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Found 273 results

  1. Another almond Butter recipe, Almond Butter Fudge 1 cup (240g) Almond Butter (The 8oz tub of my Artisan Blends works great for this) 1 cup (240g, Coconut Oil 1/4 cup (60g) Coconut milk (Canned) 1 tsp Vanilla or extract of choice Stevia to taste, or a bit of maple syrup (Lakanto Sugar free can work) 1. Melt Almond Butter and coconut oil together 2. In a food processor or blender mix everything together. 3. Pour into muffin tins, or baking pan and refrigerate for 2-3 hours for it to set.
  2. Ennis_TX

    Jambalaya

    Here is a nice flavorful Jambalaya recipes I found years ago and modified slightly and added my own tips for it and things I have tried. I did not create or own this one. 1 tablespoon oil 1 cup chopped onion 1 cup chopped red bell pepper 1 tablespoon minced garlic 6 ounces andouille sausage, sliced (Aidells is Gluten Free and found in most walmarts) 1 package Miracle Rice (Original recipe used 1 cup long grain rice) 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1/2 teaspoon onion powder 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 1/4 teaspoon garlic salt 2 cups chicken broth 3/4 cup water 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 (14.5-ounce) can no salt-added diced tomatoes, undrained 1 Bayleaf (Optional) 1/2 pound peeled and deveined medium shrimp 2 (Frozen pre cooked works great just thaw them for a day in the fridge before hand, or you can use canned crab meat like millers) 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley to finish 1. Prepare and pan dry the Miracle rice as instruction set aside in a bowl 2. Add the first 5 ingredients (if your sausage is pre cooked add it in the next step) and stir cooking til vegetables are tender 5-7mins 3. Add in the Miracle rice, paprika, pepper, oregano, thyme, onion and garlic powder stir well cook another 2 mins 4. Then pour in the chicken broth, water, tomato paste, can of tomates stir well and throw in the bay leaf on top. Bring to boil, cover and reduce to low heat and simmer for 20mins 5. Remove the bay leaf (easy to get it now) Add in your Shrimp stir in and cover for another 5mins(I found I could sub a can of crab meat, or surumi) 6. Remove from heat let stand for another 5-10 mins then stir in the parsely and serve. I found this to have plenty of heat the original recipe asked to use hot hot sauce I found it worked best letting everyone add in to to each bowl, I provided some Brother Bru Bru hotsauce NOTE ingredients bought through the Thrive link get you a extra 25% off, great for gluten free shopping. Thrive Market http://thrv.me/gf25 https://thrivemarket.com/p/pacific-foods-organic-low-sodium-chicken-broth https://thrivemarket.com/p/miracle-noodle-shirataki-rice https://thrivemarket.com/p/brother-bru-brus-african-hot-pepper-sauce-very-hot https://www.aidells.com/products/dinner-sausage/cajun-andouille
  3. Is anyone else struggling to afford being 100% gluten free? I would love to receive suggestions on government and non-profit funding for Celiac patients.
  4. I went gluten-free over nine years ago. I was always thin - 5'9" and roughly a size eight. After years of chronic pain and mood issues and insomnia a doc caught the celiac. Soon after quitting gluten all symptoms subsided but I quickly gained A LOT of weight. It's been many years, many docs and MANY different diets. I can't lose the weight. I've tried every variation of diets and it doesn't budge. I exercise regularly and eat a fraction of what others eat. I'm so tired of people telling me "calorie in calorie out." It's BS! I've seen tons of docs, most of which don't believe my diet log. I did crossfit for five years. The more paleo I ate and the harder I exercised the more with I gained. Doc told me I blew my adrenals so I stopped and stuck to walking for eight months. I recently took up yoga and I'm gaining again. I like to about about 90% paleo, organic with minimal red meat. I also don't eat soy and I never drink coffee. My thyroid tests are normal and I've tried all the thyroid meds and they don't do anything. I'm about 40 lbs over weight and SOOOOO tired of it. I'm covered in a very fatty layer and look full of cellulite. I do supplements, cleanses, you name it. If I eat fruit, it's low glycemic. I only eat minimal nuts to avoid calories. It just doesn't add up. I'm pretty sure, whatever anyone suggests, I've tried it. I've seen the best docs in the area and they are baffled. I have high insulin but I'm not prediabetc. I have gorgeous blood work - It appears I'm very healthy. I've monitored my blood glucose and... normal. My A1C is 4.6! I have a team of naturopaths and no one can figure it out! Anyone else have this problem!?!? I'm fat as hell and I shouldn't be. If anyone wants to tell me I don't eat enough... I tried that route too (more food, more frequently to boost metabolism - nothing). IDEAS!?!?!?!?!?!?
