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Found 293 results

  1. I was going to make hamburger Salad but recalled a mini burger receipe from a cook book I got from ketosummit. Modified slightly and made 2 regular size buns in 2 cup glass dishes. I have their permission to repost this. Today is also National Comfort Food Day....well not having ate a burger bun in 5 years I think this counts. (I made a extra bun and ate it mashed avocado) Makes 2 buns or 4 slider buns. 2/3 cup (70g) Almond Flour 1 tsp (4g) Baking powder 1/2 tsp salt 2 eggs 5 tbsp (75ml) Nutiva Butter Flavored Coconut oil 1. Put half of each dry ingredient in each dish (1/3cup (35g) almond flour, 1/2 tsp baking powder, 1/4 tsp salt) whisk. Now add 2.5tbsp Coconut oil, 1 egg to each and mix well. 3. Microwave on high 90 sec each and let set a min and they should pop out. 4. If using the 2 cup dishes cut in half, if using coffee mugs you get 4 slices for sliders each. Thrive Market 25% off http://thrv.me/gf25 https://thrivemarket.com/p/bobs-red-mill-super-fine-almond-flour https://thrivemarket.com/nutiva-butter-flavored-coconut-oil And Check out they have cook books and recipes that are pretty much all gluten free, low carb, and easily made dairy free https://ketosummit.com
  2. Found a way to make low carb and dairy free green bean casserole. As a kid I only really ate the French onions on top so I loaded a whole special batch of them on my casserole. Start by making my French fried onions from the other post but add in 2 thin sliced scallion. Then the following. 2 cans greenbeans drained 8oz sliced mushrooms chopped rough 2tbsp Nutiva Butter Flavored Coconut oil 3 minced cloves garlic 1/2 cup chicken stock 1 can full fat coconut milk 1/4-1/2 cup nutritional yeast 1. Preheat oven to 400F 2. Over medium heat sauté mushrooms and garlic in the coconut oil til soft (5min) 3. Add the coconut milk, stock and bring to a boil reduce heat and simmer til it starts to thicken. 5. Stir In the nutritional yeast til combined and then the green beans stirring to coat. 6. Transfer greased 8x8 dish and top with the onions as desired then bake 15 mins. For extra crisp few mins under broiler.
  3. So a few days ago when experimenting with making something else, I managed to make french fried onions by accident adding stuff in the wrong order and then did it again trying. Update Perfection, 2 cups (220g) Blanched Almond Flour 2 tsp Black Pepper 1 tsp Salt 4 Eggs Whisked 1 large onion cut into small slivers then into 1/2-1" Lengths. Mix your almond flour, Pepper, salt and whisk Cut up your onion as described Mix the almond flour and egg mixture then coat the onions in it and proceed to pan fry in 1/2" of oil over medium high heat in small batches, letting the oil come back up to temp between batches (check temp you do not want it too hot or to burn) Pan frying gave blacked edges and crisper, while air frying gave something a bit more like crisped blooming onion result, the deep fry in the oil was a bit messy and required setting on a paper towel covered plate This is a concept I would like to throw out there for thanksgiving to see if anyone has better luck with and can perfect it These would be great over dressing or casserole
  4. 1/2 onion sliced thin 2 shallots sliced thin 2 cloves garlic minced 8 Oz sliced mushroom rough chopped 2 packs Miracle Noodles, prepared chopped 2 cans Tuna with the water shredded 8tbsp Primal Kitchen Mayo 1 tsp Primal Kitchen Mustard 1Tbsp lemon Juice or apple cider vinegar 1/2 cup (55g) Blanched Almond Flour 1/2 tsp crushed dried rosemary 1 tsp ground pepper 1 tsp salt 1. Preheat oven to 325F and grease a 8x8 pan 2.Pan fry onion and shallots over medium heat til tender, then add in the garlic and chopped mushroom cook a few more min til soft and cooked well, Remove from heat. 3. In a bowl mix chopped noodles, mayo, tuna and water, mustard and lemon juice. 4. In another bowl mix almond flour, rosemary, black pepper, and salt. Then mix half of the seasoned almond flour into the noodle mixture and combine well. 5. Add noodle mix to the pan and combine well with the mushrooms and onions, transfer to baking dish and top evenly with the rest of the almond flour mix. 6. Bake 30-40min til lightly browned. I used Capellini noodles as the thin texture worked best in my mind But Angel Hair Could also work. This recipe is my own and a combination of aspects from two other tuna recipes and another casserole dish. http://thrv.me/gf25 For 25% off your first order. https://thrivemarket.com/p/bobs-red-mill-almond-flour https://thrivemarket.com/p/thrive-market-wild-albacore-tuna-no-salt-added https://thrivemarket.com/p/primal-kitchen-organic-spicy-brown-mustard https://thrivemarket.com/p/primal-kitchen-avocado-oil-mayo https://thrivemarket.com/p/miracle-noodle-shirataki-noodles-angel-hair
  5. First batch was still too soft did it again this time with Ingredients 2-½ tablespoons Nutiva Butter Flavored coconut oil divided 2 Bags Miracle Rice, prepared and dried 3 cups Almond Milk 3/4cup (100g) Nutiva Coconut Flour 1 cup (110g) Blanched Almond Flour 1tbsp Konsyl Psyllium 2/3 cup Lakanto maple syrup 30-35 Drops oooflavors Corn Bread Flavoring (Omit for bread pudding, or sub their Raisin Bread extract for a different take) ½ teaspoon ground ginger ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon salt 2 egg, beaten ½ cup cold almond milk Preparation Preheat oven to 300°F. Grease a 1-½ quart soufflé mold or baking dish with 1 tablespoon of the Nutvia Butter; set aside. Prepare your Miracle rice, whisk your eggs in one bowl, and whisk your Flours and Psyllium together in another so they will be ready. Heat 3 cups of milk in a saucepan until it is close to boiling. Add the Flour mix and reduce heat to low use a immersion blender to mix it in. Stir until the mixture thickens (about 5 minutes). Remove from the heat and add the remaining Nutiva Butter, maple syrup, Flavoring, cinnamon, ginger, salt, eggs, and miracle rice stir in well, then PULSE with a hand blender so their are still come clumps of miracle rice left but it thickens up nice. Pour into buttered dish. Place in the preheated oven and bake for 40 minutes. Pour the cold milk over the pudding and return to the oven. Cook for 2 hour to 2 hour 45 minutes until the top is brown and crisp. Depends on dish and how deep. Serve hot or warm with topping of choice. Turned out better...I am doing it in a deep loaf pan so I think that is part of my issues, I am also debating adding another egg or two for a more custard like consistency. Family thought it was a good bread pudding. Thrive Market http://thrv.me/gf25 https://thrivemarket.com/nutiva-butter-flavored-coconut-oil https://thrivemarket.com/p/miracle-noodle-shirataki-rice https://www.luckyvitamin.com/p-435169-nutiva-organic-coconut-flour-3-lbs https://thrivemarket.com/nutiva-organic-coconut-flour https://thrivemarket.com/p/bobs-red-mill-almond-flour https://thrivemarket.com/p/lakanto-maple-flavored-sugar-free-monkfruit-syrup https://www.amazon.com/Konsyl-Supplement-All-Natural-Gluten-Free-Sugar-Free/dp/B079G2K943/ https://www.oooflavors.com/products/corn-bread-flavor?variant=17030567685
