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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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Found 263 results

  1. I contacted Bear Naked about their Gluten Free Granola. I just wanted to let everyone know what they responded with.
  2. Hello all. I suspect that I am gluten intolerant. I went gluten free last Monday. About two days after that I felt great! However, yesterday I started feeling bad again. Today is even worse. I'm having leg cramps again, bloating (it's like I went up two sizes in two days!), bad cramps, muscle spasms and joint pain. Is it possible to go through gluten withdrawl after feeling better? I've also been very careful with my diet too. I've also been more on edge and angry. I am not an angry person...
  3. Lemon Ricotta Scones (gluten free, sugar free, grain free, dairy free, Keto) 2 1/2 cups (280g) Almond flour 1/3 cup Swerve Granular Sweetener 1 tbsp baking Powder 1/2 tsp salt Zest of one lemon 2 large eggs 1/2 cup Kite Hill Ricotta 1/2 Tsp lemon extract Lemon Glaze 1/4 cup Swerve Confectioners 1 tbsp Lemon Extract Amusingly leaving out binders on this makes them a bit crumbly and is the perfect texture for scones and a great gluten free treat. 1. Preheat oven to 325F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper 2. In a large bowl whisk together almond meal, sweetener, baking powder, salt, use a sift to sift out into the bowl again and whisk in zest 3. In a separate bowl mix the eggs, ricotta, and lemon extract. 4. Combine the ricotta mix into the flour mix and stir until dough is well combined. 5. Divide the dough in half. and pat into two 6" diameter circles on the parchment paper lined sheet. 6. Cut each into 6 wedges with a dough knife or butter knife using a spatula you can spread them out on the pan a few inches apart 7. Bake around 25mins until golden brown and firm 8. Let cool and whisk the powdered sweetener and lemon juice and drizzle over the cooled scones. http://thrv.me/gf25 For 25% off your first order. https://thrivemarket.com/p/swerve-confectioners-sugar-replacement https://thrivemarket.com/p/swerve-granular-sugar-replacement https://thrivemarket.com/p/bobs-red-mill-almond-flour
  4. Pina Colada Pie 1 Pie Crust (I suggest the gram cracker version of my gluten-free Pie Crust)https://www.celiac.com/blogs/entry/2146-grain-free-pie-crust/ 1 Can Full Fat coconut milk 1 20oz Can Crushed Pineapple in natural juice 1 tsp Vanilla Extract 2 tbsp maple syrup dash of salt If you want it a bit more stable I suggest adding 2tbsp of coconut oil 1. Place all ingredients but the crust in blender 2. Blend well. 3. Pour over crust and place in freezer for at least 4-6 hours for optimal texture, and cut. Note if frozen over night it sets up a little hard but is just as tasty and can be eaten like a pizza.
  5. Creamy Broccoli Mushroom Casserole This is gluten, corn, and dairy free and can be made vegan by subbing vegetable stock for the chicken 1 medium Onion 1-2 tbsp oil 2 cloves of garlic 12oz of mushrooms 2 tbsp flour (I've used Nutiva Coconut and garfava [blend of garbanzo and fava] before you can probably sub bobs gluten-free flour found in most stores) 1 cup chicken stock (can sub vegetable for vegan) 1 cup almond milk 1/2 cup nutritional yeast KAL or Brags 2 packages of 10-12oz broccoli florets Steamed 2 bags miracle rice or 4 cups of cooked rice of choice 1. Preheat oven to 350F 2. Chop garlic and onions and give the mushrooms a medium chop in a food processor. 3. Cook the broccoli and give a rough chop so no large chunks and rice set aside 4. Saute the garlic and onions in the oil til soft over medium high heat 5. Add the mushrooms and cook til liquid had cooked off and they start browning stir constantly (6mins) 6. Sprinkle the flour over the vegetables and add the broth stir until thick 7. Remove from heat and add the milk and 1/4 cup of the nutritional yeast and stir in the broccoli seasoning to taste with salt and pepper 8. Put the rice in the pan spreading it out and pressing a bit, proceed to to p with the broccoli mix spreading evenly, sprinkle pepper, and the other 1/4 of the nutritional yeast over the top evenly 9. Cover with foil and bake for 15-25mins, remove the foil and cook for another 5-15 mins til desired moist level for your casserole.
  6. Celiac.com 03/16/2018 - Celiac awareness has increased exponentially over the last decade among physicians and the general public alike. Increasing numbers of research publications and very active support groups and individuals have contributed to this growing awareness. Knowledge of the many and varied manifestations is also growing rapidly although some individuals continue to cling to the notion that celiac disease is characterized by malabsorption and that nutrient deficiency is the dominant feature of this ailment. This misses the broader understanding of the many ways in which gluten grains negatively impact on human health. From toes to head, any and all of our human body systems may be harmed by ingesting gluten under some circumstances. Although the wide range of signs and symptoms of celiac disease is impressive, a similar, even broader range of impacts may be attributed to gluten in the context of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Those with celiac disease only comprise a small portion of the population of people who are afflicted by non celiac gluten sensitivity. Dr. Rodney Ford has offered the all encompassing term of 'gluten syndrome' to identify everyone whose health is compromised by gluten consumption (1). From Dr. Fasano's most conservative estimate that 6% of the population is afflicted by non-celiac gluten sensitivity (2), to Dr. Rodney Ford's estimate that 10% is afflicted (3), to Dr. Kenneth Fine's finding that IgG class anti-gliadin antibodies are found in about 11% of the population (4), to this writer's assertion that non-celiac gluten sensitivity includes well more than 20% of the population, the paucity of research in this area offers a wide range of estimates without a solid basis for refuting any of them. Nonetheless, it is clear that those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity outnumber those with celiac disease by a ratio of somewhere between 6 to 1 and more than 20 to 1. The gluten syndrome may therefore include from seven percent to more than twenty percent of the population. The importance of these percentages and ratios is that we are seeing growth in the diagnosis of celiac disease, and in the number of people who have celiac disease (4). It has been argued that a similar trend may be seen across the spectrum of the gluten syndrome, attributing that trend to the genetic modifications that have been made to grains, and the increased consumption of these foods (5). But this is just the tip of the iceberg. Dr. Fasano bases his estimate of non-celiac gluten sensitivity on those who mount an innate immune reaction to gluten grains. While there is likely some overlap between innate immune reactions and selective antibody reactions, most estimates of non-celiac gluten sensitivity are based on IgG class antibodies against one of the proteins of several protein families found in gluten. It makes eminent sense to me that when our bodies are mounting a measurable immune response against the most common food in our diets, whether the reaction is by the innate immune system or by creating selective antibodies, that food might be harmful to our health. I do not quarrel with the basis on which these sensitivities are identified. I simply argue that they are only identifying a sub-fraction of many more possible cases of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. To put this issue into sharper focus, there are several protein families to be found in each of the gluten grains. In wheat, for instance, each family, glutelin, gliadin, and glutenin contains a number of individual proteins. The antibody test for gliadin ignores possible reactions to proteins in either of the other two families. Further, IgG class antibodies are the most common and widespread class of selective antibody we produce. But they form only one of five types of selective antibodies (known as immunoglobulins). Further, as is obvious from Dr. Fasano's conservative approach to identifying non-celiac gluten sensitivity, there are other facets of the immune system that do not involve selective antibodies, and can also be enlisted in a reaction against gluten grains. Thus, when we test for IgG anti-gliadin antibodies, the most common test for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, positive results are identifying reactions against only one of the several protein families found in gluten, and only one of the five possible selective antibody reactions against this single protein family. It therefore seems wholly improbable that testing for reactions against a single protein family in only a single class of selective antibody would identify all or even most cases of gluten sensitivity. Admittedly, some researchers test for IgA antibodies but those investigators usually do not test for IgG antibodies. However, even with testing for both classes of selective antibodies, which most published reports on this issue have not done, it is clear that many possible immune reactions to any other protein fractions of gluten might well be overlooked, either in the form of other selective antibodies or as other immune reactions and various innate reactions against gluten grains. I'm sure that, by now, the reader will see that there are many possible immune reactions against this most common food, and that most of these reactions will go undetected, both in the context of standard medical testing and in most research conducted in this venue. On a more practical plane, when Dr. Curtis Dohan identified significant improvements among patients with schizophrenia patients eating a gluten-free, dairy-free diet (6), and Singh and Kay replicated their findings (7), many looked for celiac disease among patients with schizophrenia and found only a small increase. Dohan and Singh's publications were followed by several sloppy studies that ignored the guiding principles expressed in this pioneering work. These weak studies further undermined acceptance of the connection between gluten and schizophrenia. The net result was a growing belief that Dohan had erred and his heroic work was widely dismissed. Yet, more than twenty years after his death, one of Dohan's most vigorous critics is listed among the authors of a paper that reports an immune reaction against gluten that, while different from the reaction seen in celiac disease, is common among people with schizophrenia (8). Similarly, I think that we can expect, sometime in the future, to see research that identifies immune reactions and damaging dynamics caused by gluten consumption among people with learning disabilities. There is, for instance, one newspaper report of an informal study conducted at the Nunnykirk School in Northumberland, a school that serves only children with dyslexia, a condition that is reported to afflict about 10% of children in the United Kingdom. After six months of eating a gluten free diet, more than 80% of these children improved their reading at a rate of at least twice that of normal children. Some leaped ahead, in their reading skills, by as much as 2.5 years over this six month period (9). Relatedly, I had the privilege of working with Dr. Rodney Ford on a retrospective analysis of indicators of school readiness among children who had celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity (as measured by selective antibody testing) and children who showed no signs of either reaction to gluten. A large majority of those who reacted to gluten improved dramatically. There was a small but significant sub-group whose school readiness improved following a gluten free diet, and these improvements happened within 6 months of avoiding gluten (unpublished data). Autism, especially where normal development was curtailed after one or several years, is another condition in which excluding gluten seems to provide substantial improvements even in the absence of celiac disease. Some research in this area suggests