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Found 12 results

  1. Celiac.com 09/21/2018 - The English as a Second Language (ESL) pie is so large in countries such as South Korea that there seem to be enough helpings for anyone interested. However, these generous slices may be off limits to individuals with severe food allergies or intolerances, including those with celiac disease. If you have diet restrictions and are thinking of heading to South Korea or another Asian country, the following information will help you decide whether or not this move is a good idea. One might think that Asia, the land of rice-based meals, would be a celiac’s paradise. As one naïve dietician told me before I moved to Seoul, “You couldn’t be going to a better place.” This assumption could not be further from the truth. If cooked with traditional ingredients, many local dishes are gluten-free. However, in Korea, wheat flour is now cheaper than other kinds of flour, despite the fact that it has to be imported. Wheat flour and barley are currently the two most common ingredients in Korean food products. In Korea, eleven major food allergens must be included on product labels: poultry eggs, milk, buckwheat, peanuts, soybean, wheat, mackerel, crab, pork, peaches, and tomatoes. As for anything else, the Korean Food and Drug Administration states that only the five major ingredients in a product have to be labeled. Furthermore, a label need only include intentional ingredients, not things accidentally mixed into a product through cross-contamination. So you can say goodbye to warnings like: “this product may contain traces of peanuts.” Stricter labeling regulations will be put into effect in September 2006. However, these laws will remain less stringent than those in North America and Europe. According to a source at the KFDA, labeling restrictions are similar in Japan and more lax in China and South East Asia. One can easily learn Korean for “I’m allergic to ____” in any phrasebook or from a Korean coworker, friend, or even the guy in the next seat on your Korean Air flight. Yet it is the cultural barrier, not the language barrier, which poses the most difficulties for a celiac. Korean culture revolves around the sharing of food due to food shortages during the Japanese occupation; Koreans do not ask, “How are you?” but, “Have you had your meal?” Co-workers, friends, and even the occasional stranger will offer to share food. The politest way to refuse is by saying, “Thank you, but I can’t. I’m allergic.” Also, rather than saying you are allergic to something in Korean—allerugi—it is much more effective to say you cannot have it. (see the list of useful phrases). Unfortunately, even these statements are unlikely to be fully effective when eating Korean food. Many Koreans are completely unaware that frequently-used ingredients such as tashida soup flavouring and soybean powder contain wheat. Most Koreans I spoke with were shocked to hear that, as a celiac, I could not eat food which had so much as touched gluten. Generally, they assume that people with food allergies are still able to consume a product with a 1-2% trace of the allergen. Food allergies, celiac disease, vegetarianism, and other kinds of diet restrictions are rare in this country and are not taken very seriously. Furthermore, according to gastroenterologist Dr. Kim of Severance Hospital in Seoul, only two people were ever diagnosed with celiac disease in Korea. The world of North American restaurants, where servers cater to those with food allergies, food sensitivities, and plain old picky eaters, is very far away. Koreans generally order what is on the menu without making any special requests. Even Westerners who learn enough of the Korean language to explain their diets often end up being served something they asked specifically not to have. Furthermore, Korean food is not served on personal plates: everyone at the table reaches his or her chopsticks into the various communal dishes, causing cross-contamination. I was at a restaurant with some Korean friends and was trying to explain my gluten-intolerance to them, when one young man told me he was so sensitive to peaches that he could not so much as touch a peach without breaking out into a rash. Five minutes later I saw him eat a dish containing peach slices. This is the attitude of Koreans to food allergies—both theirs and yours. The gluten-free meal which is safest and easiest to find in Korea is samgyupsal. This dish features fatty, thick slices of pork cooked over a clean grill right at your table. Just make sure that all sauces are kept off the grill. Bibimbop is a rice, vegetable, and egg dish usually served with kochujang, a red pepper paste which unfortunately contains wheat. Bibimbop can be ordered, however, with the kochujang on the side. Most foreigners are in Korea to work rather than visit, and having an apartment provides the extra advantage of having one’s own cooking space. There are a few of us who have managed the gluten-free diet in Korea. However, it has not been easy. If you have celiac disease or food allergies and are thinking of moving to this part of the world, I can guarantee you that it will be a monumental challenge. Useful Korean phrases: Thank you, but I can’t. I’m allergic: kamsa hamnida man, allerugi issoyo. I cannot have barley, rye, or wheat: chonun pori hago homil hago mil motmuhgeyo. Barley: pori Wheat: mil Rye: homil Bibimbop with the red pepper paste on the side: bibimbop kochujang garu Grilled Pork: samgyupsal