  6. Stormy morning, can't bake most gluten-free recipes as weather prevents rising. So going testing a old recipe from a card (Families card box) I found. Amazingly this is a naturally gluten free, Grain free one. I modified it to be keto friendly and it turned out wonderful. Amaretti Cookies (card name) 100g Blanched Almond Flour 100g Swerve Sweetener 1/2 tsp salt 1/2 Almond Extract 1 Jumbo Egg White 60g 1. Preheat oven to 350f 2. Mix Flour and sweetener in one bowl 3. In another small bowl whisk egg white, extract, salt til lightly stiff 4. Fold the white mixture into the flour mix. 5. Form 1tbsp balls and place on parchment paper lined cookie sheet, flatten slightly as they do not spread. 6. Bake 18-25 min depending on if you want softer or crisper cookies. 7. Let set for 10 mins before removing to a cookie rack. 8. Dust with a bit of Swerve Confectioners Sweetener when Finished On another note, did it with vanilla extract and a bit more swerve over the tops for sugar free sugar cookies. Thrive Market http://thrv.me/gf25 https://thrivemarket.com/p/bobs-red-mill-super-fine-almond-flour https://thrivemarket.com/p/swerve-granular-sugar-replacement https://thrivemarket.com/p/swerve-confectioners-sugar-replacement
  7. Celiac.com 10/03/2018 - Gluten-related disorders include the full spectrum of adverse clinical symptoms and conditions triggered by eating gluten. A team of researchers recently set out to review the available medical literature concerning MDs and gluten sensitivity with and without enteropathy. The research team included A Vinagre-Aragón, P Zis, RA Grunewald, and M Hadjivassiliou, with the Academic Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK. Celiac disease or gluten sensitive enteropathy is the most common manifestation, but clinicians have reported a number of extra-intestinal manifestations, which may occur without enteropathy. Gluten sensitivity is another term that has been used to include all gluten-related disorders, including those where blood tests show antibodies to gluten in the absence of any enteropathy. Gluten ataxia is the most common extra-intestinal neurological manifestation, and has been well documented. Clinicians have reported movement disorders related to gluten sensitivity. To assess the current medical literature on movement disorders and gluten sensitivity, both with and without enteropathy, the team conducted a systematic search on the PubMed database, and included 48 articles that met the inclusion criteria into the present review. This review demonstrates that the range of gluten related movement disorders goes beyond gluten ataxia, and shows that the majority of patients with gluten-related disorders benefit from a gluten-free diet. Read the full review at: Nutrients. 2018 Aug 8;10(8). pii: E1034. doi: 10.3390/nu10081034.
  8. Celiac.com 09/14/2018 - Celiac.com was all set to do a story on the latest peer-reviewed data on the Nima gluten testing device, when along comes Gluten-Free Watchdog with another of their famous non-recommendations. Gluten-Free Watchdog says they cannot recommend the Nima gluten test kit because of alleged flaws. But what does the science say? The latest Nima article and Gluten-Free Watchdog’s complaint both focus on the science, so let’s start there. Nima makes two different food sensors: one detects gluten, the other detects peanuts. Each sensor comprises a small, handheld electronic device and a cartridge. To test food, consumers place a pea sized amount into the cartridge, place the cartridge inside the sensor, and run the device. They then receive a smiley face or wheat symbol with "gluten found," depending on whether or not the Nima device detected the allergen. Nima reported their original data in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. Among the conclusions: “Compared with reference R5, Nima antibodies (13F6 and 14G11) had 35- and 6.6-fold higher gliadin affinities, respectively. Nima demonstrated device performance using a comprehensive list of foods, assessing detection sensitivity, reproducibility, and cross-reactivity. Nima presented a 99.0% true positive rate, with a 95% confidence interval of 97.8%–100%.” Gluten Free Watchdog says that: “Based on third party testing data, the Nima Sensor fails to detect gluten at the 20 ppm level over 20 percent of the time. It isn’t until a sample contains a level of gluten at the 40 ppm level, that a gluten found result is received close to 100% of the time.” Gluten Free Watchdog suggests that this is a problem, because: “At a level of gluten in a sample from less than 2 ppm up to a level of gluten between 30 ppm and 40 ppm, the result displayed on the Nima Sensor may be either smiley face or gluten found. If a sample is tested with a Nima Sensor and the result is a smiley face, there is no practical way for a consumer to know if the level of gluten in the sample is less than or more than 20 ppm. If a sample is tested with a Nima Sensor and the result is gluten found, there is no practical way for a consumer to know if the level of gluten in the sample is less than or more than 20 ppm. As a result, the data point received from the Nima Sensor for gluten presents major interpretation problems.” Gluten Free Watchdog charges that Nima uses “NOT the scientifically validated Ridascreen Gliadin R5 ELISA Mendez Method from R-Biopharm used by Gluten Free Watchdog.” The fact is that R5 Elisa remains the industry standard for most testing applications. Gluten Free Watchdog closes its warning with a word from their independent expert: According to Adrian Rogers, Senior Research Scientist at Romer Labs, “It could be argued that the device is not fit for purpose as the company states that there is a clear differentiation between safe and unsafe products based on a 20 ppm level which the validation data does not corroborate.” It’s worth noting that for all his accomplishments, Rogers is neither a doctor, nor a PhD. Rogers' LinkdIn page lists his education as: Bsc (Hons), Microbiology, University of Wales, Aberystwyth. A Bachelor of Science degree may not necessarily make an expert in this subject, yet he is presented as one. Rogers also seems to have a potential conflict of interest that was omitted in Thompson’s press release. Directly from Rogers’ LinkdIn site: “Romer Labs®, Inc. developed an immunochromatographic lateral flow assay for the qualitative detection of gluten in raw ingredients, processed foods, finished food products, and environmental surfaces, using the G12 antibody developed by Belén Morón. The G12 antibody targets a 33-mer peptide which is resistant to enzymatic digestion and heat denaturation, as well as being the fragment of the gliadin protein to which celiac disease sufferers react, making it a reliable analytical marker.” The company Rogers works for, Romer Labs, makes its own gluten testing kits. It seems a bit disingenuous for Gluten Free Watchdog to use a spokesperson from a potentially competing company to try to counteract a peer-reviewed scientific publication for a device which is made by a potential competitor. Nima’s Scientific Advisory Board includes some of the most highly respected celiac disease researchers and scientists in the world. They include: Peter HR Green, MD Phyllis and Ivan Seidenberg Professor of Medicine. Director, Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University; Jody Puglisi, PhD Stanford University Professor of Structural Biology; Lucille Beseler, MS, RDN, LDN, CDE, FAND Family Nutrition Center of South Florida; Benjamin Lebwohl, MD, MS Director of Clinical Research Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University; John Garber, MD Gastroenterology, Mass General; and Thanai Pongdee, MD Consultant, Division of Allergic Diseases, Mayo Clinic. Nima says that Gluten Free Watchdog’s view of their recently published validation is incomplete and misleading. Nima