that toxins (generated by bacteria resident in the intestines) are allowed access to the bloodstream and the brain (10). Perhaps exclusion of dietary gluten is the factor that limits access to the bloodstream through reducing zonulin production. Similarly, although not as well supported, there is some evidence to suggest that gluten contributes to bi-polar disorder. Just how frequent and significant the contribution may be is still open to debate, but I have observed some evidence to support this hypothesis in my own family. A range of types of epilepsy have been found in association with celiac disease, many of which are mitigated by the gluten free diet (11). The manifestations of undetected non-celiac gluten sensitivity are not limited to brain function. We know that celiac disease is much more frequent in the context of other autoimmune diseases. We also know that antibody tests show even higher rates of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Since we are only identifying a fraction of those who may be reacting to gluten, it seems reasonable to suggest that everyone with an autoimmune disease, or antibodies suggesting that an autoimmune disease is imminent, should begin a strict gluten free diet and follow it for at least one year. If there is any reduction of auto-antibodies or symptoms of autoimmunity, the diet should be continued. Although difficult in the early stages, it is an entirely benign intervention/treatment. There are no unwanted side effects or hazards. There are more than 200 autoimmune and other medical conditions reported in association with gluten and are listed in Appendix D of Dangerous Grains (12). In each case, a lengthy trial of a gluten free diet would be well advised. Again, there are no negative side effects of the gluten free diet. It is an entirely benign intervention. A significant proportion of those who suffer from IBS, Crohn's or any of the various types of colitis have also been reported to benefit from a gluten free diet on various websites. Similarly, many people with MS and a host of other neurological diseases have been shown to benefit from a gluten free diet (13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23). Even many AIDS patients are helped by a gluten free diet. It reduces their diarrhea and improves nutrient absorption (24). This is an important discovery that can be harnessed in conjunction with the improved treatments now available for this very serious illness. Overweight, obesity, and weight loss are contentious issues with regard to the gluten free diet. Until quite recently, there were two reports of small studies of changes in body mass index in the USA and one report from Ireland, following institution of a gluten free diet. The two American studies showed weight loss among overweight subjects on a gluten free diet. The study from Ireland showed only weight gain among overweight subjects after following a gluten free diet. In November of 2011, another small study was published. Their conclusion states "The GFD (gluten free diet) has a beneficial effect upon the BMI (body mass index) of overweight children with celiac disease" (25), which is congruent with the earlier two American studies. I have previously suggested that the discrepancy between the findings may be due to the acceptance of wheat starch as part of the gluten free diet in the United Kingdom. However, regardless of the cause, the preponderance of evidence supports the notion that a gluten free diet can be used as an effective weight loss strategy in some cases of celiac disease. Other evidence suggests it may be a more broadly effective weight loss tool. Thus, my estimate of the prevalence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity includes the 6% who show signs of innate immune reactions to gluten, in addition to those who show IgG antibodies against gluten, at about 11% of the population (although there may be some overlap between these 6% and 11% groups). My estimate also includes many of those with schizophrenia who number about 1% of the general population, and a portion of those with autism who are quickly approaching 1% of the population. I am also including 80% of the approximately 10% of the population with some degree of dyslexia. Because of overlaps between groups, and because gluten's impact is often only demonstrable through a gluten free diet, I only assert that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a factor in more than 20% of the general population. However, I remain open to findings that will show a much greater negative impact from eating foods derived from gluten grains. The portion of the human population that may be negatively impacted by gluten consumption can range as high as the 80% portion that produce haptaglobin 2, for which zonulin is the precursor. The take away point here is that the gluten free diet may aid overall health for up to as much as 80% of the general population. In that context, my estimate that 20+% of the population is showing signs that they are variously mounting immune reactions against gluten or are otherwise harmed by gluten appears modest. The overlapping symptoms make it extremely difficult to narrow my estimate further. Nonetheless, gluten is one of the most harmful substances in our diet. Yet it is the most ubiquitous factor in our diets. Sources: 1. www.doctorgluten.com 2. Sapone A, Lammers KM, Casolaro V, Cammarota M, Giuliano MT, De Rosa M, Stefanile R, Mazzarella G, Tolone C, Russo MI, Esposito P, Ferraraccio F, Cartenì M, Riegler G, de Magistris L, Fasano A. Divergence of gut permeability and mucosal immune gene expression in two gluten-associated conditions: celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. BMC Med. 2011 Mar 9;9:23. 3. personal communication 4. personal communication 5. Wheat Belly 6. Dohan FC, Grasberger JC. Relapsed schizophrenics: earlier discharge from the hospital after cereal-free, milk-free diet. Am J Psychiatry. 1973 Jun;130(6):685-8. 7. Singh & Kay 8. Samaroo D, Dickerson F, Kasarda DD, Green PH, Briani C, Yolken RH, Alaedini A. Novel immune response to gluten in individuals with schizophrenia. Schizophr Res. 2010 May;118(1-3):248-55. 9. Blair, Alexandra. Wheat-free diet gives food for thought. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article444290.ece 10. Sandler RH, Finegold SM, Bolte ER, Buchanan CP, Maxwell AP, Väisänen ML, Nelson MN, Wexler HM. Short-term benefit from oral vancomycin treatment of regressive-onset autism. J Child Neurol. 2000 Jul;15(7):429-35. 11. Ribaldone DG, Astegiano M, Fagoonee S, Rizzetto M, Pellicano R. Epilepsy and celiac disease: review of literature. Panminerva Med. 2011 Dec;53(4):213-6. 12. Braly J, Hoggan R, Dangerous Grains. Avery, New York, 2002. 13. Hadjivassiliou M, Sanders DS, Grünewald RA, Woodroofe N, Boscolo S, Aeschlimann D. Gluten sensitivity: from gut to brain. Lancet Neurol. 2010 Mar;9(3):318-30. 14. Turner MR, Chohan G, Quaghebeur G, Greenhall RC, Hadjivassiliou M, Talbot K. A case of celiac disease mimicking amyotrophic lateral scl Nat Clin Pract Neurol. 2007 Oct;3(10):581-4. 15. Hadjivassiliou M, Chattopadhyay AK, Grünewald RA, Jarratt JA, Kandler RH, Rao DG, Sanders DS, Wharton SB, Davies-Jones GA. Myopathy associated with gluten sensitivity. Muscle Nerve. 2007 Apr;35(4):443-50. 16. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald RA, Kandler RH, Chattopadhyay AK, Jarratt JA, Sanders DS, Sharrack B, Wharton SB, Davies-Jones GA. Neuropathy associated with gluten sensitivity. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2006 Nov;77(11):1262-6. Epub 2006 Jul 11. 17. Hadjivassiliou M, Sanders DS, Grünewald RA. Multiple sclerosis and occult gluten sensitivity. Neurology. 2005 Mar 8;64(5):933-4; author reply 933-4. 18. Hadjivassiliou M, Williamson CA, Woodroofe N. The immunology of gluten sensitivity: beyond the gut. Trends Immunol. 2004 Nov;25(11):578-82. Review. 19. Hadjivassiliou M, Sanders DS, Grünewald RA, Akil M. Gluten sensitivity masquerading as systemic lupus erythematosus. Ann Rheum Dis. 2004 Nov;63(11):1501-3. 20. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald RA, Davies-Jones GA. Gluten sensitivity as a neurological illness. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2002 May;72(5):560-3. 21. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald RA, Lawden M, Davies-Jones GA, Powell T, Smith CM. Headache and CNS white matter abnormalities associated with gluten sensitivity. Neurology. 2001 Feb 13;56(3):385-8. 22. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald RA, Davies-Jones GA. Gluten sensitivity: a many headed hydra. BMJ. 1999 Jun 26;318(7200):1710-1. 23. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71. 24. Quiñones-Galvan A, Lifshitz-Guinzberg A, Ruíz-Arguelles GJ. Gluten-free diet for AIDS-associated enteropathy. Ann Intern Med. 1990 Nov 15;113(10):806-7. 25. Reilly NR, Aguilar K, Hassid BG, Cheng J, Defelice AR, Kazlow P, Bhagat G, Green PH. Celiac disease in normal-weight and overweight children: clinical features and growth outcomes following a gluten-free diet. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2011 Nov;53(5):528-31. 26. Cheng J, Brar PS, Lee AR, Green PH. Body mass index in celiac disease: beneficial effect of a gluten-free diet. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2010 Apr;44(4):267-71. 27. Murray JA, Watson T, Clearman B, Mitros F. Effect of a gluten-free diet on gastrointestinal symptoms in celiac disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Apr;79(4):669-73.
  7. Celiac.com 03/10/2018 - There's something so fun about summertime picnics; everyone is always so excited to whip up a batch of their famous gluten-free pasta salad or cornbread. Whether you're bringing along the red and white checker tablecloth and wicker basket or simply using a towel and a canvas tote - there's always fun to be had at a picnic. It may be nothing fancier than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich but you're still likely to have a fabulous time with good friends and tasty food. After 30 years of picnics, I've seen just about every dish – the potato salad, the Jell-O mold and the deviled eggs. But no matter how faithful you are to your picnic favorites I'll bet you'll find a few tasty options below to keep your taste buds happy this picnic season. Here are a few of my tasty gluten-free favorites to bring along to my summertime picnic soirees. Fresh Mozzarella and Balsamic Peaches: Toss together 4 sliced peaches, 12 mini balls of fresh mozzarella, 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar, 1 small red onion, 2 Tbsp. rosemary, 2 Tbsp. olive oil, 1 tsp. lemon juice, sea salt and pepper. Beet Salad Pitas: Peel beets and grate them in a food processor; add ½ cup pistachios, 1 Tbsp. orange zest, 2 Tbsp. orange juice, 2 Tbsp. olive oil, 1 cup Greek plain yogurt and ½ tsp. fresh parsley stuffed into gluten-free pitas. Avocado Hummus and Fruit Skewers: Combine 2 ripe avocados, 1 cup black beans, ½ cup cilantro, 1 cup corn, 1 pint cherry tomatoes, sea salt, pepper, 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice, 1/3 tsp. chili powder and ¼ tsp. cumin in a food processor; pulse until smooth. Serve with fresh fruit skewers of apples, pineapple and jicama chunks. Curried Deviled Eggs: Hard boil a dozen eggs. Slice each egg in half, remove yolks. Combine yolks with Greek plain yogurt, curry powder, Dijon mustard, lime juice, sea salt, white pepper, cilantro, red onion and diced apple; mix well. Place a Tablespoon of mixture into each egg white half and serve. Sweet Potato Pesto Turkey Wraps: Combine 4 baked sweet potatoes, 8 Tbsp. olive oil, sea salt and pepper, 2 ½ cups fresh parsley, ½ cup pine nuts, 1/3 cup walnuts, 1 clove garlic, 1 tsp. lemon juice, ½ tsp. lemon zest in a food processor; pulse until smooth. Spread atop organic slices of turkey and roll up. Peanut Edemame: Toss together 1 cup cooked edemame, 1 Tbsp. smooth peanut butter, 1 tsp. honey, 2 tsp. warm water, 1 tsp. sesame seeds; gently toss to combine. Sunshine Tea with Fresh Mint: Combine 4 cups of boiling water, 4 green tea bags, 1 freshly sliced lemon and 1/3 cup fresh mint leaves in a large pitcher. Set in the sun for 8 hours. Serve over ice. Bon appétit!