  2. Celiac.com 09/01/2018 - Finding the best celiac-friendly products can be a challenge, but the hunt is about to get a whole lot easier thanks to a healthy food company that’s changing the way we shop for groceries. Thrive Market’s mission is simple: make healthy living and organic food accessible to everyone—regardless of where they live or how much they make. How do they do it? By offering organic, wholesome foods (including celiac and gluten-free options) and nontoxic home and body care products for less than what you’ll find in traditional retail stores—all delivered straight to your door. Here are just a few of the perks you can enjoy when you join: Everyday low prices: Shop trusted celiac-friendly brands like Simple Mills, Enjoy Life, Purely Elizabeth, The New Primal, Lundberg Farms, Country Life, Amy’s, Banza, Sir Kensington’s, and many more, at 25-50% off! Find exactly what you need: Thrive Market has done the work for you! It carries the top allergen-friendly and specialty brands, and the site and free app make it simple to find exactly what you need. Easily filter categories and dietary needs, like “gluten-free,” “certified gluten-free,” and “certified organic.” Shipped to your door: Skip lines at the grocery store, shop in the comfort of your home, and get everything delivered to your door. Eco-friendly packaging: All boxes and inserts are made from recycled paper and are recyclable. Thrive Market is 100% carbon-neutral and certified through carbonfund.org. Our certification covers national shipping, packaging materials, warehouse utilities, even the commutes of our team. Shop with a cause: Thrive Market believes by working together, it can make healthy food accessible for all. That’s why it started Thrive Gives, a program that provides grocery stipends, educational content, and free memberships to teachers, veterans, and low-income families. Its efforts are made possible by a dedicated team, partners, and committed Thrive Market members. For every paid Thrive Market member, we donate a free membership to a family in need! So, what are you waiting for? Get an extra 25% off your first purchase and a FREE 30 day trial. Simply click here!
  3. Celiac.com 07/31/2018 - Using funds from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Canada Research Chairs Program, researcher Charlene Elliott, PhD, of the Department of Communication, Media, and Film, University of Calgary recently set out to assess the nutritional quality of gluten-free products specifically marketed for children. For her assessment, Elliott bought child-targeted gluten-free food products from two major supermarket chains in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Elliott used the Pan American Health Organization Nutrient Profile Model to compare the nutritional quality of products labeled gluten-free with those not so labeled. A secondary analysis compared the nutritional profile of child-targeted gluten-free products to their non-gluten-free “equivalents.” Elliott’s analysis showed that child-targeted gluten-free products generally had lower amounts of sodium, total fat, and saturated fat, However, those same foods also had less protein and about the same amount of calories from sugar as child-targeted products without a gluten-free claim. According to the Pan American Health Organization criteria, both gluten-free products and "regular" products designed for children can be classified as having poor nutritional quality (88% vs 97%). Compared to their non-gluten-free equivalents, products with a gluten-free claim had similarly high sugar levels, (79% vs 81%). So, the big picture is that gluten-free supermarket foods targeted at children are generally less nutritious than their non-gluten-free counterparts, and both types have alarmingly high sugar content. A gluten-free label is no guarantee of healthier, more nutritious food for kids, and it’s a mistake for parents to buy gluten-free products believing they are healthier than their non-gluten-free equals. The evidence shows that is simply not true. The takeaway here seems to be that, gluten-free or not, supermarket foods aimed at children are generally poor in nutrition and loaded with sugar, and parents should choose wisely when buying food for their children. Source: Pediatrics, July 2018
