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Found 64 results

  1. celieacresearch

    Celiac Research

    Do you or someone you know have Celiac Disease? Do you or someone you know have a Gluten Intolerance or Sensitivity? We Want to Hear Your Story! We are two cultural anthropology students from Linfield College conducting research on Celiac disease and how it affects the lives of those who have it. Cultural anthropologists aim to learn about human lives within their society and how different variables affect them. Celiac disease is one of those variables. Your story is what we’re looking for and everyone has something to tell. If you are interested in participating, email Rose or Carmen at celiacresearch24@gmail.com or reply to this post for more details or to set up an interview time and date.
  2. WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE? Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that affects around 1.4% of the population (91.2 million people worldwide, and 3.9 million in the U.S.A.). People with celiac disease suffer an autoimmune reaction when they consume wheat, rye or barley. The immune reaction is triggered by certain proteins in the wheat, rye, or barley, and, left untreated, causes damage to the small, finger-like structures, called villi, that line the gut. The damage occurs as shortening and villous flattening in the lamina propria and crypt regions of the intestines. The damage to these villi then leads to numerous other issues that commonly plague people with untreated celiac disease, including poor nutritional uptake, fatigue, and myriad other problems. Celiac disease mostly affects people of Northern European descent, but recent studies show that it also affects large numbers of people in Italy, China, Iran, India, and numerous other places thought to have few or no cases. Celiac disease is most often uncovered because people experience symptoms that lead them to get tests for antibodies to gluten. If these tests are positive, then the people usually get biopsy confirmation of their celiac disease. Once they adopt a gluten-free diet, they usually see gut healing, and major improvements in their symptoms. CLASSIC CELIAC DISEASE SYMPTOMS Symptoms of celiac disease can range from the classic features, such as diarrhea, upset stomach, bloating, gas, weight loss, and malnutrition, among others. LESS OBVIOUS SYMPTOMS Celiac disease can often less obvious symptoms, such fatigue, vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, anemia, to name a few. Often, these symptoms are regarded as less obvious because they are not gastrointestinal in nature. You got that right, it is not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have few or no gastrointestinal symptoms. That makes spotting and connecting these seemingly unrelated and unclear celiac symptoms so important. NO SYMPTOMS Currently, most people diagnosed with celiac disease do not show symptoms, but are diagnosed on the basis of referral for elevated risk factors. CELIAC DISEASE VS. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE Gluten intolerance is a generic term for people who have some sort of sensitivity to gluten. These people may or may not have celiac disease. Researchers generally agree that there is a condition called non-celiac gluten sensitivity. That term has largely replaced the term gluten-intolerance. What’s the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitivity? CELIAC DISEASE VS. NON-CELIAC GLUTEN SENSITIVITY (NCGS) Gluten triggers symptoms and immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Gluten can also trigger symptoms in some people with NCGS, but the similarities largely end there. There are four main differences between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity: No Hereditary Link in NCGS Researchers know for certain that genetic heredity plays a major role in celiac disease. If a first-degree relative has celiac disease, then you have a statistically higher risk of carrying genetic markers DQ2 and/or DQ8, and of developing celiac disease yourself. NCGS is not known to be hereditary. Some research has shown certain genetic associations, such as some NCGS patients, but there is no proof that NCGS is hereditary. No Connection with Celiac-related Disorders Unlike celiac disease, NCGS is so far not associated with malabsorption, nutritional deficiencies, or a higher risk of autoimmune disorders or intestinal malignancies. No Immunological or Serological Markers People with celiac disease nearly always test positive for antibodies to gluten proteins. Researchers have, as yet, identified no such antobodies or serologic markers for NCGS. That means that, unlike with celiac disease, there are no telltale screening tests that can point to NCGS. Absence of Celiac Disease or Wheat Allergy Doctors diagnose NCGS only by excluding both celiac disease, an IgE-mediated allergy to wheat, and by the noting ongoing adverse symptoms associated with gluten consumption. WHAT ABOUT IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) AND IRRITABLE BOWEL DISEASE (IBD)? IBS and IBD are usually diagnosed in part by ruling out celiac disease. Many patients with irritable bowel syndrome are sensitive to gluten. Many experience celiac disease-like symptoms in reaction to wheat. However, patients with IBS generally show no gut damage, and do not test positive for antibodies to gliadin and other proteins as do people with celiac disease. Some IBS patients also suffer from NCGS. To add more confusion, many cases of IBS are, in fact, celiac disease in disguise. That said, people with IBS generally react to more than just wheat. People with NCGS generally react to wheat and not to other things, but that’s not always the case. Doctors generally try to rule out celiac disease before making a diagnosis of IBS or NCGS. Crohn’s Disease and celiac disease share many common symptoms, though causes are different. In Crohn’s disease, the immune system can cause disruption anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, and a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease typically requires more diagnostic testing than does a celiac diagnosis. Crohn’s treatment consists of changes to diet and possible surgery. Up to 10% of Crohn's patients can have both of conditions, which suggests a genetic connection, and researchers continue to examine that connection. Is There a Connection Between Celiac Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity and Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Large Number of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Sensitive To Gluten Some IBD Patients also Suffer from Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Many Cases of IBS and Fibromyalgia Actually Celiac Disease in Disguise CELIAC DISEASE DIAGNOSIS Diagnosis of celiac disease can be difficult. Perhaps because celiac disease presents clinically in such a variety of ways, proper diagnosis often takes years. A positive serological test for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase is considered a very strong diagnostic indicator, and a duodenal biopsy revealing villous atrophy is still considered by many to be the diagnostic gold standard. But this idea is being questioned; some think the biopsy is unnecessary in the face of clear serological tests and obvious symptoms. Also, researchers are developing accurate and reliable ways to test for celiac disease even when patients are already avoiding wheat. In the past, patients needed to be consuming wheat to get an accurate test result. Celiac disease can have numerous vague, or confusing symptoms that can make diagnosis difficult. Celiac disease is commonly misdiagnosed by doctors. Read a Personal Story About Celiac Disease Diagnosis from the Founder of Celiac.com Currently, testing and biopsy still form the cornerstone of celiac diagnosis. TESTING There are several serologic (blood) tests available that screen for celiac disease antibodies, but the most commonly used is called a tTG-IgA test. If blood test results suggest celiac disease, your physician will recommend a biopsy of your small intestine to confirm the diagnosis. Testing is fairly simple and involves screening the patients blood for antigliadin (AGA) and endomysium antibodies (EmA), and/or doing a biopsy on the areas of the intestines mentioned above, which is still the standard for a formal diagnosis. Also, it is now possible to test people for celiac disease without making them concume wheat products. BIOPSY Until recently, biopsy confirmation of a positive gluten antibody test was the gold standard for celiac diagnosis. It still is, but things are changing fairly quickly. Children can now be accurately diagnosed for celiac disease without biopsy. Diagnosis based on level of TGA-IgA 10-fold or more the ULN, a positive result from the EMA tests in a second blood sample, and the presence of at least 1 symptom could avoid risks and costs of endoscopy for more than half the children with celiac disease worldwide. WHY A GLUTEN-FREE DIET? Currently the only effective, medically approved treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. Following a gluten-free diet relieves symptoms, promotes gut healing, and prevents nearly all celiac-related complications. A gluten-free diet means avoiding all products that contain wheat, rye and barley, or any of their derivatives. This is a difficult task as there are many hidden sources of gluten found in the ingredients of many processed foods. Still, with effort, most people with celiac disease manage to make the transition. The vast majority of celiac disease patients who follow a gluten-free diet see symptom relief and experience gut healing within two years. For these reasons, a gluten-free diet remains the only effective, medically proven treatment for celiac disease. WHAT ABOUT ENZYMES, VACCINES, ETC.? There is currently no enzyme or vaccine that can replace a gluten-free diet for people with celiac disease. There are enzyme supplements currently available, such as AN-PEP, Latiglutetenase, GluteGuard, and KumaMax, which may help to mitigate accidental gluten ingestion by celiacs. KumaMax, has been shown to survive the stomach, and to break down gluten in the small intestine. Latiglutenase, formerly known as ALV003, is an enzyme therapy designed to be taken with meals. GluteGuard has been shown to significantly protect celiac patients from the serious symptoms they would normally experience after gluten ingestion. There are other enzymes, including those based on papaya enzymes. Additionally, there are many celiac disease drugs, enzymes, and therapies in various stages of development by pharmaceutical companies, including at least one vaccine that has received financial backing. At some point in the not too distant future there will likely be new treatments available for those who seek an alternative to a lifelong gluten-free diet. For now though, there are no products on the market that can take the place of a gluten-free diet. Any enzyme or other treatment for celiac disease is intended to be used in conjunction with a gluten-free diet, not as a replacement. ASSOCIATED DISEASES The most common disorders associated with celiac disease are thyroid disease and Type 1 Diabetes, however, celiac disease is associated with many other conditions, including but not limited to the following autoimmune conditions: Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: 2.4-16.4% Multiple Sclerosis (MS): 11% Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: 4-6% Autoimmune hepatitis: 6-15% Addison disease: 6% Arthritis: 1.5-7.5% Sjögren’s syndrome: 2-15% Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: 5.7% IgA Nephropathy (Berger’s Disease): 3.6% Other celiac co-morditities include: Crohn’s Disease; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Chronic Pancreatitis Down Syndrome Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Lupus Multiple Sclerosis Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Psoriasis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Turner Syndrome Ulcerative Colitis; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Williams Syndrome Cancers: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (intestinal and extra-intestinal, T- and B-cell types) Small intestinal adenocarcinoma Esophageal carcinoma Papillary thyroid cancer Melanoma CELIAC DISEASE REFERENCES: Global Prevalence of Celiac Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2018;16:823–836 Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Gluten Intolerance Group National Institutes of Health U.S. National Library of Medicine Mayo Clinic University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center
