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Found 7 results

  1. ryann14

    Gluten free roommates

    Hey fellow gluten free eaters! I am looking for a gluten free roommate or roommates in the DFW area of Texas. If any of you all could help it would be great. Thanks, Natalie
  2. ryann14

    Looking for rommates

    Hey fellow gluten free eaters! I am looking for a gluten free roommate or roommates in the DFW area of Texas. If any of you all could help it would be great. Thanks, Natalie
  3. manderoni22

    Camp Celiac 2013

    Hey! I'm Mandy. I'll be turning 15 in July, and I'm from Maryland. I was diagnosed with Celiac when I was almost 2 years old. I haven't really been on this forum for a year buuuut since Camp Celiac is coming up I wanted to know who was going since this is my first time, and I won't have many friends there! So, Camp Celiac, Rhode Island, August! Who's going?
  4. So what do you do when a group of friends invites you to a place you obviously can't eat at? Like pizza place or sandwich shop. Every option seems to have a downside. I can either politely decline and be totally left out, try to make everyone change their minds about the restaurant chosed, or just sit in the restaurant with a rumbly stomach. I really curious how others deal with this. Thanks
  5. Fire Fairy

    Opinions Wanted

    Okay so long story short after going gluten-free I noticed a lactose intolerance then I noticed an egg intolerance. Learning about my food after going gluten-free I saw too many videos on animal cruelty and gave up meat. So a little over a year ago I claimed the mantle of Vegan. I added a ton of Vegan friends and groups on FB. Well now I can have dairy and egg again. I totally understand Vegan's but at the same time 1) It's just so hard to find Vegan gluten-free food when socializing with non-gluten-free non-vegans. 2) I firmly believe if the world became a Vegetarian Utopia the dairy and egg industry would take care of itself and there would be tons of dairy and egg alternatives everywhere. So why I need your opinions.....what do I do in regards to all my Vegan friends? Do I delete the groups and leave all the friends and wait for the post where I say something that isn't Vegan? Do I post in one of the groups why I'm removing myself? Do I delete the folks I don't talk to regularly and send the others a group message explained I'm no longer Vegan and if that bothers them they need to delete me? I wouldn't be so concerned (maybe) but I posted a month or so back asking what exactly ethically gathered wool meant and I had a few folks really angry at me for even asking. Also I've seen a few folks on the war path about the Hobbit and I fully intend to go see it! (Some of the animals used in filming were accidentally hurt because the farm they were kept on had too many hills and holes etc.) I am sadden by those animals being harmed or even dying because the land was treacherous but I don't think for a moment it was done to be cruel and that right there is enough to earn me the wrath of a lot of Vegans.
  6. I am 15 years old and was diagnosed with celiac disease almost two years ago. After many years of stomach pains and rheumatoid arthritis I was relieved to finally have an answer. Even today I still remember the shock that comes with the realization that you will never have another bite of "normal" food again. After coping with the different emotional struggles that accompany a life changing diagnosis, I still had some difficulties. Most of these had to do with my friends. Over time I have learned how to handle the awkward social encounters pertaining to my celiac disease. Here are some of the most common: Refusal: I had some friends that flat out refused to eat in front of me, in order to not make me "feel bad.". Although I am flattered that they would sacrifice something for me, this reaction made me feel uncomfortable. I feel the best way to handle this situation is to be prepared if possible. If you know that for example, your class is having a party, bring some gluten free cookies. This will help you avoid an awkward conversation as well as make you feel more comfortable and less alone. Insensitive jokes: I also found that some of my friends make rude comments about my incapability to eat their food. I urge you to remember that this is a reaction due to a combination of ignorance and not knowing what to say. I usually use humor or sarcasm to lighten the situation. If someone continues to be rude after talking to them, it gives me a hint that I probably shouldn't be friends with them. A true friends will except with or with out celiac disease. Embarrassment: When I was first diagnosed with celiac disease I was afraid to tell my friends and eat in front of them. I was really nervous about bringing my "different" food to school. My mom ended up taking me on a one on one shopping trip to find the best tasting gluten free food we could find (It was really fun.) When I faced my insecurity and ate at school, I was shocked to find that my friends loved the food. I think that because I felt so confident about the food my mom bought me, my friends