  5. I have created a pie crust before with almond flour, but it was more of a gram cracker. This time playing with one of my favorites, coconut flour, I have created more pastry like crust. 98g (3/4 cup) Coconut flour (Nutiva Organic is the best for this) 48g (1/4 cup) Erythritol like truvia, pyure, or now foods blend avoid swerve for this as granular worked best 1/2 tsp salt 1 tsp vanilla 7tbsp Nutiva Butter Flavored coconut oil melted. 2 large eggs room temperature (must leave out to get to room temperature or the oil will harden. 1. Preheat oven to 350F and lightly oil a pie pan 2. Mix dry ingrdients in a bowl 3. Combine eggs and liquid ingredients in other bowl and mix well then pour into the dry and mix well 4. Put dough into pie pan and using your fingers and hands work it out evenly spreading it to form your pie crust. 5. Bake for 10-12 mins 6. Take out of the oven and using the back of a spoon or spatula press the crust back down into the pan. NOTE ingredients bought through the Thrive link get you a extra 25% off, great for gluten free shopping. Thrive Market http://thrv.me/gf25 https://thrivemarket.com/nutiva-butter-flavored-coconut-oil https://www.luckyvitamin.com/p-435169-nutiva-organic-coconut-flour-3-lbs https://thrivemarket.com/nutiva-organic-coconut-flour https://www.luckyvitamin.com/p-300938-now-foods-erythritol-100-pure-natural-sweetener-2-5-lbs
  6. Hi! Im a First Time mom with an 11 month old! in the past month I came to discover that my son is allergic to Gluten. Recently this week he is refusing to eat any of his Purees (mind you, i am all organic and feed him nothing but), and he is still a breastfed baby but is also refusing to eat as much, as you can imagine its not as satisfying for him. He's going through a growth spurt as well as teething, he has two teeth so far and two more on the way in. so as you can see he can't chew all that well with certain things..Now, I need help with some meal ideas, and finger foods because as i said I'm new to this. I myself have had to go Gluten Free for it passes through my breastmilk and was making him sick.. I'm only 20 years old and am completely lost on what to do and what to make him. I have introduced dairy in small amounts, and I'm not ready to introduce meats... Any ideas at all on what i should do and make? I need help!
  7. ryann14

    Gluten free roommates

    Hey fellow gluten free eaters! I am looking for a gluten free roommate or roommates in the DFW area of Texas. If any of you all could help it would be great. Thanks, Natalie
  8. Advertising Banner-Ads

    Autism and Gluten. How it Became My Business

    Celiac.com 05/03/2018 - My son Jackson was diagnosed with autism at the age of 3 years. There was no scientific evidence to link autism to gluten allergy or intolerance. However, there was anecdotal evidence. If it can't hurt, but can help I'm in! Dairy free: Result: Immediate and noticeable changes. Just a few days. Hooked! Gluten removal. Result: More immediate positive changes. Less than 1 week. Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) No Gluten! -dairy free version Result: Profound and continual improvement throughout diet when done strictly. There are regression phases within the first year of the diet across the spectrum. When the diet was relaxed after several years no regression occurred. Healing Home Foods was born from the creations made to feed Jackson and improve his health. There is no turning back. Our products are Certified Gluten Free and Vegan. No GMO's or questionable ingredients. Please email if you are interested in further details about our experience. Shelley@healinghomefoods.com. Visit our site and use coupon code: Celiac05 For a 10 % discount. Free shipping over $40. For more info visit our site.
  9. It is an unusual question - as most of the discussions I have read are around "acne" clearing up once you go gluten free. I was diagnosed with Celiac in July, and since then I have been gluten free. Major change in my diet includes having Sorghum/Millet regularly along with rice instead of wheat. Since the change, i have started having these acne - which i had never had before in my 30 years! My skin feels oily (which was dry before) and these red acne pop up across my face, shoulders, back Has anyone else faced this? Any reason why going gluten free (and Lactose free) are leading to these?
  10. Celiac.com 01/09/2018 - The quest for delicious gluten-free pizza never ends, and great discoveries can be found in some unlikely places. That's why we're making a list and adding to it as we get new information on the best gluten-free pizza money can buy. We're not talking frozen gluten-free pizzas here, we're talking proper gluten-free pizzeria pizza. Numerous pizzerias prepare their gluten-free options in a common kitchen, so the concern about gluten contamination can be real. Many offer a boilerplate statement that indicates that they take steps to minimize the likelihood of exposure to flour, but that they cannot recommend gluten-free items for guests with Celiac or any other gluten sensitive disorder. Of course, you should always trust your gut, and adjust accordingly. If you aren't sure, then be careful. The risk of gluten-contamination is higher in places that make traditional pizza, but the potential payoff is also bigger. A pizzeria you can trust to make great gluten-free pizza is a real delight. So, if you're up for tasty gluten-free pizza pies baked at genuine pizzerias, then come along with us. We've tried to spread the love here, geographically speaking, but if you know about a great gluten-free pizza joint that we've missed, please let us know in