wrote: “All the studies show Nima is highly sensitive across a range of both low and high levels of gluten." "The Nima third party data accurately reported gluten found at 20 ppm and above between 93.3% for food as prepared (a food item that is spiked with an intended quantity of gluten) and 97.2% for food as quantified by an ELISA lab kit (used to determine the exact ppm of gluten in the food)." "The Nima peer reviewed study published in the Food Chemistry Journal reported gluten found at 20 ppm and above at 96.9% accuracy." The statement that: “'Nima will fail to detect gluten at 20 ppm 20% of the time' is almost entirely driven by 1 specific food out of 13 tested. That sample, when quantified, was actually below 20 ppm." "In real life, people get glutened at many different ppm levels, not just 20 ppm. Nima has been shown to detect gluten at levels below, at and above 20 ppm across a variety of foods in a number of studies.” Reading the peer reviewed data provided by Nima, and reading Gluten Free Watchdog’s complaints, it becomes clear that Gluten Free Watchdog’s complaints sound serious and authoritative, but ring a bit hollow. Consider the Following Analogy Imagine a gluten-sniffing dog that performed as well as Nima in scientific trials; same performance, same exact data. You can give this dog a sniff, or a small bite of food, and he can signal you if the food’s got gluten in it with 97% accuracy at 20ppm or below. Nearly 100% accuracy at 40ppm or above (as stated by Gluten Free Watchdog). People would think that the dog was not only cute and fluffy, but wonderfully helpful and everyone would love it, and everyone with celiac disease would want one. And it would be a great big gushing warm and fuzzy feel-good story. Pretty much no one would be arguing that the dog was potentially dangerous, or somehow unfit for people with celiac disease. Such dogs would also be far more expensive to own and maintain than the Nima device. Apparently such dogs can cost upwards of $16,000, not including the cost of food, vet bills, etc. So, what’s the accuracy rate of a gluten-sniffing dog, anyway? From Mercola.com: Willow, a German shorthaired pointer, is another gluten-sniffing dog, in this case living in Michigan. Her owner, Dawn Scheu, says she can detect gluten with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. She worked with a trainer (the same one who trained Zeus) to teach her own dog to detect gluten, with excellent results. Gluten-sniffing dogs may detect gluten in amounts as small as .0025 parts per million with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. So, will Gluten Free Watchdog be warning against gluten-sniffing dogs anytime soon? Somehow, because Nima is a mechanical device made by a company, it's not so warm and fuzzy, not so feel-good. Maybe Nima needs to shape their device like a cute little doggy, or a Pez candy dispenser? But the data remains, as does the fact, whatever its drawbacks, anything that detects gluten like Nima does, as well as it does, is potentially very helpful for celiac disease in numerous situations. And it is extremely unlikely to do them any harm. Nima seems very much committed to transparency, scientific excellence, and continual product improvement. These are noble goals and generally a win for people with celiac disease. Think of it, just ten years ago, a portable gluten-sensor with the kind of accuracy Nima is reliably achieving would have been the stuff of fantasy. Yet here it is. More accurate than any gluten-sniffing dog, and for a couple hundred bucks. People with celiac disease are living in a very different world than just a few years ago. Nima did not have to publish its data, but it chose to do so, and in a reputable, peer-reviewed scientific journal. Nima conducted its research using solid scientific standards, and reported those results publicly. They explained their methodology and results, they acknowledged product limitations and expressed a commitment to improvement. How is this remotely controversial? The celiac disease community is fortunate to have companies committed to investing time and money into products and devices that help to improve the lives of people with celiac disease. We feel strongly that the perfect should not be the enemy of the good. Devices like the Nima gluten sensor can be helpful for numerous people with celiac disease. Disclosure: Nima is a paid advertiser on Celiac.com. Celiac.com's advertisers do not influence our editorial content. Read Nima’s full report on test data at: Food Chemistry.com Read Gluten Free Watchdog’s Statement on the Nima device at: Glutenfreewatchdog.org Read Nima’s Reply to Gluten Free Watchdog at: Nimasensor.com
  9. Hello I made this account tonight because I am need of help by those with more experience than me. Basically since June I've been feeling horrible every morning throughout the entire day. My main symptoms were extreme nausea (no vomiting), stomach pain, constipation, and diarrhea. I was in and out of the doctors doing blood work and taking medicines for other things like ibs and gastritis until we started to think about a month and a half later that it could be celiac or a gluten insensitivity. My typical day was wake up around 9 am, feel nauseous, eat little while drinking water, and feel okay enough to fall asleep around 3 pm for a few hours and wake up feeling better with almost no nausea at all. After seeing a Gastroenterologist and having extensive blood work done, everything came back looking normal (beginning of august). We kept up with gluten free diet while taking protonix and eventually things started to turn around. I was waking up less nauseous and it would only last a few hours or a couple compared to all day. It ended up getting better to the point where i woke up later than 8 or 9 am with finally no nausea or hunger pains and i would be able to eat a fair amount throughout the day and not have any symptoms besides occasional bloating. Something happened last thursday where I woke up with nausea and it lasted a couple hours. It has been the same thing since then and even today was one of my worst days with eating little and nausea being present after eating any meal no matter how small. I never use to get nausea at night and for the past two days i have had it for a couple hours before bed. I canceled my endoscopy that was scheduled for the 27th this monday about a week prior to that date because i had felt so much better but now i regret it. We think ive been glutened but i keep a food journal and i havent been eating anything different than before i had made great progress. Does anyone else have this problem? Does this sound like ive been glutened? Something feels different and although i havent been officially diagnosed celiacs I just dont understand why id be feeling this way after making such great progress. This all comes when im starting up school and an internship and is very inconvenient and depressing. I have my own utensils and cookware that I use and I am extra paranoid and safe about making sure my areas in the kitchen are gluten free and clean. Does anyone have any tips or knowledge about this? Should I call up my doctor again? The nausea was so bad this summer i couldnt work and couldnt do anything besides pace around the house while sipping water with the air conditioner running. Im really hoping i can go back to feeling the way i felt just a week ago so that i can start up my internship and make it to school everyday. I appreciate any and all feedback!