were more interested in trying it. Also, just remember your friends care about you and want to help you. Carelessness: One of the largest problems I have experienced is a friend exposingme to gluten by accident. For example, a friend drinking out of my water bottle, or sticking their "glutenized" hand in my pretzel bag. Usually I see them and resolve the situation, but it is still important to talk to your friends about accidentally exposing you to gluten. Most friends are very understanding, but everyone is human and therefore makes mistakes. Baking: Soon after I was diagnosed with celiac disease, a boy asked me to the school dance by giving me a homemade gluten free pretzel. It was really sweet and I felt really bad that I couldn't eat it. Because he was not aware of cross contamination, I could not be sure he took the proper baking precautions. I someone bakes you gluten free food, politely except it but explain to them that you can't eat it. Cross contamination is not something to mess around with, and must be taken seriously. Friends will understand. Disbelief: Because of my celiac disease and arthritis I missed a lot of school this past year. I had some friends the refused to believe my reaction to gluten was actually bad. I found this problem sorted itself out over time. As a beginner I sometimes messed up my diet, and got violently sick in front of my friends. Eventually all of my peers believed me, I just needed to be patient and understanding with them. Although living with celiac disease is hard, I find that it is a part of my identity that I have learned to like. After going through embarrassing situations, my confidence has increased and my friendships have strengthened. When dealing with your friends remember to be patient and know that everyone makes mistakes. As a teenager these situations can be embarrassing, so remember that you are special and your illness is not something to be ashamed of. I can honestly say that I am proud to be gluten free!
  7. This article originally appeared in the Winter 2006 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. Celiac.com 04/30/2010 - The gluten-free lifestyle is a big part of who we are. So when friends, relatives, and loved ones don’t get it—I should clarify—when they seem to choose not to get it—we sometimes get a little cranky. I know—I was reminded of how it feels when loved ones don’t choose to get it this past Thanksgiving when one of my relatives who shall remain nameless glutenized the mayo jar. Now I realize it may seem petty to get tweaked about someone dipping a knife in a mayo jar—but it had gluten all over it, and worse yet, she did the same thing last Thanksgiving, and I threw a tizzy about it then. Realizing the first dip alone contaminated the entire jar (of course it was the club-sized jar that is the size of a small Volkswagen), there was no point in stopping her from doing it again. But I watched incredulously as she taunted me, dipping the knife into the jar—then onto the (gluten) bread—over, and over, and over again. How many gobs of mayo does one need on a piece of bread?!? I found myself seething, and my blood boiled with every dip-and-spread motion; I swear she was doing it intentionally. Yes, I know I should have had a squeeze bottle handy, and I even write about that in my books. My mistake, but I also write about doing the “gob drop,” which is—as the name implies—the process of taking a gob of (insert condiment here) and dropping it onto said piece of gluten. Using a separate knife, you spread. It’s really not that tough. The bigger point here is that it made me wonder why, after fourteen years of going through this, she didn’t care more about our gluten-free lifestyle. I spent about six minutes pondering this when I remembered that it’s not that she doesn’t care—maybe she does, and maybe she doesn’t. The bigger point is that she wasn’t thinking about it at that moment—and that’s okay. This is our lifestyle, and we love it. Those friends and family who do care enough to call and make sure the meal they’re serving us is gluten-free are to be cherished. Those who make a special trip to the health food store to buy a mix and make gluten-free cookies are to be downright hailed as saints. Even those who make a beautiful gluten-free meal and then top it with teriyaki sauce (of the gluten-containing variety) because they don’t know any better are to be adored for trying. I write about this stuff in my books, and it surprised me a little to find myself getting miffed about such a petty thing. I thought I had outgrown those feelings 14 years ago. I guess my point is that we all face certain challenges from time to time, and we need to put our brightest face forward and meet those challenges with a good attitude, lest they get the best of us. The most important thing that helps keep me on track, for what it’s worth, is to remember that the gluten-free lifestyle is the key to our health and ultimate happiness. We’re blessed to know that a simple change in lifestyle is all it takes to be perfectly healthy—and that’s worth a lotta mayo.
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