  4. Celiac.com 07/10/2018 - As part of its 50th Anniversary activities, Celiac UK has launched a research fund and accompanying fundraising appeal to support new research and development. The fund has already received an injection of £500k from Innovate UK, in addition to £250k from the charity. Together, Coeliac UK and Innovate UK have opened applications for grants from the £750,000. Researchers and businesses can apply for a grants ranging from £50k to £250k for healthcare diagnostics, digital self-care tools and better gluten free food production. Food businesses can receive grants by developing more nutritious and affordable gluten free food, by using new ingredients, improving nutritional value, flavor and/or texture, and creating better methods of preservation. The three main goals of the program are: To improve celiac disease diagnostics; to improve the quality of gluten-free foods, and to promote digitally supported self-care for people with celiac disease. The matching industry funds will bring spending for new research on the growing global gluten-free foods market to nearly £1m. Ultimately, Coeliac UK is looking to raise £5 million to improve understanding and treatment of celiac disease and gluten related autoimmune conditions. Sarah Sleet, Chief Executive of Coeliac UK said: “With the global diagnosis for coeliac disease increasing year on year, this is a chance for UK business and researchers to get ahead and develop competitive advantages in innovation which will be of benefit to a badly underserved patient group. Read more at: NewFoodMagazine.com
  5. Celiac.com 06/04/2018 - Rates of contamination in commercial food advertised as gluten-free are improving, but nearly one in ten still show unacceptable levels of gluten. As part of a government mandated food sampling program, the city of Melbourne, Australia recently conducted a survey of 127 food businesses advertising gluten-free options. For the tests, government officers conduct unannounced site visits and take a sample of at least one food item declared to be gluten-free. Ridascreen Gliadin R5 ELISA analysis showed that 14 of 158 samples (9%) contained detectable gluten in excess of the official Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) definition of gluten-free. Nine of the 14 samples (6% overall) registered gluten above 20 parts per million, which exceeds the official threshold for foods labeled gluten-free in Europe and the United States. At one business, food labeled gluten-free registered above 80 ppm, even though they were asked directly for a gluten-free sample. These findings confirm the lack of understanding reported by many people with celiac disease. The good news is that rates of gluten non-compliance has improved over earlier audits, from 20% of samples in 2014 to 15% of samples in 2015. The survey team notes that one-third of the businesses in this study had previously been audited) and education seems to be paying off. In one burger chain alone, four of five venues which were non-compliant in 2014, were fully compliant in 2015 and 2016. The survey results showed that businesses that provided gluten-free training for staff showed 75% better odds of compliance. The overall good news here is that gluten-free compliance in commercial food businesses has improved steadily since the first surveys in 2014. One in ten odds of getting gluten contamination from food labeled gluten-free is still to high, but even though there is room for improvement more and more businesses are providing gluten-free training for their staff, and those that do are reaping benefits. Look for this trend to continue as more businesses offer training, gluten-free and celiac disease awareness increases, and more consumers demand safe gluten-free foods. Read more at: The Medical Journal of Australia
  6. Celiac.com Sponsor: Banner

    Autism and Gluten. How it Became My Business

    Celiac.com 05/03/2018 - My son Jackson was diagnosed with autism at the age of 3 years. There was no scientific evidence to link autism to gluten allergy or intolerance. However, there was anecdotal evidence. If it can't hurt, but can help I'm in! Dairy free: Result: Immediate and noticeable changes. Just a few days. Hooked! Gluten removal. Result: More immediate positive changes. Less than 1 week. Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) No Gluten! -dairy free version Result: Profound and continual improvement throughout diet when done strictly. There are regression phases within the first year of the diet across the spectrum. When the diet was relaxed after several years no regression occurred. Healing Home Foods was born from the creations made to feed Jackson and improve his health. There is no turning back. Our products are Certified Gluten Free and Vegan. No GMO's or questionable ingredients. Please email if you are interested in further details about our experience. Shelley@healinghomefoods.com. Visit our site and use coupon code: Celiac05 For a 10 % discount. Free shipping over $40. For more info visit our site.