  10. Vegan Bacon Bits Combine 4 tbsp Coconut Secret Coconut Aminos 4 tbsp Colgin Liquid Smoke 3 tsp Lakanto Maple 1 1/2 tsp Smoked Paprika 1. Preheat oven to 270F 2. Mix well then dump in 7-8 Oz of Let's do Organic Unsweetened Toasted Coconut Flakes make sure to mix and coat well then let set 5-10 mins 3. Place on foil lined baking sheets and turn the oven to 200F and bake 30-35 mins check then turn off oven and leave in there for a hour to dry out. NOTE ingredients bought through the Thrive link get you a extra 25% off, great for gluten free shopping. Thrive Market http://thrv.me/gf25 https://thrivemarket.com/coconut-secret-organic-raw-coconut-aminos https://thrivemarket.com/lets-do-organic-toasted-coconut-flakes-unsweetened https://www.luckyvitamin.com/p-2001037-lakanto-maple-flavored-syrup-sweetened-with-monk-fruit-13-oz https://www.amazon.com/Colgin-Assorted-Liquid-Smoke-Gift/dp/B00H5WG6IG/ref=sr_1_7_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1512309885&sr=8-7&keywords=Liquid+smoke
  11. hi all! i was wondering if there were any super low gi grains like barley (which has a gi of 28 or something). I need to find something because i have problems with blood sugar, but obviously cant have barley with celiac. I know that there are vegetables with a low gi but i need something with comparable calories (~350/cup) and id have to eat a 5 kg of carrots to get that lol! any ideas?
  12. Are any of you really bloated despite being gluten free? My abdomen is very hard/distended. After a year of no gluten, my other celiac symptoms have greatly improved but this hasn’t improved at all. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
  13. I’ve been gluten free for a year now and I would never go back. But making friends is so difficult. Anyone 20-40 in the Columbus area? Looking for a brunch buddy!
  14. Last week I got my ceilac penal results Although in my biopsy doctor confirm me as ceilac patient I am on gluten free diet since 3 month. Still some problems are there.. endomysial anti body IGA negative.. tissue transglutmanise Ab ,iga 5 u/ml. Immune globulin A is 213 . Thanks and any good vitamins.
  15. Southern Keto Coleslaw (Sweet with a tang) 2lb shredded cabbage 70g grated carrot (5 baby carrots) 1/4 medium onion sliced thin strip (Mandolin cutter on the shallow setting is perfect for this) 220g (about a heaping 3/4 cup) mayo 3 tbsp (45g) Apple Cider Vinegar 2 tbsp Mustard 2-6tbsp Swerve (or other erythritol like pyure, truvia adjust to taste) Combine and mix mayo, mustard, sweeteners, vinegar then add in the rest mixing til well combined. (I like putting on gloves and using a claw and twist like working burger) Let it set overnight, if it needs more tang or sweetener then add to adjust. I find it best served with a few cracks of black pepper. Extra 25% off your first order with Thrive Market http://thrv.me/gf25 https://thrivemarket.com/p/organicville-stone-ground-mustard https://thrivemarket.com/p/bragg-organic-apple-cider-vinegar https://thrivemarket.com/p/primal-kitchen-avocado-oil-mayo https://thrivemarket.com/p/swerve-granular-sugar-replacement
  16. Celiac.com 07/06/2018 - I had the chance to road trip through Texas. It’s an awfully large state, and there is a lot to see, eat and appreciate. I was surprised by the amount of amazing food I was able to consume without concern of cross contamination. I had the opportunity to visit Dallas, Houston, San Antonio and Austin. I compiled a list of my favorite options from each city. Dallas Company Cafe (2104 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX 75206) Ladies and Gentleman, I finally got to eat some DELICIOUS fried chicken and couldn’t have been happier. I also had their version of french toast bites, which tasted a million times better than what I remembered. A 100% gluten free restaurant and bakery. Everything we ate here melted in our mouths. We got to meet the owners, and hear their story, which made the food taste all of the more better. Let them know if you have any dairy allergies, and they will be happy to accomodate you. Also be mindful of their hours, as they are open everyday but only for brunch. Hopefully they expand to San Diego soon, fingers crossed! Back Home BBQ (5014 Ross Ave., Dallas, TX 75206) Back Home BBQ’s Smoked Meat Selection: Sliced Brisket, Sausage and Smoked Chicken Brought to you by the same owners of Company Cafe. It’s not 100% gluten free, but the BBQ is, as is the cornbread and pecan pie. Authentic BBQ delicious that is safe to eat (yeehaw). HG Sply Co. (2008 Greenville Ave, Dallas, TX 75206) A restaurant where ALL items can be made dairy and/or gluten free. Yaaaasss! We ordered and absolutely loved the HG Chips and Queso (cashew cheese), Beet Poke (actually tastes like you’re eating fish because of the white seaweed), the curried sweet potato soup and Pulled Pork Tacos. They have a second location in Fort Worth. Houston Pondicheri / Pondicheri Bake Lab - Upstairs (2800 Kirby Dr B132, Houston, TX 77098) Pondicheri’s Gluten Free Avocado Dosa Indian, GF and vegan option deliciousness! Chickpea Masala fried chicken… Yes, this is real life. They have a restaurant downstairs, open during specific hours. While their upstairs cafe and bakery is open all day, it has a different menu, as well as enough interesting GF baked goods (like honey mesquite cake) to fill your heart’s desire. They also sell Indian spices, ghee and other fun supplies in their small shop. Be sure to check out India1948 for recipes, their online store and cooking classes. In case you’re wondering, they have NY location. True Food Kitchen (1700 Post Oak Blvd, Houston, TX 77056) True Food’s Strawberry & Rhubarb Crisp: almond crumble, chia seed, vanilla ice cream I truly love this place, and it’s no wonder they now have so many locations in the USA. They are known to have a health conscious, organic, and seasonal menu. Although not 100% gluten free, they use all separate equipment if you are Celiac, or have other food allergies. I feel safe and satisfied each time I eat there. My favorite? A side of their gluten-free pita to dip in their ponzu sauce, and their almond ricotta pizza. Now, wait until you try one of their seasonal desserts, with a side of their homemade coconut ice cream. Sign up for their birthday list, and get one for free. You’re welcome. San Antonio 5 Points Local (1017 North Flores, San Antonio, TX 78212) Karma Bowl (v): Fluffy quinoa, roasted rosemary sweet potatoes, whole black beans, fresh kale salad, and drizzled with our chipotle cashew crema aka "Kitchen Crack" An organic, 100% gluten free restaurant, serving ingredients that are all consciously sourced. They cater to all types of diets, and are consistent in tasting delicious. I recommend any of their bowls, and fluffy pancakes. They also have a yoga studio and school attached! Can’t get any cooler. Green Vegetarian Cuisine (200 E Grayson St #120, San Antonio, TX 