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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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  1. Celiac.com 02/24/2018 - Forget about Valentine's Day. Well, not literally, you should definitely do something nice for your Valentine; but let's put that aside for a moment. Just about any day can be right for a romantic dinner if you plan ahead and keep it simple. One suggestion: fondue. Few dishes can so effortlessly anchor a simple, romantic dinner as traditional Swiss fondue. Yes, you could make your own fondue, but I prefer to make it easy by dropping by my local Trader Joe's. Made in Switzerland, Trader Joe's Fondue is a blend of Swiss Emmental and Gruyère cheeses, white wine, kirsch, a dry cherry brandy, and a selection of savory spices. Trader Joe's also make a French version called Isigny Ste Mère Fondue Normande, which is made with soft cheeses Camembert, Livarot, and Pont L'Eveque cheeses and apple brandy. Want my recipe for the easiest, most romantic gluten-free dinner I know? Lightly steam some broccoli, asparagus, carrots, zucchini, potatoes until tender, but firm. Cut them into bite-sized chunks and arrange on a plate. Also add cut apples, pears, some toasted gluten-free bread, and some good ham or sausage. Grab a box of Trader Joe's Fondue, and prepare as directed. If you don't have a fondue pot, you can still heat the fondue in the microwave and serve it a ramekin or other ceramic dish. The ceramic will hold the heat well, and help keep the fondue fit for dipping. Spread out on a blanket near the fireplace, and if you don't have a fireplace, turn on one of those fireplace videos on YouTube. Pour a glass of your favorite wine, dig in, and enjoy your lingering, romantic dinner. If you don't have a Trader Joe's nearby, or feeling DIY? Fret not. Here's a great recipe recipe for an easy gluten-free beer and cheddar fondue. Gluten-Free Beer and Cheddar Fondue Ingredients: 12 ounces light gluten-free beer ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 clove garlic ¼ teaspoon Gluten-free Louisiana-style hot sauce 4 cups shredded sharp Cheddar cheese 2 tablespoons cornstarch or potato starch Cooked sausage or ham, cut to bite-size New potatoes, steamed and cut to size Gluten-free Bread, toasted and cut into cubes Apples cut into bite-size squares Pear cut into bite-size squares broccoli cauliflower asparagus carrots zucchini Directions: Heat beer, Dijon mustard, garlic, and hot sauce in 4-quart saucepan on low; whisk in Cheddar cheese tossed with cornstarch until melted and smooth. Pour into a warm ramekin or other ceramic dish. Lightly steam some broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, carrots, zucchini, potatoes until tender, but firm. Cut into bite-sized chunks and arrange on a plate. Add cut apples, pears, toasted gluten-free bread, and good ham or sausage. To serve, spear fruit, veggies or meat with a fork and dip in cheese. Eat and repeat.
  2. Celiac.com 02/10/2018 - People with celiac disease must avoid all forms of gluten from wheat, rye, or barley. So, what about Kamut? Is Kamut safe for people with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity? Like Spelt, Kamut is simply another form of wheat that is sometimes wrongly thought to be gluten-free. Kamut is simply a trademark for a specific kind of wheat, Khorasan wheat, grown under specific conditions. Khorasan wheat is triticum turanicum. It is wheat, and it contains gluten, which people with celiac disease should not eat. So, in short, Kamut is NOT safe for people with celiac disease or any sensitivity to gluten. Because Kamut is still a type of wheat that contains gluten it is not safe for people with celiac diseases and appears on Celiac.com's UNSAFE food list of non-gluten-free foods.
  3. Celiac.com 01/27/2018 - If you've ever had a good version of this crowd-pleasing dish at a restaurant, you likely wondered if it could be made at home. It can, indeed, and you can do it gluten-free with no extra trouble at all. This version is tasty and easy to make. Enjoy it over rice. Ingredients: 2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breast halves, cut into bite-size chunks 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 3 cloves garlic, minced ½ medium onion, diced ½ cup gluten-free soy sauce or tamari ¼ cup ketchup 2 teaspoons sesame oil ½ cup honey 2 tablespoons cornstarch 3 tablespoons water 2 scallions, white and light-green parts, chopped, for garnish â…“ cup Toasted sesame seeds ½-1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes, as desired Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper Potato starch for dredging Directions: Season the chicken lightly with salt and pepper, and dredge in potato starch. Add vegetable oil to a medium skillet, and sauté onion until translucent. Add the garlic, and chicken and stir, cooking, until the chicken browns slightly and the onion softens. Add the soy sauce, ketchup and crushed red pepper flakes, and stir to mix. Add the sesame oil and honey, stirring to incorporate. Dissolve the cornstarch in water in a small bowl, then add to the pot, a little at a time, stirring as you go, until it thickens as desired. Stir in most of the sesame seeds. Divide among individual plates; sprinkle with the scallions and remaining sesame seeds. Serve over rice.
  4. Celiac.com 01/18/2018 - Okay, so wine is good for lots of things, drinking notwithstanding. But try to wrap your head around this: wine flour. Yeah, flour made from wine grapes. There's no such thing you say? Well, wine flour is in fact a thing. The mashed post-crush grapes used to make top wines are indeed being milled into a unique flour. Creator Hillary Niver-Johnson calls her product Finger Lakes Wine Flour. Her wine flour is made from the the pomace, or grape skins and seeds, are typically discarded in the wine making process. Niver-Johnson and her team of three collect the from local wineries in the Finger Lakes of New York. They then sort, separate, sun-dry, and mill the pomace in Hector, New York. But, why buy wine flour? First, it is gluten-free. Those with sensitivity to gluten will be happy to know that all of the wine flour options are naturally gluten-free. Second, it's nutritious. Wine flour has all the same vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants as grapes. Wine flour is also rich in protein and fiber, with two grams of protein and three grams of fiber in every teaspoon. It comes in varietals to match you taste. Wine flour is available as Riesling, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Pinot Noir, and Gewurztraminer. It's a great supplemental flour for enriching most any recipe with its nutrients, flavor, and of course, that wine tint. Use wine flour as a supplement to regular flour to make your favorite foods. Read more at brit.co.
  5. Does anyone know if the mix for Cheeseburger macaroni hamburger helper is gluten free? I'm having a hard time figuring out which ingredients are in the pasta and which ingredients are in the mix! I'd like to substitute with gluten free noodles and just use the mix. Thanks!
  6. Celiac.com 01/10/2018 - If you're looking for a tasty variation on the usual winter stews of soups, try this delicious red chile sauce. It makes a great potluck dish and is sure to leave plenty of happy eaters on game day. Ingredients: 2 pounds boneless pork shoulder, trimmed and cut in half 2 quarts of chicken broth ¾ cup dried chiles de arbol 4 or 5 dried ancho chiles 3 15-ounce cans white hominy, drained and rinsed 6 cloves garlic (2 smashed, 4 minced) 2½ teaspoons ground cumin 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 large white onion, chopped 1 tablespoon dried Mexican oregano (regular will do in a pinch) 1 bay leaf Kosher salt Diced avocado, tortilla chips, lime wedges, chopped cabbage, diced onion, sliced radishes and/or fresh cilantro, for topping Directions: Break the stems off the chiles de arbol and ancho chiles and shake out as many seeds as possible. Put the chiles in a bowl and cover with boiling water; weigh down the chiles with a plate to keep them submerged and soak until soft, about 30 minutes. Transfer the chiles and 1½ cups of the soaking liquid to a blender. Add the smashed garlic and ½ teaspoon salt and blend until smooth. Strain through a fine sieve into a bowl, pushing the sauce through with a rubber spatula; discard the solids. Rub the pork all over with the cumin and ½ teaspoon salt; set aside. Heat the vegetable oil in a stock pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until soft. Add the chopped garlic and cook about 2 minutes, until fragrant. Increase the heat to medium high. Put the onion and garlic into a bowl and set aside for a few minutes. Add the pork to the pot and sear, turning as needed, until lightly browned on all sides, about 5 minutes. Stir in 2 cups water, the chicken broth, oregano, bay leaf, ½ teaspoon salt and ½ cup to ¾ cup of the chile sauce, to taste. Bring to a low boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a simmer. Partially cover and cook for about 3 hours, turning the pork a few times, until tender. Stir in the hominy and continue to simmer, uncovered, until the pork starts falling apart, about 1 more hour. Remove the bay leaf. Put the pork on a cutting board, chop, and return chopped pork to the pot. Add water or broth as needed if the pozole is too thick. Season to taste with salt. Serve with assorted toppings and the remaining chilihil sauce.