  8. Grain Free Keto Cookies 1/4 cup (52g) coconut oil 1/4 cup (60g) Sugar free Maple or Honey (Lakanto Maple or a similar honey) 1/2 tsp Vanilla Extract 1/4 tsp salt 1/4 tsp baking soda or 1/2 tsp baking soda sub 34g coconut flour 24g almond flour 45g chocolate chips (sugar free I used chopped up Lakanto Chocolate Bar, Lilly's or other sugar free would also work) 1. Preheat your oven to 350 and line a baking sheet with parchment paper 2. Mix coconut oil, maple, vanilla and salt and heat slightly (10-20 sec just above room temp) in the microwave mixing again. 3. In a separate bowel mix Baking Soda, Coconut Flour, Almond flour whisk together 4. Using a sifter if you have one sift the flour mixture into the liquid then stir in the chocolate chips, 5. Let the dough sit for 10 mins letting the coconut flour thicken 6. scoop the cookie dough onto the baking sheets 1heaping to 2 tsp portions and flatten a bit with the spoon. 7. Bake for 10-12mins remove and let sit on the sheets for 3-8 mins before moving them to cooling racks. In an attempt to recreate my grain free cookies without sugars or starches I have created a Grain free sugar free Cookie. These will soon be featured at my bakery with both a sugar and sugar free options. Feel free to test these at home. While not as rich and soft as my almond butter ones they are very cost effective.
  9. Hi there! I am looking for insight from anyone that may have insight on what is going on in my body. I have had 6 years of fuzzy head and GI issues (bloating, constipation, nausea, pain, discomfort). I cut out gluten 3 years ago. Then did a IgG mediated food allergy test with a holistic doctor and did a food elimination diet based on those results. So I now avoid dairy and gluten and tomato. I notice i have flare ups when I consume corn so I am trying to be more strict about it lately but I get a week long of nausea/heartburn/acid reflux when i do eat it. I also started following a low fodmap diet a few months ago due to still not feeling great and when I follow all of these things (gluten free, dairy free, corn free, low fodmap) I feel the best I ever have, although it is very hard to sustain. Also, i still have random spouts of horrible heart burn and nausea occasionally and cannot pinpoint it. I also am on a PPI for this. I have had a hydrogen breath test in 2015 and it was negative. I also have had multiple EGD's and Colonoscopies that have been unrevealing besides a stomach ulcer which is now healed and some esophagus irritation most recently. I am now scared of eating so many foods because I have had so many days of not feeling right. I have considered getting more strict on the corn restriction or maybe considering nightshade free because I am not sure what to do/if Fodmap is really helping since it isnt all the time and I am stressed about what I can even eat anymore. Any suggestions or thoughts are appreciated! Thanks in advanced, Sara
  10. Hi, does anyone know if Lockets are gluten free? i usually buy strepsils but have had two lockets today as they were all I could buy in the shop, and I was desperate for some relief from this sore throat! Stupid without checking they're 100% gluten-free first but dire times they don't list any gluten containing ingredients and have no allergen info? many thanks
  11. This is a fun one just a small bowl of sticky gooey dough fun to eat with a small spoon, its stretchy and oh so gooey. Careful though it is packed full of fiber. This is a acquired taste, I for one was the kid that ate the cinnamon rolls out of the oven before they were done...I loved that super gluten stretchy yeast doughy centers and that is what this replicates. 2 heaping scoops pure pea protein (36-40g) 1/2-1tsp pure cinnamon Pinch of baking powder 1/8th heap tsp pure uncut stevia (I use Nunaturals or Pyure for sugar one feel free to use 1-2tbsp of sugar and up the liquid the same amount) 1/2-1tsp unflavored psyllum husk (1/2 tsp is suggested for standard dough, if you want this to be super chewy like the center of pop can Pillsbury cinnamon roll half cooked raw then up it.) 8oz hot water Optional add 8 drops of a extract. 1. Wisk your protein, cinnamon, baking powder, and psyllum togheter 2. In a measuring cup put the stevia and optional extracts in the water and heat 2mins in a microwave 3. Stir the water then pour into the dry and fold well with a fork til it starts to get sticky and doughy, you can zap the mix for 10-12 seconds to make it super stretchy. https://www.amazon.com/Protein-Isolate-North-American-Farms/dp/B00NBIUGA2/ Comes in 5 and 1lb containers. The 5lb is the most cost effective proetin powder on the market https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PHCD6OS/ Spicely Organics Ceylon certified gluten free https://www.amazon.com/Metamucil-Smooth-Texture-Sugar-Free-Unflavored/dp/B001H9X8IY This is one form, I get it from another brand local stores but you want unflavored/unsweetened powder. https://www.amazon.com/Nustevia-white-Stevia-NoCarbs-Ounces/dp/B000HC0M1S/ Pure Uncut NuNatural Steiva 1/8tsp is like a tbsp of sugar or more.
  12. Celiac.com 02/10/2018 - People with celiac disease must avoid all forms of gluten from wheat, rye, or barley. So, what about Kamut? Is Kamut safe for people with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity? Like Spelt, Kamut is simply another form of wheat that is sometimes wrongly thought to be gluten-free. Kamut is simply a trademark for a specific kind of wheat, Khorasan wheat, grown under specific conditions. Khorasan wheat is triticum turanicum. It is wheat, and it contains gluten, which people with celiac disease should not eat. So, in short, Kamut is NOT safe for people with celiac disease or any sensitivity to gluten. Because Kamut is still a type of wheat that contains gluten it is not safe for people with celiac diseases and appears on Celiac.com's UNSAFE food list of non-gluten-free foods.
  13. Celiac.com 02/02/2018 - An opinion article by Dr. Di Sabatino and Dr. Corazza in the February 2012 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine (1) has unleashed a storm of opinion articles in the popular media that decry the gluten-free diet. The article by these two physicians is mostly reasonable and thoughtful but there are a couple of problems with it. The authors devalue patients' participation in their own health care and implicitly assert that gluten is a healthy food for most people. They do so through a protocol they have devised and by stating that they wish to prevent "a gluten preoccupation from evolving into the conviction that gluten is toxic for most of the population" (1). This statement, and the media claims that followed, reflect several deeply flawed assumptions and perspectives that are not only unscientific, they elevate the physician's observations over the individual's insights into her/his own health. The first assumption, of course, is that gluten is a healthy food for all those without celiac disease. Yet in the very same article, Di Sabatino and Corazza offer a list of afflictions that, in the absence of celiac disease, improve or completely disappear when gluten is withdrawn. Thus, while they acknowledge the existence of these illnesses, they simultaneously assert that a condition of gluten preoccupation exists and that gluten is not toxic for most of the population. They go on to bemoan the absence of clear diagnostic criteria for these non-celiac, gluten-induced illnesses, calling for an individualized approach to diagnosis that would involve patients following a single-blinded gluten challenge test for subjective symptoms and an open test for objective signs and symptoms. In a nutshell, they want patients to undergo a gluten challenge, without knowing (the patient is the one who is blinded) when they are or are not gluten-free, to confirm, for the physician, the patient's claim that her/his symptoms are legitimately linked to gluten ingestion. The gluten challenge is for the sole benefit of the physician. If she/he observes that the signs and/or symptoms worsen with gluten exposure and/or improve after excluding gluten then the physician will be reassured that the patient's self-report is accurate. Does that strike anyone else as a trifle offensive? Of course, this assumes that the physician's tests and observations are somehow more valid than the patient's complaints. I don't want to be too cranky about this. After all, I'm a pretty skeptical person and I think it is important to resist random claims, especially about dietary restrictions, without supporting evidence. But honestly, when an individual is seeking medical advice and reports on their signs and symptoms, there seems little cause to doubt that patient's word. After all, if they misrepresent the facts they are only hurting themselves. Patients can, of course, be mistaken. And those who are interested in a physician's diagnosis might want to subject themselves to such a paternalistic gluten challenge. I have no quarrel with patients making that informed choice. Perhaps some patients will have conditions imposed by their insurance company. Or maybe they will have some other reason to accept this protocol. However, it should not be overlooked that, at its root, this protocol is the antithesis of encouraging patients to take responsibility for their own health care. Further, despite their implied disdain for patients, Doctors Di Sabatino and Corazza don't seem to have considered some of the risks involved in their newly hatched diagnostic protocol which is aimed at pushing back against what they seem to believe is a growing idea that "gluten is toxic for most of the population". In brief, they advocate patients resuming gluten consumption, thus incurring several serious risks to the health and welfare of the patient so physicians may stem the growing tide of gluten-free patients who have undertaken the diet without the blessing of a gastroenterologist or physician. Please take a moment to consider this proposition. The gluten-free diet is restrictive, inconvenient, and expensive. Why would anyone choose to follow such a diet without being convinced that it was valuable to them? Di Sabatino and Corazzo freely acknowledge that there is a dearth of diagnostic tests and protocols for diagnosing or excluding non-celiac gluten sensitivity (although they do overlook some basic tests that I'll discuss shortly). The inconvenience of a gluten-free diet should disabuse critics and skeptics of much of their doubt. However, even if this huge factor is ignored, there are issues of opioid addiction, appetite manipulation, and the risks of triggering allergies, chronic inflammation, autoimmune disease, and psychiatric illness, any or all of which can accompany ingestion of gluten in some individuals. All of these costs and risks are ignored by these two innovators in their Brave New World of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Addiction to Gluten-derived Opioids Most of the people I know who follow a gluten-free diet are well aware of how addictive gluten can be. Once a person has broken away from an addictive substance, it seems very questionable, to say the least, to persuade them, ostensibly in the interests of their health, to ingest that addictive substance again. Since 1979, we have had solid evidence of the morphine-like peptides of gluten grains (2). Many subsequent reports have replicated the findings first reported by Christine Zioudrou and her colleagues (3, 4, 5, 6) so there is little cause to question the addictive potential of gluten grains and the foods derived from them. How wise would it be to ask a former smoker to do a trial of smoking cigarettes for a few weeks? Or to ask an alcoholic to return to alcohol to reassure his physician of the correctness of the patient's choice to quit? Appetite Manipulation Relatedly, an opioid blocker, Naloxone, was given to a group of binge eaters who experienced reduced "duration and