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Found 17 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/10/2017 - Grilling season is nearly upon us once again, and once again, the call of cooking outside begins to beckon. While there's no dearth of good things to throw on the grill, this recipe for grilled garlic prawns with black pepper is a great place to start. Ingredients: 1 pound large prawns, peeled, deveined 2 teaspoons paprika, plus more for garnish 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon coarsely ground pepper 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus more for grill Kosher salt Lime wedges and paprika as garnish Preparation: Whisk paprika, garlic, pepper, lime juice, and 2 tablespoons oil in a large bowl. Add prawns and toss until well-coated. Add salt and mix a bit more. Skewer 5-6 shrimp at a time onto double skewers, until all shrimp are ready to grill. Prepare a grill for medium-high heat; clean grates well, then oil the grill lightly. Grill prawns, turning once, until cooked through and lightly charred, about 2-3 minutes each side. Serve with lime wedges and paprika.
  2. Celiac.com 05/17/2017 - Want a great gluten-free entree that's tasty and easy to make? Made with ingredients you likely have laying around in your kitchen, these honey-glazed garlic pork chops are just the thing. Toss them on the grill, baste, and you've got the makings of a solid meal. Ingredients: 6 pork chops ½ cup ketchup 3 tablespoons honey 3 tablespoons gluten-free soy sauce 3 cloves garlic, crushed Directions: Lightly oil the grill grate, and heat to medium high. In a medium mixing bowl, blend the ketchup, honey, soy sauce, and garlic. Place the chops on the hot grill, and lightly sear them on both sides. Lightly brush glaze onto each side of the chops as they cook. Grill until no longer pink in the center, about 6-8 minutes per side. Serve with your favorite sides.
  3. Celiac.com 05/06/2017 - Want a great gluten-free dinner idea that's tasty and ridiculously easy to make? This recipe for honey-glazed garlic chicken is just what you've been looking for. Just toss the chicken into the slow-cooker, blend the ingredients, pour over the chicken, and turn it on. Come back later, and dinner is ready to go. Serve over rice or gluten-free pasta, and add your favorite side for a delicious dinner. Ingredients: 6 skinless, boneless chicken thighs ½ cup ketchup ½ cup gluten-free soy sauce 3 tablespoons honey 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon dried basil Directions: Arrange chicken thighs in the slow cooker. Whisk soy sauce, ketchup, honey, garlic, and basil together in a bowl. Pour over the chicken. Cook on low for 6 hours. Serve with rice, or your favorite gluten-free pasta.
  4. I tried a Q Cups™ Savory Garlic & Mushroom for lunch yesterday and was pleasantly surprised. Many of the meals in a cup that I've tried are overpowering in flavor, but not Q Cups™. The hearty texture and taste came mostly from the quinoa and shiitake mushrooms. There was a mild hint of seasonings that included chives, garlic, celery, thyme, and bay leaves. My overall impression was that in just 5 minutes I could have a healthy, gluten-free meal. Q Cups™ are perfect for a quick lunch at the office, or to take on camping trips or planes. Visit their site for more info.