the comments section. Here is our list of America's Top Gluten-Free Pizzeria Pizzas: Base Pizzeria – Phoenix, AZ Base Pizzeria's offerings range from the traditional Margherita to more far-flung inspirations like white truffle oil, prosciutto and artichokes. All pizzas are available with a no-joke gluten-free crust. Blue Pan Pizza – Denver, CO Detroit-style pizza in Colorado? Denver's Blue Pan brings the taste of the Motor City to the heart of the Rockies. Blue Pan offers both square Detroit style or traditional round pizza, with all the awesome toppings you want. And you can get either of them made gluten-free. Buddy's — Detroit, MI Detroit is famous for Sicilian-style square pizza, and Buddy's, has been a city favorite since 1946. Buddy's bakes their airy, focaccia-like dough in the blue steel pans traditionally used in the auto industry, and tops their pizzas with tangy, buttery Wisconsin brick cheese. Most of Buddy's numerous specialty pizzas can be made gluten-free. Make it easy on yourself and start with the Detroiter, a strata of brick cheese, pepperoni, parmesan, tomato-basil sauce, and the restaurant's proprietary Sicilian spice blend. The Couch Tomato Bistro – Philadelphia, PA The Couch Tomato not only offers a tasty gluten-free crust, they offer a range of gluten-free sauces, as well. Forno Rosso Pizzeria Napoletana — Chicago, IL Chicago knows a thing or two about pizza, and Forno Rosso is one of its cognoscenti. I'm not talking Deep Dish, though they do know a thing or two about that, too. I'm talking traditional thin crust pizza. This popular Chicago pizzeria Forno Rosso Pizzeria Napolitana serves a fantastic Neapolitan-style gluten-free pizza. La Famiglia Giorgio's – Boston, MA La Famiglia Giorgio's looks to bring the tastes of Rome to Boston's North End. La Famiglia Giorgio's will make any of their top-notch pizzas gluten-free, that includes the Buffalo Chicken, Old World Sicilian, and of course, the traditional pizza Margherita. Pinky's Pizzeria – Portland, OR Portland staple Pinky's serves delicious one-of-a-kind specialty pizzas, such as “The Super Mario,” “The White Eagle,” and “The Buscemi.” And they will make any of them gluten-free. Mary's Pizza Shack — Northern California Mary's is a family-owned Northern California institution, with more than a dozen locations throughout Marin, Sonoma, Napa and neighboring counties. Mary's prepares its Italian comfort food from scratch every day. No heat lamps. No frozen dough. No canned sauces. Their soups, salad dressings, sauces, pizza dough and focaccia are all made fresh daily, using Mary's original recipes. Their pizza is delicious, and that includes their gluten-free pizzas. Rocco's – Seattle, WA Rocco's is where Seattleites for delicious pizza made with ingredients from a dizzying list of toppings, all available on their yummy gluten-free crust. Rubirosa – New York City Consistently ranked among the top gluten-free pizzas in New York, Rubirosa doesn't just offer regular pizza toppings on a gluten-free crust, they offer a complete menu of gluten-free pizzas! Tony's Pizza Napoletana – San Francisco, CA Twelve-time World Pizza Champion Tony Gemignani is the proprietor of Tony's Pizza Napoletana, a classic Neapolitan-style pizzeria, located in the heart of San Francisco's Little Italy. Tony's uses authentic ingredients imported from Naples, so whether you choose a gluten-free version of the famous Pizza Margherita or the savory Cal Italia, Tony's has you covered. What's more, Tony's Pizza Napoletana recently earned a recommendation in the MICHELIN Guide San Francisco 2016. Via 313 – Austin, TX If you're looking for the best pizza in Austin, head to Via 313 for their traditional Sicilian-style square pizza. They do both traditional and gluten-free pizzas that live up to their motto: Built right. To the last bite. Woodstock's Pizza — Santa Cruz, CA, with locations in Northern California and Oregon Originating in Oregon before spreading into California, Woodstock's Pizza was named #3 Independent Pizzeria in the Nation by Pizza Today. Woodstock's offers tasty gluten-free versions of their popular pizzas.
  11. I don't know how to interpret these lab results and my doctor isn't available for a few days to call. Anybody know what this means? Test Result Flag Reference Range Immunoglobulin A, Qn, Serum 78 L 91-414 t-Transglutaminase (tTG) IgA >100 H 0-3 Negative 0-3 Weak Positive 4-10 Positive >10 Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) has been identified as the endomysial antigen. Studies have demonstrated that endomysial IgA antibodies have over 99% specificity for gluten sensitive enteropathy. Deaminated Gliadin Abs, IgA 53 H 0-19 Negative 0-19 Weak Positive 20-30 Moderate to Strong Positive >30
  12. Even an 8th grader found gluten in Cheerios! This kid is going places! http://atlantajewishtimes.timesofisrael.com/8th-graders-celiac-warning-gluten-in-cheerios/ It is legit and not fake news! https://www.georgiacenter.uga.edu/sites/default/files/gsef-2018-honors-ribbon-recipients.pdf
  13. Hi everyone. Sorry if this is old news, but I just found this website and it has where you can click on what allergens you are looking to avoid, like gluten, soy, lanolin, etc. https://www.skinsafeproducts.com/ It has things like body lotions, lip balm, makeup, etc. and you can search for specific products. Or you can also just click on what allergens you want to avoid and let it pull up pages of products that are free from those ingredients. I am seeing some foundation powder and such, and some body lotions, foot cream. Things like that. I doubt it's a complete list, but one more source to help in our searches.