magnitude of binge eating episodes" (7). Another group, of healthy volunteers, showed 28% reductions in food intake on days when they were given the same opioid blocker (8). Although gluten opioids were not the intended target of the Naloxone, it may be that this was exactly what this drug was doing in both of these studies. As the obesity epidemic spreads, it is increasingly important to exercise care with respect to foods that cause abnormal and unwarranted increases in appetite. Other researchers have also reported reductions in food intake after administration of opioid blocking medications (9, 10). Autoimmunity Although obesity is an important health concern, autoimmune disease may be of at least equal concern. The loss of integrity of the mucosal barrier of the small intestine is now considered an important factor in the development of many cases of autoimmunity (11, 12). This group of ailments currently plagues the western world with their serious, sometimes lethal consequences. Especially among those who report symptoms in association with gluten consumption, it seems only prudent to proceed with an abundance of caution. When there may be an increased risk of developing one or more autoimmune diseases, a return to gluten consumption seems a very poor choice. In susceptible individuals, gluten consumption triggers zonulin production. Zonulin mediates the tight junctions between the epithelial cells that form the protective barrier between the digesting food in our intestines, and our bloodstreams (11). Thus, ingesting gluten , for those at risk, invites leakage of undigested and partly digested proteins into the bloodstream. The immune system sees these foreign substances as invaders and attacks them in the same manner it would attack a viral or bacterial invader. These same antibodies sometimes attack self tissues with similar protein structures. Because gluten is ingested each day, several times a day, this leaky gut and flood of antibodies can quickly become chronic. Why would a caring health-care professional advise someone who is reporting symptoms associated with gluten consumption to return to eating this substance when the patient may well be reporting early signs and symptoms of a developing autoimmune disease? Allergies and Inflammation Similarly, a compromised intestinal mucosa has been connected to allergies and chronic inflammation. It seems irresponsible to bring one's professional authority to bear on the patient, encouraging them to return to eating gluten so the physician may be persuaded that the patient is accurately reporting their responses to gluten. At the Department of Neurology at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield, U.K., a group of researchers have been reporting, since the mid 1990s, the identification of elevated serum IgG antibodies against one of the proteins in gluten among a majority of patients with a variety of neurological diseases of unknown origins (13). They also report that the prognosis is quite poor for these people. I attended a presentation by the lead researcher of this group, Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou, in 2005. He repeatedly stated that these individuals require an exceedingly strict gluten-free diet to have any chance of improving their prognosis. Yet doctors Di Sabatino and Corazza's approach would further compromise these patients' chances of recovery to satisfy the doubts held by physicians. The research group at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital, and many other researchers, continue to use testing for IgG and IgA class antibodies against gliadin, a sub-group of gluten proteins, as an indicator of gluten sensitivity (13). It may be imperfect, but any time a particular food protein is triggering an abnormal immune response in our bodies, it seems reasonable to assert that this individual is sensitive to that food protein. When celiac disease has been ruled out, positive IgG and/or IgA anti-gliadin antibodies clearly indicate a condition of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. There are other forms of non-celiac gluten sensitivity that may be missed by these tests, but it is clear that IgG and IgA testing for anti-gliadin antibodies is identifying some, perhaps most, cases of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. About 12% of the general population shows elevated levels of IgG antibodies against gluten (13, 14). Notwithstanding Di Sabatino and Corazza's assertion that there are no tests for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, IgG and IgA anti-gliadin antibody tests are certainly one means of identifying gluten sensitivity, whether in the blood or in fecal matter. Additional markers may well arise from current and future research. Psychiatric Illnesses Some forty years ago, Dr. Curtis Dohan and his colleagues established a clear connection between gluten and dairy proteins and schizophrenia (15). Doctors Singh and Kay replicated those findings (16). The issue was hotly debated on the basis of several other studies of sloppy design that followed. For a long time, the connection with gluten was dismissed because of the contradictory reports in the medical literature. In the last fifteen years, another spate of research has emerged showing that Dr. Dohan, Dr. Singh, and both of their research groups had unearthed a compelling connection with serious implications for the effective treatment of a sub-group of patients with schizophrenia and other mental illnesses. Some of these findings were capricious, as in the case of a long-term schizophrenic who was placed on a ketogenic diet. After 53 years of battling her symptoms she experienced complete relief from her schizophrenia (17). Genetic studies and investigations of schizophrenic patients and bi-polar patients have also shown that gluten may be an important factor in these conditions (18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 ) which are both common and debilitating. A subset of autistic patients have also experienced symptom improvement on a gluten-free diet (25, 26, 27). Thus, there is compelling evidence across a number of specialty areas of human illness in which gluten plays a role as an important contributor to symptoms and/or it lies at the root of these conditions. I must therefore question how Dr. Di Sabatino and Dr. Corazza can assert that gluten is not toxic to most people? Their implicit claim to that effect is questionable given the wide range illnesses that it contributes to or causes. We now know that increased production of zonulin, the mediator of intestinal barrier integrity, discovered at the University of Maryland in 2000 (28), is triggered, in some people, by gluten ingestion (29). Subsequent research has revealed that zonulin is the precursor of haptoglobin 2 which is found in about 80% of the human population (11). In the absence of further research, there may well be cause to suspect that gluten grains are a healthy food for only about 20% of the population. So these two physicians would have us continue to consume gluten until such time as we develop full-blown illness or signs and symptoms acceptable to our physicians. Surely that has put the cart before the horse. Their patients do not visit them for the sole benefit of the physician. Nonetheless that is the central thrust of this protocol. This published opinion has spawned a number of articles online and in the popular press, all of which (that I've seen) seem to ignore all of the concessions to non-celiac gluten sensitivity mentioned in the article by doctors Di Sabatino and Corazza . Some of these spin-off commentaries even use the original article to support their suggestions that a gluten-free diet is inappropriate even for those with symptoms that are relieved by the diet. This blatantly contravenes the opinions expressed by Di Sabatino and Corazza but these journalists don't let the facts get in the way of their over-simplified, august opinions. While I take exception to their implied distrust of patients, at least Di Sabatino and Corazza concede that the gluten-free diet is appropriate for those who experience symptom mitigation or remission when avoiding gluten. These reporters make no such concession. One article from the LA Times, states: "That hasn't stopped many people from declaring they are gluten sensitive, even though they may not be" (30). This journalist seems to imagine that he/she is in a better position to judge whether there is benefit in a gluten-free diet than the people who choose to follow it. Given Di Sabatino and Corazza's flagrant disrespect for patients, I suppose similar disparagement by the journalists who mindlessly follow should not surprise us. They, too, dispense medical advice that could prove very harmful. The quality of that advice is about what one might expect under the circumstances. Doctors Di Sabatino and Corazza not only acknowledge non-celiac gluten sensitivity as a cause for symptoms very similar to those of celiac disease, they call for further research to develop and codify diagnostic protocols that will help clinicians better recognize and treat this newly recognized ailment. They go on to acknowledge that conditions including "headache, lethargy, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ataxia, or recurrent oral ulceration" in the absence of celiac disease often improve or resolve on a gluten-free diet. Their unfortunate denial of gluten as toxic seems to have invited much of the spin-off, journalistic conjecture under such titles as "Gluten-free diets not always necessary, study suggests" (31). Even the characterization of this opinion article as a study is misleading in the extreme. These journalists and medical opinion authors also seem oblivious to the strong connection between learning disabilities and gluten consumption (32, 33). My own professional experience echoes Blair's report in which 70% to 90% of children with dyslexia accelerated their reading and writing skills more rapidly than mainstream children not afflicted with dyslexia during a six month trial of the gluten-free diet (33). This is startling! In most cases, children with dyslexia work very hard to reduce the gap by which they are falling behind in their studies. In my work it is often difficult to persuade parents of a child who struggles with learning disabilities to undertake a six month trial of a gluten-free diet. Yet the positive results are often quite astounding. The medical opinion expressed by Di Sabatino and Corazza and the subsequent spin-off in the popular press have just made this task substantially more difficult. Who wants to be characterized as a radical nut case? Who wants to risk their child's learning and welfare on a fad diet? These are the accusations implicit in the Di Sabatino and Corazza characterization of "gluten preoccupation" and the journalistic frenzy that followed. One article in The Toronto Star claims that the gluten-free diet is dangerous. Anyone who has followed it knows that claim to be pure nonsense. The article is based on an interview with Dr. Corazza so it is difficult to tell whether the journalist got it wrong or Dr. Corazza actually made this silly claim. The dangers that Dr. Corazza is quoted about are that it will be more difficult to get a diagnosis of celiac disease and that the diet will cost more money (34). Yet the title says " Gluten-free diets could be dangerous, doctors say" (34). What these journalists and physicians missed is the rapidly growing body of evidence showing that increasing numbers of ailments among escalating numbers of people are driven by this ubiquitous food (2-35) . Gluten may or may not be toxic for most of the population. We don't know. We can't know that without more research. Neither can Di Sabatino and Corazza or any of the journalistic lemmings who leaped off that same cliff, asserting that those who take up a gluten-free lifestyle are the ones who are misguided. Regardless of whether gluten is toxic to most of us, a gluten-free diet certainly is not. Just how do Dr. Corazza and/or these journalists imagine that humans survived and thrived before gluten grains were first cultivated about 10,000 years ago? And most of the world's populations survived and thrived without gluten for many more millennia without gluten grains. The growing numbers of people who are willing to accept the inconvenience and expense of a gluten-free diet because of the benefits they experience should incite curiosity and discourse - not contempt and dismissal. Gluten may be toxic to many more people than are currently identifiable by limited available testing. Asserting one side or the other of this argument is at least premature. At most it could prove very harmful to those individuals who listen and obey the voices of experts and journalistic hucksters using devious methods to promote their own pet ideas. Sources: 1. Di Sabatino A, Corazza G. Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity: Sense or Sensibility? Ann Intern Med. 2012;156:309-311. 2. Zioudrou C, Streaty RA, Klee WA. Opioid peptides derived from food proteins. The exorphins. J Biol Chem. 1979 Apr 10;254(7):2446-9. 3. Fukudome S, Jinsmaa Y, Matsukawa T, Sasaki R, Yoshikawa M. Release of opioid peptides, gluten exorphins by the action of pancreatic elastase. FEBS Lett. 1997 Aug 4;412(3):475-9. 4. Fukudome S, Yoshikawa M. Gluten exorphin C. A novel opioid peptide derived 5. from wheat gluten. FEBS Lett. 1993 Jan 18;316(1):17-9. Fukudome S, Yoshikawa M. Opioid peptides derived from wheat gluten: their isolation and characterization. FEBS Lett. 1992 Jan 13;296(1):107-11. 6. Huebner FR, Lieberman KW, Rubino RP, Wall JS. Demonstration of high opioid-like activity in isolated peptides from wheat gluten hydrolysates. Peptides. 1984 Nov-Dec;5(6):1139-47. 7. Drewnowski A, Krahn DD, Demitrack MA, Nairn K, Gosnell BA. Naloxone, an opiate blocker, reduces the consumption of sweet high-fat foods in obese and lean female binge eaters. Am J Clin Nutr. 1995 Jun;61(6):1206-12. 8. Cohen MR, Cohen RM, Pickar D, Murphy DL. Naloxone reduces food intake in humans. Psychosom Med. 1985 Mar-Apr;47(2):132-8. 9. Wolkowitz OM, Doran AR, Cohen MR, Cohen RM, Wise TN, Pickar D. Single-dose naloxone acutely reduces eating in obese humans: behavioral and biochemical effects. Biol Psychiatry. 1988 Aug;24(4):483-7. 10. Trenchard E, Silverstone T. Naloxone reduces the food intake of normal human volunteers. Appetite. 1983 Mar;4(1):43-50. 11. Tripathi A, Lammers KM, Goldblum S, Shea-Donohue T, Netzel-Arnett S, Buzza MS,Antalis TM, Vogel SN, Zhao A, Yang S, Arrietta MC, Meddings JB, Fasano A. Identification of human zonulin, a physiological modulator of tight junctions, as prehaptoglobin-2. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Sep 29;106(39):16799-804. Epub 2009 Sep 15. 12. Fasano A. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2012 Feb;42(1):71-8. 13. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71. 14. Fine K. Enterolabs. Private communication. 15. Dohan FC, Grasberger JC, Lowell FM, Johnston HT Jr, Arbegast AW. Relapsed schizophrenics: more rapid improvement on a milk- and cereal-free diet. Br J Psychiatry. 1969 May;115(522):595-6. 16. Singh MM, Kay SR. Wheat gluten as a pathogenic factor in schizophrenia. Science. 1976 Jan 30;191(4225):401-2. 17. Kraft BD, Westman EC. Schizophrenia, gluten, and low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets: a case report and review of the literature. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2009 Feb 26;6:10. 18. Dickerson F, Stallings C, Origoni A, Vaughan C, Khushalani S, Leister F, Yang S, Krivogorsky B, Alaedini A, Yolken R. Markers of gluten sensitivity and celiac disease in recent-onset psychosis and multi-episode schizophrenia. Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Jul 1;68(1):100-4. Epub 2010 May 14. 19. Samaroo D, Dickerson F, Kasarda DD, Green PH, Briani C, Yolken RH, Alaedini A. Novel immune response to gluten in individuals with schizophrenia. Schizophr Res. 2010 May;118(1-3):248-55. Epub 2009 Sep 11. 20. Cascella NG, Kryszak D, Bhatti B, Gregory P, Kelly DL, Mc Evoy JP, Fasano A, Eaton WW. Prevalence of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity in the United States clinical antipsychotic trials of intervention effectiveness study population. Schizophr Bull. 2011 Jan;37(1):94-100. 21. Kalaydjian AE, Eaton W, Cascella N, Fasano A. The gluten connection: the association between schizophrenia and celiac disease. Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2006 Feb;113(2):82-90. 22. Wei J, Hemmings GP. Gene, gut and schizophrenia: the meeting point for the gene-environment interaction in developing schizophrenia. Med Hypotheses. 2005;64(3):547-52. 23. De Santis A, Addolorato G, Romito A, Caputo S, Giordano A, Gambassi G, Taranto C, Manna R, Gasbarrini G. Schizophrenic symptoms and SPECT abnormalities in a coeliac patient: regression after a gluten-free diet. J Intern Med. 1997 Nov;242(5):421-3. 24. Dickerson F, Stallings C, Origoni A, Vaughan C, Khushalani S, Yolken R. Markers of gluten sensitivity in acute mania: A longitudinal study. Psychiatry Res. 2012 Mar 2. 25. Millward C, Ferriter M, Calver S, Connell-Jones G. Gluten- and casein-free diets for autistic spectrum disorder. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(2):CD003498. 26. Shattock P, Whiteley P. Biochemical aspects in autism spectrum disorders: updating the opioid-excess theory and presenting new opportunities for biomedical intervention. Expert Opin Ther Targets. 2002 Apr;6(2):175-83. 27. Knivsberg AM, Reichelt KL, Høien T, Nødland M. A randomised, controlled study of dietary intervention in autistic syndromes. Nutr Neurosci. 2002 Sep;5(4):251-61. 28. Fasano A, Not T, Wang W, Uzzau S, Berti I, Tommasini A, Goldblum SE. Zonulin, a newly discovered modulator of intestinal permeability, and its expression in coeliac disease. Lancet. 2000 Apr 29;355(9214):1518-9. 29. Clemente MG, De Virgiliis S, Kang JS, Macatagney R, Musu MP, Di Pierro MR, Drago S, Congia M, Fasano A. Early effects of gliadin on enterocyte intracellular signalling involved in intestinal barrier function. Gut. 2003 Feb;52(2):218-23. 30. http://www.latimes.com/health/boostershots/la-heb-gluten-sensitivity-20120221,0,4517592.story 31. http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-57381966-10391704/gluten-free-diets-not-always-necessary-study-suggests/ 32. Knivsberg AM. Urine patterns, peptide levels and IgA/IgG antibodies to food proteins in children with dyslexia. Pediatr Rehabil. 1997 Jan-Mar;1(1):25-33. 33. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article444290.ece 34. http://www.thestar.com/living/article/1146787--gluten-free-diets-could-be-dangerous-doctors-say#article 35. Hoggan R. Considering wheat, rye, and barley proteins as aids to carcinogens. Med Hypotheses. 1997 Sep;49(3):285-8.
  14. Celiac.com 01/30/2018 - Numerous clinicians have reported higher levels of celiac disease markers in their patients with psoriasis. A number of researchers believe that some psoriasis patients suffer from asymptomatic celiac disease, and a number of patients have reported symptom improvements with gluten-free diets. A team of researchers recently set out to determine the prevalence of antigliadin IgA antibodies in psoriasis vulgaris, and to assess the response of seropositive patients to a gluten-free diet. The research team included Nikolai A Kolchak, Maria K Tetarnikova, Maria S Theodoropoulou, Alexandra P Michalopoulou, and Demetrios S Theodoropoulos. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Hematology, Omsk State Medical Academy, Omsk, Russia; Dermatology Private Practice, Chelyabinsk, Russia; Department of Pharmacy, Trikala General Hospital, Trikala, Greece; Department of Philosophy and Social Studies, School of Philosophy, University of Crete, Rethymnon, Greece; and Allergy Associates of La Crosse, Onalaska, WI, USA. The team assessed the prevalence of gliadin IgA antibodies among patients with psoriasis in an urban population, along with noting the clinical effects of a strict gluten-free diet. The team recruited 97 patients with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index greater than 2.4 from a dermatology clinic. They measured gliadin IgA antibodies in all participants and in 91 control subjects. They found elevated gliadin IgA antibodies in 13 patients, and two controls. All 13 patients were placed on a strict gluten-free diet without any other modifications in their ongoing treatment of psoriasis. Psoriasis patients who do not have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity commonly show high levels of antigliadin IgA antibody. These results show that antigliadin IgA testing can identify psoriasis patients likely to benefit from a gluten-free diet. Source: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare. DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S122256
  15. Hey everyone!! I need help finding the name of a really good gluten free flatbread that I found at Shaw's in Windham, NH in the frozen section! I kind of recall what it looked like and want to find it again, as I haven't seen it since at the store, anywhere! I am pretty sure that it was in a black and clear either plastic wrap or a thin box, you could see the flatbread through the clear part. It was rectangular shaped and decently thick, not very big though width/height wise.. as many gluten free things aren't.. It was in the gluten free section, freezer area in Shaw's and now I cant find it anywhere. I have looked online, searching every different way I could. If anyone thinks they know what I'm talking about, please let me know where to find it! I haven't found anything else like it besides the scharr gluten free pizza crust that's also not really a think crust type pizza which I like. Thanks in advance!!!
  16. Nice to know that Disney makes an effort to take care of people with allergies or special diets (like gluten free!): https://publicaffairs.disneyland.com/walt-disney-parks-resorts-receives-honors-allergy-friendly-fare/
  17. Does anyone know if the mix for Cheeseburger macaroni hamburger helper is gluten free? I'm having a hard time figuring out which ingredients are in the pasta and which ingredients are in the mix! I'd like to substitute with gluten free noodles and just use the mix. Thanks!
  18. Celiac.com 01/12/2018 - As an American, I almost never get excited about British royalty, or soon-to-be royalty. Chatter about William and Kate? Yawn. Charles and Camilla? Double yawn. Royal babies? Pshaw. I'd rather watch paint dry. However, one soon-to-be royal has just jumped into our gluten-free celebrity of the month pool, and so a brief story can't be helped. Much of the celebrity-gawking world might be unabashedly obsessed with Meghan Markle right now, and that makes her claims about ditching gluten newsworthy. In a recent interview with Delish, the 36-year-old Markel said that cutting gluten from her diet resulted in major improvements in her skin and energy levels. Now, there are health experts who claim that at least cutting back on gluten consumption can improve gut health, which plays a role in skin health. And there's plenty of evidence to show that, for people who are sensitive to gluten, eliminating gluten from the diet can reduce gut inflammation and improve symptoms that may affect skin and other organs. However, for people without celiac disease, there's no good research to support claims of any direct link between cutting gluten and improvements in gut and skin health. So, should you ditch gluten to get better skin? If you have genuine gluten sensitivity, then yes, by all means, ditching gluten will likely be helpful. If you don't have a gluten sensitivity, then ditching gluten is unlikely to have any major benefits, at least, that's what the science says.