  7. For BFree Foods, it wasn't enough to create wraps, rolls, bagels and bread loaves that were simply wheat and gluten-free alternatives. Instead the innovative company set out to develop gluten-free breads that taste just as delicious as their conventional counterparts and still have exceptional nutrition. Not to mention ones that won't disintegrate, crack or crumble mid-meal. Since using real, whole ingredients is the best way to bake, BFree's products have an impressive list of high-quality, non-GMO ingredients. Whether it's deriving protein and fiber from whole peas, apples and potatoes or using a unique blend of buckwheat and corn flours to provide gluten-like pliability, BFree provides matchless taste and nutrition and stays intact. BFree products are not only high fiber and low fat, they're also calorie-responsible; BFree Multigrain Wraps, for example, are only 100 calories per wrap, the lowest calorie count in the category. A list of what is not included in BFree products is almost as impressive as what is. BFree products do not contain wheat, dairy, eggs, nuts or soy, making the entire BFree product line free from all major allergens—and completely vegan. Select BFree products are rolling out to shelves at Ralphs, Lucky's, Raley's and Save Mart throughout California. For more information, please visit www.us.BFreeFoods.com.
  8. Celiac.com 12/26/2017 - Because gluten is vital to the texture, structure and stretch of pasta, replicating pasta without gluten is especially difficult. It's even harder for fresh pastas, and harder still for filled pastas, like ravioli and tortellini. In the case of pasta, the trick is to get the pasta to stretch around the filling. In traditional fresh pastas, the stretch comes from gluten in the wheat flour. General Mills thinks it has found an answer in a cold extrusion process of pasta dough made with a special blend of flours and gums. The company's process allows the successful manufacture of a variety of free-from, fresh pastas including ravioli, tortellini and agnolotti; products that were previously hard to make without gluten. The company is looking to patent its new method for manufacturing gluten-free filled pastas, such as ravioli, without any breaking or tearing during production. For this patent, the company chose a blend of rice flour and cornstarch had been chosen for a bland flavor profile, and relies on 2-3% xanthan gum for structure and flexibility. The process works best by including at least 10% fresh egg by by mass. The process General Mills hopes to patent delivers an improved process for a commercially manufacturable gluten-free or reduced-gluten pasta. Other parts of the General Mills process include: cold extruding the mixture into sheets of around 1-1.2mm thickness at 34 C or less; adding the filling; and shaping the pasta around it prior to cooling and packing. Early trials showed 32 C was best for plain pasta and 25.7 C for filled pasta. In all cases, the extruder pressure had to be 75 Bar or more. General Mills said its invention would help address the increased demand for variety in fresh, gluten-free and reduced-gluten products. Source: foodnavigator-usa.com
  9. Celiac.com 12/16/2017 - Looking for something warm and tasty, yet easy to make? This delicious ham and potato soup will fill your tummy and warm your soul. It's so comforting it practically wraps you up in a blanket and sings you a lullaby! Ingredients: 3½ cups chicken stock 3½ cups peeled and diced potatoes 1 cup diced cooked ham (from ham hocks) â…“ cup parmesan cheese ½ cup diced celery ½ cup finely chopped onion 5 tablespoons butter 5 tablespoons potato starch 2 cups milk ½ teaspoon salt, to taste 1 teaspoon ground white or black pepper, or to taste Chopped chives, or flat leaf parsley, for serving Directions: Combine the potatoes, celery, onion, ham and water in a stockpot. Bring to a boil, then cook over medium heat until potatoes are tender, about 10 to 15 minutes. Stir in the chicken stock, salt and pepper. In a separate saucepan, melt butter over medium-low heat. Whisk in potato starch with a fork, and cook, stirring constantly until thick, about 1 minute. Slowly whisk in some milk, avoiding lumps, until all of the milk is added. Whisk in parmesan cheese. Continue stirring over medium-low heat until thick, 4 to 5 minutes. Stir the milk mixture into the stockpot, and cook soup until heated through. Serve immediately with toasted gluten-free bread and butter, and chives, or parsley garnish, as desired.
  10. Celiac.com 12/13/2017 - Who's slinging the tastiest gluten-free hamburger buns? We assessed the contenders and these winners rose to the top. Bread Srsly San Francisco darling Bread Srsly is like the little gluten-free engine that could. Bread Srsly long ferments organic millet, sorghum and arrowroot with a wild sourdough culture to deliver a tasty gluten-free classic with a delightful sourdough tang. In addition to being gluten-free, Bread Srsly's Sourdough Slider Rolls are xanthan gum-free. They use psyllium husk to deliver an airy texture that is perfect for burgers, especially when toasted first. Breadsrsly.com Canyon Bakehouse Folks who enjoy the soft, tender texture of a classic sandwich potato roll, Canyon Bakehouse's whole-grain Gluten-Free Hamburger Buns are just the ticket. They have a mild, slightly sweet flavor that goes nicely with any burger option. Canyonglutenfree.com Franz Seatlle's Franz bakery turns out a gluten-free version of the classic white hamburger bun. It's light enough to complement your favorite burger, but sturdy enough to hold up under eating. Franzbakery.com Happy Campers Oregon-based Happy Camper bakery take the nutritious route by packing its gluten-free breads with superfoods like chia, teff, quinoa, amaranth, buckwheat and millet. Happy Camper's Wild Buns have earned a reputation as a sturdy, nutritious bun option for the gluten-free burger lover. Happycampersgf.com Jennifer's Way Bakery Looking for a smaller bun for a smaller burger? Actress Jennifer Esposito's Jennifer's Way Bakery is serving up these protein-packed Roasted Sunflower Seed Slider Rolls that are not only packed with protein, they are light and airy, too. Despite their seemingly dainty appearance, these buns are sturdy enough to handle the juiciest of burgers. Available in plain, olive, poppy seed, sesame seed and sunflower seed. Jenniferswaybakery.com Kinnikinnick Gluten free, dairy free, nut free and kosher, old favorite Kinnikinnick soft breads & buns are specially formulated so they stay soft after freezing, and don't need toasting. That means they're great for hamburgers anytime, and anywhere you like. Kinnikinnick.com Kim & Jake's Colorado-based husband-and-wife bakers, Kim and Jake Rosenbarger, make their yeast-free, vegan sourdough Herb and Olive Oil Buns using naturally fermented sorghum starter, flax meal and coconut amino acids. The end result is a bread with a unique crunchy outer crust and tender, chewy inside. Perfect for burgers, especially grilled burgers. Available in plain, seeded, and herb and olive oil. Kimandjakes.com Manini's Another baker to deliver a brioche-like bun that's great for burgers is Manini's, whose Gluten-Free Ancient Grains Hamburger Buns are gluten- rice- and corn-free. To get their yellow, brooch-like bun, Manini's uses a blend of naturally gluten-free ancient grains, including amaranth, millet, teff, sorghum and quinoa to yield an undeniably buttery-sweet flavor and soft texture. Maninis.com Mariposa Bakery Cold, or toasted, Mariposa's soft, fluffy sandwich rolls are the perfect choice for a juicy burger. Mariposa bakery.com Three Bakers Looking for a soft, pillowy cloud of a gluten-free bun? One you can serve right out of the bag? Try Three Bakers' Whole Grain Hamburger Buns. Baked with a touch of honey for the perfect level of sweetness to complement your favorite burger. Threebakers.com Udi's Gluten-Free As light, airy and fiber-rich as Udi's popular sandwich loaf bread, Udi's Whole Grain Hamburger Buns can handle even the latest backyard burger. Plus, Udi's nice, neutral flavor won't spoil the taste of your favorite burger. Udisglutenfree.com
  11. Celiac.com 12/12/2017 - Does a gluten-free diet have any effect on cardiovascular risk in people with celiac disease? Does it effect people without celiac disease? So far, both questions have remained unanswered. Recently, a team of researchers set out to conduct a systematic review to shed some light on the matter. The team was led by Michael D.E. Potter, MBBS (Hons), from the University of New Castle, Australia. The team focused their review on the "potential of the gluten-free diet to affect modifiable cardiovascular risk factors including weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugars," and to do this they searched for "studies which measured these risk factors in individuals before and after the institution of a gluten-free diet." In all, Potter and colleagues reviewed 27 studies that evaluated the effect of a gluten-free diet, as followed for a minimum of 6 months, on cardiovascular risk factors such as BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glycemia, hemoglobin A1c and serum lipids. Despite their efforts, they found no clear evidence that a gluten-free diet increases cardiovascular risk in celiac patients. They found no evidence that it increases heart disease risk in people without celiac disease. They really found nothing much at all. While the results varied across studies, and researchers did see changes in some cardiovascular risk factors, they say the data do not support a gluten-free diet for cardiovascular health in individuals without celiac disease. True, perhaps. But it's also true that the data neither support nor condemn a gluten-free diet in people without celiac disease. Unless and until researchers get some solid data from large groups and can make accurate, informative comparisons between those groups, it seems foolish for them to advocate or discourage a gluten-free diet in people without celiac disease. Source: Healio.com
