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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/01/2016 - Between five to ten percent of Germans may suffer from wheat intolerance. These people suffer immune reactions when they eat wheat and other cereals such as spelt, rye, and barley. They suffer symptoms including diarrhea, fatigue, psychological disorders, and worsening of chronic inflammatory diseases. They may have celiac disease, wheat allergy, and non-celiac-non allergy wheat sensitivity (NCWS). Now doctors and biomedical and agricultural researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the University of Hohenheim have joined forces to study these disorders, especially NCWS. They are gearing their research towards the breeding of new types of wheat that lack these disease causing properties, while maintaining favorable characteristics, such as good baking properties and palatability. The researchers have three main aims. Firstly, they want to find out how the content of wheat proteins called alpha-amylase-trypsin inhibitors (ATI's) has naturally evolved in the various wheat varieties. For this purpose, they are looking at whether there are differences in ATI content in older and newer varieties, the extent to which this is genetically determined in each variety, and whether environmental influences play a role. They also hope to establish exactly how many proteins belong to the family of ATIs in the wheat varieties examined and which of these proteins mainly cause the immune response. The harvested samples are thus being analyzed for ATI content by genetic and proteome methods, while human cell lines are being used to evaluate their immune system-activating effects in the laboratory. Lastly, the scientists hope to be able to establish how far ATI content affects baking properties and palatability, evaluating the wheat variants on the basis of standard quality criteria. Finally, and outside of the current proposal, "we plan several proof-of-concept clinical studies with patients that suffer from defined chronic diseases to assess how far a significant reduction of ATIs in the diet, for example by approximately 90 percent, may improve their condition," said Schuppan. The goal over the medium term is to use the findings to breed new varieties of wheat that sensitive population groups will better tolerate. "We thus need to get the balance correct and create wheat varieties with a low ATI content that still have good baking properties and palatability," concluded Longin. Source: eurekalert.org.
  2. 4 Large potatoes boiled in skins and peeled while hot. 6 strip bacon fried crisp 1 medium onion 1 teaspoons salt 2 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon celery salt or ½c diced celery 1/3 cup Cider vinegar or Heinz white vinegar 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1 cup water After potatoes have bee boiled and peeled slice thinly. When bacon is fried crisp and remove from skillet. In bacon drippings brown onion and celery. Stir in salt and cornstarch. Add vinegar and water. Stir in sliced potatoes. As the sauce thickens as potatoes are added more water may be needed. More seasoning may be added if desired.
  3. I've never been big on cake, but when it comes to German chocolate cake, now that's a different story. This is a great recipe for celiacs because it is as close to the real thing as it gets. The only difference with this recipe and a “regular” German chocolate cake recipe, is that this one uses rice flour instead of wheat. German Chocolate Cake (Gluten-Free) Ingredients: 4 ounces gluten-free sweet German chocolate ½ cup boiling water 6 eggs, separated 2 cups sugar, divided 1 cup butter or butter substitute 1 teaspoon pure vanilla 2 cups rice flour 2 tablespoons arrowroot (or cornstarch) 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup buttermilk To Make: Melt chocolate in boiling water. Cool. In small mixing bowl beat egg whites until frothy. Add ½ cup sugar and heat until stiff but not dry. Set aside. Using large mixing bowl, cream butter with remaining sugar and vanilla until fluffy. Add egg yolks and beat well. Blend in chocolate. Sift rice flour with arrowroot, baking powder, soda and salt. Add alternately with buttermilk to chocolate mixture, beating after each addition until smooth. Fold in beaten whites. Pour into three 8-inch or 9-inch layer pans lined on bottom with paper. Bake at 350 degrees F., about 30 minutes or until done. Cool. Frost tops of cakes, and enjoy!