  14. I found a tasty treat in the clearance section of Price Chopper today. Cans of macaroons. The were marked down to $3.47 a can. They are certified gluten-free and says so on the front of the can, but I also do not see soy, corn, or xanthan gum in the ingredients. (I also noticed online they have a sugar-free one, but not sure what all the ingredients in that are). I tried the chocolate, which are chewy and yummy, like the texture and flavor of a brownie with coconut in it. Then I also tried the hazelnut chocolate. Those didn't have much chocolate flavor at all to me, but I loved them. They have a very nice hazelnut flavor. It seems like a nice substitute for a biscotti. I am going to go back to the store tomorrow and pick up a few more cans since they are marked down. They seem to have a good seal on the cans and a plastic lid on top of that, so I am hoping they will store well. I looked up the brand online and found they have several flavors. I'd like to try the almond, and also the carrot cake sometime. Other flavors are cappuccino chip, mint chocolate, and more. Here is the link - http://www.manischewitz.com/ It says you can buy them online at a few places, but amazon has some crazy, ridiculous prices for them. A better place to order seems to be : https://www.aviglatt.com/manischewitz But you can also look in your local grocery stores. I wouldn't be surprised if they are more common to buy in town during Passover or other Jewish holidays and if they are not in the gluten-free section of the store would probably be in the aisle with the other kosher, Jewish holiday items. (Then be sure to check after the holidays too, for clearance prices! ) I found the ingredients for the SUGAR FREE ones....click on the "food allergen and nutrition info" here - http://www.manischewitz.com/product/sugar-free-coconut-macaroons/
  15. Well as many of you know I run a bakery, and often do smoothies/porridge for myself and use extracts in both to recreate flavors. I have used Amorettis...hit and miss...they had one extract test positive for gluten. LorAnn Oils has been my constant go to, issue is their extracts are great in baking....no consistency in strength and no good in smoothies, or raw foods due to alcohol content. This brings me to my newest find, I came across a company that provides all kinds of flavors in dropper bottles and larger. The flavors I have tested so far were dead on, and I have reviewed them. They are all allergen free, and gluten free, lab analysis are available for each one publicly for you to view. They contain minimal to no alcohol, they work great in raw foods, beverages, and baked goods.....they are easy to use 1drop to 1oz liquid about 1,5x that to a bake base from my testing, They are SOO dead on from the ones I tried so far. I got the chocolate brownie one....it tasted like the old betty crocker hershey double fudge brownies from my child hood in a nut milk base...OMG in coffee. The Chocolate Glazed doughnut tasted like those cheap little frosted mini gas station doughnuts from my child hood, bit chemical but dead on like those cheap things. In a sweetened almond milk base....the cereal one...tasted like frosted corn flakes/corn pops...this might not mean much for most but I have been allergic to corn for years so this is amazing. I have a whole line up of testing to do, I might suggest doing what I did. get a bunch of the 13ml droppers and experiment. It is great to have those flavors back without any side effects. I just had to share this after fan girling over this discovery and jumping up in down in my kitchen with tears of nostalgia....just glad no one videoed that lol . PS they have a less expensive silver line I have yet to check out. AND SHIP INTERNATIONAL https://www.capellaflavors.com/13ml?p=1
  16. I contacted Bear Naked about their Gluten Free Granola. I just wanted to let everyone know what they responded with.
  17. Hello all. I suspect that I am gluten intolerant. I went gluten free last Monday. About two days after that I felt great! However, yesterday I started feeling bad again. Today is even worse. I'm having leg cramps again, bloating (it's like I went up two sizes in two days!), bad cramps, muscle spasms and joint pain. Is it possible to go through gluten withdrawl after feeling better? I've also been very careful with my diet too. I've also been more on edge and angry. I am not an angry person...
  18. Lemon Ricotta Scones (gluten free, sugar free, grain free, dairy free, Keto) 2 1/2 cups (280g) Almond flour 1/3 cup Swerve Granular Sweetener 1 tbsp baking Powder 1/2 tsp salt Zest of one lemon 2 large eggs 1/2 cup Kite Hill Ricotta 1/2 Tsp lemon extract Lemon Glaze 1/4 cup Swerve Confectioners 1 tbsp Lemon Extract Amusingly leaving out binders on this makes them a bit crumbly and is the perfect texture for scones and a great gluten free treat. 1. Preheat oven to 325F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper 2. In a large bowl whisk together almond meal, sweetener, baking powder, salt, use a sift to sift out into the bowl again and whisk in zest 3. In a separate bowl mix the eggs, ricotta, and lemon extract. 4. Combine the ricotta mix into the flour mix and stir until dough is well combined. 5. Divide the dough in half. and pat into two 6" diameter circles on the parchment paper lined sheet. 6. Cut each into 6 wedges with a dough knife or butter knife using a spatula you can spread them out on the pan a few inches apart 7. Bake around 25mins until golden brown and firm 8. Let cool and whisk the powdered sweetener and lemon juice and drizzle over the cooled scones. http://thrv.me/gf25 For 25% off your first order. https://thrivemarket.com/p/swerve-confectioners-sugar-replacement https://thrivemarket.com/p/swerve-granular-sugar-replacement https://thrivemarket.com/p/bobs-red-mill-almond-flour
  19. Hi everyone My 7 year old daughter was juat diagnosed 2 days ago by a celiac blood test (after over 2 years of constant stomach aches, constipation, unexplained anemia and headaches). Should she have a biopsy done as well? I'm on the fence as it can be a little invasive and the bloodwork already indicated that she has the disease. Her GP doesn't think it's needed. We put her on gluten free right away so she has been gluten free for 2 days now. If we decide to to the biopsy, does she need to go back on gluten or will the short time she's been off not make a difference on the biopsy? Part of me wants her to have the biopsy to see what kind of damage is already done. But I don't want to put her through that if it really isn't needed. Does it make a difference for her medically? Thanks in advance This is all so new and the more I read the more scary it seems.