  3. Sorry for the long post, I've been dealing with this forever and want to figure it out! Hi, I just got tested for celiac (blood test at a family practice (USA)) without knowing that I had to have been eating gluten regularly for it to show anything. I read forums here that said so, so I called the doctor's office before my test to ask if that was true, and they put me on with a nurse that said "I've never heard of that, but let me check the test we have....Oh, yep, it says to eat gluten. So just eat some bread before you come today." Seemed doubtful. I ended up NOT eating any gluten, and I've been actively avoiding wheat for at least 3 years (I noticed a gluten intolerance when I started college, my dad and uncle and 2 cousins can't eat it either). I was accidentally glutened with the tiniest bit of fajita seasoning from a restaurant 3 weeks prior to my blood test, but that's it. I didn't want to make myself sick with bread after reading that the blood test really only works if you've been eating it for weeks/months, so I went and got tested with basically non gluten in my system at all. The test itself said "negative." But I've attached a screenshot of my levels. After talking with the nurses on the phone twice, I'm convinced they know nothing about it. My antibodies were low/normal, probably because I haven't eaten gluten in years. (I sometimes drink beer made with barley instead of wheat because it doesn't give me horrible stomach cramps, but I hadn't had any in probably a month). The one thing that seemed "high" to me for someone who hasn't eaten wheat in years was the tTG IGA (I have no idea what that means). Mine said 7.2 U/mL (again, whatever that means). This family practice test says that a normal level is under 15 U/mL, but all my other levels are less than 1. After some research, I came across what "normal" levels should look like and Mayo Clinic suggested under 4.0 U/mL is negative for celiac (Source) [4.0-10 is a "weak positive"]. Like I said, I'm not very trusting that the practice I went to knows anything about celiac. I know if I want a diagnosis I should go to some specialist. But I really don't want to get put under just to be told "yep, do exactly what you've doing for years, avoiding gluten." So, I decided to sort of "self-diagnose" myself with celiac JUST to make myself be extra careful, you know, just in case my intestines are damaged whenever I get cross-contaminated food. My question is: does anyone else think it's possible I have celiac? Or am I being nuts? Recap & Symptoms: In 2014 I could barely eat anything in my house because I would be sick with horrible stomach cramps and constipation that would make me cry and have to stay home the next day. I lost weight then. Someone suggested going gluten-free, and I knew my dad was doing that because he had a couple passing-out episodes and similar gut pain. My uncle (dad's brother) also has a sever intolerance to gluten, like it gets him hospitalized because of malnutrition and cramping (I'm pretty sure he has celiac, but he's too stubborn to get tested). I tried avoiding gluten for a week and felt way better. Now I've been gluten free for years. Like I said before, though, I am not careful with barley and rye. Malt hurts me a lot, and when I take one bite of, say, a donut thinking it'll be worth it (I miss donuts..) it NEVER is. I'm out for two days after that. If I get glutened, I experience: fatigue, horrible cramps, gas (that won't pass), constipation (for days), foggy head, itchy skin, irritability, and my appetite fluctuates like crazy-- one minute I'm so full I can't think of food, another I'm starving.
  4. I’m the parent of a nearly 15 year old daughter. 5 years ago we finally found something that made a difference in her pain. A natural doctor did a blood test showing her to be severely gluten intolerant. Regretfully, we did not know to test her for celiac before removing gluten from her diet. Without that diagnosis, many doctors have made us feel gluten intolerance isn’t that serious. Very long story. Anyway, after 5 years of strict gluten avoidance, we were on vacation and let our guard down. Served what we thought was rice, she ate a portion. It ended up being ORZO. Pasta that looks like rice. That night she was dizzy, faint, even developed a fever. She slept most of the next day not eating much at all thinking she was coming down with a cold. Then, severe stomach pain and headache. Then, she threw up everything she ate for a few days. Ready to take her to the ER, we realized it was gluten! Picked up some digestive enzymes, anti-nausea medications, ginger, peppermint, tea, you name it. Today was the first day she could eat proper in a week. Still having some discomfort. Joint pain starting now too. My main question is: Is this typical for just gluten intolerance or does it sound more like celiac? She has been severely vitamin d deficient taking as much as 10,000 iu a day in liquid D and never bringing her levels to normal and menstral cycle never regular although she started at 10. Goes for months without and then when it does come, crazy heavy lasting weeks. Doctor still wasn’t horribly concerned. Just exhausted trying to be our own doctor. Insurance constantly changing making us look for new doctors. I wish I was rich. So expensive and frustrating having to try to get enough bedside time with each new doctor to reexplain her whole journey. Any information appreciated. She was doing much better by strictly avoiding gluten all these years but this last episode has me researching again to do what I can. Again, what do you think? My gut says “Celiac” but I guess we might not ever know for sure.
  5. I hope not to make this long but I am in dire need of advice. I have been having these episodic seizure and stroke like symptoms. It starts with my eyes fluttering. I typically slump over. My legs work but I can't lift my head. Sometimes the left side of my face goes numb. I am completely unable to think or speak. It's like my mouth won't move right. If I can move my hands/arms, then I can not write or text. I also have difficulty walking (the leg I broke in a car accident gets really tight) This happens when I wake up, at work, walking, in shower, and sometimes in mid conversation, and once while driving (don't drive anymore). I've been to many doctors. Some nerve in my neck is crooked or slightly blocked. Referred to neuro. He thinks its a seizure. Long story short after several EEGs, MRI's, an MRA, and blood test they find: white spots on brain (unusual for age), positive western blot for Lyme (IgG), negative EEG, negative MRA. No strokes. negative spinal fluid. negative for lupus. Later, negative for Lyme on a C6peptide test. took Topamax and that stops migraines I was having, but not the episodes. referred to psych. she says no mental health issues after examining me. continue to see her because I'm so stressed about not feeling well. My general diagnosis is complex migraines. At some point I had a seizure like episode and was diagnosed with a complex partial seizure, but that was changed after the EEG's. June 2013: Go alcohol and gluten free. Then just gluten free. Miraculously I had no episodes for a week. After 2 weeks my hands and feet aren't numb. Oct 2013: Celiac panel is negative. My red blood, iron, and hemoglobin are all very low Now: Despite being gluten free, I find that I constantly get "glutened" by little things (bun accidentally left on my burger, corn tortillas that aren't really gluten-free, medicines etc) . One glutening can result in multiple episodes. The longest I've gone is a week and a half without episodes. Before June I had them everyday multiple times and they were very severe. I can't find a doctor that will answer my questions to save my life. I live near NIH, so you would think there are plenty of intelligent docs here but I have been largely unsuccessful. I like to work hard and I am ashamed at my performance (work and school) because I have these uncontrollable episodes. Does anyone struggle with this? What doctor did you go to? Have you been able to get anything other than "don't eat gluten"? Are you able to get a diagnosis?
  6. My entire life I've been dealing with what I now know is reactive hypoglycemia. I vividly remember eating a ton in the morning because I was scared of getting "woozy" and not having snacks prepared during elementary school. I also remember nearly passing out several times in P.E. class just two hours after lunch. Over the years I've managed it by having snacks and protein with each meal, but it's been getting more difficult as I've gotten older. My mom has the same thing and she gets woozy pretty often. She said her mother dealt with it, too. I thought this could be something related to diabetes, but after I posted on a diabetes forum, I had someone ask if I had been tested for gluten intolerance or thought about it. So, I'm bringing my symptoms here to see if any of this sounds like an intolerance. I am so tired of having digestive problems and I don't know what to do. Here are my other symptoms: *I have dealt with anorexia since I was 13 (currently 18), but I've been doing well for this past year, so new foods/normal amounts of food/eating out really shouldn't be bothering my stomach this much anymore. I've never experienced a regular period since I started starving myself soon after I first got it. When I was recovered the first time, before a relapse, I had a couple of irregular periods. Since my second recovery, I STILL have not regained my period. It has been over a year and my nutritionist seemed stumped. I have since stopped seeing her and am eating quite normally and freely as I used to and have gained weight recently just to see if that could help. Still nothing. In the mornings I'm usually very full, kind of nauseous, hot, and thirsty. I feel sick after eating a lot, or even "normal" amounts when I go out with friends. I have stomach cramps/sharp pains, extreme gas all day and everyday, suuuuuper bloated all the time, reflux, nausea, sometimes constipation, fatigue, my finger and toes often tingle, mouth ulcers, headaches...when I was younger I had "chicken skin" on the backs of my arms, which has since gone away. I also am diagnosed with anxiety. There's honestly more symptoms but I can't list them all. To sum it up, my stomach is upset all the time and I am always bloated no matter how long ago I ate/how nutritionally dense the food was. *forgot to mention, I'm also lactose intolerant, just like my mom. Any feedback is greatly appreciated.
