Italy. Between 2009 and 2012, the researchers enrolled 65 consecutive newly-diagnosed adult patients (median age 38 years, 18–70) with biopsy-proven atrophic celiac disease. The researchers assessed patients after one year of gluten-free diet, using duodenal histology, serological assays, symptom reports and a dietary interview based on a validated questionnaire. They defined complete histological recovery as the absence of villous atrophy and ≤30/100 intraepithelial lymphocytes. The team found that 81.5% of patients showed adequate gluten-free diet adherence (ADA), whereas 18.5% had inadequate adherence (IADA). Overall, 66% of ADA patients achieved complete histological recovery, but no IADA patients recovered (P < 0.00001). Interestingly, ADA patients who achieved complete histological recovery showed about the same antibody seroconversion and symptoms as those who achieved partial histological recovery with P = 0.309 and P = 0.197, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that, for ADA patients with incomplete histological recovery, Marsh 3C was still a risk factor (OR 8.74, 95% CI: 1.87–40.83). This study shows that 66% of adult celiac patients who successfully follow a gluten-free diet can make a complete histological recovery after 1-year. However, patients with severe histological damage at diagnosis who successfully follow a gluten-free diet remain at risk for incomplete histological recovery 1 year later. Lastly, patients who do not follow a gluten-free diet have no hope of making a full histological recovery. For clinicians and doctors, this data should serve as a guideline for determining gluten-free diet adherence in celiac patients, and determining the level of patient recovery. For celiac patients, the data should serve to demonstrate the importance of following a strict gluten-free diet. Source: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 2014; 40(6):639-647.
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