  20. Pina Colada Pie 1 Pie Crust (I suggest the gram cracker version of my gluten-free Pie Crust)https://www.celiac.com/blogs/entry/2146-grain-free-pie-crust/ 1 Can Full Fat coconut milk 1 20oz Can Crushed Pineapple in natural juice 1 tsp Vanilla Extract 2 tbsp maple syrup dash of salt If you want it a bit more stable I suggest adding 2tbsp of coconut oil 1. Place all ingredients but the crust in blender 2. Blend well. 3. Pour over crust and place in freezer for at least 4-6 hours for optimal texture, and cut. Note if frozen over night it sets up a little hard but is just as tasty and can be eaten like a pizza.
  21. Creamy Broccoli Mushroom Casserole This is gluten, corn, and dairy free and can be made vegan by subbing vegetable stock for the chicken 1 medium Onion 1-2 tbsp oil 2 cloves of garlic 12oz of mushrooms 2 tbsp flour (I've used Nutiva Coconut and garfava [blend of garbanzo and fava] before you can probably sub bobs gluten-free flour found in most stores) 1 cup chicken stock (can sub vegetable for vegan) 1 cup almond milk 1/2 cup nutritional yeast KAL or Brags 2 packages of 10-12oz broccoli florets Steamed 2 bags miracle rice or 4 cups of cooked rice of choice 1. Preheat oven to 350F 2. Chop garlic and onions and give the mushrooms a medium chop in a food processor. 3. Cook the broccoli and give a rough chop so no large chunks and rice set aside 4. Saute the garlic and onions in the oil til soft over medium high heat 5. Add the mushrooms and cook til liquid had cooked off and they start browning stir constantly (6mins) 6. Sprinkle the flour over the vegetables and add the broth stir until thick 7. Remove from heat and add the milk and 1/4 cup of the nutritional yeast and stir in the broccoli seasoning to taste with salt and pepper 8. Put the rice in the pan spreading it out and pressing a bit, proceed to to p with the broccoli mix spreading evenly, sprinkle pepper, and the other 1/4 of the nutritional yeast over the top evenly 9. Cover with foil and bake for 15-25mins, remove the foil and cook for another 5-15 mins til desired moist level for your casserole.
  22. I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease back in October 2009. I seem to be OK as long as i stick to a strict gluten free regiment which can be challenging at times. It is difficult to know if a product is truly gluten free when its labeled as such. I only buy gluten free labeled products and i'm still having problems with my stomach, specifically pasta. In the past year i switched from Tinkyada brand pasta to Barilla. I had heard and read that the taste and consistency of the Barilla gluten free product was not much different from traditional pasta. Being Italian, we typically have pasta every Sunday so this was great for me. In the past few months my body has been rejecting the Barilla gluten free pasta and i'm not sure if its due to a cross contamination issue. I'm tired of feeling sick and being in pain and would like to get to the bottom of this ongoing problem. Has anyone else had any problem with the Barilla gluten free brand?
  23. Celiac.com 03/16/2018 - Celiac awareness has increased exponentially over the last decade among physicians and the general public alike. Increasing numbers of research publications and very active support groups and individuals have contributed to this growing awareness. Knowledge of the many and varied manifestations is also growing rapidly although some individuals continue to cling to the notion that celiac disease is characterized by malabsorption and that nutrient deficiency is the dominant feature of this ailment. This misses the broader understanding of the many ways in which gluten grains negatively impact on human health. From toes to head, any and all of our human body systems may be harmed by ingesting gluten under some circumstances. Although the wide range of signs and symptoms of celiac disease is impressive, a similar, even broader range of impacts may be attributed to gluten in the context of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Those with celiac disease only comprise a small portion of the population of people who are afflicted by non celiac gluten sensitivity. Dr. Rodney Ford has offered the all encompassing term of 'gluten syndrome' to identify everyone whose health is compromised by gluten consumption (1). From Dr. Fasano's most conservative estimate that 6% of the population is afflicted by non-celiac gluten sensitivity (2), to Dr. Rodney Ford's estimate that 10% is afflicted (3), to Dr. Kenneth Fine's finding that IgG class anti-gliadin antibodies are found in about 11% of the population (4), to this writer's assertion that non-celiac gluten sensitivity includes well more than 20% of the population, the paucity of research in this area offers a wide range of estimates without a solid basis for refuting any of them. Nonetheless, it is clear that those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity outnumber those with celiac disease by a ratio of somewhere between 6 to 1 and more than 20 to 1. The gluten syndrome may therefore include from seven percent to more than twenty percent of the population. The importance of these percentages and ratios is that we are seeing growth in the diagnosis of celiac disease, and in the number of people who have celiac disease (4). It has been argued that a similar trend may be seen across the spectrum of the gluten syndrome, attributing that trend to the genetic modifications that have been made to grains, and the increased consumption of these foods (5). But this is just the tip of the iceberg. Dr. Fasano bases his estimate of non-celiac gluten sensitivity on those who mount an innate immune reaction to gluten grains. While there is likely some overlap between innate immune reactions and selective antibody reactions, most estimates of non-celiac gluten sensitivity are based on IgG class antibodies against one of the proteins