  7. Hi all, For years now I have been struggling with severe bloating and cramping after eating certain foods. I have been to the doctors several times and had scans, blood tests, the lot. However, eventually they gave up and told me that I just had IBS. I decided to try eliminating food groups myself, starting with gluten as I noticed particular flare ups every time after pizza, sunday dinners, chinese and burritos. I have been gluten free for approximately 2 weeks now and have been feeling lots better and no flare ups. It wasn't until this weekend that I had a cheese sandwich made with gluten-free bread, cheddar cheese, lettuce, pepper and butter - with this I had a packet of Walkers crinkle cut crisps. After this meal, I had a huge flare up and felt so sick and nauseous for the rest of the day - and I am now still suffering from this flare up as it takes days sometimes weeks for my stomach to deflate after. I've been trying to pinpoint what I have eaten in this meal to cause this and my instant thoughts was that I may have a dairy intolerance also. However, I had eaten cheese the day before and was fine, and also have normal milk with my gluten free cereal, as well as poached eggs without any flare ups (I do bloat after eating boiled eggs on their own however). The crisps didn't have any gluten allergy warnings on the back, only milk - however I was fine eating the same packet of crisps a few days prior also. This led me to the conclusion that it must of been the butter! I also ate a gluten free pie today and feel really ill after that so wondering if I'm starting to see a link. Is it possible to have a gluten intolerance and have a sensitivity to just butter and boiled eggs but fine drinking milk and eating eggs cooked another way? I'm very confused and doctors seem to no help. I'm just sick of forever having to wear baggy clothes incase of a flare up and being in pain all the time!! Thanks, Soph93
  8. Celiac.com 02/22/2018 - I am writing this article hoping to help those who have been diagnosed with gluten intolerance but who are still not feeling well, as well as for those who need to be diagnosed or will be in the future. Just to clarify our terms, I use 'gluten intolerance' as an umbrella term to encompass both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. I have the privilege of speaking with many individuals, on a weekly basis, who not only live in the locality of my clinic but also those who live across the United States and internationally. Just a few days ago I had phone consultations with individuals living in Shanghai, Philadelphia and Los Angeles. My clinic, HealthNOW Medical Center, is a destination clinic where we treat individuals who live at a distance as well as those who live nearby, hence these particular calls. As a result of doing such consultations and receiving responses to my lectures, books, blogs and videos, I have an opportunity to speak with many people and hear their stories. Frankly I often wish I had the ability to 'beam them up' utilizing the fictional technology from Star Trek—it would make travel logistics a piece of cake and I'd be able to help more people faster. Getting back to reality, I want to review the most common mistakes and misconceptions that I run into with people who are gluten intolerant. These miscues are resulting in ill health both currently and in the individual's future. Here's a list of 10: 1. People who are pretty convinced of their sensitivity based on their own experimentation but who later abandon their own knowledge when a celiac test is negative. Discussion: Firstly, they should know that celiac testing is not highly sensitive. If it were, we would be diagnosing more than 5% of the celiacs in this country. Secondly, a negative celiac test is NOT an absolute indicator that one doesn't have the disease, it in no way tests for gluten sensitivity, a serious condition affecting likely fifteen times the number of people who have celiac disease. Finally, the gold standard test that we utilize here at HealthNow is one that has been established by other researchers to be quite reliable. It is the very test that this person is now ignoring. Namely, eliminating gluten for 30 days to see how you feel. A noticeable improvement in symptoms is a valid test. Too often I speak with people who are quite seriously ill. They have ignored, sometimes for years, something they knew to be the truth simply because an insensitive lab test didn't corroborate their own identification of gluten intolerance. Don't ignore the knowledge you possess about your body. If you need a lab test to affirm that knowledge, there's always genetic testing for both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Entero Labs has a good test for both. 2. Some people discover they are gluten intolerant by self experimentation or by actually receiving a gluten sensitivity or celiac blood test that has positive results. Unfortunately some doctors have antiquated data regarding these diseases and believe that an intestinal biopsy is needed to confirm a diagnosis. Such doctors insist that their patients reintroduce gluten into their diet for a minimum of six weeks and then schedule an intestinal endoscopy and biopsy. Discussion: It was once thought that a biopsy was the 'gold standard' for celiac diagnosis. We now know that to be untrue. When I say 'we' I am referring to those in the field who research or who stay on the cutting edge of research. Unfortunately there are many doctors who are not in this category and their lack of current knowledge puts their patients at great risk. I cannot tell you how many times I have spoken with individuals who have reintroduced gluten into their diets, despite their knowledge of how sick it would make them, only to get extremely ill, sometimes for months. Worse still, some patients initiated an autoimmune disease due to the reintroduction that we couldn't completely reverse. I call reintroducing gluten 'Russian roulette'. Perhaps you can now appreciate why. One should NEVER EVER reintroduce gluten once they know they are sensitive to it, regardless of any test result. There is no test that is 'worth' risking your health over, especially not for a biopsy that is very poor at identifying the presence of non-classical celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. That brings up some new terminology: Classic celiac disease describes the disease as it was originally described as primarily digestive in nature, and associated with destruction of the lining of the small intestine. We now know, through research, that classical celiac forms a minority of celiac cases. Once again, these data are not well known in the medical community, which explains why we miss 95% of those who suffer from the disease. Gluten sensitivity is an intolerance to gluten that is not associated with the destruction of the lining of the small intestine but it creates inflammation through the immune system and creates many of the same diseases and symptoms associated with celiac disease. Conservative estimates of the incidence of gluten sensitivity put it at 15% of the population, making it much more prevalent than celiac disease. Assuming other factors, an intestinal biopsy would not be positive in an individual with gluten sensitivity. 3. Individuals who try the gluten-free diet and find it difficult and decide to limit gluten instead of eliminating it, thinking that less gluten is bound to help. Discussion: Unfortunately, whether you have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, gluten consumption requires a zero tolerance policy. I like to tell patients that consuming gluten is a qualitative factor not a quantitative one. In other words, ANY gluten is problematic. It does make intuitive sense that more of a toxic substance is bound to create greater harm than less, but with gluten intolerance that doesn't happen to be the case. It doesn't require much gluten to begin the cascade of inflammation that can create one of the more than 300 diseases and conditions associated with it. 4. A person does not exemplify the classic symptoms of celiac disease (see point #2 above for a definition) and therefore gets no cooperation from their doctor for appropriate testing. Discussion: This scenario can result in many different repercussions. An individual can strongly suspect gluten intolerance based on observing their body's reactions to it, but due to the absence of classic digestive symptoms, their doctor refuses to test them and, worse yet, persuades them that gluten could not possibly be a problem! This one frustrates me because the person knows, without question, that gluten is the culprit but they allow a clinician who is operating from a dated knowledge base, to cause them to doubt themselves, and, as a result, the patient damages their health even further. I truly cannot tell you how often I hear such stories. These individuals feel completely adrift and helpless because they literally don't know where to turn for help. I'm glad when they find our clinic and we can validate what they know to be true and really get down to work to improve their health. 5. There are some individuals who cannot 'feel' the effects of cheating and due to this they continue to cheat and eat gluten. Discussion: This is a tough one because it is human nature to avoid things that make us feel badly but it's more difficult if there are no obvious effects. Someone who has been diagnosed as gluten intolerant is having a reaction to gluten and it is shortening their lifespan and moving them closer to disease, each and every time they cheat. In the past, here at HealthNOW, we have used laboratory testing to 'show' patients that their immune system was registering their cheating and thereby (hopefully) convince them that damage is being caused. Fortunately a new lab test by Cyrex Labs is due to be released this summer (2012) that will go a step further. This test will reveal if an autoimmune disease is being created as a result of consuming gluten and what part of the body is being targeted. We may not 'feel' diseases in the making, so this test will be a wonderful asset to educating patients about what consequences they may be bringing on themselves as a result of their lax diet. 6. Some people 'cheat' expecting something dramatic to occur within a few hours and when it doesn't they think they are okay to cheat occasionally. Discussion: This really is a point of poor education on the part of the doctor, their patient or both. We put in a lot of time with our patients to ensure that they understand that a reaction to gluten can occur within hours or days of ingesting it. We do our very best to ensure that patients understand that a headache or rash (as an example) that appears two days after a gluten 'cheat' is a reaction to that dietary indiscretion. We also strive to ensure that they understand that the damage goes way beyond the symptom that they feel. It goes deeper to the degree that they are likely creating a degenerative or autoimmune disease with their lax diet. 7. I hear too many stories from people who actually received a positive blood test for celiac disease but who were then told by their doctor that the test was not 'for sure' and instead the doctor decided to concentrate on a different disease the patient had rather than prescribe a strict gluten-free diet. Discussion: The above may strike you as a little unbelievable. I only wish it was. I don't know if certain clinicians just don't feel comfortable asking their patients to follow a diet that they might not want to follow, or what exactly the issue is. But the above scenario has come up often. To add insult to injury the disease process that the doctor has decided to focus on rather than the celiac disease is often a disease CAUSED by gluten! I distinctly remember a young adult woman who was told by her endocrinologist that they were going to focus on her diabetes rather than her celiac disease because it would be 'too much' to address both. There is strong research evidence of the correlation between celiac disease and diabetes, not to mention the fact that untreated celiac disease is known to increase the risk of death from all causes. 8. Individuals with known gluten intolerance let 'peer pressure' cause them to cheat. Discussion: You might think that I'm only talking about children here but I'm not. As a matter a fact I often find my younger patients to be quite disciplined. Adults, however, do at times suffer from 'not wanting to be different' or 'not wanting to be rude' and they solve their dilemma by cheating. My advice here is to explain to the person urging you to cheat that gluten is like rat poison to you. This works well for those people who say, "Come on, a little won't kill you…". Ask the person how they would feel if you offered them 'just a little' rat poison. Would they take it? After all, it's just a little. You get my point. I've been doing this for more than twenty years and patients report that this example does seem to communicate well to others. Feel free to utilize whatever talking points work best for you, but PLEASE, don't let peer pressure damage your good health. 9. Some people have close relatives they know to have celiac disease or other autoimmune diseases and they don't get tested for gluten intolerance because they're 'afraid to find out' or they don't feel too badly or they just don't know about the strong correlation between gluten intolerance and autoimmune disease. Discussion: There's a saying that goes, "What you don't know can't hurt you." Unfortunately that's not true for people with gluten intolerance. Deciding not to get tested doesn't diminish or slow down gluten's degenerative effects. Gluten isn't something you can hide from. If gluten intolerance or autoimmune diseases are a part of your family tree I would strongly suggest that you get tested for both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity and if negative, confirm the accuracy or inaccuracy of that test result with a thirty day gluten elimination diet. It is that important that you know for sure that you are not part of the genetic predisposition that is present in your family tree. 10. Patients eliminate gluten due to a diagnosis of gluten intolerance but after initially feeling much better, they begin to feel poorly again and don't know what to do to correct the problem. Discussion: This may be the last point on our list but it certainly is not the least important. In fact, when I'm talking with individuals who know they have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, this is one of the most common complaints I hear. Unfortunately the medical profession's sole treatment strategy for celiac disease is gluten avoidance, period. I wish that was enough, but for the vast majority of people it isn't. The secondary effects created by gluten intolerance do not remedy themselves when gluten is removed from the diet. Gluten has a devastating effect on the body's immune system and in order to normalize that immune system there are several factors that must be addressed, the most common of which follow: a. The presence of pathogenic (disease-causing) organisms. These can be bacteria, parasites, amoeba, etc., but they must be discovered and treated in order to remove excess stress from the immune system and to allow vital healing of the small intestine. b. An imbalance of the good bacteria or probiotic population in the small intestine. These probiotics (or microbiome) account for the strength of the immune system and supporting their restoration to a healthy, robust level is critical for the immune system as well as the prevention of disease. c. Cross-reactive foods can be part of the patient's diet and these foods can mimic the effects of gluten thereby preventing healing and causing gluten-related symptoms despite a gluten-free diet. These foods are often temporary irritants while the body is healing but we have found some patients who require permanent elimination of some of these foods. d. Hormonal imbalance created by the stress on the body that gluten creates is something that must be normalized through natural means in order to regain mental balance, increased energy levels and normalized weight, just to name a few. e. Toxic elements including heavy metals and poor detoxification abilities of the body are also a potential hurdle that needs to be overcome when restoring health to someone who is gluten intolerant. f. Enzyme and vitamin deficiencies should be evaluated and treated as they are discovered. Basically, the stress on the system that gluten has created must be diagnosed and remedied in order for the individual to regain optimal health. Addressing these secondary effects is not complicated. It takes the knowledge of what they are, how to correctly test for them and how to effectively treat them, but this is not difficult. The lack of widespread awareness of these factors results in many individuals continuing to suffer despite maintaining their gluten-free lifestyle. This just isn't fair and it's something I am passionate about remedying. I hope you found this helpful for yourself, a family member or a close friend. Feel free to contact me if you need assistance. I'm here to help and welcome you to give me a call for a free health analysis. Call 408-733-0400.