  7. Celiac.com 04/27/2018 - The latest market research shows that the gluten-free food boom is being driven by people looking to improve their diets with healthier, more nutritious food, rather than concerns about gluten intolerance or celiac disease. A recent survey showed that gluten-free items were the top bakery choice for consumers. That news led DuPont Nutrition & Health to begin trials in its bakery center in an effort to improve their product offerings. The company said in a news release that the trend was driven by people looking to improve their diets with healthier food, rather than concerns about gluten intolerance or celiac disease. Additionally, consumers are looking for better quality and wider availability in their favorite specialty foods. Even though just under 1% of the population avoids gluten due to celiac disease, more than 10% of people in Italy and the U.K. choose gluten-free products, while in France and Spain, about 8% of consumers choose gluten-free. Obviously, these numbers greatly exceed the number of people with celiac disease, and that is part of the power driving the rapid expansion of gluten-free products. According to DuPont’s reading of the Mintel study data shows “untapped potential for bakers to develop more and better-quality products with extra nutritional benefits,” including products that are high in fiber, devoid of added preservatives, and low in saturated fats, carbohydrates and calories. These numbers help to dispel the idea that the gluten-free food explosion is simply a passing fad. In any case, building an association between good nutrition and gluten-free bakery products can only help food makers with global consumers who are actively seeking one. Read more at: fooddive.com
  8. Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers. "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims. Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods. The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods. Source: fdfworld.com
  9. Celiac.com 03/30/2018 - The latest Gluten-Free Food Market Report offers a comprehensive global market evaluation, including enabling technologies, key trends, market drivers, challenges, standardization, regulatory landscape, opportunities, future road map, value chain, ecosystem player profiles and strategies. The report also includes global gluten-free investment forecasts from 2017 to 2022. The report covers top gluten-free manufacturers, including General Mills, Hain Celestial Group, Dr. Schar, Freedom Foods, Gruma, Kellogg, Kraft Heinz, Doves Farm, Amy’s Kitchen, Blue Diamond Growers, Enjoy Life Foods, Boulder Brands, and Bob’s Red Mill. The report focuses on the global market for gluten-free food products, especially in North America, China, Europe, Southeast Asia, Japan, India. The report is divided into sections based on manufacturers, regions, type and application, and covers the categories of bakery, confectionery, cereals and snacks. It is targeted at supermarkets and hypermarkets, convenience stores, speciality stores, online retailers, other relevant retailers. The report offers analyses of the global Gluten-Free Food market and its commercial landscape, along with insights into the Gluten-Free Food production processes, major issues, and solutions that may help manufacturers to mitigate product development risk. It is designed to provide readers with a comprehensive understanding of the most relevant forces driving and restraining the gluten-free food market and their projected impact. Readers of the report will gain potentially valuable information about the market strategies being embraced by major gluten-free businesses, along with projected directions in the gluten-free food market. Anyone curious about the report may request a sample.