of several protein families found in gluten. It makes eminent sense to me that when our bodies are mounting a measurable immune response against the most common food in our diets, whether the reaction is by the innate immune system or by creating selective antibodies, that food might be harmful to our health. I do not quarrel with the basis on which these sensitivities are identified. I simply argue that they are only identifying a sub-fraction of many more possible cases of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. To put this issue into sharper focus, there are several protein families to be found in each of the gluten grains. In wheat, for instance, each family, glutelin, gliadin, and glutenin contains a number of individual proteins. The antibody test for gliadin ignores possible reactions to proteins in either of the other two families. Further, IgG class antibodies are the most common and widespread class of selective antibody we produce. But they form only one of five types of selective antibodies (known as immunoglobulins). Further, as is obvious from Dr. Fasano's conservative approach to identifying non-celiac gluten sensitivity, there are other facets of the immune system that do not involve selective antibodies, and can also be enlisted in a reaction against gluten grains. Thus, when we test for IgG anti-gliadin antibodies, the most common test for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, positive results are identifying reactions against only one of the several protein families found in gluten, and only one of the five possible selective antibody reactions against this single protein family. It therefore seems wholly improbable that testing for reactions against a single protein family in only a single class of selective antibody would identify all or even most cases of gluten sensitivity. Admittedly, some researchers test for IgA antibodies but those investigators usually do not test for IgG antibodies. However, even with testing for both classes of selective antibodies, which most published reports on this issue have not done, it is clear that many possible immune reactions to any other protein fractions of gluten might well be overlooked, either in the form of other selective antibodies or as other immune reactions and various innate reactions against gluten grains. I'm sure that, by now, the reader will see that there are many possible immune reactions against this most common food, and that most of these reactions will go undetected, both in the context of standard medical testing and in most research conducted in this venue. On a more practical plane, when Dr. Curtis Dohan identified significant improvements among patients with schizophrenia patients eating a gluten-free, dairy-free diet (6), and Singh and Kay replicated their findings (7), many looked for celiac disease among patients with schizophrenia and found only a small increase. Dohan and Singh's publications were followed by several sloppy studies that ignored the guiding principles expressed in this pioneering work. These weak studies further undermined acceptance of the connection between gluten and schizophrenia. The net result was a growing belief that Dohan had erred and his heroic work was widely dismissed. Yet, more than twenty years after his death, one of Dohan's most vigorous critics is listed among the authors of a paper that reports an immune reaction against gluten that, while different from the reaction seen in celiac disease, is common among people with schizophrenia (8). Similarly, I think that we can expect, sometime in the future, to see research that identifies immune reactions and damaging dynamics caused by gluten consumption among people with learning disabilities. There is, for instance, one newspaper report of an informal study conducted at the Nunnykirk School in Northumberland, a school that serves only children with dyslexia, a condition that is reported to afflict about 10% of children in the United Kingdom. After six months of eating a gluten free diet, more than 80% of these children improved their reading at a rate of at least twice that of normal children. Some leaped ahead, in their reading skills, by as much as 2.5 years over this six month period (9). Relatedly, I had the privilege of working with Dr. Rodney Ford on a retrospective analysis of indicators of school readiness among children who had celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity (as measured by selective antibody testing) and children who showed no signs of either reaction to gluten. A large majority of those who reacted to gluten improved dramatically. There was a small but significant sub-group whose school readiness improved following a gluten free diet, and these improvements happened within 6 months of avoiding gluten (unpublished data). Autism, especially where normal development was curtailed after one or several years, is another condition in which excluding gluten seems to provide substantial improvements even in the absence of celiac disease. Some research in this area suggests that toxins (generated by bacteria resident in the intestines) are allowed access to the bloodstream and the brain (10). Perhaps exclusion of dietary gluten is the factor that limits access to the bloodstream through reducing zonulin production. Similarly, although not as well supported, there is some evidence to suggest that gluten contributes to bi-polar disorder. Just how frequent and significant the contribution may be is still open to debate, but I have observed some evidence to support this hypothesis in my own family. A range of types of epilepsy have been found in association with celiac disease, many of which are mitigated by the gluten free diet (11). The manifestations of undetected non-celiac gluten sensitivity are not limited to brain function. We know that celiac disease is much more frequent in the context of other