  4. This recipe come to us from "GermanMia" in the Gluten-Free Forum. Ingredients/Items Needed: Cabbage. Salt (No pickling salt. We found that either sea salt, Himalayan salt or raw stone salt works best). Sauerkraut crock: a ceramic jar the rim of which has a water trough to fit the lid in ceramic or stone weights. Clean cloth. Sharp knife. Cabbage shredder, if you have, otherwise just shred with sharp knife. Wooden paddle or any other device suited for stomping the cabbage (we did it with our fists the first time, it just works all right. All items have to be really, really clean - you don’t want to grow something orange or green-blue in your cabbage...I’m not sure about the availability of sauerkraut crocks in the US, Canada, Australia or England. This special crock for lacto-fermentation has a trough where you fill in water so that the lid swims in it. That means, the jar is sealed airtight but any gas can get out. It’s important to exclude any oxygen because lacto-fermentation is an anaerobic process! On the other hand it’s important to let surplus gas out - like in grape fermentation to make wine. We tried to make sauerkraut without such jars; in this case it’s best to use a small jar (no more than 5 liters) so that the sauerkraut gets used up faster. I’ll explain that after describing the making. Directions: Remove the first layer of leaves from the cabbage until you reach a layer that looks clean and is not bruised. Usually you need not wash the cabbage, but if it seems too muddy, wash the surface and make it dry - that is important! That cabbage should not be wet when you process it. Take a couple of clean cabbage leaves to layer the ground of the jar and some to layer the surface of the finished kraut. Half and then quarter the cabbage, remove the core. Either shred the cabbage with a shredder or cut it into fine stripes (1/2 cm) with a sharp knife. I know of Turkish kebab houses who make their own coleslaw and have a cabbage shredder. Maybe if you know some Turkish people you could ask them about that. Layer the ground of the crock with one layer of cabbage leaves. Measure first batch of shredded cabbage: 4 pounds of cabbage require 25 gram salt. Mix 4 pounds cabbage with 25 gram salt well, then either fill it in your jar and crush it in the jar or crush it in an unbreakable jar or crock. Crush until it feels and sounds very wet and you have brine on top of the cabbage. Then press the crushed cabbage firmly into the jar.It has to be firmly packed because otherwise you might have air bubbles between the cabbage which lead to spoilage. Repeat steps 1-5 until the jar is filled up to 10 cm under the rim. It must not be packed higher or it will come out of the jar during fermentation! Cover the firmly packed cabbage with whole leaves so that no stripes of kraut swim to the top. Cover it with the clean, dry cloth which you firmly stuff down the sides of the pot so that nothing of the cabbage can get out. The cloth has to be completely covered by the liquid. Either put the weights on top of the cloth or substitute them with a plate which you weight with a (again very clean) stone. I tried everything from a piece of marble decoration to a stone from the garden which I put into a plastic freezer bag. It only must be clean and heavy enough to press the cabbage down so that it is always covered with liquid. No bricks, though, as they take in liquid. Cover the jar with the lid and pour water into the trough so that the lid rests in water. Store at room temperature. It will start to bubble after the first 12 to 24 hours. Don’t lift the lid during the first week, only check that there is always enough water in the trough. After one week or 10 days carefully lift the lid to check if there is still enough brine covering the cabbage—if it isn’t, just pour in a little clean, filtered water with some salt (so that it just tastes a bit salty) to cover the cabbage. As soon as it stops bubbling, most of the fermentation process will be finished. This may be 10 to 14 days, depending on the surrounding temperature. If it’s cooler than normal room temperature, it may take three weeks until fermentation is completed. You might then place the jar or crock in the cellar or at some other place cooler than room temperature (12-16 degrees Celsius are fine); the sauerkraut will keep longer then. When you start eating the sauerkraut, always be careful to replace leaves, cloth and weights tightly and press down the kraut to avoid too much air to get in and to get liquid cover the contents of the jar. You should replace the cloth at least once a week as soon as you start consuming the sauerkraut. With opening the