  9. Hello... New to the board, first post :). Glad I found you... History.... I had been suffering with loose soft frequent stools and gas/bloating and lethargy for a while... About 15 months ago I brought it up to my PCP, and she suggested running a test for celiac. It came back negative. Iron levels were a bit low so started on a supplement. The last year the above symptoms have worsened.. OBGYN attributed it to hormonal changes (im 46). Two months ago I went back to see my PCP again (her nurse this time) for an annual physical and blood work. Talked to her about my symptoms again... So we ran a full panel blood work (no celiac test). Results came back with dangerously low iron, low vitamin D. Based on my symptoms she immediately thought there was something blocking the absorption of iron in my body and brought up gluten. We didn't test this time but rather, she wanted me to completely give up gluten for 3 to 4 weeks, double up on iron supplements and see how I felt after a month. I should add that I'm also vegan so consume plenty of greens along with iron supplements so I should not be deficient in iron. It's now been 8 weeks gluten free (with the possible screw up, as im still learning what to avoid)... And while my bowel issues have gotten 90% better (solid stools, far less flatulence), I'm Still extremely fatigued. I can get 8 full hours of sleep, yet feel I still cannot function with such low energy levels. I have to nap every day. I was getting dizzy spells during my workouts. I feel after 8 weeks gluten-free my iron levels should have improved but I still feel Lethargic as all hell and I just want my life back. Doc says it could take 6 months for iron levels to restore. Is this the case with any of you? I should add that I'm a very active mom of two. I workout every day and am in very good physical condition, I eat very well.. So this should all be supplying my body with a lot of energy. I feel at a loss... I want my life back. Any words of wisdom?
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  11. Hi all! I'm new to the community, and would love to hear about what I can expect as I enter a new gluten-free life and begin recovery. I understand that everybody's experiences are very different, but I'm interested in hearing a range of experiences. For those of you that had lived a gluten-filled life until diagnosis, what was your experience when you started a true gluten-free diet for the first time in your life? The bads and the goods? Thanks for sharing your stories with me! I'm excited to (hopefully) start recovering and enjoy a life of energy and happiness and less pain!
  12. Celiac.com 03/29/2018 - Fatigue is the most common symptom plaguing a majority of patients. Trouble sleeping, weight issues, PMS, headaches, fertility or libido issues, and achy joints are also very common and can all be affected by hormonal imbalance that continues after gluten has been removed from the diet. The trouble with trying to resolve such symptoms is that the root cause can vary. If every patient with fatigue had a thyroid problem, it would be easy to correct because we would know exactly where to look. If you're gluten intolerant you may have suffered from some of the complaints listed above prior to discovering your celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. But perhaps now, despite your gluten-free diet, some of these same symptoms continue to plague you. If so, read on. Let's review the list of symptoms and add a few more: Fatigue Trouble sleeping Weight trouble PMS Migraines Infertility or miscarriage Achy joints or muscles Allergies Light headedness Frequent illness Asthma While the list is long, believe it or not, there is a common cause to all of them. I'm not saying it's the only cause, but what I do wish to discuss is the reason why someone can be found gluten intolerant, successfully institute a gluten-free diet, yet continue to suffer from many of the above symptoms. There are two glands in your body called the adrenal glands. They sit atop each of your kidneys and they are the masters of multi-tasking! If I asked you if one part of your body was responsible for: Giving you energy, maintaining your weight, keeping your immune system strong, maintaining stable mood, anti-aging, controlling sleep quality, assisting with hormonal balance, keeping allergies at bay and more…what would you say? You might think to yourself that if there was one type of body part responsible for all those things then you had better start treating it well! You'd be very right in your analysis. As you've probably guessed the aforementioned adrenal glands are responsible for that very long list and, unfortunately, those very same adrenal glands tend to be quite stressed in the gluten intolerant individual. Why? Because adrenal glands are sensitive to, and get very stressed with, unstable blood sugar. Stable blood sugar comes from eating healthy food that your body finds nourishing. As you well know if you're gluten intolerant, gluten, for you, is a poison. Therefore years of eating gluten created unstable blood sugar and thereby put a tremendous strain on your adrenal glands. Because of the many, many jobs that the adrenal glands do, simply removing gluten as a stressor is typically insufficient to restore them to normal function. They need to be 're-set' with a nutritional and dietary program, to restore their good health. This explains why many who are gluten intolerant continue to suffer with the symptoms mentioned above. Therefore, even if your gluten intolerance has been diagnosed and you've instituted a strict gluten-free diet, if you haven't also found a clinician who understands and specializes in restoring health and function to the adrenal glands, you may very well continue to suffer with symptoms associated with adrenal stress. The good news is that the treatment to normalize adrenal function is not at all difficult. It is a completely natural program, when done correctly, involving no dangerous drugs or surgery. There are lab tests to determine the level of adrenal malfunction occurring but these are functional specialized lab tests rather than traditional ones. I mention this because I want to ensure that there is no confusion created when I mention adrenal function lab testing. The adrenal glands can become diseased but the disease isn't common. If you ask your traditional doctor to test for adrenal malfunction he or she will test for adrenal disease – once again a rare occurrence – and will likely pronounce your adrenal glands 'fine'. What I am discussing is malfunction vs. disease, two very different conditions. While adrenal gland disease is rare, adrenal gland malfunction is extremely common. It is this latter condition that we are discussing here. This is an important distinction because I want to make sure that if you are suffering from adrenal fatigue that you aren't given a 'clean bill of health' incorrectly. Unfortunately this happens often. If it took you a while to receive a diagnosis of gluten intolerance then you will understand this phenomenon. Sadly this area of health is fraught with misunderstanding and it is the patient who suffers, often unnecessarily. If you need any help finding a clinician to help you, feel free to contact me. Normalizing adrenal function is one of our areas of expertise and patients visit us for treatment, at our destination clinic, from across the country, as well as internationally. If we cannot find a clinician close to you that specializes in this then we are more than happy to see you here. The good news is that the treatment is natural and inexpensive. I look forward to hearing from you.
  13. Hello, I'm hoping some of you can provide me with some insight here. I don't always react to gluten but I do enough of the time to give me pause. Several years ago I had migraine headaches almost daily. I went on a diet for weight loss but it turned out that the migraines went away within 3 days. I looked at the ingredients of the diet products and the only thing I could figure was that all the products were gluten-free/almost gluten-free. After being on the diet for a week and a half, I ate one slice of white bread. Half an hour later, I felt like someone took a sledgehammer to my head. I went gluten free for 2 months. Tried to reintroduce it and it didn't work. Tried again after 2 months and for some reason, I didn't have a reaction again. And the migraines never returned. Fast forward to now and I've been eating gluten since then. I had gastro issues on and off for years (gas, diarrhea, stomach pain, nausea) but they got much worse this past year. So I looked up the symptoms of gluten intolerance and celiac and I have all of them. The only one that didn't fit for celiac was that I've always been heavy, although I've read some people can still be heavy and have celiac. Other symptoms I've had include stomach pain, fogginess, vomiting, constipation. I also have severe depression which I read can be linked to gluten either because of celiac or even IBS. I read that in studies they found that people with depression and IBS get better not eating gluten anymore, even if they don't have celiac. I went gluten free again for about 2 weeks. Two days ago, I ate a few mini donuts and couldn't eat all day after that. The pain in my stomach was horrible, just under my breasts. Yesterday, after eating half a frozen dinner that was a breaded product, I threw up twice and crawled into bed for several hours. My head was foggy and I felt like I was drugged. My limbs felt heavy. I had knee pain really bad. No injury there but the ligaments are tight and sore sometimes. Just never that bad before. At lunch today, I ate three bites of a turkey sandwich. I almost threw up. I stopped eating it. For dinner, I ate cheesy bread from dominos. The only reaction was my knee started to hurt again but not nearly as bad as yesterday. I see my doc for bloodwork in a few weeks and want to ask for the celiac test. I ate gluten products 4 times over the last 2 week, once being today. Yesterday was the worst reaction. I was trying to narrow it down and everything that has caused a bad reaction has gluten. I've been eating dairy, eggs, and nuts but subtracted just gluten and had no problems. When I reintroduce bread products and stuff with gluten, I feel awful. But it doesn't happen every time. It seems that when I reintroduce gluten it gets bad for a day or so. Then the symptoms ease up and I feel "normal." But I know that continuing to eat stuff with gluten in it will bring back the problems in the long term. Am I right in thinking that my body is literally trying to readjust from my abstinence from it and that's why I didn't react with dinner? Could it be something else that I'm eating that's the problem but am eliminating it and not realizing it when I go gluten free? I know you guys aren't doctors. But tbh, I don't always trust doctors. Doctors have screwed me over in the past. I had a back condition that took over 2 years to treat due to several misdiagnoses and one doc almost killed me with a medicine interaction that she had every reason to catch. So I want to go into the doc appointment with as much info as possible. Thanks for taking the time to read all this. Sorry it's so longwinded but I don't really know anyone who can help.