  10. Celiac.com 11/24/2017 - Do you have an emergency survival kit at home should disaster strike? Does that include drinking water and gluten-free provisions for at least a few days? The fallout from the latest string of disasters still looms over parts of America; over Houston, Florida and neighboring states devastated by Hurricanes and by resulting floods; and over northern California communities devastated by wildfires. That got us thinking about emergency kits. Gluten-Free-free emergency kits, to be precise. What's in Your Emergency Gluten-Free Food Kit? This list is by no means authoritative or final. In fact, we are inviting you to share any favorites or ideas you may have for your own emergency kit. Your Gluten-free Emergency Kit should include the following: Water: You'll need a minimum of 3 days worth of drinking water for ever person. This includes water for cooking and other non-drinking uses. When it comes to water, it never hurts to have more than you need, so consider stocking even more than a 3 day supply. Food: When assembling a survival kit, you want to put together a kit that will feed each family member family 2 cups of prepared meals 3 times a day. Canned foods like black beans are essential. Any of the following food items are good to have in your kit: Rice, Quinoa and Other Gluten-free Grains: Organic grains like rice and quinoa make great additions to an emergency kit. Be sure to soak your grains before you cook them. If you're on a grain-free diet, quinoa works well, if you can tolerate it. Dried Potatoes: Dried potato flakes can be used to make mashed potatoes. Pasta: Gluten-free pasta are good additions to any emergency kit. Gluten-free Crackers or other snacks: Gluten-free crackers can be part of a no-cook meal, especially when combined with canned tuna or other fish. Canned Pasta Sauces: If you're stocking gluten-free pasta, then be sure to stock your favorite pasta sauce. Pomí makes a boxed pasta sauce that packs easily for emergency storage. There are a number of canned pasta sauces on the market, so stock whatever you like. Canned and Dried Meats: Jerky, Spam, Dried Salami, and Canned Tuna or other Fish make excellent additions to any emergency kit. Homemade jerky can be kept in an air-tight container for about a year. It's a great source of protein, and a great no-cook snack with options like beef, bison, pork, turkey and salmon. Spices and Gluten-free Bouillon cubes or packets: Since you may be making things like rice, or quinoa, or other things that may need some spices to lively them up, spices are a smart addition to your emergency kit. Make sure yours are gluten-free. Keep your kit in a cool, dry place that can be reached in an emergency. Consider building your kit around a printed menu that can be prepared with the items you have stocked. Remember, since gas and electric may not be functioning in an emergency, you may not have full cooking facilities, so plan meals that you can make with minimal preparation and fuss. Want someone to make your emergency kit for you? Check out https://www.emergencykits.com/emergency-food/gluten-free.
  11. Celiac.com 09/06/2017 - Gluten-free food is now so mainstream that its lack of gluten is no longer a highlight, but is now just another of the many ways manufacturers signal a healthy product. Gluten-free has gone from specialty niche to mainstream, says David Sprinkle, research director of the market research firm Packaged Facts. "Where once upon a time a package might have had a singular fat-free or no-sugar-added label, it is now common to see packages that carry a host of tags such as certified organic, non-GMO, gluten-free, no antibiotics ever, no artificial preservatives, cage-free and more," says Sprinkle. Gluten-free tag is now just one of many "free-from" tags that help to lure consumers. That sentiment is shared by Kara Nielsen, sales and engagement manager at U.S.A., for Dutch company Innova Market Insights. Nielson says that Innova's data from "both global product launches and consumer surveys show that gluten-free is not going away, but rather found a place in the mainstream." So a market once dedicated to people with medical issues has now become a market for consumers who see avoiding gluten as a lifestyle choice. As that has happened, gluten-free has become part of that mix instead of being a focal point. This has in turn driven an evolution towards more healthy ingredients, and healthier overall profiles for many gluten-free foods. "The gluten-free trend is evolving in bakery products to feature more high-fiber and high-protein ancient grains and seeds, including buckwheat, teff and chia seeds, as well as gluten-free oats," Ms. Nielsen said. For consumers who have celiac disease or gluten intolerance, this can require more diligence in their shopping. They can't necessarily trust a gluten-free label without proper scrutiny. There are more than a few tricky labels out there. Some products that appear to be gluten-free may not meet FDA standards. The upside is a flood of new gluten-free products that are not only safe for people with celiac disease, but markedly healthier than gluten-free products of the past. Source: foodbusinessnews.net
  12. Attached please find a Kroger food list that I found with products that do not contain gluten. It looks like it is updated as of 5/14. https://www.kroger.com/asset/5388bc7f84ae8f9154615adf?data=1 Let me know if there are any brands listed that may cause problems. Cleaning out the kitchen pantry tonight. (The list can be updated online by region - Gluten free product list at Kroger.com (70 pages). Thanks,
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