78215) Since most restaurants in San Antonio are closed on Mondays (still not entirely sure why), this was a great option for us. Located in the very hip Pearl Brewery District, this is a fun little vegan restaurant with gluten-free options. I was quite happy with my nachos and enchiladas (the plates are huge FYI), and cupcake. The best part of our experience, was our waiter, Heath. He made the experience a lot of fun. Parking in the lot there allows you to explore the river walk a bit, which we loved. They have a another location in San Antonio, and one in Houston. Larder Coffee (Hotel Emma, 136 E. Grayson, San Antonio, TX 78215) Larder’s gluten Free Avocado Toast with house smoked salmon. And their Gluten Free Bagel with cream cheese, housemade jam and strawberries. This is attached to my new favorite hotel, Hotel Emma, also located inside hip Pearl Brewery District. It is an adorable coffee shop, that serves many dairy alternative options, and gluten free toasts and treats. There is also a small market inside. Be sure to check out the bar area right next door, and the hotel, which has the coolest architecture. P.S. They also have a restaurant attached with Gluten Free options, called Supper. Austin Picnik (4801 Burnet Rd, Austin, TX 78756) Picnik’s Chicken Tenders: Rice flour tempura, honey-mustard aioli. Available at their brick-and-mortar restaurant on Burnet Road. Our friend half-joked when she said she moved to Austin from LA because of this restaurant… I now can understand how that might be a real thing. They are 100% gluten, corn, soy and peanut free. The food is just, wow, and can be modified to fit most dietary restrictions. Did we visit twice in less than 24 hours? Yes. The chicken tenders aren’t like anything else, and I would recommend ordering at least two orders to start off with, including two of their honey aioli sides. They also have a couple grab and go trailers in Austin. Wild Wood Bakehouse (3016 Guadalupe St., Ste. 200 Austin, Texas 78705) Another great 100% gluten free restaurant and bakery. They serve some yummy comfort food, like fried calamari and chips, chicken and waffles, biscuits, sausage and bakery. Did I mention their amazing bakery? A mountain of gluten free options. Thanks for treating me well Texas...until we meet (I mean eat) again. As Always, Buen Camino
  17. Salmon Cakes, Grain Free Paleo Bit inspired by a few of our members and limitations I decided to combo and modify a few recipes to make this one without garlic, or onion in the base cakes. 3 6oz cans Salmon drained, crumbled 2 tbsp Fresh Dill minced fine (6 grams) 4 Eggs whisked (Room Temperature) 1/4 cup (28g) Coconut Flour 1/4 cup (20g) shredded Unsweetened Shredded Coconut 1/2 tsp Baking Powder 1/4 cup (60g) Unrefined Coconut oil (Melted) Black Pepper and Salt to taste (I omit salt) 2 tbsp coconut oil to fry them in 1. Whisk together your coconut flour, baking powder, shredded coconut, black pepper salt, 2. In another bowl mix your whisked eggs, coconut oil, salmon, and dill combining thoroughly with your hands or a spatula 3. Combine both bowls and mix well working like a meat loaf by hand. 4. Put in the fridge to set up for 30-60 mins, 5. Form into patties cooking 1-2 mins each side on medium heat adding more oil as needed between batches. These pair well with ranch, ketchup, or dill sauce. I can provide recipes for sauces if needed
  18. NOTE on this recipe you can change the cilantro, lime, garlic, for any simmering sauce base, BBQ, teriyaki, harissa etc. 1/2 cup or so worth. Cilantro Lime Pork Chops Pork Chops a lean and finicky meat, being lean they dry out easy. This cooking method of searing then oven baking, followed by simmering in sauce, helps keep them moist. 4-5 boneless pork chops thin 1 tbsp oil for the pan 1/2 cup chopped cilantro 2 large limes (zest and juice) 2 minced garlic cloves 2tbsp butter flavored coconut oil (Nutiva) Cast iron skillet 1. Preheat oven to 400 2. Oil pan and cook the chops 1min each side over medium heat til lightly browned. Transfer to plate to sit. 3. In a small food processor pulse the, cilantro, oil, garlic, lime zest, juice. 4. Place pork chops back in the skillet and place in the oven for 6-7 mins (tip sheet of foil loose over top for splatter reduction. 5. Move skillet to stove pour in cilantro sauce, setting juices and stir around over medium heat for about a min or two. Pairs well with salsa, guacamole, salads.
  19. I contacted Bear Naked about their Gluten Free Granola. I just wanted to let everyone know what they responded with.
  20. Some people ask what I use for breading that is gluten and grain free. Here are my top 3 Chip Breading Simple, preseasoned, 1bag of chips (I use https://eatprotes.com/products/chips as they are low carb the Zesty Nacho, BBQ, Chili & Lime and even the Toasted Coconut all have their own niche in breading foods) 1 cup Coconut Flour 4 eggs 2 cup almond or coconut milk Meat, shrimp, Or even Vegan cheese cut into sticks 4 Bowls/bowl plates for the line 1. Put your chips in a food processor and pules til crumbed Put this in a bowl 2. Now prep your other bowls 1 with whisked eggs, 1 with the coconut flour, 1 with the milk, 3. Dip the item to be breaded in the milk, then dredge in the coconut flour, dip in eggs, then roll in the crumbed chips 4. Cook either deep fry, air fry, or bake in a oven to crisp/cook. (Oven 400-425F 15-20mins depending on item) 5. BONUS when done combine the leftovers from the bowls add in some some more milk if you need....you got hush puppies that are great fried in a bit of coconut oil. Heavy Coconut breading (Fryer/Deep skillet and refined coconut oil fry) This is perfect for cutting chicken into nuggets, fish nuggets, shrimp etc. Small pieces 4 eggs 5 tbsp (35g) coconut flour 1/2 tsp baking powder salt&Pepper to taste 2 tsp seasoning of choice (try http://bigaxespice.com/shop.html here, choose the blend for your dish) 1 cup unsweetened shredded coconut (This can be skipped and just use the batter, I like the extra through with seafood) 2 bowls 1. Heat your oil to 325F 2. Whisk your eggs in a bowl 3. Now add in your coconut flour, baking powder, seasoning, salt & pepper, mix until smooth 4. In another bowl put your coconut flakes 5. Dip your food in the batter and mold it onto the item, roll in optional coconut flakes. dropping into the oil after 6. Flip once when the underside is golden, most foods will float up when done. I found these store bought nut based breading crumbs by https://nutcrumbs.com/collections/all that work great with everything. Choose your flavor and go, You take 2 eggs 1/4cup of almond milk" 1-2 cups of the crumbs 1. Mix your eggs and milk in one bowl, and dump the crumbs in another 2. Dip your prepared meat, veggies (cauliflower, zucchini etc) in the egg mix then dredge in the crumbs 3. Cook how ever you want, baked, fried, etc use like you would in any recipe you have for gluten breading or panko.