  14. I have been very sick for over 2 months and have lost over 26 lbs. Haven't been able to eat without getting sick. I have started a gluten free diet and am starting to feel a little better. I had the blood test done for Celiac's and am unable to understand the results. Can someone please help me with this? Is these positive or negative results? My doctor was not able to explain. Thanks in advance.
  15. Good morning everyone. So I have been gluten free for 4 months now. One thing I have realized is that I have an issue with yeast overgrowth which may be causing my gluten and dairy intolerance. I am wondering if anyone else experienced this and how they approached it. Also if you detoxed from yeast were you able to eat gluten and dairy again? I want to start a cleanse but I am not sure where to start. i am going to the doctor next week but thought it may be a good idea to be proactive. Thank you so much for all of your help!
  16. I was gluten free for about a year and feeling great, then I started eating twizzlers and wasn't really thinking about the gluten in them. I was started to feel off all the time. Then I got a really bad cold virus and wanted some warm chicken noodle soup and ate that for about 2 weeks and of course wasn't feeling well because I already had a cold. Then I just completely crashed one day. Started having extreme fatigue and weakness. Muscle pain. Stomach problems. Anxiety and panic attacks. I immediately stopped eating the noodles and went back to gluten free. I noticed that eating oats caused the same reaction. Now it is two months out and I am still feeling weak and fatigued. Other symptoms are: hard time sleeping, muscle pain, crying easily, panic attacks, reactions to almost everything I eat now. However it is gradually seeming to subside. Questions...Can gluten have a cumulative affect where the symptoms just keep getting worse the more you keep eating and eventually cause a crash? Can the symptoms last for 2-3 months or longer? Can oats cause the same reaction (the oats were gluten free)?
  17. Does anyone know of any support groups in the southern Arkansas area? I know there is one in Little Rock, but living 3 hours south of there, that's a drive for me especially on Monday nights when I usually have to work. If not, does anyone know how to start one? I'm up for suggestions.
  18. Hello guys this is my first post forgive the long post but my situation is complicated. I just got out of bed as I had to cause of Night Sweats, I hate them, I did go with my wife and kids to the centre of town (London) to see a chinese TCM doc and so we went to China town to a restaurant, its been cold also and the stress of the kids having tantrums I think sent me overboard. I must say though for 3 nights have had terrible night sweats BUT the previous 3 days I ate wheat and dairy which I usually avoid, I had ricotta cheese and Italian wheat bread, gluten free lasagna but has cheese/ and my wife made chinese food with soy sauce, chinese restaurant food. My symptoms are sneezing, roof of the mouth hurts and when I sneeze its as if Ive just torn a layer of skin or something from the roof of the mouth, night sweats, mucus in the mornings. I suppose the stress I have in my life doesnt help, Im lowering my medication (Paxil) and hope to reduce and stop Prilosec also as I believe it maybe the reason I have a damaged intestine or leaky gut seeing as chronic low stomach acid could allow bad bacteria to migrate from the stomach to the duodenum etc, low stomach acid food arriving in the duodenum doesnt have the acid trigger that you need to send a message to the pancreas to digest the food and so partially digested food feeds the bad bacteria, right? I also did coffee enemas for 9yrs daily an this may have damaged my duodenum/small intestine cause bile is released each time and bile is slightly corrosive? I stopped doing them now but not sure which diet to follow, Ive heard of FODMAPs diet, SCD (Specific Carbohydrate Diet), Mcdoughall high starch low fat/oil diet, Keto, low carb, Mediterranean. Im confused which diet to follow cause I have a few issues, fatty liver, gallbladder polyps, GERD/Hiatal Hernia, depression/Anxiety all diagnosed but the leaky gut, or Gluten intolerance hasn't been diagnosed, maybe I should get an allaergy test, I think I'll test positive even for water at least it seems this way, that my body is becoming intolerant to many foods and the list seems like its growing. I wasn't gluten intolerant from birth, this is what the Chinese doc said to me yesterday, she said I doubt if your Gluten problem started 4 yrs ago, usually people have it from birth, i thought what is she talking about, I', Italian and I ate mamas lasagna, spaghetti, bolognese, minestrone etc as Italians we ate a paste based meal everyday and this was for decades I ate wheat, I ate bread as well and processed foods, surely I would have known sooner and reacted sooner? I started reacting 4 yrs ago and intially was going nuts cause I thought I had dust allergy and thought |I was allergic to my home, to mold, insects, the air, I just didnt make the food connection, until I read about Gluten, then i started to avoid Gluten and started to eat Gluten free bread (took some getting used to), finally after 3 to 4 yrs some relief, now I cannot eat Gluten and even Dairy, sometimes I find sugar/stress and potato skins gives me auto immune problem symptoms like red hot ear (Relapsing polychondritis?) This is just my intro I have written a longer letter to give to a doc, but not sure which doc could help me, I will send it in a few minutes once Ive finished it, the chinese doc I saw says we cannot shrink the polyp and is too expensive with her herbs but will try for a few weeks to see if I feel better, the reason why I like the chinese approach is that they treat you whole-istically cause I have too many things going on for a one size fits all approach, one remedy or diet may harm or worsen another problem that I have. Thankyou guys for reading any help or advice will be much appreciated, thanks. Gerald
  19. Celiac.com 12/06/2016 - Neurological problems are a very common effect of gluten intolerance. Whether you have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, there is research showing that gluten can cause nervous system problems in affected individuals. What kind of problems? When it comes to the nervous system, symptoms run the gamut from depression to schizophrenia, from migraines to brain fog, and from seizures to numbness and pain. I want to share more information with you about a particular type of nervous system ailment called peripheral neuropathy. The name basically means damage to the nerves of the extremities (arms and legs) that typically manifests in numbness and pins and needles-type pain that all of us have experienced at one time or another if we sat on our feet too long or fell asleep in a weird position and had a hand ‘go to sleep'. While these latter type incidents are normal, having such symptoms occur when no pressure is being put on the nerve is abnormal. Not only is it uncomfortable to have such sensations, but when truly numb, accidents from tripping or burning oneself can occur due to not having adequate sensation. I think it is interesting to note that the most common occurrence of peripheral neuropathy is seen in type I diabetes, an autoimmune disease. Celiac is also an autoimmune disease and according to the University of Chicago's Center for Peripheral Neuropathy, 10% of those diagnosed with celiac disease have a neurological problem, and peripheral neuropathy is quite common. Taking it a step further, we know that gluten creates a leaky gut and we know that a leaky gut is associated with autoimmune disease, through several wonderful studies brought to us by Dr. Alessio Fasano and his team. Therefore, seeing a connection between gluten and peripheral neuropathy is not unexpected based on research. Further, despite a dearth, or scarcity, of research on gluten sensitivity, doctors currently engaged in such research cite peripheral neuropathy as one of the most common symptoms associated with gluten sensitivity. In fact neurological symptoms are frequently associated with gluten sensitivity before any digestive symptoms ever develop. And in some cases, the nervous system disorders are present with no digestive disturbances. A lack of any digestive symptoms is perhaps one of many reasons why these individuals' gluten sensitivity is missed by their doctors. When it comes to comparing gluten sensitivity to celiac disease, according to Dr Fasano, 30% of the patients he diagnoses with gluten sensitivity suffer a neurological ailment, a much higher percentage than that associated with celiac disease. How Do You Know if You Have Peripheral Neuropathy? The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are numbness, a feeling of hot/cold or a pins and needles feeling that tends to start at the ends of your body's long nerves, meaning your feet and hands, before moving upwards. The symptoms can be in legs and/or arms, right side and/or left. Certainly, considering that type 1 diabetes is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy, with an estimated 50% suffering some type of nerve damage, that would be the first thing to rule out. What Should You Do? If you have these symptoms and your doctor has ruled out diabetes and any other obvious sources of the problem (including any drugs you may be taking that create neuropathy as side effects), you may fit into the category of "idiopathic neuropathy". This means that you have the problem but the reason is unknown. Or is it? Let's look at the result of a study where researchers worked with more than 200 individuals with neuropathy, 140 of whom fell within the ‘idiopathic' category. These smart doctors tested those 140 people for antibodies to gluten, specifically utilizing the anti-gliadin antibody test – AGA-IgA and AGA-IgG. This blood test is a general blood test that is not specific to celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, but shows that the body's immune system is reacting negatively to these proteins in gluten called gliadin. Of those tested, 34% were positive to one or both tests, compared to 12% of the general population. Interestingly, a full 9% of those tested in the ‘idiopathic' group actually had celiac disease, compared to 1% of the general population. And perhaps even more interesting, 80% of that same idiopathic group had the genes for celiac disease, either HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8. 80%!! In the normal population that number is about 40%. Our takeaway message is that peripheral neuropathy has a rather high correlation to immune reaction to gluten – be it celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Therefore anyone you know who suffers with such symptoms absolutely should be checked for gluten intolerance. Regaining one's strength and correcting nervous system abnormalities is well worth the change in diet when gluten is the cause. Such cases have been described in the literature where the only treatment that led to success was a gluten-free diet. So many diseases and symptoms can be prevented and reversed by discovering their true underlying root cause and for many of those ailments it is gluten that is the culprit. Don't continue suffering nor let you friends and family members suffer. Find out why the symptom is there rather than just masking it with a drug. If you need assistance, consider calling us for a free health analysis – call 408-733-0400. Our destination clinic treats patients from across the country and internationally. You don't need to live local to us to receive assistance. We are here to help! To your good health, References: Hadjivassiliou M. et al. Neuropathy associated with gluten sensitivity. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry. 2006 Nov;77(11):1262-6. Rigamonti A. et al. Celiac disease presenting with motor neuropathy: effect of gluten-free diet. Muscle & Nerve. 2007 May;35(5):675-7. University of Chicago Center for Peripheral Neuropathy. Types of Peripheral Neuropathy - Inflammatory - Celiac Disease.