  19. Celiac.com 01/09/2018 - The quest for delicious gluten-free pizza never ends, and great discoveries can be found in some unlikely places. That's why we're making a list and adding to it as we get new information on the best gluten-free pizza money can buy. We're not talking frozen gluten-free pizzas here, we're talking proper gluten-free pizzeria pizza. Numerous pizzerias prepare their gluten-free options in a common kitchen, so the concern about gluten contamination can be real. Many offer a boilerplate statement that indicates that they take steps to minimize the likelihood of exposure to flour, but that they cannot recommend gluten-free items for guests with Celiac or any other gluten sensitive disorder. Of course, you should always trust your gut, and adjust accordingly. If you aren't sure, then be careful. The risk of gluten-contamination is higher in places that make traditional pizza, but the potential payoff is also bigger. A pizzeria you can trust to make great gluten-free pizza is a real delight. So, if you're up for tasty gluten-free pizza pies baked at genuine pizzerias, then come along with us. We've tried to spread the love here, geographically speaking, but if you know about a great gluten-free pizza joint that we've missed, please let us know in the comments section. Here is our list of America's Top Gluten-Free Pizzeria Pizzas: Base Pizzeria – Phoenix, AZ Base Pizzeria's offerings range from the traditional Margherita to more far-flung inspirations like white truffle oil, prosciutto and artichokes. All pizzas are available with a no-joke gluten-free crust. Blue Pan Pizza – Denver, CO Detroit-style pizza in Colorado? Denver's Blue Pan brings the taste of the Motor City to the heart of the Rockies. Blue Pan offers both square Detroit style or traditional round pizza, with all the awesome toppings you want. And you can get either of them made gluten-free. Buddy's — Detroit, MI Detroit is famous for Sicilian-style square pizza, and Buddy's, has been a city favorite since 1946. Buddy's bakes their airy, focaccia-like dough in the blue steel pans traditionally used in the auto industry, and tops their pizzas with tangy, buttery Wisconsin brick cheese. Most of Buddy's numerous specialty pizzas can be made gluten-free. Make it easy on yourself and start with the Detroiter, a strata of brick cheese, pepperoni, parmesan, tomato-basil sauce, and the restaurant's proprietary Sicilian spice blend. The Couch Tomato Bistro – Philadelphia, PA The Couch Tomato not only offers a tasty gluten-free crust, they offer a range of gluten-free sauces, as well. Forno Rosso Pizzeria Napoletana — Chicago, IL Chicago knows a thing or two about pizza, and Forno Rosso is one of its cognoscenti. I'm not talking Deep Dish, though they do know a thing or two about that, too. I'm talking traditional thin crust pizza. This popular Chicago pizzeria Forno Rosso Pizzeria Napolitana serves a fantastic Neapolitan-style gluten-free pizza. La Famiglia Giorgio's – Boston, MA La Famiglia Giorgio's looks to bring the tastes of Rome to Boston's North End. La Famiglia Giorgio's will make any of their top-notch pizzas gluten-free, that includes the Buffalo Chicken, Old World Sicilian, and of course, the traditional pizza Margherita. Pinky's Pizzeria – Portland, OR Portland staple Pinky's serves delicious one-of-a-kind specialty pizzas, such as “The Super Mario,” “The White Eagle,” and “The Buscemi.” And they will make any of them gluten-free. Mary's Pizza Shack — Northern California Mary's is a family-owned Northern California institution, with more than a dozen locations throughout Marin, Sonoma, Napa and neighboring counties. Mary's prepares its Italian comfort food from scratch every day. No heat lamps. No frozen dough. No canned sauces. Their soups, salad dressings, sauces, pizza dough and focaccia are all made fresh daily, using Mary's original recipes. Their pizza is delicious, and that includes their gluten-free pizzas. Rocco's – Seattle, WA Rocco's is where Seattleites for delicious pizza made with ingredients from a dizzying list of toppings, all available on their yummy gluten-free crust. Rubirosa – New York City Consistently ranked among the top gluten-free pizzas in New York, Rubirosa doesn't just offer regular pizza toppings on a gluten-free crust, they offer a complete menu of gluten-free pizzas! Tony's Pizza Napoletana – San Francisco, CA Twelve-time World Pizza Champion Tony Gemignani is the proprietor of Tony's Pizza Napoletana, a classic Neapolitan-style pizzeria, located in the heart of San Francisco's Little Italy. Tony's uses authentic ingredients imported from Naples, so whether you choose a gluten-free version of the famous Pizza Margherita or the savory Cal Italia, Tony's has you covered. What's more, Tony's Pizza Napoletana recently earned a recommendation in the MICHELIN Guide San Francisco 2016. Via 313 – Austin, TX If you're looking for the best pizza in Austin, head to Via 313 for their traditional Sicilian-style square pizza. They do both traditional and gluten-free pizzas that live up to their motto: Built right. To the last bite. Woodstock's Pizza — Santa Cruz, CA, with locations in Northern California and Oregon Originating in Oregon before spreading into California, Woodstock's Pizza was named #3 Independent Pizzeria in the Nation by Pizza Today. Woodstock's offers tasty gluten-free versions of their popular pizzas.
  20. Updated list here new links, and composed in a more organized manner LOOK for * on links and you can order from them directly, at the bottom are some websites to purchase from Full Meal Options/Entrees, broad spectrum companies http://iansnaturalfoods.com/allergy-friendly-products/search-by-allergens/?tax_products_tags[]=gluten-free&wpas=1 ^Ians gluten-free options you will find sides, baked/fried snacks, onion rings, chicken strips, cheese sticks, fish sticks, pizza bread. etc from them that are good subs you can find where to buy them or even have your local grocer stock them on request. Best thing about Ians is you can go to their site and adjust the filter to find stuff free of other ingredients. http://udisglutenfree.com/product-catalog/ ^ Whole lot of food staples from this company (none safe for me) but all gluten-free alternative you can have, udi is like the cheap bargain gluten-free brand alot of there stuff seems lacking but they have a little bit of everything. From microwave dinners, pizzas, burritos, instant pasta dishes, granola's, and cookies. http://www.vansfoods.com/our-products ^ go to breakfast guys. Select Gluten free from dietary restrictions or other options you need, NOTE most products use oats. https://enjoylifefoods.com/our-foods/ ^All Free of the 8 top allergens, they have premade cookies, chips, and baking ingredients. http://www.namastefoods.com/products/cgi-bin/products.cgi?Category_Id=all ^ Free of top 8 allergens, they have everything from flours, mixes, and entrees, https://www.simplemills.com/collections/all ^Mixes, Crackers, and cookies, ALL GRAIN FREE https://knowfoods.com/collections/frontpage ^Low carb bread, muffins, waffles, cookies, etc. All low carb and keto friendly great for diabetics https://www.geefree.com/collections/all ^All gluten-free Pizza pouches, Meal bits, pastry puffs, Breads/Pizza Note some of the above spectrum companies also offer their own https://canyonglutenfree.com/buy-gluten-free-bread-products/ ^Raved by most people I talk to as some of the BEST gluten-free breads/bagels/buns available, several of my customers talk about using them with artisan nut butters all the time. https://julianbakery.com/shop/?fwp_product_categories=bread *^Grain Free Corn free low carb bread, The seed bread toast just like gluten breads, The almond and coconut each have their own niche. Bread is best used toasted, PS the coconut bread makes awesome french toast https://cappellos.com/collections/pizza *^Grain Free Pizza crust to make your own with using eggs, coconut and arrowroot for a base crust blend. The Naked pizza crust is dairy free. Order frozen by the case and they ship them to you. https://realgoodfoods.com/productpage/ *^Grain Free Pizza They use Dairy Cheese blended with chicken breast to form personal pizza crust. You can order them frozen and shipped to you. NEW PRODUCTS they do Enchiladas NOW https://www.califlourfoods.com/collections *^ This is the only one I buy, grain free, low carb crust, and the plant based one is great, NOTE these make a New york style flat crust, I use 15 min prebake before adding toppings to make them extra crispy http://glutenfreedelights.com/our-sandwiches/ ^Gluten free hot pockets? YES they make them for when you need the old instant hotpocket, odd craving but I know they hit sometimes. CRUST MIXES Grain free https://www.simplemills.com/collections/all/products/almond-flour-pizza-crust-mix https://julianbakery.com/product/paleo-pizza-crust-mix-gluten-grain-free/ Baking Mixes https://julianbakery.com/shop/?fwp_product_categories=mixes\ *^Grain Free low carb mixes have pancakes, bread, pizzia https://www.simplemills.com/collections/almond-flour-baking-mixes ^Grain Free Mixes http://www.bobsredmill.com/shop/gluten-free/gluten-free-mixes.html ^Major Staple provider of baking mixes and flours for the gluten free https://www.bettycrocker.com/products/gluten-free-baking-mix ^Your old Favorites, note these are loaded with starches and can cause some issues (Note a specialty gluten-free company) http://www.kingarthurflour.com/products/gluten-free-mixes/ ^More classic starchy mixes (Note a specialty Gluten Free company) Chocolate https://phikind.com/collections/all ^Gluten Free, Dairy Free, and Sugar Free Truffles! https://www.lakanto.com/collections/sales-title/products/box-of-lakanto-sugar-free-55-chocolate-bar ^Gluten Free, Sugar Free, Dairy Free, Soy Free bars OMG better then a Hershey bar https://www.lindtusa.com/gluten-free-chocolate--sc4?utm_source=eean&utm_medium=affiliate_loyalty&utm_campaign=lindtaffiliate#facet:&productBeginIndex:0&facetLimit:&orderBy:&pageView:grid&minPrice:&maxPrice:&pageSize:& ^Various gluten free truffles, and chocolate bars http://lilyssweets.com/ ^Chocolate Bars, Baking Chips etc. all gluten, dairy, and sugar free. Might contain Dairy in some and soy Bars https://julianbakery.com/shop/?fwp_product_categories=protein-bar&fwp_per_page=100 ^High protein low carb, meal bars, take some getting used to with the texture but great for diabetics and those sensitive to sugars. https://www.kindsnacks.com/products/kind-nut-bars ^Good nut bars and snacks they also make granola https://theglutenfreebar.com/ ^Gluten free food bars, contain oats in many. https://enjoylifefoods.com/our-foods/grain-seed-bars/ ^Allergen Free Bars Snacks/Chips/Crackers/Wraps https://www.mygerbs.com/ *^They have pumpkin seeds, hemp seeds, sunflower seeds, granola, etc. all free of the top 8 allergens, Also they offer various spices, etc. https://eatprotes.com/products/protes-protein-chips?variant=24971155656 *^Grain free low carb, vegan protein chips, bit of a acquired taste http://beanitos.com/#snacks ^Corn free tortilla chips, taste like a high end restaurant chips, they also make corn free puff snacks. http://www.beanfieldssnacks.com/ ^More Corn free tortilla chips note these also have vegan options, they are a bit lighter and crispier. http://www.lundberg.com/products/snacks/ ^Rice and Quinoa Chips, crackers, etc. https://sietefoods.com/collections/tortilla-chips *^Cassava based chips grain free bit high in starch but light and crisp https://sietefoods.com/collections/tortillas *^Cassava based grain free tortillas http://www.nucoconut.com/coconut-wraps/ *^Coconut wraps, I love to use these, you have to warm them up a bit to make them pliable. https://www.bluediamond.com/brand/nut-thins ^Almond based crackers https://bakeryonmain.com/shop/ ^Oat based granola snacks, bars, etc. https://www.wildwayoflife.com/ ^Gluten free, Grain Free, Hot Cereal, granola and smoothie bases https://www.goraw.com/shop/sprouted-flax-snax/ ^These flax crackers are great...the pizza is addicting Fries/Hashbrowns/Tatertots http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/Categories/French-Fries http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/Categories/Hash-Browns http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/Categories/Tater-Tots ^Go to company for most of is with this disease, NOTE most other companies will use wheat flour in fries/tots/hashbrowns http://iansnaturalfoods.com/products/organic-crispy-potato-puffs/ Cooking Ingredients/Rice/Flours/Condiments https://www.pacificfoods.com/broths-and-stocks ^Many of use this brand in our cooking https://www.spicely.com/collections/organic-spices-seasoning *^Gluten free, Organic, Non GMO spices #1 go to for safe spices for many of us http://www.lundberg.com/products/ ^Great and safe Gluten Free Rice company, they make many instant rice entrees, rice crackers, and rice cakes http://www.lotusfoods.com/#products ^Another option for various rice products https://cappellos.com/collections/pasta ^Grain Free FRESH soft pasta options EXPENSIVE but some of the highest end stuff you can get http://www.glutenfreeoats.com/ *^ONLY true Gluten free oat company that I would trust, it is owned by a celiac family https://miraclenoodle.com/collections/miracle-noodle-rice-products *^Carb Free/Low Carb, Grain free noodles, rice, and instant meal kits. https://www.waldenfarms.com/ ^Gluten Free, Sugar Free, Carb Free. Dairy Free, Soy Free for cravings when you can't have them, bit overly processed but helps out when your limited They have coffee creamers, topping syrups, dessert dips, savory dips, salad dressings, condiments etc. CAREFUL if you have issues with highly processed foods and xantham gum http://natureshollow.com/index.html ^Sugar Free jams, honey, and maple syrup using xylitol for a sweetener instead of of a bunch of crud. Stuff takes awhile for your gut to adjust to but honestly They have the only Honey I can use http://www.polanerspreads.com/polaner-products/ ^ All their products are gluten-free and their jams are good I love using their sugar free products with fiber, I also use some of smuckers SF products https://www.coconutsecret.com/products2.html ^gluten-free and soy free teriyaki sauces, soy sauce subs, garlic sauce, cooking sauces, and they make knock off granola bars without oats http://sirkensingtons.com/products ^Great source for mayo, vegan mayo, mustard, ketchup, and SECRET SAUCE. all gluten and corn free with NO artificial preservatives, My main condiment when cooking for others, as a chef I trust it quite a bit. http://www.nucoconut.com/products/coconut-vinegar/ ^These are vinegar made from coconut, great for cooking with and over salads http://www.eatparma.com/store ^Awesome Vegan Parmesan options the bacon one is a GOD SEND https://www.nutilight.com/ ^OMG You need to try this, dairy free, and sugar free Nutella substitute Meat/Meat Alternatives http://beyondmeat.com/products ^ Meat alternative using Pea Protein, I love the beefy crumbles as they have the texture and flavor of ground beef. Low carb and good for ketogenic diets. MUCH easier to digest then actual beef while having the same amount of protein and less fat. https://www.jennieo.com/products ^look for the gluten-free label, you can get all kinds of sausage, bacon, burger patties etc from them all from turkey. I like using the bacon and sausages for soup stocks, and seasoning myself https://skinnygirllunchmeat.com/ ^Love the deli meats from this company I use them in my catering sometimes https://www.mccormick.com/thai-kitchen/products ^I love using the curry paste from the Thai Kitchen, Noodle kits, Soup kits, stir fry kits, even Chinese take out kits. some even instant microwaveable. All gluten-free from what I have found gluten-free Thai/Chinese food. http://new.organicvillefoods.com/category/products/ *^gluten-free sauces like sriracha, BBQ, mustard, ketchup, ect. Good line up of products. http://www.authenticfoods.com/ *^Great source for flours, baking ingredients etc. all you basics https://store.nutiva.com/coconut-flour/ ^Coconut flour, I use this brand in my baking alot Dairy Free Alternatives to Dairy Foods https://www.bluediamond.com/brand/almond-breeze ^ Almond, cashew, coconut, blends etc. https://silk.com/products ^ More Almond, cashew, coconut, blends, they also offer yogurt and icecream alternatives. http://sodeliciousdairyfree.com/products ^ They offer many coconut options, Yogurt, cheese, milks, icecream pints, icecream bars. http://malkorganics.com/products/ ^VERY high end minimally processed almond milk, one the the best https://www.ripplefoods.com/products/ ^ NUT FREE, Dairy Free options of a rich milk alternative from yellow peas (legumes) http://goodkarmafoods.com/products/ ^Flax Based milk alternatives http://www.leafcuisine.com/raw-vegan-food-dairy-free-probiotic-cashew-spreads/ ^ BEST and least processed cheese spreads, cream cheese etc. I can eat these without any issues https://daiyafoods.com/ ^Offers Vegan cheese slices, cheese blocks, cheese shreds, pizza, CHEESE CAKES!, yogurt, s https://followyourheart.com/products/ ^ Diary free and vegan, cheese, spreads, dips, dressings, condiments https://winkfrozendesserts.com/collections/wink-frozen-desserts-pints *^ICE CREAM by the pint AND THEY SHIP IT TO YOU, Dairy free, soy free, sugar free, PERFECT bliss I suggest getting the gluten free pastry pack Flavors/Extracts https://www.capellaflavors.com/13ml ^Great flavors for any dessert you might desire, you add 1 drop to each oz of liquid base in smoothies, icecream, and drinks....great way to kick cravings, Needs Sweeteners http://www.lorannoils.com/1-ounce-larger-sizes ^Baking Extracts Coffee/Tea https://www.christopherbean.com/collections/flavored-coffee *^ DESERT Flavored Coffee all gluten-free and safe, I called the company and even tested most of the coffee flavors myself using testing kits. Sounded too good to be true but most of these taste dead on like the deserts they are supposed to , just add sweetener. Also try their plain coffee http://www.republicoftea.com/ *^Great tea company, all gluten-free certified teas, both bulk and bags. Hard Ciders/Liqours While Most Hard Liqours are gluten free due to the distilling process these are ones I have contacted the company on. https://austineastciders.com/ ^Local cider here in Texas, I keep these for guest, good alternative to the "Beer Can Chicken" http://www.acecider.com/ ^Suggested by someone else I was talking to https://www.captainmorgan.com/ ^Old Staple for many and company says they are gluten free http://admiralnelsonsrum.com/ ^I use this in cooking, goes great finishing off veggie saute http://www.titosvodka.com/ ^Corn Based Vodka https://www.ciroc.com/ ^Grape Based Vodka EMERGENCY MEAL Supplies for long term survival http://www.glutenfreeemergencykits.com/gluten-free-emergency-kits-1/ ^All gluten free meal options dedicated company https://www.wisefoodstorage.com/emergency-food-kits-supplies/gluten-free-food-storage.html ^Gluten Free Options from a Wise company http://www.thrivelife.com/all-products/thrive-foods-161/gluten-free.html ^Various Freeze Dried foods, great for not just emergency foods but the dehydrated veggies give options for soups and always having veggies in stock without refrigeration. Places to order From Check these for most the the above products, these are the best pricing options, Always cross check and look for sells. https://www.luckyvitamin.com ^Really good place for supplements, protein powders, and some gluten-free foods and snacks, Cross check with amazon for best pricing and sometimes Luckys will price match. http://thrv.me/gf25 ^Thrive Market, like a online grocery store that ship to you so you do not need to go out and buy stuff, has alot of brands just search under Gluten Free. https://www.amazon.com/ ^The go to everything store. Found a UPC list from Several Grocery stores, you can takes these to your local grocery store manager and have items ordered. https://www.heb.com/static/pdfs/Gluten-Free-List.pdf ^HEB/Central Market http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/service/gluten-free-products-list ^Whole Foods select location and store and you can even see what they have in stock. https://www.kroger.com/asset/541b1c6a84ae4e0350fcace0?data=1 ^ Kroger http://www.traderjoes.com/PDF/tjs-gluten-free-dietary-list.pdf ^Trader Joes
  21. Hi everyone My 7 year old daughter was juat diagnosed 2 days ago by a celiac blood test (after over 2 years of constant stomach aches, constipation, unexplained anemia and headaches). Should she have a biopsy done as well? I'm on the fence as it can be a little invasive and the bloodwork already indicated that she has the disease. Her GP doesn't think it's needed. We put her on gluten free right away so she has been gluten free for 2 days now. If we decide to to the biopsy, does she need to go back on gluten or will the short time she's been off not make a difference on the biopsy? Part of me wants her to have the biopsy to see what kind of damage is already done. But I don't want to put her through that if it really isn't needed. Does it make a difference for her medically? Thanks in advance This is all so new and the more I read the more scary it seems.
  22. Well as many of you know I run a bakery, and often do smoothies/porridge for myself and use extracts in both to recreate flavors. I have used Amorettis...hit and miss...they had one extract test positive for gluten. LorAnn Oils has been my constant go to, issue is their extracts are great in baking....no consistency in strength and no good in smoothies, or raw foods due to alcohol content. This brings me to my newest find, I came across a company that provides all kinds of flavors in dropper bottles and larger. The flavors I have tested so far were dead on, and I have reviewed them. They are all allergen free, and gluten free, lab analysis are available for each one publicly for you to view. They contain minimal to no alcohol, they work great in raw foods, beverages, and baked goods.....they are easy to use 1drop to 1oz liquid about 1,5x that to a bake base from my testing, They are SOO dead on from the ones I tried so far. I got the chocolate brownie one....it tasted like the old betty crocker hershey double fudge brownies from my child hood in a nut milk base...OMG in coffee. The Chocolate Glazed doughnut tasted like those cheap little frosted mini gas station doughnuts from my child hood, bit chemical but dead on like those cheap things. In a sweetened almond milk base....the cereal one...tasted like frosted corn flakes/corn pops...this might not mean much for most but I have been allergic to corn for years so this is amazing. I have a whole line up of testing to do, I might suggest doing what I did. get a bunch of the 13ml droppers and experiment. It is great to have those flavors back without any side effects. I just had to share this after fan girling over this discovery and jumping up in down in my kitchen with tears of nostalgia....just glad no one videoed that lol . PS they have a less expensive silver line I have yet to check out. AND SHIP INTERNATIONAL https://www.capellaflavors.com/13ml?p=1
  23. This is a fun blend, can be a bit thin, and consistency is dependent on a hand blender and how much you work with it. But easy to recall, and your choice of adding a extra extract and jam of choice changes it up. I made a orange one this morning. 2 cups milk of choice (or water) 2 tbsp coconut flour 2 tbsp ground flax 2 tbsp almond meal or butter 2 tbsp sweetener of choice (I use swere) 2 tbsp Jam of choice (I use sugar free smuckers) 2 tsp vanilla (Optional fun extracts for any dessert your desire, Look up http://www.lorannoils.com/1-ounce-larger-sizes[1/2tsp of their supers will do] for any flavor you could imagine cheap. Or for a premium look up https://www.capellaflavors.com/4oz) 2 ways 1. Blend water (not the milk), and all other ingredients in a 2 cups measuring cup 2. Heat 2 mins in the microwave, pulse with hand blender again and pulse heat til it starts to boil, blend again. 3.Pour into a large 4+cup pot and add your milk blending with the hand blender then simmer while stirring and it should thicken up. NOTE ingredients bought through the Thrive link get you a extra 25% off, great for gluten free shopping. Thrive Market http://thrv.me/gf25 https://thrivemarket.com/nutiva-organic-coconut-flour https://thrivemarket.com/bobs-red-mill-almond-flour https://thrivemarket.com/p/swerve-granular-sugar-replacement https://www.luckyvitamin.com/p-299197-premium-gold-flax-products-100-natural-true-cold-milled-golden-flaxseed-24-oz https://www.luckyvitamin.com/p-435169-nutiva-organic-coconut-flour-3-lbs