  12. Celiac.com 12/11/2017 - With blazing progress in 3D printing technology, the future of numerous fields from house building to cake-making and, yes, cooking, is literally being written, or printed, before our very eyes. Food is definitely one of those arenas that will see major influence for 3d printing. In the future, more and more kitchens will come with one of more 3d printers that deliver highly customized food choices for chefs, on demand. Currently, platform for 3D printing personalized food are being developed for numerous applications, including gluten-free, vegetarian, vegan, and other specialized diet markets. In a talk presented at the 3D Printing and Beyond: Current and Future Trends conference at Hebrew university on October 25, Prof. Ido Braslavsky presented breakthrough 3D-printing innovations by Israeli and international experts from academia and industry. The conference was organized by the 3D & Functional Printing Center at the Hebrew University and Yissum, with the support of the Jerusalem Development Authority, the Ministry of Jerusalem Affairs and the Jerusalem Municipality. One breakthrough touted by Baslavsky was the ability to use 3D food printing to serve "numerous populations including the gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan markets, as well as the specialized diet market, for anyone from athletes to people with diabetes or celiac disease." In the very near future, chefs will be able to use a single machine to automatically prepare, mix, form and cook personalized food. Yaron Daniely, head of the university’s Yissum Research & Development technology-transfer company, called the technology nothing short of revolutionary. The self-assembly properties of nano-cellulose fibers enable the addition and binding of proteins, carbohydrates and fats as well as controlling the food’s texture. The food products could then be cooked, baked, fried or grilled while being printed out in the three dimensional space. "The idea is to enable full control of the substances used, for the purpose of creating healthy and tasty meals that can be eaten immediately. This has the potential to address a variety of challenges facing the field of nutrition, from the demand for personalized food … to addressing the problem of lack of food in developing countries," said Daniely. Will printed food be the future of eating, gluten-free and otherwise? Stay tuned for more news on that front. Read more at: Israel21c.org
  13. Celiac.com 12/07/2017 - Amaranth is naturally gluten-free and usually safe for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Amaranth is not actually a grain, but is considered a pseudo-cereal like it's cousin, quinoa. Both are part of the same large family that includes beets, chard and spinach. Amaranth is highly nutritious, and contains about one-third more protein than rice, sorghum, or rye. It also contains high levels of calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and fiber, together with a nearly perfect amino acid profile. So, amaranth is good to include in just about any diet, but especially for gluten-free folks looking for more nutritious options. Cooked amaranth is very similar to cooked quinoa, with similar nutty taste and chewy texture, although cooke amaranth is not quite as fluffy as quinoa. Like quinoa, it's important to soak amaranth thoroughly before cooking. As with buckwheat and quinoa, you can also bake with amaranth flour. If you're looking for something more nutritious than brown rice and other flours, then amaranth flour may be a good fit. Here are some recipes that use amaranth flour. Also, amaranth is more comparable to wheat in terms of the chewy, sticky characters needed for baking, so it's a good addition to many gluten-free breads. You'll likely still need xanthin gum, but probably less of it. Like rice, or quinoa, amaranth goes great in soup. Here's a recipe for stuffed chicken breasts with oatmeal and amaranth.
  14. Will a new treatment enable people with celiac disease to ditch a gluten-free diet? About one in a hundred people in the United States is affected by celiac disease. If you're one of them, you know how hard it can be to maintain a strict gluten-free diet. Everyone's got their horror stories about trying to simply eat a meal, only to have a tiny amount of gluten wreck havoc on their digestive system. There are currently no therapeutics on the market to treat celiac disease, says Sydney Gordon, a scientist at Ab Initio Biotherapeutics. Sure, there are other over-the-counter enzyme treatments, Gordon adds, but most are slow to act, or don't break down enough gluten to prevent a reaction. "There are no other enzymes on the market for celiac disease," said Justin Siegel, the co-founder of PvP Biologics and an assistant professor of chemistry, biochemistry and molecular medicine at UC Davis. "There is nothing that is approved by the FDA for celiac disease. Nothing has made it through clinical trials. There are pills on the market that cause degradation of gluten, but there is no clinical evidence that they are effective." "We wanted to design an enzyme […] a protein that would act as a therapeutic for celiac disease. We came up with a design using a protein modeling tool called FoldIt," said Ingrid Pultz, a co-founder of PvP Biologics. PvP Biologics enzyme therapy works by targeting the exact triggering molecule, the immunogenic epitope, before it gets to the intestine and causes an immune reaction. To do this, PvP Biologics uses kumamolisin, a naturally occurring enzyme that, unlike some other enzymes, can survive the acidity of the stomach. By modifying the amino acid sequence in the original kumamolisin enzyme, researchers were able to specifically target the epitope causing the reaction. If the therapy proves successful, many celiac patients won't have to worry about minute amounts of cross-contamination when eating outside. Those are pretty strong claims. Many people with celiac disease might likely say that it sounds too good to be true. Still, the company is moving in a direction that few others have gone. No word on if or when we might expect to see a finished treatment come to market. For all the company's claims, there is much to work out, and a long, winding road to get FDA approval. Stay tuned to see if the evidence from trials and from potential consumer use supports those claims. Read more at TheAggie.org. Editor's note: We've received a correction on this story from PvP Biologics, makers of KumaMax, which states that their product is designed for accidental gluten ingestion, and not as a replacement for a gluten-free diet in people with celiac disease. Their enzyme could lessen the effects of accidental consumption of small amounts of gluten.
  15. Celiac.com 12/02/2017 - Pozole, pozole, pozole. Pozole seems to be popular lately. Pozole is a hominy-based Mexican stew closely associated with the Pacific-coast state of Guerrero. I've noticed a number of references to pozole lately. I've seen articles touting pozole in place of traditional turkey dinner for Thanksgiving, and articles about using leftover Thanksgiving turkey to make pozole. This tasty recipe calls for chicken, but you can easily substitute turkey, leftover or otherwise. When stewed in chicken broth and other tasty ingredients like tomatillos, green chiles. Ingredients: Three 15-ounce cans of hominy, drained 8 cups chicken stock 2 cups water 6 chicken thighs on the bone, with skin 1 pound tomatillos, husked and halved 1 medium onion, quartered 2 poblano chiles, cored, seeded and quartered 2 jalapeños, seeded and quartered 6 large garlic cloves, smashed 1 tablespoon oregano leaves Salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon vegetable oil For Serving: Finely shredded cabbage Fresh Mexican cheese (queso fresco) chopped cilantro sliced radishes chopped onion diced avocado sour cream tortilla chips lime wedges Directions: In a large stock pot, bring the chicken stock and water to a boil. Add the chicken thighs, cover and simmer over very low heat until they're tender and cooked through, about 30 minutes. Skim any fat from the cooking liquid and reserve. In a blender, combine the halved tomatillos with the quartered onion, poblanos and jalapeños, smashed garlic, chopped cilantro and oregano. Blend until coarsely chopped. With the machine on, add 1 cup of the cooking liquid and purée until smooth. Season with salt and pepper. In a large deep skillet, heat the vegetable oil. Add the tomatillo purée and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the sauce turns a deep green, about 10 minutes. Pour the green sauce into the cooking liquid in the stock pot. Add the hominy and bring to a simmer over moderate heat. Add the chicken thighs back to the stew, season with salt and pepper and cook just until heated through. Serve the pozole in deep bowls, and garnish as desired with quest fresco, cabbage, radishes, onion, avocado, sour cream, tortilla chips and lime wedges at the table.