  21. Ennis_TX

    Jambalaya

    Here is a nice flavorful Jambalaya from my Paleo based catering, 1 tablespoon oil 1 chopped onion 1 chopped red bell pepper 1 tablespoon minced garlic 12 ounces andouille sausage, sliced (Aidells is Gluten Free and found in most walmarts) 2 package Miracle Rice 1 tablespoon Cajun seasoning like Big Axe Spice No Salt Black'N Jack 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1/2 teaspoon onion powder 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 3-4 cups Pacific Chicken Bone Broth 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 (14.5-ounce) can no salt-added diced tomatoes, undrained 3/4 pound peeled and deveined medium shrimp 2 (Frozen pre cooked works great, or 12oz of Canned Crab or chopped up surumi) 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley to finish (Optional) 1. Prepare and pan dry the Miracle rice as instruction set aside in a bowl 2. Add the first 5 ingredients and stir cooking til vegetables are tender 5-7mins 3. Add in the Miracle rice, paprika, pepper, oregano, thyme, onion and garlic powder stir well cook another 2 mins 4. Then pour in the chicken broth, water, tomato paste, can of tomatoes stir well. Bring to boil, cover and reduce to low heat and simmer for 20mins 5. Add in your Shrimp/Crab, and Cajun Seasoning stir in and cover for another 5mins(I found I could sub a can of crab meat, or surumi) 6. Remove from heat let stand for another 5-10 mins then stir in the parsley and serve. Extra 25% off your first order with Thrive Market http://thrv.me/gf25 https://thrivemarket.com/p/miracle-noodle-shirataki-rice https://thrivemarket.com/p/pacific-foods-chicken-bone-broth https://thrivemarket.com/p/brother-bru-brus-african-hot-pepper-sauce-very-hot http://bigaxespice.com/shop.html
  22. Another almond Butter recipe, Almond Butter Fudge 1 cup (240g) Almond Butter (The 8oz tub of my Artisan Blends works great for this) 1 cup (240g, Coconut Oil 1/4 cup (60g) Coconut milk (Canned) 1 tsp Vanilla or extract of choice Stevia to taste, or a bit of maple syrup (Lakanto Sugar free can work) 1. Melt Almond Butter and coconut oil together 2. In a food processor or blender mix everything together. 3. Pour into muffin tins, or baking pan and refrigerate for 2-3 hours for it to set.
  23. Is anyone else struggling to afford being 100% gluten free? I would love to receive suggestions on government and non-profit funding for Celiac patients.
  24. Why You Should Listen to Your Girlfriends (AKA “I Told You Something Was Wrong With Me”) Nearly five years of health-related nonsense left me depressed, anxious, over-tired, over-weight, and feeling defeated. Until I shared a glass (or two) with my girlfriends and they insisted that I not give up. I didn’t. And that’s how I finally found out what was actually wrong. It was one of those four thousand snowy days in New Jersey, where the kids were off from school for the second day in a row and I was getting some serious cabin fever. The roads were still a mess and too icy to go anywhere, but I needed company. “Cabin Fever Cocktails?” I texted my neighborhood girlfriends, all in walking distance of my front door. “OMG YES” they texted back, and at 5 p.m. on the dot, my winter emotional rescue team walked in. My grandmother used to have a cake in the kitchen for anyone who might stop by and share a cup of coffee. I, apparently, always have bubblies on hand, and we popped open a couple bottles and sat around with our feet tucked and caught up with life. Maybe it was the cozy fire, maybe it was too much self-reflection after 48 hours of being cooped up, maybe it was just the vibe of the room of supportive and caring people, but I finally confessed to my (skinny, fit and fabulous) friends how frustrated I was that I was having such a hard time losing weight, and feeling crummy in general. Weight has been an up and down thing for me my whole life. Puberty and middle school was an awesome time of growing sideways first, then sprouting taller and leaner. College freshman fifteen, up, down. Pregnancy did not make me a baby-bump glowing human – I gained just as much weight in my butt as I did in my belly. I used to say it was nature’s way of making sure I wouldn’t tip over. Baby weight on, baby weight off. Up. Down. By the time the pounds had started creeping on in my late thirties, I blamed age and a lack of time to exercise, and decided to make some lifestyle changes, really try and take care of myself once and for all. Then I tried some fun anti-anxiety meds, which packed on 50 pounds in six months. I wasn’t anxious - because I was a zombie. I stopped the meds but couldn’t get rid of the pounds. For the last two years I had been really trying, seriously trying, to little avail. “I just feel like I’m stuck – like if the answer really is that it’s just that hard to lose weight when you’re older I get it, but this is ridiculous,” I told the ladies. “What have you been doing?” they asked, wanting to listen, wanting to understand, the way good girlfriends do. I explained how I had joined a gym in the fall, and had been seeing a trainer three times a week for an hour at a time, and was on the Peloton bike one or two times in addition to that. I explained how I had joined a meal delivery service and was eating 1300 calories a day. How I read an article that said sleep was important for weight loss so I was maniacal about sleep health and sleep hygiene and was getting eight hours a night and had started using essential oils so I would have better sleep and despite all of this, I hadn’t seen a difference on the scale. “Something’s wrong.” “That’s not normal.” “You’re working too hard for there not to be success.” “WTF?” I’d never been so glad to have other people tell me there was something wrong with me. That’s how I’d been feeling too. A couple of years of raised eyebrows, and a serious six months of WTF? They asked me more questions. Was I seriously not sweating sitting so close to the fire? Nope. I was usually chilly. My feet were always cold. I wore socks to bed every night. I had rosacea that started in the fall as well – my whole life I’d always had great skin and now this was a new awful WTF thing. They asked about my poop, periods, pimples, all the good things that good girlfriends want to know. “That’s too many things. I think it’s auto-immune,” Marni said. Amy agreed. “Could be thyroid. You know that stuff runs in threes too, right? You could have a bunch of things going on at the same time.” Mandy nodded. “Your body is acting like it’s starving to death, it’s holding on to every ounce of fat it can.” “You’re working so hard, there should be results with all that work!” Chris exclaimed. “Go see my doctor,” said Kristen, “he’s a functional medicine doctor. He’s like a detective. He doesn’t take insurance but he’s worth it.” And then we drank some more champagne and complained about our kids and families and parents and spouses and dogs. And I felt so much better, because of all of it. I decided to go see my primary doctor again. She’s a general practioner, and I’ve always liked her. Plus, she takes insurance, so for $25 maybe I could get her to order me a blood test to check my thyroid and I could find out what was wrong and get a magic thyroid pill and be skinny. Right, skinny and healthy. But really what I was focused on was wanting to be skinny again instead of feeling like I was trapped in a fat suit. Dr. M saw me the next day. She came in and was friendly and curious why I was there. I’m either super healthy, or super not healthy. I won’t need to talk to a doctor for three years and then I’ll get bronchitis and cough and break a rib. Or get bitten by a neighbor’s dog that leaves teeth marks around my arm and requires a tetanus booster, just to be safe. You know, fun stuff like that. I explained why I was there. How frustrated I was that I wasn’t losing weight, and that I’d been anxious and depressed and exhausted and generally having a hard time. “What are you eating?” she asked. And I explained