  20. Before I get into the neurological symptoms, let me give you a synopsis of my background and family history. Both my parents smoke and my dad was always a heavy drinker. My mom had GERD / Acid Reflux pretty much her whole life and it should be noted that she's basically 100% Norwegian (I've read that Northern Europeans have GERD and gastrointestinal issues more than anyone else - same with the Irish). My mom was also recently tested positive for Celiac Disease (our diets growing up was filled with wheat products, so connecting the dots here, I think she was being bombarded with gluten and her body couldn't handle it). She would have severe mood swings, especially towards my dad (who is now passed on). Her acid reflux got so bad that she went in for an endoscopy and they told her that she had Barrett's Esophagus. She's still alive to this day though and seems to be holding up reasonably well. My sister also has severe acid reflux and panic attacks. Now to get to my own history. I was born in 1983. As a baby, I had severe eczema, and would rub certain areas of my body (such as my wrists) raw on the carpet, because I was constantly itchy. I would also constantly spit up breast-milk and even the baby formula. My parents had a hard time figuring out what to feed me! We would also drink tons of cow's milk. That finally hit a brick wall around age 25 (in 2008), when I started noticing that if I drank straight cow's milk I would end up with (and still do end up with if I drink it) sulfur burps which taste and smell like rotten eggs. I even tried drinking raw cow's milk one time and the result was the same, I was burping rotten egg smelling burps and would get diarrhea! This is also around the time when I noticed my acid reflux getting worse and worse. In 2009, I started lifting weights again after taking a long break from high school. When I would do any squatting motion exercises such as dead-lifts or squats, I'd almost pass out because I couldn't catch my breath afterwards. I finally went in for an endoscopy and they told me that my esophagus was raw and red. I also should note that I've read getting anesthesia and all the drugs they give you during that time, can cause long-term psychological issues, especially anxiety, which I never really had until after that year. I realized that I couldn't do those squatting exercises or anything that put pressure on the abdomen area, since it would push acid back up into my esophagus. I decided to start lifting weights on an empty stomach and that did work for awhile but I couldn't figure out why my acid reflux was still so bad. Acid shooting back up into the esophagus, is caused by inflammation. This affects the Vagus Nerve (which is the longest cranial nerve). Some of the main functions of the Vagus Nerve include, 1. Breathing 2. Speech 3. Sweating 4. Helping in keeping the larynx open during breathing 5. Monitoring and regulating the heartbeat 6. Informing the brain of the food that is ingested and food that has been digested 7. The Vagus Nerve performs the major function of emptying the gastric region of food Any damage to the vagus nerve causes Gastroparesis which is losing the muscular function in the stomach and intestines. This results in food being emptied slowly, that leads to other problems such as fermentation of food in the stomach and food getting compressed into hard pellets which can cause severe problems if the pellets get stuck in the intestine. Especially in people with diabetes, when sugar levels get high and are not well controlled, it can result in the vagus nerve damage. This can result in anxiety / panic attacks, OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), trouble swallowing, chills, asthma-like symptoms, heart palpitations, tingling / numbness in extremities and limbs, blood in the stool, hard of breathing, anxiety attack-like symptoms, canker sores, nightmares (including hypnogogic and hypnopompic auditory / visual hallucinations, such as hearing a gun shot upon waking up, even though no gun was fired), dry mouth, heart attack-like symptoms, and more (I had all these symptoms too btw). I believe that since our bodies are intolerant to wheat and dairy products, it is causing inflammation in the body, which then causes all these other symptoms. So at that point, I began having hallucinations (including hypnopompic and hypnagogic hallucinations). They were mainly auditory hallucinations and some (but fewer) visual hallucinations. They started around 2013, when I got sick with the flu and also had an in-grown toenail (I had to get it cut out by the doctor and it was the worst pain of my life!). I was extremely religious back then (I left my faith last year at end of 2015) and felt like these were omens or signs for some of the things that were deemed ‘sinful’. I then had a breakup with a gluten-free who lived in Montana and the auditory hallucinations continued. I’ve been having them again starting in 2016 after getting sick with a chest respiratory infection (I’m seeing a trend here with getting sick and having these), which I believe were caused by the Autumn Rhinitis / Hay Fever Allergies. I was at the gym around the start of August 2016, and I felt like I couldn’t catch my breath after each set of lifting. I went home and haven’t been back to the gym since. I was having trouble breathing just walking up a flight of stairs, and it was a daily nightmare until I started looking into ways to help solve my issues (which I’ll get into in a minute). I also don’t have a great sleep schedule from working late night shifts, so I’m typically always sleep deprived. I should also mention that I think I have formed P.T.S.D. (PTSD - Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) from watching a music video where it showed a death. The image of the woman dying kept playing in my head (this also happened around August 2016). Then on top of all that, I was lifting weights 2 times a week (full body workouts), doing H.I.I.T. (High Intensity Interval Training) a couple times a week in the morning, AND working night shifts. On top of all that, my dad died last year (October 3, 2015) and within a week afterwards around October 10th, I ended up with appendicitis so I had to get the appendectomy surgery to get my appendix removed. A few weeks later, I walked away from my faith (not due to emotional reasons, but due to extensive research, which was already in the process starting at the beginning of 2015). So I lost my dad, my faith and my appendix within a month's time period. It put a lot of stress on me I think. I’m 33 years old, so still somewhat young, but I think I was pushing my body to the limit, and it’s been affecting my brain chemistry. Not only that, but recently, I put the other dots to the puzzle and found out that I also have gluten intolerance / Celiac / Coeliac, so I’ve stopped eating gluten (and dairy) products. I also have done a few sessions of AAT (Advanced Allergy Therapy), by a doctor named Dr. Jill Cohn in the San Francisco / Berkeley / Oakland Bay Area. You don’t even have to be there in person for her to treat you, she does it all online through a conference call on a site similar to Skype. You can watch testimonials on YouTube as well, and I’m here to tell you that her system did cure me of Ragweed allergies. I now understand that because I was pushing my body to the limit as well as trying to stay 500 calories below maintenance (to cut fat and get shredded), that my body wasn’t getting the proper nutrients and vitamins due to eating wheat and gluten (as well as dairy). This damages the alveoli and villi in the intestinal tract which are crucial for absorbing the nutrients from your food. I also found out that my body reacts poorly to chocolate as well. Chocolate is a 'stimulant' and has been proven to affect the brain the same way that cannabis / marijuana will. This could be some of the problems you all are facing as well. At that point, your body is so run down, that it will start attacking ‘harmless’ invaders, such as ragweed pollen, pet dander or even just simple dust particles, which this process of your body in attack mode, will cause inflammation, hence the reason I was having trouble breathing (my body developed exercise-induced / allergy-induced asthma). Not only that, but when your body is so run down and not getting the proper nutrition, it can cause psychosis and schizophrenic symptoms as well! I started taking a ton of supplements and they’ve helped tremendously. Here are a few to get you started. Try these and eat a balanced diet for a couple months. I’ll bet you start to feel better and the hallucinations diminish. 1. Vitamin D3 (Jarrow Brand 5,000IU – take two to four per day) – This is especially necessary if you live above the 37 degree parallel (latitude) in the Fall and Winter (typically from September to March). The sun only produces Vitamin D3 in our body when it is 50 degrees (altitude not temperature) above the horizon and even during the Spring and Summer, this only occurs from around 10AM in the morning to 2-3PM in the afternoon. So you have only a 4 to 5 hour window in the morning to afternoon when the sun is producing Vitamin D3, which most people aren't really out during those times, because of work schedule. This is why around 75 to 80% of the world population are D3 deficient! A good source of information on this is Dr. John Cannell. Go research how vital and important D3 is for us! You want your ng/ml (nano-grams per milliliter of blood) to be from 50 to 100 (or even slightly over 100 is fine too!). 2. Magnesium (CALM BRAND) – Magnesium is the driver for Vitamin D3. It’s very important and we don’t get enough of it in our diet on average. 3. Vitamin C (take around 2,000mg per day) – Look up Dr. Thomas Levy and Dr. Linus Pauling for good information on this. The Liposomal type of Vitamin C is the best kind! 4. Vitamin K2 (different from Vitamin K1 – Get the Jarrow Brand called Vitamin K-Right) – Millions of people take calcium supplements to maintain healthy bones. Yet few patients or physicians realize that optimizing bone integrity involves more than taking a single mineral supplement. A critical additional component for bone and cardiovascular health is vitamin K2. Recent research has revealed that, without vitamin K2, calcium regulation is disrupted. In fact, low levels of vitamin K2 are associated with an increased risk of heart disease and atherosclerosis. K2 is the gateway that allows calcium to get to your bones. When you take vitamin D3, your body creates more of these vitamin K2-dependent proteins, the proteins that will move the calcium around. They have a lot of potential health benefits. But until the K2 comes in to activate those proteins, those benefits aren't realized. So, really, if you're taking vitamin D, you're creating an increased demand for K2. And vitamin D and K2 work together to strengthen your bones and improve your heart health.For so long, we've been told to take calcium for osteoporosis... and vitamin D3, which we know is helpful. But then, more studies are coming out showing that increased calcium intake is causing more heart attacks and strokes. That created a lot of confusion around whether calcium is safe or not. But that's the wrong question to be asking, because we'll never properly understand the health benefits of calcium or vitamin D3, unless we take into consideration K2. That's what keeps the calcium in its right place. 5. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Ubiquinol – it’s a substance similar to a vitamin. It is found in every cell of the body. Your body makes CoQ10, and your cells use it to produce energy your body needs for cell growth and maintenance. It also functions as an antioxidant, which protects the body from damage caused by harmful molecules. (Get the Jarrow Brand – no I don’t work for them, but I’ve heard they are the best in all of these, and it’s what I take). 