  16. Celiac.com 12/01/2017 - Celiac disease is a genetically determined disorder in which affected individuals show an intolerance to ingested gluten (Food Safety Authority of Ireland [FSAI]). It is an inheritable, life-long disease and is characterized by an inflammatory reaction to dietary gluten in the human small intestine. The special feature of the disease is a flattening of intestinal villi along with crypt hypertrophy. As a result, it leads to significant loss of absorptive surface area and resulting malabsorption of nutrients, vitamins and minerals. Untreated celiac disease may be found in the context of symptoms like: anemia, bone diseases, infertility, neurological problems, cancer and other complications due to persistent inflammation and micronutrient deficiencies. Approximately 1% of the United States population has the disease, which is similar to its frequency in the United Kingdom. Only about 10% of affected individuals have been diagnosed thus far [Kagnoff MF (2007) Celiac disease: pathogenesis of a model immunogenetic disease. J Clin Invest 117: 41–49]. At present, the only suitable treatment is strict, life-long exclusion of gluten from the patient's diet. Although a large fraction of patients who attempt to follow such a diet still exhibit signs or symptoms of active disease, there is no available supplementary therapy for such conditions [Ehren J, Morón B, Martin E, Bethune MT, Gray GM, et al. (2009) A Food-Grade Enzyme Preparation with Modest Gluten Detoxification Properties. PLoS ONE 4(7): e6313. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0006313]. Gluten is defined as a protein fraction from wheat, rye, barley, oats or crossbred varieties and derivatives thereof. Some persons are intolerant to this group of proteins that are insoluble in water and 0,5 M sodium chloride solution [Commission Regulation (EC) No 41/2009 concerning the composition and labeling of foodstuffs suitable for people intolerant to gluten. Official Journal L 16/09 21 January 2009]. To address this problem, the food industry is developing new products for people affected by celiac disease. These new foods are very helpful in diversifying the celiac diet. More available products will increase nutrient consumption, including fiber and minerals, which are often lacking in restrictive diets. Production of gluten free products involves the fulfillment of specific requirements. These products must be free of gluten, which is present in most components of confectionery production. Labeling of the final product is subject to the European Community Commission Regulation No 41/2009 of 20 January 2009, which sets conditions that must be fulfilled by manufacturers. The composition and labeling of foodstuffs suitable for people who are intolerant to gluten is divided into two categories of products according to the nutritional purpose: Gluten free for people intolerant to gluten, and very low gluten content [Wojtasik. A, Daniewski W., Kunachowicz H., 2010. Ocena wybranych produktów spożywczych w aspekcie możliwoÅ›ci ich stosowania w diecie bezglutenowej. Bromat. Chem. Toksykol., XLIII, 2010, 3, str. 362-371]. Selected paragraphs of these labeling rules are quoted below: Foodstuffs for people intolerant to gluten, consisting of or containing one or more ingredients made from wheat, rye, barley, oats or their crossbred varieties which have been especially processed to reduce gluten, shall not contain a level of gluten exceeding 100 mg/kg in the food as sold to the final consumer. The labeling, advertising and presentation of the products referred to in paragraph 1 shall bear the term ‘very low gluten'. They may bear the term ‘gluten-free' if the gluten content does not exceed 20 mg/kg in the food as sold to the final consumer. Oats contained in foodstuffs for people intolerant to gluten must have been specially produced, prepared and/or processed in a way to avoid contamination by wheat, rye, barley, or their crossbred varieties and the gluten content of such oats must not exceed 20 mg/kg. Foodstuffs for people intolerant to gluten, consisting of or containing one or more ingredients which substitute wheat, rye, barley, oats or their crossbred varieties shall not contain a level of gluten exceeding 20 mg/kg in the food as sold to the final consumer. The labeling, presentation and advertising of those products shall bear the term ‘gluten-free'. Where foodstuffs for people intolerant to gluten contain both ingredients which substitute wheat, rye, barley, oats or their crossbred varieties and ingredients made from wheat, rye, barley, oats or their crossbred varieties which have been especially processed to reduce gluten, paragraphs 1, 2, and 3 shall apply and paragraph 4 shall not apply. The terms ‘very low gluten' or ‘gluten-free' referred to in paragraphs 2 and 4 shall appear in proximity to the name under which the food is sold. To achieve gluten content as described above, special conditions in work environment must be instituted. Preparation of high quality products that are safe for people affected by celiac disease, the production process must be controlled not only at the production plant. Origin, breeding, harvesting, storage and transport of ingredients must be also taken into account. The best way to ensure the customer about the safety of a given product is to implement a specially designed quality management plan from the very first step of production. In order for products to be gluten-free or reduced in gluten when they reach the consumer, the gluten-free quality of the product must prevail at every stage of production. Cross contamination is the process by which a reduced-gluten or gluten-free product loses that status. It has come into contact with something that is not gluten-free. Cross contamination may happen during primary production, harvesting and storage of grain, during the manufacture of gluten-free or reduced gluten food in the same plant where gluten-containing food is produced. Cross contamination may also occur as a result of poor re-work, incorrect formulation, product carry-over due to use of common equipment, clean-up or sanitation, poor equipment design, human error or the presence of gluten products near exposed product lines. Potential risks, preventative measures and critical control points need to be identified in the handling of ‘gluten-free' or ‘very low gluten' products. (Deibel, Kurt, Tom Trautman, Tom DeBoom, William H. Sveum, George Dunaif, Virginia N. Scott, and Dane T. Bernard. 1997. A Comprehensive Approach to Reducing the Risk of Allergens in Food. Journal of Food Protection. Vol. 60, No. 4: 436-441) Raw Materials Origin To minimize risk, producers of raw ingredients have to implement appropriate control practices during crop production, harvesting and storage. Plants should originate from certified seeds which guarantees a high level of species purity. Cleaning of sowing machines is also important because seeds from the previous planting can contaminate new crops. The same rule applies to equipment used for harvesting and transportation. Storage areas should be thoroughly cleaned before filling with new crops. Every magazine should be identifiable and people responsible for crop delivery must be informed and instructed to maintain a gluten free workplace. Producers should produce representative samples for laboratory analysis to verify their product's "gluten free" status. Even on the first level of food production, which is plant growing, training and supervision of employees and producers is critical for maintaining the non gluten status of raw materials. Good training of all staff working at these first stages will help to avoid potential sources of food allergens. This type of training should increase awareness about food allergens and the consequences of unintentional consumption by allergic persons. Workers should be encouraged to report any suspected breaches of protocol to their supervisors and suggest possible improvements [Australian Food and Grocery Council, Food Industry Guide to Allergen Management and Labelling - 2007 Revised Edition]. Transport Suppliers of raw materials are obligated to have good allergen management practices to minimize the risk of cross contact between raw materials. Suppliers should provide information identifying any products that contain allergens, the origins of allergenic materials, or those that are likely to cross contamination with allergens. Vendor audits are recommended to verify and explore potential contact with allergenic substances [Australian Food and Grocery Council, Food Industry Guide to Allergen Management and Labelling - 2007 Revised Edition]. Storage Manufacturing plants should be designed to accommodate all aspects of the quality control and allergen management plan,. Storage of raw materials should prevent mixing allergens with non allergenic ingredients. To meet this condition, allergenic materials should be kept at separate facilities, or when this is impossible, all raw materials should be covered to avoid allergenic dust contamination. Clear and visible labeling of containers and all equipment should also be implemented. Tools and equipment used for different materials must also be kept separate [Guidance Note No. 24 Legislation on ‘Gluten-free' Foods and Avoidance of Cross-contamination during Manufacture of ‘Gluten-free' or ‘Very Low Gluten' Products Published by: Food Safety Authority of Ireland 2010, ISBN 1-904465-71-4]. Production To minimize the risk of unintentional contamination of products good manufacturing practices – the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) plan must note all specific conditions. The production plan should be designed to avoid production of allergenic and non allergenic foods during the same shift. If this is impossible, non allergenic products should be produced first to avoid contamination from dust. Ingredients containing gluten should be identified by color-coded containers or stickers. Ingredients containing gluten must be added at the end of the shift after gluten free products are completed and removed. Rework containing gluten should be reused into the same products. Appropriate employee training and labeling for rework can also help to minimize the risk of cross contamination through human error. The possibility of contamination can easily be minimized by using dedicated equipment for the gluten free products. When it is impossible to have a separate building, the use of special barriers is necessary. The use of separate space and separate containers for all materials (as above) is recommended for gluten free production. In such conditions ventilation and dust flow must be well controlled. Dust flow in the plant has a potential to carry over allergens from separate spaces of facilities. [Guidance Note No. 24 Legislation on ‘Gluten-free' Foods and Avoidance of Cross-contamination during Manufacture of ‘Gluten-free' or ‘Very Low Gluten' Products Published by: Food Safety Authority of Ireland 2010, ISBN 1-904465-71-4]. Packing and labeling are also important elements in preventing cross contamination. Packing equipment may also be a source of contamination. The packaging machines and material should be checked for any allergens, e.g. foil coated with releasing agents derived from wheat flour. Appropriate labeling should be use to inform customers who are affected by coeliac disease. Correct labeling should reflect actual and real composition of the product. Labels must also fulfill legislative requirements. To facilitate recognition of gluten free products, labeling must be clear and readable. EU legislation regarding food labeling imposes an obligation to provide true and clear information about ingredients. Alerts to all allergenic ingredients, starch source (plant from witch starch originates) and gluten content are required. The manufacturer is obligated to ensure readability of the above information. Directive 2003/13/EC of 10 February 2003 posted in the Official Journal of the European Union requires that food manufacturers should place notification on labels of any of the fourteen groups of potential allergens responsible for more than 90% of allergic reactions if they have been used as food ingredients (including alcoholic drinks), regardless of the allergen content. The list of allergenic ingredients is constantly being updated. Also, the components derived from allergenic substances must be listed as potential allergens [ Czarniecka-Skubina E., Janicki A. 2009. Znakowani produktów żywnoÅ›ciowych. Informacje żywieniowe i zdrowotne. PrzemysÅ‚ Spożywczy, StyczeÅ„, 34-36; Commission Directive 2003/13/EC of 10 February 2003 amending Directive 96/5/EC on processed cereal-based foods and baby foods for infants and young children. Official Journal of the European Union L 41/33, 14.2.2003] Codex Alimentarius has proposed the introduction of the following descriptions in the vicinity of the product name. If the product comes from natural raw materials that do not contain gluten, it is described as "gluten free by nature," or "product may be used in gluten-free diet" [Hoffmann M., JÄ™drzejczyk H. 2007. Å»ywność bezglutenowa – legislacja i aspekty technologiczne jej produkcji. PostÄ™py Techniki Przetwórstwa Spożywczego, 1, 67-69]. Products low in gluten, are marked with the inscription: "very low gluten foods", "low gluten foods", or gluten-reduced foods [Wojtasik. A, Kunachowicz H., Daniewski W. 2008. Aktualne wymagania dla produktów bezglutenowych w Å›wietle ustaleÅ„ kodeksu żywnoÅ›ciowego. Bromat. Chem. Toksykol., XLI, 2008, 3, str. 229-233; Darewicz M., Jaszczak L.; „Oznakowanie produktów stosowanych w diecie osób chorych na celiakiÄ™", PrzeglÄ…d Piekarski i Cukierniczy, march, 2012.]. Training Employee awareness at all levels of production, beginning with plant growing to finished preparation of proper labels is necessary throughout the gluten free production chain. Everybody must be informed about the consequences of gluten consumption by coeliac patients. Staff who are employed from time to time must be also well trained. Implementation of control procedures and proper documentation will be very helpful in maintaining control. Documentation of the training of every new employee needs to be prepared and maintained. All working stuff and implemented methods must be supervised all the time [Guidance Note No. 24 Legislation on ‘Gluten-free' Foods and Avoidance of Cross-contamination during Manufacture of ‘Gluten-free' or ‘Very Low Gluten' Products Published by: Food Safety Authority of Ireland 2010, ISBN 1-904465-71-4]. By taking into account all aspects mentioned above and striving to make continuous improvements, manufactures are able to produce safe, high quality gluten free products. The human factor is one of the most important elements in this process because only human mistakes can lead to contamination and only good training and awareness at every stage of production stage can produce the best possible product. Implementation of quality management systems like HACCP or GMP assures customers of food quality and safety, while also allowing the producer to lower production costs related to potential human mistakes. However, nothing will really change the fact that all of the factors described above must be implemented in everyday production, ensuring that they are not simply ideas on the piece of paper. Implementation is the key.
  17. Celiac.com 11/24/2017 - Do you have an emergency survival kit at home should disaster strike? Does that include drinking water and gluten-free provisions for at least a few days? The fallout from the latest string of disasters still looms over parts of America; over Houston, Florida and neighboring states devastated by Hurricanes and by resulting floods; and over northern California communities devastated by wildfires. That got us thinking about emergency kits. Gluten-Free-free emergency kits, to be precise. What's in Your Emergency Gluten-Free Food Kit? This list is by no means authoritative or final. In fact, we are inviting you to share any favorites or ideas you may have for your own emergency kit. Your Gluten-free Emergency Kit should include the following: Water: You'll need a minimum of 3 days worth of drinking water for ever person. This includes water for cooking and other non-drinking uses. When it comes to water, it never hurts to have more than you need, so consider stocking even more than a 3 day supply. Food: When assembling a survival kit, you want to put together a kit that will feed each family member family 2 cups of prepared meals 3 times a day. Canned foods like black beans are essential. Any of the following food items are good to have in your kit: Rice, Quinoa and Other Gluten-free Grains: Organic grains like rice and quinoa make great additions to an emergency kit. Be sure to soak your grains before you cook them. If you're on a grain-free diet, quinoa works well, if you can tolerate it. Dried Potatoes: Dried potato flakes can be used to make mashed potatoes. Pasta: Gluten-free pasta are good additions to any emergency kit. Gluten-free Crackers or other snacks: Gluten-free crackers can be part of a no-cook meal, especially when combined with canned tuna or other fish. Canned Pasta Sauces: If you're stocking gluten-free pasta, then be sure to stock your favorite pasta sauce. Pomí makes a boxed pasta sauce that packs easily for emergency storage. There are a number of canned pasta sauces on the market, so stock whatever you like. Canned and Dried Meats: Jerky, Spam, Dried Salami, and Canned Tuna or other Fish make excellent additions to any emergency kit. Homemade jerky can be kept in an air-tight container for about a year. It's a great source of protein, and a great no-cook snack with options like beef, bison, pork, turkey and salmon. Spices and Gluten-free Bouillon cubes or packets: Since you may be making things like rice, or quinoa, or other things that may need some spices to lively them up, spices are a smart addition to your emergency kit. Make sure yours are gluten-free. Keep your kit in a cool, dry place that can be reached in an emergency. Consider building your kit around a printed menu that can be prepared with the items you have stocked. Remember, since gas and electric may not be functioning in an emergency, you may not have full cooking facilities, so plan meals that you can make with minimal preparation and fuss. Want someone to make your emergency kit for you? Check out https://www.emergencykits.com/emergency-food/gluten-free.