about the meal delivery plan and how I’d been following it for six months and wasn’t having success. “Are you really only eating 1300 calories a day?” Dr. M asked me. “Well, mostly,” I said. “If I get really hungry I might eat an apple or some almonds,” I confessed. Dr. M nodded. “Yup. That’s your problem. An apple is too much. You should never eat a whole apple. A THIRD of an apple. That’s a snack,” she told me. “Look at me,” she said, and I did. She might be four foot eleven and I doubt she weighs triple digits. She’s super cute and super little. “I eat nothing – that’s how I stay looking like this.” I bit my tongue. I think my skeleton (or left boob) might weigh more than her full corporal form. “Do you really think that a whole apple instead of a third of an apple is my problem though? My girlfriends suggested I might have a thyroid issue?” She started writing out a blood work form. “We can test you for thyroid. You only need Free T4, I don’t need to test you for T3.” I tried to remember what Amy had said about the full panel of thyroid testing, but I was feeling fat and badly about my existence and all of a sudden lost my ability to ask questions or advocate for myself. In the six minutes Dr. M had spent with me in the exam room I went from thinking about my written list of symptoms to wondering if I could survive on a third of a piece of fruit. She handed me the lab form. “If you want to talk to me about a gastric sleeve we can have that conversation. I’m not against that,” and she walked out of the room. Wait, What? A gastric sleeve? WTF?? OMG. Was everyone looking at me and thinking “Jesus, she needs to get her stomach stapled, what is her problem?” and I was thinking I was fat, but like in a just a little fat kind of way? I thought about my half-hearted joke that I needed fatter friends, like Chubby Checkers, how I went to Disney World and felt skinny and was so glad I wasn’t on a jazzy scooter. Was I one giant turkey leg and a big gulp away from needing electric transport to roll my fat ass through life? I had my blood drawn at the lime green lab of lost souls down the hall and walked outside. I called my sister from the car. “I need to ask you something and I need you to be completely honest with me. Because if you are lying to me you are not helping me and I need the truth from you right now,” I started out, not even saying hello. “Okay…..” she said. “I can do that.” “Do I need gastric bypass? Are you all looking at me and talking about how morbidly obese I am and not telling me? Because I just saw my doctor…” and I spilled my guts on the whole thing. My sister was furious. “If you tell me where she lives, I will egg her house,” she said. “She didn’t listen to you. She isn’t trying to help you. She’s blaming you. This is not what you need. Go to another doctor.” So I did. I called Kristen’s doctor who didn’t take insurance. I had my first test results from Dr. M by the time I went to see him. Thyroid T4 or whatever was normal. No further follow up requested. I wondered if there were giant GMO apples I could buy. I told Dr. Z “I was on the phone with my sister this morning on my way here and she was glad I was coming to talk to you. She said she didn’t want to sound mean but that I’m kind of a bit of a mess right now.” Dr. Z smiled. “What does your sister want me to know about you?” And I went through my story again. Dr. Z listened and asked questions. For an HOUR. We talked about how I’m tired ALL THE TIME. We talked about my weight gain and inability to lose pounds, my restrictive calories, working out with a trainer (who also said I should see a doctor and get my blood checked, because even SHE thought I should be more successful than was my reality), we talked about my depression, anxiety, rosacea skin, my tendency to complain and then make jokes, my blog, my kids, my dogs, my parents and my childhood, my vitamins, my husband and marriage, and how I love to travel. After an hour, Dr. Z asked if he could do an exam, and then we talked again. We did a fasting blood draw and he explained that the last test I had wasn’t “as complete” as what he would be ordering. “I can’t tell you much right now,” he said, “we’ll need to see what’s going on with the blood work, but I think something is definitely out of balance. We’ll get you back on that path where you want to be.” Dr. Z emailed me the blood work results a couple weeks later. The first test packet came from my typical lab of despair and had a bunch of the usual stuff, some I recognized. Others I did not. I did recognize that my once-perfect cholesterol was no longer perfect. I sent my mom a text thanking her for our crummy family DNA. I am snarky that way. Thankfully my mom puts up with me. Then I read the second test packet, something called a “Custom NutriQuant Panel” and read the first item, Arsenic. It was high, like out of range high. I called my sister. Obviously I was being poisoned by my husband and someone needed to know, so when I wound up dead the police would be pointed in the right direction. “I don’t think that’s how he’d kill you,” my sister told me. “I think he’d find something more modern. Arsenic is so old-fashioned. Unless he’s a time traveler, I don’t think that’s it.” My sister can be so logical. She didn’t argue that my husband wouldn’t kill me. She just thought he would find a more efficient and modern way to do it. “What’s the rest of the test say?” she asked. “I don’t know.” I said. “There’s stuff all over the place. I’m supposed to call the doctor.” “And you called me instead?” my sister asked. “Cool. Go call the doctor.” So I called Dr. Z. “Which page do you have in front of you?” he asked. “Arsenic!” I declared. “I already told my sister my husband is trying to kill me,” I explained to him. “Mm, well that might be true, but, I wouldn’t worry too much about the arsenic. It could be that you eat a lot of rice or had some fish with some higher arsenic levels. It’s not worth worrying about that but we can retest it again just to check if that would make you feel better.” I sniffed. I was glad everyone was taking my husband potentially poisoning me seriously. We talked about my Vitamin B12 being low, my Vitamin D being low, even a weird level for Copper was low. I didn’t even know the body needed Copper. Was I going to turn green like the Statue of Liberty? “I’m so confused,” I said. “I take a multi vitamin every day with 1667% of Vitamin B12. And for Vitamin D I take 4000IU every morning. How on earth am I still so low?” And Dr. Z told me. “All of these things are probably testing low because your body isn’t able to absorb them. If you turn the page you’ll see you tested positive for Celiacs. You’re malnourished in several areas.” W.T.F. Celiacs? Malnourished? This was a cosmic joke. Why couldn’t I get skinny person Celiacs? How on earth did I get fat from being malnourished? I had been so fixated on my arsenic poisoning that I hadn’t bothered to look up most of the other stuff on the test. I had been tested for Celiacs ten years ago when my daughter was first diagnosed with it. I was negative then. I was positive now. Was the test ten years ago wrong? Apparently the negative tests are only correct 71% of the time. Or had the Celiacs just turned on at some point in the last few years? I have no way of knowing. Part of fun and funky thing about autoimmune diseases like Celiacs is that they can activate at any point in life. Katie and I had zero similarities in terms of symptoms. She was nearly two when she was diagnosed, and her pediatrician suggested that we test her because Katie had fallen off the growth chart. She was tiny, hovering near that “failure to thrive” mark. Within 6 months of a gluten-free diet, Katie was growing and thriving and her blood work was back to perfect. All the blood testing helped lay the foundation for her fear of needles, but that’s another story. My symptoms were different, but apparently not atypical at all. The unfortunate thing is that most doctors think of a “celiac