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Found 2,265 results

  1. Celiac.com 10/17/2018 - In the interviews I conducted last year, the Celiac.com viewers shared with me some disturbing stories about how others either sabotaged their gluten-free diet or how their gluten-free requirements are continually scrutinized and doubted. Here are a few examples: A co-worker at my office ate a gluten-containing burrito and thought it would be funny to cross-contaminate my work space. With his gluten-coated hands, he touched my phone, desk, pencils, pens, etc. while I was not at my desk. I came back and was contaminated. I had to take several days off of work from being so sick. The waiter at a restaurant where I was eating dinner asked me if I was really “a celiac” or if I was avoiding gluten as a “fad dieter.” He told me the food was gluten-free when he served it, only to come up to me after I ate the dinner and admit there was “a little” gluten in it. My cleaning people were eating Lorna Doones (gluten-containing cookies) while cleaning my gluten-free kitchen, cross-contaminating literally everything in it. When I noticed I exclaimed, “I am allergic to gluten, please put your cookies in this plastic bag and wash your hands.” They chided, “You have insulted our food. We are hungry and we will eat anything we want to, when we want to.” At a family dinner, Aunt Suzie insisted that I try her special holiday fruit bread. In front of everyone around the table, she brushed off my protests and insisted that I over exaggerated my food sensitivities saying, “a little bit wouldn’t hurt you.” These are but a few of an exhaustive list of situations that we regularly contend with. What can possibly be the rationale for any of this conduct? I’m providing some recent headlines that may impact the attitudes of those we interact with and would like to hear what you think influence this behavior (see questions below). Recently, the New York Times published an article entitled, “The Myth of Big, Bad Gluten.” The title alone casts doubt on the severity of gluten exposure for those with CD (Myth, 2015) In his political campaign, Senator Ted Cruz stated that if elected President, he would not provide gluten-free meals to the military, in order to direct spending toward combat fortification (Wellness, 2/18/16). Business Insider.com called Tom Brady’s gluten, dairy free diet “insane” (Brady, 2017). Michael Pollen is quoted as saying that the gluten-free diet was “social contagion.” Further, he says, “There are a lot of people that hear from their friends, ‘I got off gluten and I sleep better, the sex is better, and I’m happier,’ and then they try it and they feel better too. [It’s] the power of suggestion” (Pollan, 2014). Jimmy Kimmel said, “Some people can’t eat gluten for medical reasons… that I get. It annoys me, but that I get,” and proceeded to interview people following a gluten-free diet, asking them “what is gluten.” Most interviewed did not know what gluten is. (ABC News, 2018). Do headlines like this enable others to malign those of us making our dietary needs known? Do these esteemed people talking about gluten cast doubt on what we need to survive? Humans are highly influenced by others when it comes to social eating behavior. Higgs (2015) asserts that people follow “eating norms” (p. 39) in order to be liked. Roth, et al. (2000) found that people consumed similar amounts of food when eating together. Batista and Lima (2013) discovered that people consumed more nutritious food when eating with strangers than when eating with familiar associates. These studies indicate that we are hypersensitive of what others think about what we eat. One can surmise that celebrity quips could also influence food-related behaviors. Part of solving a social problem is identifying the root cause of it, so please weigh in by answering the following questions: How do you handle scrutiny or sabotage of others toward your dietary requirements? Please speculate on what cultural, religious or media influences you suppose contribute to a rationalization for the sabotage and/or scrutiny from others when we state we are observing a gluten-free diet? Are people emulating something they heard in church, seen on TV, or read online? We welcome your answers below. References: ABC. (2018). Retrived from https://abcnews.go.com/Health/video/jimmy-kimmel-asks-what-is-gluten-23655461 Batista, M. T., Lima. M. L. (2013). Who’s eating what with me? Indirect social influence on ambivalent food consumption. Psicologia: Reflexano e Critica, 26(1), 113-121. Brady. (2017). Retrieved from https://www.businessinsider.com/tom-brady-gisele-bundchen-have-an-insane-diet-2017-2 Higgs, S. (2015). Social norms and their influence on eating behaviors. Appetite 86, 38-44. Myth. (2015). Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/05/opinion/sunday/the-myth-of-big-bad-gluten.html Pollan, M. (2014). Retrieved from https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/14/michael-pollan-gluten-free_n_5319357.html Roth, D. A., Herman, C. P., Polivy, J., & Pliner, P. (2000). Self-presentational conflict in social eating situations: A normative perspective. Appetite, 26, 165-171. Wellness. (2016). Retrieved from https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/ted-cruz-gluten-free-military-political-corectness_us_56c606c3e4b08ffac127f09f
  2. Celiac.com 10/16/2018 - Apparently, local St. Louis radio station Z1077 hosts a show called “Dirty Little Secret.” Recently, a woman caller to the show drew ire from listeners after she claimed that she worked at a local bakery, and that she routinely lied to customers about the gluten-free status of baked goods. The woman said she often told customers that there was no gluten in baked goods that were not gluten-free, according to local tv station KTVI. Apparently the woman thought this was funny. However, for people who cannot eat gluten because they have celiac disease, telling people that food is gluten-free when it is not is about as funny as telling a diabetic that food is sugar-free when it is not. Now, of course, eating gluten is not as immediately dangerous for most celiacs as sugar is for diabetics, but the basic analogy holds. That’s because many people with celiac disease suffer horrible symptoms when they accidentally eat gluten, including extreme intestinal pain, bloating, diarrhea, and other problems. Some people experience more extreme reactions that leave them in emergency rooms. As part of a story on the “joke” segment, KTVI interviewed celiac sufferer Dana Smith, who found the punchline to be less than funny. “It’s absolutely dangerous, somebody could get very sick,” said Smith. KTVI also interviewed at least one doctor, Dr. Reuben Aymerich of SSM St. Clare Hospital, who pointed out that, while celiac disease is “not like diabetes where you can reduce the amount of sugar intake and make up for it later, it’s thought you need to be 100 percent compliant if you can.” For her part, Smith sought to use the incident as a teaching moment. She alerted the folks at Z1077 and tried to point out how serious being gluten-free is for many people. Mary Michaels, owner of Gluten Free at Last Bakery in Maryville, Illinois, says it’s time people became more respectful. “I wouldn’t make fun of you if you had diabetes or a heart condition it’s kind of like that,” Michals said. We will likely never know if the radio station caller was telling the truth, or just putting listeners on. The Z1077 morning team did post a follow-up comment, which stated that they take celiac disease seriously, and that they did not intend to offend anyone. One host said his mom has celiac disease. It’s good to see a positive response from the radio station. Their prank was short-sighted, and the caller deserved to be called out on her poor behavior. Hopefully, they have learned their lesson and will avoid such foolishness in the future. Let us know your thoughts below.