  18. Celiac.com 11/23/2017 - Many theories have been fielded about autism. Some research careers have been made by investigating autism, while other careers have been seriously damaged when that research threatened some sacred cows of allopathic medicine. Yet despite all of this active research exploring the world of autism, we continue to experience exponential increases in rates at which autism is diagnosed. And debate continues unabated regarding the causes and appropriate treatments. Part of this increasing trend is, doubtless, because we have gotten better at recognizing the various manifestations of this debilitating condition. However, the evidence indicates that there is a dramatic increase in the absolute incidence of autism. Although frightening, this trend may offer some insight into several of the factors that contribute to this condition. That is the crux of my argument here. Since most prior theories have been tested in isolation, as is the norm in medical investigations, measurement of changes induced by individual contributing factors may either be so mild as to escape notice, or may not have been sufficient to induce symptom mitigation. Similarly, if preconceived notions shape resistance to some of these hypotheses, we may miss the most salient characteristics of autism. I have therefore chosen to combine several findings to form a testable hypothesis. I'll let posterity and the reader be the judges of whether this speculation is worthy of further investigation. We begin with Dr. Kalle Reichelt, who sought to understand autism and other psychiatric illnesses through the prism suggested by Dr. Curtis Dohan's work investigating schizophrenic patients. While Dohan et al reported positive results among schizophrenics from a gluten free, dairy free diet, Reichelt and his colleagues identified unique peptides in the urinary excretions from patients on the autistic spectrum and explored their possible connections with gluten and dairy proteins(1). A leaky gut appeared to be a precondition for autism. In 1996, D'Eufemia and others reported increased intestinal permeability in almost half of their autistic patients, using synthetic sugars that can be measured in the urine (2). Gardner has reported disturbed gastrointestinal function in autism. Reichelt and Knivsberg have also published reports of improved social interaction and communication among some children with autism following institution of a gluten-free, casein-free diet (4). However, their investigations reveal that the diet must be consistent, strict, and long-lasting to allow the gradual dissipation of the psychoactive peptides from these foods. Others have reported that this dissipation process can take up to 12 months (5). It is important to note that, while the work indicating that the symptoms of autism can often be mitigated by the strict, long-term avoidance of gluten and dairy, none of these investigators claimed that this diet can cure autism or even eliminates all of its symptoms. The diet simply helped children improve to the point where they could function better in school and society by mitigating their most severe and limiting symptoms (4). Many of these researchers postulate that improved integrity of the intestinal barrier and reduced ingestion of psychoactive peptides in the diet are a likely root of these improvements. Against this backdrop of widespread recognition of gastrointestinal dysfunction, excessive intestinal permeability, and symptom mitigation through dietary restriction in many autistic children, Dr. Andrew Wakefield, along with 12 other researchers, published their discovery of a pattern of intestinal inflammation and compromised barrier function in 11 of 12 subjects with pervasive developmental disorders, including 9 children with autism. Based on histories provided by parents, health visitors, and general practitioners, a pattern of behavioral/autistic symptom onset was seen within 14 days of combined vaccination for measles, mumps, and rubella. The average time to symptom onset was about 6 days. In the same report, Wakefield et al state "We did not prove an association between measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine and the syndrome described." Later on the same page, they state "If there is a causal link between measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine and this syndrome, a rising incidence might be anticipated after the introduction of this vaccine in the UK, in 1988." [my emphasis] Wakefield et al identify several reports connecting vaccine-strain measles virus with Crohn's disease and autoimmune hepatitis. They also hearken to earlier work that implicates inflamed or dysfunctional intestines in the behavior changes seen in some children. They point to other factors that suggest a genetic predisposition may also be a precondition of developing autism, along with markers of vitamin B12 deficiency (which many readers will recognize as a common finding in celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity). Clearly this group was not attacking the MMR vaccine or its importance to public health. Nonetheless, in the same issue of The Lancet, no less than six letters, written by a combined total of 21 authors, attacked Wakefield et al because of the impact that their findings might have on public health. Over the ensuing months and years, Wakefield's methods were criticized and denigrated. One of the more emotional attacks alleged academic fraud on Wakefield's part (7). He has been vilified in the public and professional media as a brigand. Yet he and his research group were careful to avoid making any claims beyond having found a form of bowel disease (lymphoid hyperplasia) in 9 of their subjects, and non-specific colitis in 11 of their subjects, along with reporting the close temporal association of onset of behavioral symptoms and MMR vaccines as reported by parents, health visitors, and general practitioners. They would have been remiss had they failed to report this association. Further, there were 12 other researchers who put their names to this research. Surely we cannot suspect that all 13 of these professionals would risk their careers to perpetrate a fraud! Meanwhile, as these attacks were ginning up, a research group at the University of Maryland reported that, in genetically susceptible individuals, a protein they dubbed "zonulin" can, when gluten is ingested, induce changes to intestinal permeability (8, 9). Does the gluten free, dairy free diet reduce excessive intestinal permeability? We know it does in people with celiac disease (8), but what impact would or could it have on children with the lymphoid hyperplasia and/or non-specific colitis identified by Wakefield et al? And does reduced zonulin production due to restriction of these foods explain the benefit experienced by many children with autism? Perhaps these questions are also relevant to another area of autism research reflected by identification of specific strains of clostridium infection in autism, first postulated by Bolte (10). Dr. S. Finegold and his colleagues demonstrated that 8 of 10 children with late onset autism showed transient reductions of symptoms of autism in response to oral vancomycin which returned when vancomycin was withdrawn (11). This is an antibiotic that is usually used in cases of antibiotic-resistant infections. Because this group identified an unusually large number and variety of strains of clostridium in their autistic subjects, as compared with controls, and because many clostridium variants excrete neurotoxic substances, their use of vancomycin was given to target clostridium. However, elements of Finegold's work and Wakefield's work may be taken to suggest some overlap. For instance, could the added clostridium load in autistic children contribute to the intestinal inflammation and permeability seen in Wakefield's report? Or could the MMR vaccinations produce conditions that are more hospitable to antibiotic resistant, neurotoxic strains of clostridia? Or could symptoms induced by MMR lead to administration of antibiotics that provide favorable conditions in the gut for proliferation of clostridium? To further complicate this issue, Dr. Stephanie Seneff has identified vitamin D deficiency, and popular use of statin drugs, in combination with reduced dietary consumption of cholesterol and fats as possible factors in autism. She implicates these deficiencies as arising either in utero or in infancy and she specifically cites work demonstrating that cholesterol, fats, and vitamin D are important components of healthy immune function (14). Putting it all together The hypothesis embodied herein asserts that at some stage the autistic child has: some predisposition to autism; a multi-dimensionally compromised immune system; been exposed to multiple and uncommon strains of clostridium which lead to the colonization of the gut by these antibiotic-resistant bacteria; are suffering from some degree of vitamin D deficiency and are eating a diet that is deficient in fats and cholesterol. Further, as the child develops one or more of the symptoms or sequelae of clostridium colonization or other infection, antibiotics are administered to provide relief from these or other symptoms of infection, sometimes including chronic ear infections. Thus, the competing gut bacteria that might otherwise keep these strains of clostridia in check are wiped out, permitting broader proliferation of multiple strains of clostridia. Similarly, the MMR vaccine, which, by design, engages and taxes the immune system. In the immune system's weakened state resulting from vaccination and dietary opioids (13), increased numbers of unusual strains of clostridium, abnormal gut biome, cholesterol deficiency, vitamin D deficiency, and perhaps, other nutrient deficiencies, also reduces systemic surveillance for, and antibody combat with, the