  24. Celiac.com 12/19/2017 - The Canadian Celiac Association (CCA) finds itself facing questions of rumor-mongering and inaccuracy in the face of its ongoing comments about General Mills and Gluten Free Cheerios. The CCA recently retracted a controversial October 20 press release in the face of questions about the accuracy and validity of its statements. The retraction reads as follows: "The CCA retracts its statement of October 20, 2017 and replaces it with this statement due to errors in the original statement." They retracted every claim made in the first press release. In addition to its erroneous, and now retracted press release, the CCA has made numerous public statements casting doubt on the process General Mills uses to create their Gluten-Free Cheerios, and other oat-based cereal products. The CCA has spread fear and confusion about the gluten-free status of Cheerios, and implied widespread gluten contamination in Cheerios. For example, the following statement attributed to the CCA was published on October 26, 2017 by Globalnews.ca: "[CCA] expressed doubt in the company's mechanical sorting system and claim of 100 per cent removal of cross-contaminants." Additionaly, Canadiangrocer.com reported in August 2016 that the CCA was, to paraphrase, "awaiting evidence showing the new line [of Gluten Free Cheerios] is 100% free of gluten." The article quotes Sue Newell, the CCA Manager, Education and Special Projects, as saying: "Our fear is that there are hot spots in their oats. Any given box may be fine, but every third or fifth box may not." Canadiangrocer.com has quoted the CCA's Manager making a very specific claim about the gluten-free status of Cheerios. If her claim is correct it would mean that 20% to 30% of all Cheerios boxes are contaminated with gluten above 20 ppm, and General Mills is producing millions of boxes of tainted cereal per month which are fraudulently labeled "gluten-free." When Celiac.com invited Sue Newell to further clarify her position she would neither confirm nor deny making the quotes, but instead said that her quotes were simply "media impressions." Although Celiac.com requested more clarification, Ms. Newell would not respond to further written questions (re-printed below) about her "media impressions." Celiac.com also requested that the CCA produce any evidence to back up their claims, but so far the CCA hasn't produced anything. In response to our questions (re-printed below), which mostly remain unanswered, the CCA demurred with vague claims about general levels of gluten contamination in raw oats, and even more vague claims about the unreliability of optical sorting systems in removing gluten. They referred to studies that, after further review, appear to be unrelated to General Mills' proprietary sorting and production processes. CBC reported on August 31 2016, that the "Canadian Celiac Association is warning against gluten-free Cheerios products over concerns the cereal is not 100 per cent safe for people with celiac disease." What does the CCA mean by "100 percent safe for people with celiac disease?" To our knowledge General Mills has never made the claim that their sorting process results in "100 percent removal" of gluten from the oats used in their Cheerios. It is our understanding that General Mills has only ever claimed that their process results in gluten levels under 20 ppm, which allows them to be labeled "gluten-free" in both the USA and Canada, and as such they are considered safe to consume for those with celiac disease. When Celiac.com asked the CCA to provide a source for the "100% free of gluten" General Mills claim, or for clarification of her "100 per cent safe for people with celiac disease" statement, no response was provided. Is the CCA hinting that the labeling standard for gluten-free products should be 0 ppm allowable gluten? Again, they would not answer this question. It seems that the CCA made this recommendation and their associated statements based not on independent product testing, or on any confirmed accounts of gluten-exposure in people with celiac disease who had consumed Cheerios, but instead on anecdotal evidence and innuendo. For their part, General Mills has at least publicly described their optical sorting process, and have gone on the record as saying that their raw unsorted oats contain anywhere from 200 ppm to 1,000 ppm gluten. They describe exactly how their sorting process reduces the gluten content in their oats to below 20 ppm, and how they then pulverize, process, and mix their sorted oats to make Cheerios (from Celiac.com's perspective it is this milling/pulverizing and mixing process that should eliminate any chance of "hot spots"). They have even applied for a patent on their optical sorting technology, and in order to receive this patent their process needs to function as described. Ultimately General Mills stands by their product every day by putting a "Gluten Free" label on every box right next to their trade mark. Remember Paul Seelig? Back in 2011, before we even had gluten-free labeling laws in the USA, he sold regular bread that was labeled as "gluten-free." He was tried and convicted of fraud and was sentenced to 11 years in prison. The idea that people can just slap a gluten-free label on a product that contains gluten above 20 ppm and somehow escape our judicial system, whether it be private attorneys who sue them or criminal prosecutors, is highly unlikely. Ultimately the CCA is calling General Mills, Health Canada and the FDA into question when they make unfounded claims based solely on fear and innuendo. The CCA is also casting doubt on U.S. and Canadian gluten-free standards. If 20% to 30% of Cheerios contain "hot spots" of gluten contamination, then why can't the CCA, or anyone else, produce a single box that is tainted? Where are the trial lawyers who ought to be lining up to sue them? Cheerios are are subject to regular, random testing by both Health Canada and the FDA. The FDA recently tested major American gluten-free brands for gluten-free labeling compliance and found that 99.5% of products tested are compliant with current gluten-free standards. The FDA found just one non-compliant product out of the hundreds they tested. They worked with the manufacturer to recall the tainted product and correct the manufacturing process. There is no indication that the non-compliant product was Cheerios or any other General Mills product. In this case the burden of proof for such extraordinary claims lies with the CCA, and not with General Mills. Someone can claim that the Earth is flat, or that humans never walked on the moon, however, the burden of disproving such claims doesn't lie with scientists who spent their entire lives creating a massive body of evidence which support what are now generally accepted facts, but with those making the extraordinary claims. Accordingly, it is only fair that the CCA must back up their claims with more than the equivalent of a vague conspiracy theory, which to disprove, would require General Mills to literally test every piece of cereal in every box of Cheerios (i.e., billions of boxes). General Mills returned our telephone calls and freely answered our questions. They provided a reasonable description of their sorting process and answered our questions about it. The CCA has been coy and evasive when questioned about their past statements, their claims about Cheerios, and their stance on the 20 ppm gluten-free standard, or any other standard for gluten-free labeling. Until such time as the CCA stands by their statements, and until they provide actual evidence to back up their claims, their claims should be regarded with skepticism. In their reply to our questions, the CCA included three links to articles they feel support their position on oats: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21623493 Koerner et al 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814616312614 Fritz et. al 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijfs.13288/full Fritz et al 2016 Celiac.com addresses those studies in a separate article, entitled: Why Do Quaker and General Mills Approach Gluten-Free Oats Differently? Questions Emailed to the CCA by Celiac.com, followed by their response: QUESTIONS FOR THE CCA REGARDING CHEERIOS GLUTEN-FREE LABELING AND RELATED ISSUES: The standard for under 20 ppm allowable gluten in gluten-free foods remains unchanged. in Canada, the US, and the EU. The standard is supported by Health Canada, which says that gluten levels under 20 ppm are safe for the vast majority of people with celiac disease. The 20 ppm standard is also supported by the CFIA, the FDA, the EU, by scientific and medical data, and by all major celiac disease researchers. QUESTIONS: 1) Health Canada says that 20 ppm gluten is safe for celiacs. Does the CCA believe and support that standard? ANSWER: No Response. If not, what standard is safe, according the CCA? ANSWER: No Response. 2) Health Canada allows up to 5 ppm gluten in "Marketing Authorization" oats. Obviously, gluten content above 0 but under 5 ppm is not "100% gluten-free. Does the CCA have any problem with such "gluten-free" oats? ANSWER: No Response. 3) With respect to the gluten-free Cheerios products in Canada, Candiangrocer.com reported in August 2016 that the CCA was, to paraphrase, "awaiting evidence showing the new line is 100% free of gluten." Is that still the position of the CCA? ANSWER: No Response. 4) The Candiangrocer.com article also states: "Our fear is that there are hot spots in their oats," said Newell. "Any given box may be fine, but every third or fifth box may not." Is the CCA asserting that 20% to 30% of Cheerios boxes are contaminated with gluten? What is the basis for this claim? Is the CCA forming policy based actual official test results? ANSWER: No Response. 5) Similarly, the CBC reported on August 31 2016, that the "Canadian Celiac Association is warning against gluten-free Cheerios products over concerns the cereal is not 100 per cent safe for people with celiac disease." Can you clarify what you mean by "100% gluten-free" and "100 percent safe for people with celiac disease?" ANSWER: No Response. 6) In a recent article published in October 26, 2017, Globalnews.ca writes "[CCA] expressed doubt in the company's" mechanical sorting system and claim of 100 per cent removal of cross-contaminants. https://globalnews.ca/news/3826328/celiac-association-applauds-general-mills-decision-to-pull-gluten-free-label-from-cheerios/ ANSWER: No Response. 7) Again, can CCA clarify what it means by "100 percent removal" of gluten? ANSWER: No Response. 8) Also, we are unaware of General Mills ever making a claim that their sorting process results in a "100 percent removal" of gluten from the oats used to makes Cheerios, only that their process results in gluten levels under 20 ppm, and within the range for labeling product as gluten-free. Can CCA provide any source for General Mills ever making a claim that their sorting process for oats results in a 100 percent removal of all gluten? [http://www.foodbusinessnews.net/articles/news_home/Research/2017/10/General_Mills_details_gluten-d.aspx?ID=%7BD74CACED-0224-49C3-951A-4E62E87AA243%7D&cck=1] ANSWER: No Response. 9) Is it the position of the CCA that the standard for gluten-free labeling should be 0 ppm allowable gluten? If so, how would that be measured? What products would be able to makes such a claim? ANSWER: No Response. 10) Does the CCA have any scientific data that shows that gluten levels under 20 ppm are dangerous or harmful for people with celiac disease? ANSWER: No Response. 11) Does the CCA have any scientific data or medical testing to show that Cheerios do not meet the 20 ppm standard for gluten? ANSWER: No Response. 12) If Cheerios meet US FDA standards for gluten-free products, and routinely test at below 20 ppm gluten, does the CCA feel removing the gluten-free label in Canada makes people with celiac disease any safer? If yes, how? ANSWER: No Response. 13) Regarding CCA claims of member complaints about Cheerios: Is it not possible that people who claim an adverse reaction to Cheerios are actually having a reaction to the avenin protein in oats, or to higher fiber in oats? ANSWER: No Response.
  25. Celiac.com 12/12/2017 - Does a gluten-free diet have any effect on cardiovascular risk in people with celiac disease? Does it effect people without celiac disease? So far, both questions have remained unanswered. Recently, a team of researchers set out to conduct a systematic review to shed some light on the matter. The team was led by Michael D.E. Potter, MBBS (Hons), from the University of New Castle, Australia. The team focused their review on the "potential of the gluten-free diet to affect modifiable cardiovascular risk factors including weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugars," and to do this they searched for "studies which measured these risk factors in individuals before and after the institution of a gluten-free diet." In all, Potter and colleagues reviewed 27 studies that evaluated the effect of a gluten-free diet, as followed for a minimum of 6 months, on cardiovascular risk factors such as BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glycemia, hemoglobin A1c and serum lipids. Despite their efforts, they found no clear evidence that a gluten-free diet increases cardiovascular risk in celiac patients. They found no evidence that it increases heart disease risk in people without celiac disease. They really found nothing much at all. While the results varied across studies, and researchers did see changes in some cardiovascular risk factors, they say the data do not support a gluten-free diet for cardiovascular health in individuals without celiac disease. True, perhaps. But it's also true that the data neither support nor condemn a gluten-free diet in people without celiac disease. Unless and until researchers get some solid data from large groups and can make accurate, informative comparisons between those groups, it seems foolish for them to advocate or discourage a gluten-free diet in people without celiac disease. Source: Healio.com