  5. A few months before my 22nd birthday and college graduation (late March), I started noticing daily GI issues including gas, bloating and diarrhea . I passed most of this off on the quality of the food at my school's dining hall, but once I moved out, the symptoms did not cease. In April, I went in to see the school nurse for a UTI, and as part of standard procedure, they sent the test offsite for further analysis. Later that week I received an email from the Nurse Practitioner that I had also tested positive for E. Coli, but the MacroBid I had been prescribed for the UTI should also work on the E. Coli. (Maybe of note, I was in Belize, Mexico, and Honduras for a week in early March). Took the antibiotics, and symptoms did not resolve. After graduation, I went on the Whole 30 diet to cut out soy, grains (including gluten), and dairy (I have been mildly lactose-intolerant for over a decade). My symptoms almost all but disappeared. After, I went back to eating indiscriminately, and my GI issues seemed to worsen exponentially. In July, I went to my GP and ended up doing a stool sample so she could have me tested again for E. Coli, but the test was negative. I have tried for the most part to cut gluten and dairy from my diet, but now even other grains, such as rice, give me problems where I had none in the past. Garlic is also a new problem, and has my gut feel like a gurgling hot tub. Just this past week (Mid-September), chicken pan-fried in coconut oil (with which I cooked during the Whole 30 program without issue) seems to have me running to the bathroom about 30-60 min after consumption. In the past month, eggs are giving me trouble as well. I'm scheduled to see a GI in DC in October, but looking for relief and advice in the mean time. My symptoms range from gas to diarrhea to abdominal pain, but have never included constipation. (Maybe of note, I had a strange rash on my nose that took several week to heal recently, closely resembled rug-burn, scabbing, and neosporin seemed to help a bit, but its still not back to normal). Any advice would be very welcome!
  6. Celiac.com 04/13/2016 - Fresh leek soup is a rich, creamy, velvety wonder to behold, and a delight to the taste buds. This recipe adds a dash of garlic to deliver a symphony of rich flavorful soup. Ingredients: 2 whole leeks 2 whole garlic bulbs 1 quart chicken stock 4 medium Yukon gold potatoes 1 cup cream, plus more to garnish 1 tablespoon butter Olive oil Salt Directions: Heat oven to 400°F. Slice away the top of the bulbs of garlic so that the cloves inside are exposed. Drizzle with olive oil, wrap in aluminum foil and place in the oven for 30 minutes. Remove, allow to cool and, with a firm hold of the base of the bulb, squeeze the soft, caramelized garlic into a small bowl. Remove the tops, or the darkest green leaves from the leeks. Slice the stalks in half and rinse well. Chop fine. Peel and roughly chop potatoes into small cubes. Heat butter and a drizzle of olive oil in a large pot. Add chopped leeks and stir until softened, around 10 minutes. Add 4 cups of stock, the cubed potatoes, the soft garlic and a teaspoon of salt. Combine, bring to the boil then reduce heat to medium. Cover and allow to simmer for 30 minutes or until the vegetables have softened significantly. Carefully, in very small batches, pour soup into a blender and process until smooth. Return to the pot on low heat and add cream. Serve in bowls with a bit of cream, and a sprinkle of fresh black pepper.
  7. Celiac.com 09/10/2015 - Want an easy, sure-fire hit for your next cookout? These grilled garlic shrimp are just the ticket! They are super easy to make and will have your guests coming back for more. Ingredients: 1½ pounds jumbo shrimp, cleaned, deveined, shelled 1 garlic clove, grated 1½ tablespoons dry white wine 2 tablespoons olive oil Garlic butter sauce 3 tablespoons butter 2 garlic clove, grated ¼ cup dry white wine diced red peppers (optional) Directions: Heat grill to medium heat. For the marinade, place the shrimp, garlic, white wine and olive in a large bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Marinate for 10-15 minutes. Grill the shrimp for about 3-4 minutes until cooked. Movecooked shrimp to a plate. For the sauce, add the butter, white wine, and garlic to a small pan over low heat. When the butter is melted, and the garlic fragrant, remove from the heat. Serve butter sauce on the side, or pour over the grilled shrimp.
  8. Celiac.com 09/08/2015 - Here's a quick little shrimp recipe that will dress things up nicely for your next meal, without making you work too hard. Perfect with drinks before dinner, these shrimp are quickly roasted and then paired with Parmesan chive butter for a tasty snack with just the right amount of flair. Ingredients: 2 pounds raw, peeled and deveined shrimp 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature ¼ cup freshly grated parmesan 3 cloves garlic, minced 3 tablespoons fresh chopped chives 1¼ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper 2 tablespoons olive oil additional fresh chives for sprinkling Directions: Heat oven to 425 degrees F. Combine butter, garlic, chives and pinch of salt together in a small bowl, and mix to combine. Place butter on a piece of plastic wrap, shaping it into a ball or a log and wrapping it up. Set in the fridge to harden. Add shrimp to a large baking dish. Cover in salt, pepper and olive oil, tossing to coat. Roast for 10-12 minutes until pink, remove from the oven. Remove and slice garlic chive butter over top. Top with Parmesan, as desired, and more chives, then serve immediately.