clostridia and/or remnants of MMR vaccine. The neurotoxic excreta from clostridia and MMR are released into the intestinal lumen and by zonulin's action to widen the junctions between epithelial cells, these toxins are thus given access to the bloodstream. By the same pathway, opioids, other psychoactive peptides from gluten and dairy, along with other undigested and partly digested proteins, which may be harmful, also reach the bloodstream. From there, they travel to the BBB where zonulin again opens gaps in this barrier and allows the clostridium-derived toxins, opioids, and other impurities access to the brain where they alter blood-flow patterns, damage neurological tissues, and perhaps do other damage that has not yet been recognized. Ultimately, this damage and dynamics lead to impeded social performance, intellectual performance, and sometimes, induce startlingly abnormal behaviors. Although this picture appears bleak, and much of it simply reflects the several dietary miscues of the last and our current century, there are corrective steps that can sometimes improve these children's lives. Vitamin D, vitamin B12, and other supplements can be administered to address deficiencies. Because of the associated gut problems, sub-lingual vitamins, and exposure to sunlight without sun screen may both be good starting points. A strict, long-term gluten free, dairy free diet should also be on the menu, even if the whole family has to follow it to ensure that the autistic child does not rebel due to feeling deprived. High levels of cholesterol, saturated and mono-unsaturated fats should also comprise a large part of the diet. One or more courses of vancomycin may also be worth trying. In isolation, the benefits of antibiotics alone will likely be short-lived, as reported by Finegold, but in combination with these other strategies, may extend the benefits of this drug. New developments in antibiotics research may lead to isolation of protective substances from hens' egg shells that may provide more appropriate antibiotic relief and therefore benefit these children even more (15). Most of the research, to date, has focused on one of these factors in isolation. However, if an immune system is compromised by any or all of cholesterol deficiency, vitamin D deficiency, vitamin B12 deficiency, dietary shortages of cholesterol and fats, lingering, chronic sequelae of MMR vaccination, opioids from gluten and/or dairy, and an unusual and wide variety of clostridia, then it seems unreasonable to expect to reverse this condition through implementing only one of the interventions suggested by the above. Each and all of these other components should be addressed when attempting to remediate autism. In the context of these dietary and lifestyle changes, appropriate antibiotics may lead to more permanent improvements for the autistic child. This would be the greatest gift that a physician, parent, or caretaker could give to these children. One may hope. References: Reichelt KL, Hole K, Hamberger A, Saelid G, Edminson PD, Braestrup CB, Lingjaerde O, Ledaal P, Orbeck H. Biologically active peptide-containing fractions in schizophrenia and childhood autism. Adv Biochem Psychopharmacol. 1981;28:627-43. D'Eufemia P, Celli M, Finocchiaro R, Pacifico L, Viozzi L, Zaccagnini M, Cardi E, Giardini O. Abnormal intestinal permeability in children with autism. Acta Paediatr. 1996 Sep;85(9):1076-9. Gardner MLG (1994) in Physiology of the gastrointestinal tract (Johnson LR : edit) Rave Press, NY pp 1795-1820 Knivsberg AM, Reichelt KL, Høien T, Nødland M. A randomised, controlled study of dietary intervention in autistic syndromes. Nutr Neurosci. 2002 Sep;5(4):251-61. Paul, K., Henker, J., Todt, A., Eysold, R. (1985) Zoeliaki- Kranken Kindern in Abhaengigkeit von der Ernaehrung Seitschrift der Klinische Medizin 40; 707-709. as reported in Reichelt K (1990). The Effect of Gluten-Free Diet on Urinary Peptide Excretion and Clinical State in Schizophrenia. Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine. 5(4): 223-239. Wakefield AJ, Murch SH, Anthony A, Linnell J, Casson DM, Malik M, Berelowitz M, Dhillon AP, Thomson MA, Harvey P, Valentine A, Davies SE, Walker-Smith JA. Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children. Lancet. 2004 Mar 6;363(9411):750. Flaherty DK. The vaccine-autism connection: a public health crisis caused by unethical medical practices and fraudulent science. Ann Pharmacother. 2011 Oct;45(10):1302-4. Epub 2011 Sep 13. Fasano A, Not T, Wang W, Uzzau S, Berti I, Tommasini A, Goldblum SE. Zonulin, a newly discovered modulator of intestinal permeability, and its expression in coeliac disease. Lancet. 2000 Apr 29;355(9214):1518-9. Clemente MG, De Virgiliis S, Kang JS, Macatagney R, Musu MP, Di Pierro MR, Drago S, Congia M, Fasano A. Early effects of gliadin on enterocyte intracellular signalling involved in intestinal barrier function. Gut. 2003 Feb;52(2):218-23. Bolte ER. Autism and Clostridium tetani. Med Hypotheses. 1998 Aug;51(2):133-44. Finegold SM, Molitoris D, Song Y, Liu C, Vaisanen ML, Bolte E, McTeague M, Sandler R, Wexler H, Marlowe EM, Collins MD, Lawson PA, Summanen P, Baysallar M, Tomzynski TJ, Read E, Johnson E, Rolfe R, Nasir P, Shah H, Haake DA, Manning P, Kaul A. Gastrointestinal microflora studies in late-onset autism. Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Sep 1;35(Suppl 1):S6-S16. http://stephanie-on-health.blogspot.ca/2008/11/sunscreen-and-low-fat-diet-recipe-for.html Hoggan R. Considering wheat, rye, and barley proteins as aids to carcinogens. Med Hypotheses. 1997 Sep;49(3):285-8 Seneff S, Davidson R, Mascitelli L. Might cholesterol sulfate deficiency contribute to the development of autistic spectrum disorder? Med Hypotheses. 2012 Feb;78(2):213-7. Epub 2011 Nov 17. Wellman-Labadie O, Lakshminarayanan R, Hinckeemail MT Antimicrobial properties of avian eggshell-specific C-type lectin-like proteins. FEBS Letters Volume 582, Issue 5 , Pages 699-704, 5 March 2008
  19. Celiac.com 11/21/2017 - Jersey Mike's Subs sandwich chain is known for its in-house baked bread, and tasty submarine sandwiches. To offer gluten-free buns for its customers, Jersey Mike's has partnered with Udi's. Starting in December, Denver-based Udi's will provide fully cooked, individually wrapped gluten-free buns at all 1,320 Jersey Mike's locations nationwide. The Udi's gluten-free bun will cost customers about an extra $1.50 for regular gluten-free subs and $3 for "giant" subs, according Jersey Mike's chief operating officer Mike Manzo. To their credit, Jersey Mike's did not rush this through. The company worked to test the buns at over 200 locations in six states over a two year stretch. According to Manzo, the company focused on gaining customer trust, and building the project slowly. During that time, Jersey Mike's also worked with the Gluten Intolerance Group to develop procedures and a training video to prevent cross-contamination for people with celiac disease. To avoid cross-contamination, when making a gluten-free sandwich, workers must wash their hands, change their gloves, wipe down the work counter, and put down a separate sheet of clean paper. They then make the sub. Beginning Dec. 4th, 2017, you can look for Udi's gluten-free bun at Jersey Mike's locations near you. Learn more about Jersey Mike's and find a location near you at Jersey Mike's website.
  20. Celiac.com 11/18/2017 - Just looking at its name, one might wonder if buckwheat is safe for people on a gluten-free diet. However, unlike its name, buckwheat does not naturally contain any wheat or gluten. As a result, buckwheat is considered safe for people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Turns out that buckwheat and wheat are from different, unrelated botanical families. As with quinoa, buckwheat is the seed of a flowering plant, as such it is not considered a grain or a cereal. Buckwheat is actually closely related to rhubarb. It is an excellent source of fiber and nutrients. A serving of cooked buckwheat groats, the small triangular seeds, offers 17 grams of dietary fiber and 22 grams of protein. Buckwheat is not only nutritious, but it contains rutin, a compound shown to strengthen capillary walls and improve circulation. As such, buckwheat, is also regarded as beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. As with grains, buckwheat can become contaminated with wheat during processing, transportation or if it is grown in fields also used to grow wheat. To make sure your buckwheat is gluten-free, it is important to find certified gluten-free buckwheat. Also, remember that some products labled as buckwheat may include wheat flour, so double check to make sure your product is labled gluten-free. Otherwise, buckwheat is a healthy, nutritious gluten-free alternative for people with celiac disease.
  21. Celiac.com 11/17/2017 - Quinoa is actually a seed, but let's not allow taxonomy to come between us and dinner. For our purposes, the fact that quinoa is not a grain may be appropriate, because this salad recipe is not a salad in the traditional sense of lettuces ad vegetables. In fact, this dish is more of a fruit salad with beans and quinoa. Whatever you call it, it's delicious. Toasting your quinoa before cooking before cooking enhances the delicately nutty flavor. Rinsing it well removes the bitter outer coating of saponin. Ingredients: 1 cup canned black beans, rinsed ½ cup quinoa 1 cup water ¼ cup orange juice ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 2 tablespoons rice vinegar 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil 1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger 1 medium mango, diced 1 small red bell pepper, diced 2 scallions, thinly sliced Dash of salt Directions: Cook quinoa as per directions. Mix together the rest of the ingredients together with the mango in a bowl. Add cooked quinoa and toss to combine. Serve chilled.