look”, and test people who are really skinny and little. But, according to research, a full 39% of celiac patients are overweight, with 30% actually obese. Malnourished vitamin and mineral-deprived bodies become super efficient at holding on to excess fat. They can get a gastric sleeve, eat a third of an apple a day, and their body will still recognize malnourishment as starvation. I’m convinced that undiagnosed Celiacs is part of the obesity problem in America. Yes, there are some facts and studies that support that. Mostly I just think these things in my own head and have little actual medical knowledge, but I’m totally ok with that. At the end of the day, I will miss good New York / Northern New Jersey bagels, croissants and crusty bread in Paris, and Carvel ice cream crunchies. But I will not miss my body attacking itself, holding onto excess weight, and feeling exhausted all the time because I can’t maintain needed vitamin and mineral levels. I want my body back in balance, and I want to feel good again. Is a celiacs diagnosis going to cure all my life problems? Maybe. Maybe not. I still have that whole arsenic poisoning thing to obsess about. I’m really good at obsessing in general. Thankfully my girlfriends listened to my troubles and pushed me in the right direction. What we all need is to make sure we are speaking up and pushing for ourselves too. Onwards. ******* Are you like me? Do you think you have every disease you read about? Here’s some info on Celiacs disease, the extensive blood work you might want to consider, and the link to a great card set called “Fifty Things that Might Kill You”. Because why not? Facts, Figures, and Fantastical Ideas: What the heck is gluten? A protein found in Wheat, Oats, Rye, Malt and Barley. Not the kind of good energy protein you find in eggs and meat and things. Just some weird science protein that makes everyone confused. Technically oats do not have gluten in them, but most farmers growing oats rotate the crop with wheat, and the gluten leaches out into the soil, and then when you plant the oats the gluten gets absorbed into the oats. You can find gluten-free oats in the store because those farmers are following gluten-free farming practices. Tuck that away for your trivia night evening. Celiacs Disease is not an allergy. It’s an auto-immune disease. Essentially it’s your body reacting to the presence of gluten in a way that creates an attack on your own self. Your intestines have these cute little villi that are like little fingers or tentacles reaching out to absorb nutrients. In Celiacs, the gluten makes the body think it’s under attack and the immune system kills off the villi. So no more nutrient absorption, and the body becomes malnourished. That’s what the blood test looks for – antibodies in your blood which indicates your immune system is in attack formation. There are three separate tests you need to diagnose celiac (and yes, you need all three, not just one) – Tissue Transglutam AB IGA, Gliadin Deamidated AB, IGA, and Gliadin Deamidated AB, IGG. You see why I didn’t notice I had Celiacs. None of those say Celiacs. Arsenic is way more fun to talk about. Celiacs can make people react in so many different ways that there isn’t really a “typical” symptoms list that would make you want to go get tested. I just think every human should be tested anyway. Like a CBC, cholesterol check. Just do it. A healthy gut is too important not to take care of. Did you know that 80% of your immune system is in your gut? So if your gut is sick then you’re just going to feel rotten. Maybe we’re not all sleep deprived because of long commutes and screen time. Maybe we all have celiacs. Maybe celiacs is the magic answer for everything. I wonder if Harry Potter has a spell for that? “Reparo My Gut!” In Italy, they simply test every child at age 5. That’s your baseline. And then you can get tested again later to see if you have a change. Or if you’re already Celiac as a kid you know to make changes (a strict gluten-free diet) and you get healthy early in life. I also think this Custom NutriQuant Panel was wicked important. We can all take vitamins, but how do we know if our body is absorbing them if we aren’t checking? Think about this. I was taking 1667% of Vitamin B12 thru my multivitamin EVERY DAY. And it was going right thru my body like it was water. While my body is repairing I’m taking B12 as a dissolvable tablet under my tongue so it goes directly into my blood stream instead of needing to be absorbed through my gut. Cuz apparently my gut isn’t working all that well. It can take six months for my body to heal while doing this whole gluten free diet thing. As little as one eighth of a teaspoon can be enough to set an immune system into attack mode. There’s no cheating. Or mistakes. Which makes this part really fun: Food companies do not need to indicate if their product has gluten in it. The allergy people are much better organized with the lobbyists on this front. The eight major allergens (fish, shellfish, peanuts, treenuts, eggs, milk, soy, wheat) are required to be listed on packaging. Gluten can be hidden in the ingredients – in things like “natural and artificial flavoring” - and when I have called company customer service hotlines (places like Dannon yogurt) to ask them if there is any hidden gluten I was told “the ingredients are proprietary information” (and I never bought a Dannon product again). Yes, there is a ton of gluten free options in the grocery store. Some of them actually taste good. Most are in the meh category. Gluten can hide in things like soy sauce, rice krispies (because malt flavoring is cheaper than sugar), toothpaste, medications, and envelope glue. Remember that episode of Seinfeld where Susan died from licking envelopes? Again, celiacs might be the answer to all the world’s problems. Celiacs is not something you grow out of. It’s a disease you have forever (until they find a cure). The only way to live a healthy life is to be completely 100% gluten free all the time. With all the choices of other things I could have, I’ll take this one, thank you very much.
  25. I went gluten-free over nine years ago. I was always thin - 5'9" and roughly a size eight. After years of chronic pain and mood issues and insomnia a doc caught the celiac. Soon after quitting gluten all symptoms subsided but I quickly gained A LOT of weight. It's been many years, many docs and MANY different diets. I can't lose the weight. I've tried every variation of diets and it doesn't budge. I exercise regularly and eat a fraction of what others eat. I'm so tired of people telling me "calorie in calorie out." It's BS! I've seen tons of docs, most of which don't believe my diet log. I did crossfit for five years. The more paleo I ate and the harder I exercised the more with I gained. Doc told me I blew my adrenals so I stopped and stuck to walking for eight months. I recently took up yoga and I'm gaining again. I like to about about 90% paleo, organic with minimal red meat. I also don't eat soy and I never drink coffee. My thyroid tests are normal and I've tried all the thyroid meds and they don't do anything. I'm about 40 lbs over weight and SOOOOO tired of it. I'm covered in a very fatty layer and look full of cellulite. I do supplements, cleanses, you name it. If I eat fruit, it's low glycemic. I only eat minimal nuts to avoid calories. It just doesn't add up. I'm pretty sure, whatever anyone suggests, I've tried it. I've seen the best docs in the area and they are baffled. I have high insulin but I'm not prediabetc. I have gorgeous blood work - It appears I'm very healthy. I've monitored my blood glucose and... normal. My A1C is 4.6! I have a team of naturopaths and no one can figure it out! Anyone else have this problem!?!? I'm fat as hell and I shouldn't be. If anyone wants to tell me I don't eat enough... I tried that route too (more food, more frequently to boost metabolism - nothing). IDEAS!?!?!?!?!?!?
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