jar and introducing air you also start to transfer all kinds of bacteria and germs into the jar which might settle on the cloth. There may be yeasts which you have to scum. They don’t do harm but are a very nice culture-medium for mold, and you should clean the trough every now and then because the water in it also is a nice culture medium for mold. You should see that the space under the rim is clean, too, if you use a crock with a trough, because under the trough there might develop yeast and then maybe mold. If you don’t find a crock or jar with a trough, try to find something with a loose lid. Don’t take an airtight glass jar or something like that because the gas, which develops during fermentation, must come out. Last year we smashed one of our crocks so we had to make up something to store the surplus cabbage. We took a plastic tub with a lid that can be fastened by two metal clips and threw the cabbage in - and it worked. Plastic is not what I’d prefer, but it worked and the sauerkraut didn’t taste like plastic but turned out completely normal. Anyway the crock or jar should have a lid of any kind. If it hasn’t, find a board, a plate or something else that can be used to cover the crock.Usually we have the sauerkraut from October to April; if stored in a sauerkraut crock in a cool place, it keeps very good until end of April. If stored in a crock without trough, it should be eaten within two months, maybe three, depending on how cool it is stored. In any case it’s essential that you always have the sauerkraut covered with brine. If the sauerkraut has a very strong vinegar smell and tastes extremely sour, it’s probably not lacto-fermented but acetic. It may not be dangerous to eat then, but it won’t have probiotic qualities. If it gets slimy and smells like bad cheese, it has gone bad - discard it. This could happen if you keep it for more than three months or if you use a jar without trough. I think that’s it - although this is almost a novel, the whole thing is very, very simple. Never mind which vessel is used, I never had a batch that didn’t start wonderfully. Just be careful with keeping everything as clean as possible and you will have a great time eating fresh, fruity tasting sauerkraut!
  5. This recipe comes to us from: Gayle M Chastain. Just wanted to share a few more tried and true holiday recipes. 1 beaten egg ½ cup packed brown sugar ¼ cup honey ½ cup molasses 1 tablespoon apple juice or cider ¼ teaspoon grated lemon peel ½ teaspoon lemon juice 1 cup rice flour ½ cup sweet rice flour ¼ cup tapioca flour ¼ cup garbanzo bean flour ½ teaspoon xanthan gum ¾ teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon baking soda ¼ teaspoon cloves ½ teaspoon ginger ¼ cup chopped almonds ½ cup mixed candied fruits and peels Lemon Glaze (follows) Beat egg and brown sugar until light and fluffy. Mix in honey, molasses, juices, and lemon peel. In another bowl, thoroughly combine flours, xanthan gum, and spices. Blend into molasses mixture. Stir in almonds and candied fruits. Chill dough several hours or overnight. Sprinkle waxed paper with powdered sugar. Roll out dough to 14 x 9 inch rectangle. Cut into 1 ½ x 2 inch cookies (I use a pizza cutter). Bake on lightly greased cookie sheet at 350 degrees about 12 minutes. Cool slightly; remove from cookie sheet and cool on rack. While warm, brush with lemon glaze. Lemon Glaze: Combine 1 ½ cups powdered sugar and enough lemon juice (about 2 teaspoon) to make a glaze. These are better if allowed to sit a few days before eating. They keep well.
  6. Nahrung. 2003 Oct;47(5):345-8. Celiac.com 01/14/04 – German researchers have developed a new test to determine the level of gliadin, the portion of gluten that is toxic to celiac patients, in foods. This new technique is called immunopolymerase chain reaction (iPCR), and it utilizes immunological detection of gliadin by a monoclonal antibody R5 conjugated when an oligonucleotide is amplified by PCR. The technique yields a "30-fold above the level reached by enzyme immunoassay" in laboratory tests, and it detects concentrations in food "as low as 0.16 ng/ml corresponding to 16 microgram gliadin/100 g food or 0.16 ppm (corresponding to 0.25 g of food extracted in 10 ml of solvent and 25-fold dilution of the extract prior to analysis)." This is the first time that this highly sensitive technique has been used for gliadin analysis, and "is the first approach to perform real-time iPCR in one step without changing the reaction vessels after enzyme immunoassay for subsequent PCR analysis thus minimizing risks of contamination and loss of sensitivity."
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