autoimmune diseases. We also know that antibody tests show even higher rates of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Since we are only identifying a fraction of those who may be reacting to gluten, it seems reasonable to suggest that everyone with an autoimmune disease, or antibodies suggesting that an autoimmune disease is imminent, should begin a strict gluten free diet and follow it for at least one year. If there is any reduction of auto-antibodies or symptoms of autoimmunity, the diet should be continued. Although difficult in the early stages, it is an entirely benign intervention/treatment. There are no unwanted side effects or hazards. There are more than 200 autoimmune and other medical conditions reported in association with gluten and are listed in Appendix D of Dangerous Grains (12). In each case, a lengthy trial of a gluten free diet would be well advised. Again, there are no negative side effects of the gluten free diet. It is an entirely benign intervention. A significant proportion of those who suffer from IBS, Crohn's or any of the various types of colitis have also been reported to benefit from a gluten free diet on various websites. Similarly, many people with MS and a host of other neurological diseases have been shown to benefit from a gluten free diet (13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23). Even many AIDS patients are helped by a gluten free diet. It reduces their diarrhea and improves nutrient absorption (24). This is an important discovery that can be harnessed in conjunction with the improved treatments now available for this very serious illness. Overweight, obesity, and weight loss are contentious issues with regard to the gluten free diet. Until quite recently, there were two reports of small studies of changes in body mass index in the USA and one report from Ireland, following institution of a gluten free diet. The two American studies showed weight loss among overweight subjects on a gluten free diet. The study from Ireland showed only weight gain among overweight subjects after following a gluten free diet. In November of 2011, another small study was published. Their conclusion states "The GFD (gluten free diet) has a beneficial effect upon the BMI (body mass index) of overweight children with celiac disease" (25), which is congruent with the earlier two American studies. I have previously suggested that the discrepancy between the findings may be due to the acceptance of wheat starch as part of the gluten free diet in the United Kingdom. However, regardless of the cause, the preponderance of evidence supports the notion that a gluten free diet can be used as an effective weight loss strategy in some cases of celiac disease. Other evidence suggests it may be a more broadly effective weight loss tool. Thus, my estimate of the prevalence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity includes the 6% who show signs of innate immune reactions to gluten, in addition to those who show IgG antibodies against gluten, at about 11% of the population (although there may be some overlap between these 6% and 11% groups). My estimate also includes many of those with schizophrenia who number about 1% of the general population, and a portion of those with autism who are quickly approaching 1% of the population. I am also including 80% of the approximately 10% of the population with some degree of dyslexia. Because of overlaps between groups, and because gluten's impact is often only demonstrable through a gluten free diet, I only assert that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a factor in more than 20% of the general population. However, I remain open to findings that will show a much greater negative impact from eating foods derived from gluten grains. The portion of the human population that may be negatively impacted by gluten consumption can range as high as the 80% portion that produce haptaglobin 2, for which zonulin is the precursor. The take away point here is that the gluten free diet may aid overall health for up to as much as 80% of the general population. In that context, my estimate that 20+% of the population is showing signs that they are variously mounting immune reactions against gluten or are otherwise harmed by gluten appears modest. The overlapping symptoms make it extremely difficult to narrow my estimate further. Nonetheless, gluten is one of the most harmful substances in our diet. Yet it is the most ubiquitous factor in our diets. Sources: 1. www.doctorgluten.com 2. Sapone A, Lammers KM, Casolaro V, Cammarota M, Giuliano MT, De Rosa M, Stefanile R, Mazzarella G, Tolone C, Russo MI, Esposito P, Ferraraccio F, Cartenì M, Riegler G, de Magistris L, Fasano A. Divergence of gut permeability and mucosal immune gene expression in two gluten-associated conditions: celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. BMC Med. 2011 Mar 9;9:23. 3. personal communication 4. personal communication 5. Wheat Belly 6. Dohan FC, Grasberger JC. Relapsed schizophrenics: earlier discharge from the hospital after cereal-free, milk-free diet. Am J Psychiatry. 1973 Jun;130(6):685-8. 7. Singh & Kay 8. Samaroo D, Dickerson F, Kasarda DD, Green PH, Briani C, Yolken RH, Alaedini A. Novel immune response to gluten in individuals with schizophrenia. Schizophr Res. 2010 May;118(1-3):248-55. 9. Blair, Alexandra. Wheat-free diet gives food for thought. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article444290.ece 10. Sandler RH, Finegold SM, Bolte ER, Buchanan CP, Maxwell AP, Väisänen ML, Nelson MN, Wexler HM. Short-term benefit from oral vancomycin treatment of regressive-onset autism. J Child Neurol. 2000 Jul;15(7):429-35. 11. Ribaldone DG, Astegiano M, Fagoonee S, Rizzetto M, Pellicano R. Epilepsy and celiac disease: review of literature. Panminerva Med. 2011 Dec;53(4):213-6. 12. Braly J, Hoggan R, Dangerous Grains. Avery, New York, 2002. 