  9. Celiac.com 05/28/2014 - I love asparagus. It is easy to make, cooks quickly, and tastes delicious with minimal seasoning. This recipe for asparagus uses fresh garlic and lime, along with some shallots and a splash of butter to deliver delicious asparagus. It is easy to make in the oven, but it can also be made on the grill. Ingredients: About 2 dozen fresh asparagus spears, trimmed 1 teaspoon butter ½ tablespoon olive oil 1 clove garlic, minced 1 medium shallot, minced ½ lime, juiced salt and pepper to taste Grill directions: Simply mix the ingredients, except lime, in a bowl, place in foil and fold tightly so that nothing will leak. Then throw it on the grill about five or seven minutes before you’re done with your main courses. Make sure the spears are tender. Top with lime juice before serving. Oven directions: Melt butter with olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Stir in garlic and shallots, and cook for 1 to 2 minutes until soft. Stir in asparagus spears; cook until tender, about 5 minutes. Squeeze lime over hot asparagus, and season with salt and pepper. Transfer to serving plate, and garnish with lime wedges.
  10. Celiac.com 10/04/2013 - I crave this dish all of the time! I’m certainly no top-chef when it comes to preparing chicken on the grill so I’ve recently turned to the crock pot. I have to admit, I was pretty impressed with myself after making it. The sweet and saltiness with a hint of herbs paired nicely with tender meat that fell right off the bone. Simply mix up the ingredients, pop it in the crock pot, and you’ll have a tasty meal ready by dinner time. You will need: 4 chicken thighs 2 tablespoons basil 1/2 cup of liquid aminos (less sodium and no msg) or gluten-free soy sauce 1/3 cup Ketchup 1/2 cup honey 3-4 cloves of minced garlic A pinch of cayenne pepper (optional) Procedure: Place chicken in crock pot. Stir the ingredients together in a separate bowl. Pour evenly over chicken thighs. Turn to high and cook for 3 hours. I flipped each side after 1 ½ hours but that’s optional. Serve chicken and sauce on top of Jasmine rice and baked zucchini with thyme. For a crispy outside, place on a baking sheet and broil for about 4 minutes or until desired. Enjoy! This is also great for weekly meal prep: simply combine the ingredients and freeze them. Thaw it out the night before, toss in the crock pot the next morning, and slow cook for 6 hours. Yum!
  11. Celiac.com 06/11/2013 - With the last of the cool nights upon us, and precious few excuses for romance since Valentine's Day, it's a great time to throw down a tasty, eye-pleasing meal that will speak volumes about your culinary character. This recipe for grilled rack of lamb fits the bill nicely. It makes a delicious rack that looks like a million dollars, and is bound to satisfy. Combine this with a glass of red wine or gluten-free hard apple cider, a couple of side dishes, and our recipe for strawberry mousse, and you've got the makings of a night to remember. Note: To do this right, it helps to have an instant-read cooking thermometer For lamb 1 (8-rib, 1½ pound) Frenched rack of lamb, trimmed of all but a thin layer of fat 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon olive oil For herb seasoning 3 large garlic cloves, minced ¼ cup finely chopped fresh Italian parsley 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh thyme 1½ teaspoons finely chopped fresh rosemary ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon black pepper 1½ tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Directions: Pat lamb dry and rub meat thoroughly with salt and pepper. Heat 1 teaspoon of oil heavy 12-inch pan for at least 2 minutes. Brown lamb on all sides, but not ends, about 10 minutes. Transfer racks to a small (13- by 9-inch) roasting pan. Coat and roast lamb: Put oven rack in middle position and preheat oven to 350°F. In a bowl, mix together garlic, herbs, salt, pepper, and oil. Coat the meat (not the bone) with herb mixture, using a bit of pressure to help it stick. Roast 15 minutes at 350°F, then cover lamb with foil and roast until thermometer inserted diagonally into center of meat registers 120°F. Roast for 5 to 10 minutes more. Let stand, covered, 10 minutes. While the meat stands, the temperature will rise to 125 to 130°F and the center for medium-rare. Cut each rack into 4 double chops. Serve with red wine of your choice for a delightful pairing, whatever your side dishes.