6. Vitamin B-Right (Jarrow) which has all of the B vitamins in it. Niacin (B3) has proven to be very helpful for those with Schizophrenia and Psychosis. Look up Dr. Abram Hoffer and his research on mental illness and Niacin. Careful with Niacin in huge quantities, as it will cause a 'flushing' effect, but you still want enough to get the benefits. 7. Oxylent (which is one of the best tasting and best multi-vitamins out there in my opinion). It’s got most of all you need in there when included with what I mentioned above. (Those are the main ones above, but here are a few other supplements I take. ChlorOxygen, Serrapeptase {SerraGold Brand}, mushroom supplement called 'Breathe' by New Chapter Life-shield, HealthForce Green Alchemy Protein Powder, HealthForce Vitamineral Green, Probiotics, MSM, Bragg's Apple Cider Vinegar, local honey, and avocados for potassium, along with getting at least a half gallon of water per day - which I drink at least 32 oz. to 50 oz. of water on an empty stomach every morning). Within a month of taking all this (I started on November 2nd, 2016), I’m now feeling about 95% back to my normal self. The other 5% is caused by my poor sleeping habits, as well as stress. I now realize that these psychological issues were all subconscious from the heavy religious indoctrination. If I had never been introduced to these religious ideas, I’m sure I’d not have these particular religious themed hypnopompic and hypnagogic hallucinations. When it first started, I was seeing visuals such as numbers and objects floating in the air upon waking up, which, they’d disappear within a few seconds. I also hear voices, which would say terrible things, and then the voices would continue in my head as if it were having dialogue with me in my own mind. I would feel like God hated me, due to the content of what was being said. I’m pretty sure I have some sort of religious trauma after leaving my faith and also, after my dad dying within the last year (2015). They actually have a name for this type of PTSD and it’s RTS (Religious Trauma Syndrome). You can find some good material through Dr. Marlene Winell online if you suffer from the religious form of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). Anyways, I hope all of this helps someone else who may be going through similar! Just know you’re not alone and it’s more than likely happening because of nutrient deficiency and/or a traumatic experience you suffered as well as your diet if you are gluten intolerant / lactose intolerant. These aren’t devils, demons, hobgoblins or ghouls harassing you, this is all natural phenomena and it can be treated with the right diet, the right supplements and proper sleep! I am still getting cross-contaminated (or there is a cross-reactor food that mimics gluten and/or dairy) somewhere in my diet, so my psychological issues persist, including waking up feeling like something is trying to talk to me in my mind. I am trying to figure that out now. But they also have supplements you can take that will break down gluten if you are accidentally 'glutened.' Here is a study I found from WW2, that correlates to mental disease and gluten / wheat below. "One of the first hints that these circumstances could have implications for the psychological sciences was the observation that, in several countries, hospitalization rates for schizophrenia during World War II dropped in direct proportion to wheat shortages. In the United States, where over that same period the consumption of wheat rose rather than diminished, such rates increased instead (Dohan, 1966a,b). In South Pacific islands with a traditionally low consumption of wheat, schizophrenia was only found in 1 person out of 30,000. When Western grain products were introduced into their society, it dramatically rose to 1 person out of 100! (Dohan et al., 1984)."
  21. So, for most of my childhood I didn't get sick often and would rarely throw up (only if I had food poisoning), but during the summer before freshman year of high school I began throwing up violently. I didn't have food poisoning and I wasn't sick--it came completely out of the blue--but since it was the first time it happened I just let it slide. As I went into high school I would wake up nauseous every day for no reason either. It always happened early in the morning, often times waking me up before my alarm even went off. I went to the doctor and they prescribed me anti-nausea medication and it worked, but they never diagnosed the issue. Anyway, after that a cycle of nausea has been effecting me for about five years. The pattern is that I'll be fine most of the time, but about once a month (especially if I've been eating a lot of refined carbs like bread and pasta), I'll get violently sick with diarrhea and vomiting. It always happens in the middle of the night, around 3 - 5 AM. There were periods when it stopped happening (when I went on a low carb diet, which is why I initially thought it was connected to my carbohydrate intake), but it would always come back. Then before going into university the morning nausea came back, this time with no vomiting. I would wake up in the middle of the night at around 3 - 5 AM, and would feel on the brink of throwing up, especially if I lied down. So I went to the doctors and they suggested I might have celiac disease (my grandmother has celiac disease and so does my cousin so I am genetically susceptible). I got the blood work the same day and after that immediately started on a gluten free diet because I wanted the nausea to stop. Well, it did. Although the first week was torture, my body slowly got used to it. I stopped experiencing bloating (I never even noticed I had the issue until it was gone). I also used to have a really hard time maintaining my weight, but now I'm the lightest I've ever been and I don't even try for it. Most importantly, I haven't had the usual periodic nausea and vomiting in over three months. But the blood results came back negative for celiac disease. My doctor suggested I had IBS and shooed me out of her office, and I just continued being gluten free. I've been eating lots of vegetables, lots of rice, and not a lot of processed gluten free foods (too expensive). However, I haven't tried reintroducing gluten into my diet to see if the symptoms come back (with school going on I don't want to risk it). My question is whether you've ever heard of similar symptoms? Keep in mind that I felt fine for long periods of time (if you discount occasional bloating). It almost felt like something was building up in my system and my body purged itself once the levels got to high, and I always felt the culprit was high carb intake. Now, however, I eat tons of rice and even more sugar than I used to, and I feel fine with those. Is it gluten? Can gluten build up in your body? thank you in advance
  22. Hello, My name is Bryan and I'm 23 years old. I've never made an account on any website to talk about this, so this is my first because I have a lot to say and I have been avoiding this. I guess I'll start off giving some history of the issues that I have been having. When I was 18 I was getting pretty serious about lifting weights. I started off at about 160 lbs and got to about 180 when I was about 20. Once I hit 20 years old I injured my back pretty bad to where I was in bed for 3 months, and during the time I started to have some GI symptoms around this time. At the time I thought I was literally having heart attacks due to a serious pain in my chest. It would show up sometimes when I ate food, and especially when I drank caffeine (I never really cared for caffeine, but at this time a preworkout Jack3D got me hooked on it). However, I ended up going to Dr. and he ended up telling me I had GERD within 10 minutes, shortly after that he left the room and came back with Nexium (had to be prescribed at the time). I took Nexium for a while and it helped, but once I got off things were worse. I also couldn't take it anymore because I had a SERIOUS pain in the center of my lumbar spine that would only go away if I went #2. So, I tried the holistic path to get rid of this heartburn. Good news is that I beat heartburn, it's been years since I ever even had it. This event was from about 19 to 20 years of age (Just turning 20 it ended). On the flip side, right when I was turning 21 something else slowly started to happen. I first started off with symptoms of being EXTREMELY TIRED 30 minutes eating a lot of the time. When I was 21, I was working at a dollar store and the first time I noticed one of these episodes I was so tired that I couldn't stand up. So, I just sat on the floor. It felt like a tiredness that was almost induced from a drug, it was a different kind of tired. I worked at this dollar store about 2-3 times a week for 3 years, until I was 23. Me and my boss had subway for probably about 90% of our lunches through the course of these 3 years. Subway 2-3 times a week, every week (I eat NO other fast food, just how I was raised). After I noticed this tiredness I started to pay attention to my stool. It was yellow, inconsistent, and I was going anywhere from 2-5 times a day. Once I was aware of being being tired and not being able to go to the bathroom right, I started to get this shoulder tightness that started from under my right scapula at the rib cage. It crept up from my rib under my scapula, to the rhomboid, to my rear deltoid and scapula, and finally to my neck. This shoulder irritation got so bad I considered death thousands of times. Sometimes I was so happy thinking about death that I would literally smile about it, realizing that this would all one day end. Mentally at this point I have developed a serious anxiety. Everyday I woke up as if I had a grenade go off in my head, as if I was drinking ALL night. I would get a full 8 hours without waking up once just to wake up each morning to have a messed up head. Somewhere down the line I started to experience something very strange with my head. Many times before I ate my head would feel "jared". It's like my eyes wanted to roll back into my head and have a seizure, but what would I know, I never had one. Sometimes I thought I would fall on the ground. This would also happen when I would hear something loud or high pitch, a baby screaming, motorcycle going by, or if someone were to throw a beer bottle away in the garbage if it hit another bottle (making the glass hitting each other). I don't drink, smoke, or do any drugs. I have quit caffeine completely out of my life since the beginning of 2016. I forgot to mention, but caffeine and me no longer get along. It is as if I have a complete intolerance to it. I have had -Endoscopy -Colonoscopy -Blood tests for H-Pyl, Celiac, others I can't remember -Taken antibiotics for SIBO -Gallbladder scan -Liver scan -Pancreas is fine If I remember right -I will update more if I remember anything else. This all came up clear. I have had 2 different General Practitioners tell me that I have anxiety. For a long time I put off anxiety medication and have told them I'm not interested. Eventually I caved and got on zoloft, but I started to have bad side effects. Then they put me on Wellbutrin, currently on 300mg a day. Wellbutrin helps, but I feel it's not the answer. I still get tight shoulder issues, bathroom problems, and I forgot to mention that I have a throat clearing issue that's so consistent that it's simply ruining my life. I have tried gluten free 2 different times, both times I've lasted two weeks being 100% gluten-free. My symptoms are still there, but I don't THINK they are as severe. However I caved Sunday 11/6/2016 (ending my two week and two day streak), gluten-free Monday, and caved again yesterday (being Tuesday). Tuesday was the only day I noticed anything, I was super bloated/gassy/tight shoulder/bad head space. I was just unsure how to feel about it seeing as I only had symptoms on Tuesday when I caved and not Sunday. I'm sorry this is long and so jumbled, still have bad head space. Symptoms: Right shoulder tightness, bloating, gas, food cravings for sweets/chocolate (very noticeable while gluten-free), waking up tired, anxiety, symptoms 30 minutes after eating, will add more as I remember and experience them.