  22. Celiac.com 11/15/2017 - Quinoa is regarded as safe for people with celiac disease. For many years, some celiac support groups listed quinoa as unsafe due to cross-contamination concerns. But any grain is unsafe for celiacs if it is contaminated with wheat, rye or barley. Some grains have a higher risk of such contamination, others have a low risk. Based on its low risk for cross-contamination, Celiac.com has had quinoa on our safe list since 1995. A vast amount of evidence supports that listing. The latest research shows that celiac patients can safely tolerate up to 50 g of quinoa daily for 6 weeks. The researchers in this test point out that further studies are needed to assess long-term effects of quinoa consumption. In the short-term test, the researchers looked at 19 treated celiac patients who ate 50 g of quinoa every day for 6 weeks as part of their regular gluten-free diet. The team evaluated diet, serology, and gastrointestinal parameters, and made histological assessments of 10 patients, both before and after they consumed quinoa. The results show that celiac patients seem to tolerate quinoa well, and it doesn't trigger any symptoms or cause any gut damage or dysfunction. The team found normal gut structure and mucosa to confirm that assessment. In fact, patients saw a general improvement histological and serological results, so better gut conditions and less blood antibodies to gluten in patients who ate quinoa. Celiac patients who ate quinoa for 6 weeks also experienced a mild reduction in blood pressure. Overall, this is the first clinical study to show that celiac patients can safely tolerate up to 50 g of quinoa daily for 6 weeks. Obviously, future studies need to look at the safety of long-term quinoa consumption. That said, quinoa seems to be safe for celiac patients on a gluten-free diet. If you really want to be sure, quinoa grown in main producer countries of Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador, where practically no wheat is grown, is probably the safest bet for those on a gluten-free diet.
  23. Celiac.com 11/14/2017 - One reason conventional beers remain unsafe for people with celiac disease is that they contain gluten fragments that push the finished product over the 20ppm standard for gluten-free products. Such gluten fragments in conventional beers render them unsuitable for people with celiac disease. There's been some confusion about the best ways to measure gluten levels in fermented foods and beverages. That confusion has prompted more confusion over the methods used to remove gluten from beers brewed with traditional barley. Are such beers gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease? Many barley-based beers crafted to remove gluten use proprietary precipitation and/or enzymes, such as prolyl endopeptidases (PEP), that break down the gluten molecules. When these beers are tested for gluten using using competitive ELISA, the industry standard, they often test under 20 mg/kg, which is deemed safe for people with celiac disease. But are those tests accurate? Do the products the 20 ppm standard for gluten-free? A team of researchers recently set out to assess such results using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis. The research team included Michelle L. Colgrave, Keren Byrne, and Crispin A. Howitt. They are affiliated with CSIRO Agriculture and Food in Australia. The team's analyses showed gluten peptides derived from hydrolyzed fragments, many >30 kDa in size. This may render gluten levels above 20 ppm in the final product. As expected, the team found various types of barley gluten in all conventional beers they analyzed. However, they also found gluten fragments in some gluten-removed beers. This indicates that gluten breakdown was incomplete in some commercial gluten-removed beers. Furthermore, the research team was able to spot the peptides that made up the unbroken gluten fragments. They suggest that these results may warrant further optimization of PEP gluten reduction methods in commercial settings. Since most manufacturers place a heavy premium on product quality, I would look for brewers to use this kind of information to improve their gluten-reduction processes going forward. We clearly need to learn more about the scope of the potential issue. These analyses were made using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Because they make precise measurements of small amounts of things, they are not practical for analyzing commercial products. So, we definitely need a better way to measure gluten levels in fermented products, since current methods can provide inaccurate results. What does this all mean for people with celiac disease? Obviously traditional beers beers with gluten levels over 20 ppm are best avoided. Gluten-free beers are likely fine. For celiacs who tolerate gluten-removed beers, there's little reason to change. If you have a favorite brand that works for you, that's likely okay. However, based on these findings, there is reason to be vigilant when trying a new gluten-removed beer. We advise people to follow their gut when consuming any product labeled gluten-free or gluten-reduced. As always, choose your products carefully. Even trusted products can change, or have something wrong with them from time to time. It's good practice to avoid any product seems to upset your stomach or trigger symptoms. Also, if you think a food labeled gluten-free is contaminated, by all means, report it to the FDA, and consider reporting it to the manufacturer. Lastly, it seems that manufacturers may want to take a closer look at their brewing process and their final product to be sure that gluten levels are under 20ppm. In the meantime, stay tuned for more developments on this and related stories. Source: J. Agric. Food Chem., Article ASAP. DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.7b03742
  24. Celiac.com 11/10/2017 - Gluten-free foods are more popular than ever, and the range of choices and the availability of gluten-free products continues to expand. One of the more significant changes in the last few years has been the entry of major players in a market once dominated by small companies. General Mills has taken their ubiquitous Cheerios line gluten-free, and is now one of the largest manufacturers of gluten-free food in the U.S. Udi's has grown from a once small company into a gluten-free bread giant. Major retailers like Amazon have taken a bite out of numerous smaller businesses. The gluten-free graveyard is piled high with the bones of once great companies that gave up the ghost. Here are some gluten-free companies that used to be popular, but are now out of business, went bankrupt, or no longer selling gluten-free products: Bimbo's Goodbye Gluten Blue Ribbon Bakery Bready Bye Bye Gluti / Gluten Out Cookies for Me Dads Pizza Crust Del's Gluten-Free Eats El Peto gluten-free Meals / Your Dinner Secret Gia's Gluten-Free Bakery Gluten Free A2Z Gluten Intolerance Essentials Glutenfreeapp.com Gluten-Free Artisan Bakery Gluten-Free Trading Company, LLC / Gluten-Free Warehouse GlutenFreeVitamins.com / Point Natural Gluten Less Dining The Lean on Me Baking Company Meals in a Minute Nostalgic Cookies S'Better Farms Sofella The Lean on Me Baking Company Toovaloo Gluten Free Versameal Zeer.com Do you remember any of these once proud gluten-free companies? If so, share your recollections in our comments section. And definitely let us know about any we missed.
  25. GLUTEN-FREE YAKITORI

    Celiac.com 11/09/2017 - Don't let the foreign sound turn you off. 'Yakotori' is just a Japanese term for grilled chicken on skewers. And what could be more familiar and family friendly than grilled chicken on skewers? In Japan, yakitori is commonly eaten as a snack with beer or other alcohol. However, when served with rice and other dishes, it can also form the base of a proper dinner. Yakitori is best cooked on a grill or over coals, but you can also do it in a frying pan. You can serve yakitori with sauce, or with no sauce, and just salt, as desired. They go great with your favorite gluten-free beer. Ingredients: 1 pound chicken thigh meat ½ cup gluten-free soy sauce ¼ cup sugar ¼ cup sake ¼ cup mirin 6-8 green onions) vegetable oil salt Directions: Soak 6-inch bamboo skewers in water for about 30 minutes. Mix soy sauce, sugar, sake, and mirin in a small pot, and boil for 8-10 minutes until the sauce gets a little thick. Remove from heat and set aside. Cut chicken thighs into 1" cubes, and cut scallions into 1" long pieces (use thicker parts). Place alternate layers of chicken and scallions onto the skewers. Spread oil thinly in a frying pan, and heat to medium. Cook skewered meat at medium high heat for 5 minutes. Turn and cook another 5 minutes until browned and cooked through. For Yakitori with salt, skewer just chicken pieces and sprinkle with salt. Cook, and serve with no sauce. For yakitori with sauce, dip cooked chicken in the sauce, and serve. Rice, miso soup, and a small salad make for a great meal. Gluten-free beer is optional.