  12. Crackers are usually thought of as crispy, baked things made out of flour (usually nutritionally-devoid refined white flour). Foods Alive's Organic Onion Garlic Flax Crackers are a whole different kind of snack, but they are way more nutritious, and also quite yummy! If asked to describe these crackers, I would say they’re like flat, crispy cakes of unprocessed flax seeds that have been compressed together. These are not the high glycemic rice, corn or potato flour/starch junk food crackers you’re used to – they’re 90% raw, USDA organic, and made almost entirely from a highly nutritious, unprocessed superfood that has shown some evidence of reducing heart disease, cancer, etc. etc.: flaxseed! All that might sound too nutritious to taste good, but these crackers are actually quite palatable. This onion and garlic variety is absolutely bursting with flavor. There's no weird consistency or anything like that going on either, as one might expect from eating, well, raw seeds (no, you don't have to be a bird to enjoy these)! Some gluten-free crackers that too closely try to emulate saltines or other 'conventional' crackers end up with a weird grainy texture that some find off-putting. There's nothing like that going on here: just seeds, and tasty stuff holding them together. For more information visit their website. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  13. Garlic mashed potatoes are a wonderful variation on the classic turkey side dish. This classic recipe blends potatoes with roasted garlic, butter and milk. It's a yummy, easy to prepare variation on classic mashed potatoes, and it not only please your guests, it will fill your house with the scent of roasted garlic! This recipe will make enough for about 8 servings, so scale accordingly. Ingredients: 1 large head garlic 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 pounds potatoes, peeled and quartered* 4 tablespoons butter, softened ½ cup milk 1 teaspoon of salt ¼ cup fresh chives (optional) salt and pepper to taste Preparation: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Slice off the pointed end of the garlic bulb, just enough to expose the garlic cloves. Drizzle olive oil over the clove, and wrap in aluminum foil. Bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour. On the stove, add 1 teaspoon of salt to a large pot of water, and bring to a boil. Add potatoes, and cook until tender, about 15 minutes. Drain, cool and chop the potatoes. Stir in butter, milk, salt and pepper to taste. Remove the garlic from the oven, and cut in half. Squeeze the softened cloves into the potatoes. Mash potatoes to desired consistency, fold in chives and serve. *Note: You can make this recipe with thin-skinned potatoes and leave the skins on, if desired.
  14. Gluten-free snacks are improving exponentially, and I just found the proof after sampling New York Style Risotto Chips in the Parmesan and Roasted Garlic flavor. If you are looking for a healthy, tasty alternative to gluten-free snacks, look no further. Not only are these chips satisfying in that crunchy way chips should be, they are also full of flavor! Each Risotto gluten-free chip is packed with real Parmesan cheese that you can taste in every bite. The hint of garlic is not overwhelming and adds a nice accent to the Parmesan flavor. Risotto chips come in a convenient 5 ounce bag, making it easy to grab a bag for a quick snack, or a couple bags to share at any event or gathering. The flavor is fully satisfying alone, but the chips also hold up very well when used for scooping into your favorite sauce or dip. These all natural chips are made with whole grain brown rice flour. Each serving comes packed with 11 grams of whole grains, and zero grams of trans fat, making them a healthier choice for flavorful, gluten-free snacking. For more information on this product, and other risotto chip flavors, please visit their website at: www.newyorkstyle.com. Note: Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.