13. Hadjivassiliou M, Sanders DS, Grünewald RA, Woodroofe N, Boscolo S, Aeschlimann D. Gluten sensitivity: from gut to brain. Lancet Neurol. 2010 Mar;9(3):318-30. 14. Turner MR, Chohan G, Quaghebeur G, Greenhall RC, Hadjivassiliou M, Talbot K. A case of celiac disease mimicking amyotrophic lateral scl Nat Clin Pract Neurol. 2007 Oct;3(10):581-4. 15. Hadjivassiliou M, Chattopadhyay AK, Grünewald RA, Jarratt JA, Kandler RH, Rao DG, Sanders DS, Wharton SB, Davies-Jones GA. Myopathy associated with gluten sensitivity. Muscle Nerve. 2007 Apr;35(4):443-50. 16. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald RA, Kandler RH, Chattopadhyay AK, Jarratt JA, Sanders DS, Sharrack B, Wharton SB, Davies-Jones GA. Neuropathy associated with gluten sensitivity. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2006 Nov;77(11):1262-6. Epub 2006 Jul 11. 17. Hadjivassiliou M, Sanders DS, Grünewald RA. Multiple sclerosis and occult gluten sensitivity. Neurology. 2005 Mar 8;64(5):933-4; author reply 933-4. 18. Hadjivassiliou M, Williamson CA, Woodroofe N. The immunology of gluten sensitivity: beyond the gut. Trends Immunol. 2004 Nov;25(11):578-82. Review. 19. Hadjivassiliou M, Sanders DS, Grünewald RA, Akil M. Gluten sensitivity masquerading as systemic lupus erythematosus. Ann Rheum Dis. 2004 Nov;63(11):1501-3. 20. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald RA, Davies-Jones GA. Gluten sensitivity as a neurological illness. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2002 May;72(5):560-3. 21. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald RA, Lawden M, Davies-Jones GA, Powell T, Smith CM. Headache and CNS white matter abnormalities associated with gluten sensitivity. Neurology. 2001 Feb 13;56(3):385-8. 22. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald RA, Davies-Jones GA. Gluten sensitivity: a many headed hydra. BMJ. 1999 Jun 26;318(7200):1710-1. 23. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71. 24. Quiñones-Galvan A, Lifshitz-Guinzberg A, Ruíz-Arguelles GJ. Gluten-free diet for AIDS-associated enteropathy. Ann Intern Med. 1990 Nov 15;113(10):806-7. 25. Reilly NR, Aguilar K, Hassid BG, Cheng J, Defelice AR, Kazlow P, Bhagat G, Green PH. Celiac disease in normal-weight and overweight children: clinical features and growth outcomes following a gluten-free diet. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2011 Nov;53(5):528-31. 26. Cheng J, Brar PS, Lee AR, Green PH. Body mass index in celiac disease: beneficial effect of a gluten-free diet. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2010 Apr;44(4):267-71. 27. Murray JA, Watson T, Clearman B, Mitros F. Effect of a gluten-free diet on gastrointestinal symptoms in celiac disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Apr;79(4):669-73.
  24. This is a fun one just a small bowl of sticky gooey dough fun to eat with a small spoon, its stretchy and oh so gooey. Careful though it is packed full of fiber. This is a acquired taste, I for one was the kid that ate the cinnamon rolls out of the oven before they were done...I loved that super gluten stretchy yeast doughy centers and that is what this replicates. 2 heaping scoops pure pea protein (36-40g) 1/2-1tsp pure cinnamon Pinch of baking powder 1/8th heap tsp pure uncut stevia (I use Nunaturals or Pyure for sugar one feel free to use 1-2tbsp of sugar and up the liquid the same amount) 1/2-1tsp unflavored psyllum husk (1/2 tsp is suggested for standard dough, if you want this to be super chewy like the center of pop can Pillsbury cinnamon roll half cooked raw then up it.) 8oz hot water Optional add 8 drops of a extract. 1. Wisk your protein, cinnamon, baking powder, and psyllum togheter 2. In a measuring cup put the stevia and optional extracts in the water and heat 2mins in a microwave 3. Stir the water then pour into the dry and fold well with a fork til it starts to get sticky and doughy, you can zap the mix for 10-12 seconds to make it super stretchy. https://www.amazon.com/Protein-Isolate-North-American-Farms/dp/B00NBIUGA2/ Comes in 5 and 1lb containers. The 5lb is the most cost effective proetin powder on the market https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PHCD6OS/ Spicely Organics Ceylon certified gluten free https://www.amazon.com/Metamucil-Smooth-Texture-Sugar-Free-Unflavored/dp/B001H9X8IY This is one form, I get it from another brand local stores but you want unflavored/unsweetened powder. https://www.amazon.com/Nustevia-white-Stevia-NoCarbs-Ounces/dp/B000HC0M1S/ Pure Uncut NuNatural Steiva 1/8tsp is like a tbsp of sugar or more.
  25. Grain Free Keto Cookies 1/4 cup (52g) coconut oil 1/4 cup (60g) Sugar free Maple or Honey (Lakanto Maple or a similar honey) 1/2 tsp Vanilla Extract 1/4 tsp salt 1/4 tsp baking soda or 1/2 tsp baking soda sub 34g coconut flour 24g almond flour 45g chocolate chips (sugar free I used chopped up Lakanto Chocolate Bar, Lilly's or other sugar free would also work) 1. Preheat your oven to 350 and line a baking sheet with parchment paper 2. Mix coconut oil, maple, vanilla and salt and heat slightly (10-20 sec just above room temp) in the microwave mixing again. 3. In a separate bowel mix Baking Soda, Coconut Flour, Almond flour whisk together 4. Using a sifter if you have one sift the flour mixture into the liquid then stir in the chocolate chips, 5. Let the dough sit for 10 mins letting the coconut flour thicken 6. scoop the cookie dough onto the baking sheets 1heaping to 2 tsp portions and flatten a bit with the spoon. 7. Bake for 10-12mins remove and let sit on the sheets for 3-8 mins before moving them to cooling racks. In an attempt to recreate my grain free cookies without sugars or starches I have created a Grain free sugar free Cookie. These will soon be featured at my bakery with both a sugar and sugar free options. Feel free to test these at home. While not as rich and soft as my almond butter ones they are very cost effective.