  23. I've been struggling with a lot of symptoms for over 7 years now. I've gone on many wild goose chases to get a diagnoses, but I always seem to wind up with negative test results, or an answer that doesn't account for most of my symptoms. Most of my symptoms first started when I was in my sophomore year of high school (I am 23 years old now). I started to experience disassociation, brain fog, and fatigue first, shortly followed by visual snow. I developed tinnitus in both ears around this time also. Since then, none of these symptoms have alleviated; my visual snow and tinnitus have become a constant for me, though they are thankfully relatively easy to ignore. I've experienced headaches commonly throughout my life, but for years now they have become much more frequent. I used to rarely (if ever) experience tension headaches, but now I have tension headaches much more frequently than vascular ones. I also experience (thankfully rare) ocular migraines where I lose portions of my vision for 30 minutes to an hour in both eyes. I've become extremely sensitive to light and stimuli (especially visual and auditory). I've always been sensitive to loud noises and bright colours, but now I can hardly walk through a colourful, fluorescent-lit store without walking out feeling fatigued and in a fog. The enamel on my front teeth has been shot since I was a child, and I've always been prone to canker sores. I have very stubborn dark circles under my eyes, and rough, bumpy skin on my upper arms. My joints feel too stiff and sore for my age, and I have very painful periods (that may skip a month occasionally). My memory is poor, and I struggle with OCD, tourettes, anxiety, and depression. What lead me to look into celiac, however, was the development of gastrointestinal issues. I can't remember when these issues first started-- I think they've been slowly working into my system for years-- but they became much more pronounced over the last year or two. I feel bloated nearly all the time, and frequently have either diarrhea or constipation. I also have acid reflux, as well as frequent abdominal pain and discomfort. My diet is very heavy in foods that contain gluten, and I've noticed my gastrointestinal symptoms definitely worsen when I increase my intake of these foods. Just a couple of days ago, a pb&j sandwich and poptart were all that I ate in the evening; I went to sleep with abdominal discomfort, and woke up with much worse discomfort and diarrhea. Each flareup seems to be similarly marked by consuming gluten. I've had a CT scan of my head, several in-depth eye exams, tests for diabetes, iron and vitamin deficiencies, and high blood pressure. I've had an x-ray of my neck and spine, an MRI of my jaw (for TMJD), an EEG-- all came back negative, except for one that determined I have hypothyroidism and the MRI that showed a deformity in the right side of my jaw, neither of which account for most of my symptoms. I also had one single test for celiac (I believe it was the tTG test), which also came back negative. The negative test result I had for celiac has not convinced me that gluten isn't to blame for my issues, however. I feel that too many of my symptoms line up with celiac disease to not at least treat it as a high possibility. I've also read about the possibility of the test I had showing false negatives, which gives me some hope that my negative test result for celiac wasn't just another dead end. I'm not sure where to move from here, however. I truly feel that I have reasonable cause to suspect celiac, but I've also felt that way with many other tests that provided no answers. I wonder, though, if I should pursue more testing for celiac, or just try a gluten-free diet for a few months and see if it improves my symptoms. I am not interested in having an endoscopy; I feel that a positive blood test, or positive results from a gluten-free diet are all I want for answers (plus, sedatives and anesthesia give me wicked anxiety). I guess I'm making this forum for two reasons-- 1. I would like to know if people here that have been formally diagnosed with celiac feel that I have reason to suspect celiac based on my symptoms; 2. I would also like an opinion on trying the diet vs getting a diagnosis prior I'd also love a full list of tests that I should look into if the primary one came back negative Thank you to anyone that reads and/or replies to this, and sorry for how wordy this is ahhh
  24. Celiac.com 02/27/2006 - Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) applauds McDonald’s for providing proof that their French fries are safe for persons with celiac disease and gluten intolerances, states Cynthia Kupper, RD, Executive Director of GIG. Kupper, who has worked with large corporate chain restaurants for many years to provide gluten-free menu options, states McDonald’s took the best action possible by having the fries tested by one of the leading independent laboratories in food allergens. McDonald’s has provided the reassurance those persons with celiac disease need, to feel confident they can eat the fries without getting sick. Outback Steak House was the first large restaurant chain Kupper worked with to develop gluten-free menus. “We definitely made some new friends!” stated Thomas C. Kempsey, Director of Culinary for Cheeseburger in Paradise, speaking of the gluten-free menu Kupper helped the chain launch in February. Cameron Mitchell’s Fish Market, Bone Fish Grill, Carrabba’s, Bugaboo Creek, and many others have worked with GIG to develop gluten-free menus. The program has been very successful for restaurants involved with GIG’s outreach project, states Kupper. The patrons are happy and the restaurants see a growing number of loyal customers. GIG promotes safe and healthy dining through education of restaurants and consumers. Many restaurants have developed gluten-free menu options. Some individual restaurants are part of a program GIG will soon manage called the Gluten-Free Restaurant Awareness Program (www.glutenfreerestaurants.org). Both this program and GIG’s corporate program have strict guidelines for inclusion. Many restaurants have the potential to meet the needs of persons with food sensitivities, however not all are willing to take the extra steps necessary to do so. Many people with celiac disease are afraid to eat away from home for fear of getting sick according to research. To know that restaurants offer gluten-free choices, verified by trusted sources is a big deal for these people. For people who travel, places like McDonalds and Outback become their safety nets and they will not eat anywhere else, states Kupper. Parents want their children to have options like other kids, so McDonald’s is a perfect fast food choice. Not all fast food restaurants use dedicated fryers and some use fries that are treated with wheat flour – an absolute ‘must avoid’ for celiacs. Unlike other acute allergies, such as peanut allergies, celiac disease is a chronic condition that can cause damage to the intestines, malabsorption and malnutrition by eating gluten (proteins found in wheat, rye, barley and hybrids of these grains). Celiac disease is a life-long disease that can be diagnosed at any age. The only treatment for the disease is the strict avoidance of gluten. Celiac disease affects nearly 3 million people in the US and 1:250 people worldwide, yet it is the most misdiagnosed common disorder today. The Gluten Intolerance Group, based in Seattle WA, is a national nonprofit organization providing support and education to persons with gluten intolerances in order to live healthy lives. GIG is the leading national organization for gluten intolerances with a dietitian on staff daily to work with consumers. Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) works with restaurants to offer gluten-free dining options for persons with celiac disease.
  25. Celiac.com 11/08/2005 - York Nutritional Laboratories has introduced to the US a simple, unique and revolutionary finger-stick rapid test kit designed to detect the antibodies associated with Celiac Disease and gluten intolerance. Celiac disease is a gluten intolerance enteropathy caused by a permanent intolerance to gluten and specifically to its protein fragment known as gliadin. The ingestion of this protein in people with genetic predisposition induces a severe compromise to the intestinal mucosa that is historically characterized by one hyperplasia of cryptas with total or subtotal atrophy of the intestinal microvilli. Though the definitive diagnosis of the celiac disease is based in characteristic histological changes observed in intestinal biopsies, the serological tests, such as the detection of antibodies anti-gliadins, anti-tTG and anti-endomysium, represent methods of analyses cheaper and less invasive to the detection of the disease. According to John Kernohan, Director of York Nutritional Laboratories, This new rapid test is a great improvement over our original cdSCAN, which we introduced back in 2002. Individuals now have a even quicker, more convenient and reliable means to determine if Celiac Disease or gluten intolerance is the culprit behind their ill-health. The new and improved cdSCAN is able to analyze a tiny sample of whole blood, serum or plasma for IgA/IgG/IgM antibodies against human Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) and IgA antibodies against gliadin. The kit can be utilized in either the comfort of ones own home or at a doctors office, and the results are available in approximately 10 minutes. In addition to the approximate 1 million Americans suffering from classical Celiac Disease, there are an equal number of individuals with silent or latent Celiac Disease who are unaware of their condition because they do not have the signs and symptoms typically associated with celiac disease. These individuals run the risk of developing full-blown celiac disease later in life and complications such as bowel cancer, infertility and autoimmune diseases, making proper and early diagnosis very important. Information about the cdSCAN is available from York Nutritional Laboratories, Inc. Please contact John Kernohan at (888) 751-3388.