  15. Celiac.com 01/25/2009 - It’s a brand new year with a brand new vibe. I’m excited to be launching a new year of education and advocacy on behalf of the gluten-free community, beginning with an upcoming speaking engagement. On February 10th, I’ll have the opportunity to speak with and hold a gluten-free cooking demonstration for chefs-in-training at the Western Culinary Institute, in Portland, Oregon. They may be a challenging audience, as I attempt to encourage them to think “outside the box” of more is better when it comes to exotic ingredients. The trend of the past decade seemed to be “vertical food”, with a sauce, a base, a main ingredient, another sauce, topped by two or three garnishes. While dishes resembling food-as-art may tickle the taste-buds, they are a minefield for those with food allergies and sensitivities. The incidence of food allergies, which were once rare, has increased 18% in recent years and the numbers of people affected continue to grow. [The top eight food allergens are: dairy (cow’s milk), eggs, peanuts, tree nuts (almonds, pecans, walnuts, hazelnuts etc.), wheat, soy, fish, and shellfish – and corn is another top allergen] Food allergies seldom come individually - chances are that the person allergic to peanuts is also allergic to eggs or dairy, or both. So, what’s can a foodie with food allergies to do? Forgo attending family events, parties, and other social engagements, or worse, bring their own food in an attractive Tupper-ware container? Sadly, these are options that many of the food-allergic have to consider. Handling a life with food allergies is a challenge for adults, and must be especially difficult for parents of kids with multiple food allergies, who bear the responsibility of safe-guarding their children's health. It may surprise you to know that four million American children have food allergies - that’s a sizable portion of future consumers for any business to consider. Food sensitivities are also a big issue with many adults. Lactose intolerance and gluten intolerance are problems for many people, and finding safe, healthy and interesting food choices is not easy. Here’s a story that illustrates how we’ve had to adapt. Recently we spent a ski weekend in Bend, Oregon. I baked my own gluten-free bread, and brought along other treats to keep in our hotel room. I asked the maitre de at our hotel to check with the chef about the preparation of foods in the breakfast buffet, so I would know what, if anything, I could eat. Mostly I made do with tea, fresh fruit, and my home-made gluten-free challah bread. Lunch was a no-brainer – there wouldn’t be much that I could safely eat at the ski resort, so I brought along some gluten-free Larabars – (ingredients: dates, almonds, dried apples, cinnamon) and we planned an early dinner. Later that evening, in a popular Bend landmark, I was happy to see a few choices I thought I could eat, with a few modifications. When my entree of seared Ahi tuna arrived, my son commented, “Mom, you must be an expert on that dish by now – I’ve seen you order it in a dozen restaurants!” He was right. Plain seared Ahi tuna, coated only in sesame seeds, served on greens, with a rosette of pickled ginger and wasabi, is my restaurant stand-by. I love Japanese food, but this popular dish is often served at seafood restaurants and sidewalk cafes too. With a side of green salad, or maybe the vegetable of the day, I’m set. I do wish there were more offerings to choose from, and it’s a shame that there aren’t. Very fresh seasonal ingredients, simply prepared, are truly wonderful and full of flavor that doesn’t need to be covered up by crusts, sauces, or heavy spices. A glance at the top eight is evidence that allergies to fruits, vegetables, or fresh herbs are less common than allergies to high protein foods. So, why not use them in abundance? Here’s another story that illustrates my point. While in Costa Rica a few years ago, my family had many wonderful meals. The food was always very fresh, and naturally gluten and dairy free. I never needed to check with the staff – I only needed to read the menu like anyone else. But we all agree that the very best meal we had was the night we drove down a rutted dirt road to a shack on the beach, where the sun was just beginning to set. The place looked deserted, with no lights and no customers. I asked my husband, “are you sure this is the place?” He said he’d followed the directions he’d been given. My mind began to spin some of the scary scenarios I’d seen in movies. As soon as our car pulled to a stop, we were surrounded by the ubiquitous barking dogs found in every village in Central America. A screen door slammed shut, and a slightly built man came up to the car. My husband rolled the window down and said in Spanish that we’d heard that this was a great place to eat. The gentleman led us into a gazebo, lit some candles, and seated us at a rickety table. He did not hand us any menus. Our host told us that he had caught two kinds of fish that day – swordfish and tuna. He said we could have them prepared with either ginger or garlic. He did not describe the method of preparation or what else came with the meal. Since we were rapidly being devoured by mosquitoes, we chose our options quickly. A few minutes later we were handed a can of “Deep-Woods OFF” Mosquito repellant, with a smile, and our host/fisherman, and presumably chef, left to prepare our dinner. In about twenty minutes, he arrived bearing four large platters of steaming hot grilled fish, well-coated with our seasonings of choice and garnished by fresh grilled vegetables and greens, warm home-made corn tortillas, salsa, and rice. Nothing else. It was the freshest, most deliciously prepared meal I had ever eaten. And I think it cost about twelve dollars for the four of us. So, I’m going to talk with these aspiring chefs about the importance of including simply prepared but still delicious foods on their menus. I may never tire of seared tuna, but it may not be someone else’s cup of tea. Reasonable choices should be part of any menu, and can be, with a conscious effort. At my husband’s Christmas party, I was pleasantly surprised by a buffet I could actually eat. The menu consisted of three types of small kabobs: plain grilled vegetables, grilled shrimp still in the shell, and grilled chicken, a huge tray of freshly prepared sushi, with ginger and sauces on the side, and another huge tray of Vietnamese salad rolls in rice paper wrappers. I asked first about marinades, avoided any dipping sauces, and was just fine. It was fun to be able to partake of the beautiful buffet, and I went out of my way to personally thank the catering crew. Some of the worst food from a nutritional stand-point, and certainly the worst from the perspective of someone with food allergies, has been served in the cafeterias of hospitals where I’ve worked or visited patients.. In these institutions dedicated to promoting health, nearly every entrée is breaded, sauced, cheese-coated, or poached in a pool of milk. Thanks goodness for the salad bar. Even the soups are suspect, as they are usually mass-produced, or made from a dry mix containing ingredients that the food-allergic cannot tolerate. Surely our institutions and hospitals can do better. Whether these future chefs work in a food service, or an up-and-coming tapas bar, I’m hoping to inspire them to use their creativity in a different way, to offer the freshest, healthiest food possible, and minimize the number of sauces and extraneous ingredients in at least a portion of the dishes they develop. I’ll also talk about the growing epidemic of gluten-intolerance in this country and the possible impacts it will have on the food industry. In fact, I think I’ve found the topic for my next article!
  16. This recipe comes to us from “Cams Mom” in the Gluten-Free Forum. Ingredients: 1 package of original Chebe Bread Mix (red bag) 2 eggs 2 tablespoons oil 1-2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese 1/3 Cup of plain yogurt 1-4 cloves of garlic Directions: Make it into soft dough. Split it into 4 pieces, roll them out into pretty thin ovals, then put them on a non greased cookie sheet. Mash up as much garlic as you like then sprinkle it on top of each dough. Drizzle a little olive oil on top and rub it around the top with your fingers. Place in 375F oven for around 20 minutes or until golden brown.
  17. Ingredients: 1 can white kidney beans 1 tablespoon garlic 3 tablespoon lemon juice 2 tablespoon tahini ¼ cup olive oil ¼ cup water Pinch cayenne ½ tablespoon salt Directions: Blend all ingredients together until it is the consistency of pudding. Let stand at room temperature for one hour before serving.