  3. Celiac.com 10/15/2018 - If you’re on a gluten-free diet for medical reasons, then you’re probably already cautious about eating out. A new study tells us exactly why people with celiac disease and other gluten-sensitive conditions have reason to be very careful about eating out. According to the latest research, one in three foods sold as "gluten-free" in U.S. restaurants actually contain trace levels of gluten. This is partly due to the fact that the gluten-free diet has become popular with many non-celiacs and others who have no medical need for the diet. That has led many restaurants to offer gluten-free foods to their customers, says study author Dr. Benjamin Lebwohl, of Columbia University's Celiac Disease Center. But, if this research is any indication, too many restaurants don’t do a good job with gluten-free. For the study, more than 800 investigators set out to assess the true gluten content of dishes listed as "gluten-free" on menus. Armed with portable gluten sensors, they tested for gluten levels that met or exceeded 20 parts per million, the standard cutoff for any gluten-free claim. Based on more than 5,600 gluten tests over 18 months, the investigators determined that 27 percent of gluten-free breakfast meals actually contained gluten. At dinner time, this figure hit 34 percent. The rise could reflect a steady increase in gluten contamination risk as the day unfolds, the researchers said. Off course, the risk is not all equal. Some restaurants are riskier than others. Unsurprisingly, the biggest culprit seems to be restaurants that offer gluten-free pastas and pizzas. Nearly half of the pizza and pasta dishes from those establishments contained gluten, according to the study. Why is that? Well, as most folks with celiac disease know all too well, kitchens aren’t really set up to segregate gluten, and "sharing an oven with gluten-containing pizza is a prime setting for cross-contamination," says Lebwohl. Also, too many restaurants use the same water to cook gluten-free pasta as they do for regular pasta, which contaminates the gluten-free pasta and defeats the purpose. Moreover, although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates gluten-free labels on packaged food products, there is currently no federal oversight of gluten-free claims in restaurants. The results of the study will be presented today at a meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, in Philadelphia. Research presented at meetings is usually considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. In the absence of federal enforcement at the restaurant level, the burden for making sure food is gluten-free falls to the person doing the ordering. So, gluten-free eaters beware! These results are probably not surprising to many of you. Do you have celiac disease? Do you eat in restaurants? Do you avoid restaurants? Do you have special tactics? Feel free to share your thoughts below. Read more at UPI.com
  4. Celiac.com 06/29/2018 - Warning! If you crave the taste of "real" bread, this gluten free bread may be addictive. No rice flour here. This totally satisfying, wholesome, nutritious, hearty gluten free bread exudes the robust taste and firm, springy texture of rye bread. It really, really tastes like REAL bread, no exaggeration. The bread is absolutely delicious toasted or untoasted, keeps fresh for over 2 weeks in the refrigerator, and does not tear, sink in the center, dry out or crumble. This incredible 4 inch tall loaf can even be sliced nearly paper thin and still hold together. It is vegan, free of soy, corn, wheat, gluten, nuts, dairy, or eggs. Add caraway seeds and you'll want to break out the mustard, pickles, and coleslaw. It makes the perfect deli bread. Want pizza? Toasted slices of this bread make great pizza crusts for quick and easy gluten free mini pizzas. Even those not on a gluten free diet will find this bread utterly irresistible. A Quest Begins This outstanding GF bread is the result of a years long quest for the perfect GF bread recipe. It began with the classic GF bread recipe of rice flour, tapioca starch, corn or potato starch, powdered dry milk, eggs, oil, sugar, salt, xanthan gum, yeast and water. It later evolved to include bean flours. These early GF bread recipes, mostly starch and "empty" calories, simply tasted horrible and left a bitter aftertaste. Rice flour, bean flours and corn starch were quickly eliminated. After scientific studies concluded oats were gluten free and safe (except for possible wheat contamination), oat flour became a central ingredient. Starches were limited to no more than one third of the flour mix. Mashed banana, apple sauce, pumpkin puree, and yogurt were added to increase bread height and volume. Oat flour was blended with flour from other seeds and grains, including sorghum, millet, amaranth, quinoa, and buckwheat. A blend of oat and sorghum flour, tapioca and potato starch, mashed banana and low fat vanilla yogurt became standard GF bread recipe ingredients. Einkorn Einkorn an ancient form of wheat, was separately investigated. At that time, einkorn was considered potentially safe for celiacs. Samples of einkorn were obtained from Prime Grains [1] in Saskatchewan, Canada. Einkorn flour was found to have most of same height, volume, and sinking in the center problems as with any other gluten free flour blend in creating a GF bread. Einkorn bread, however, does not require the addition of starches. An oat/einkorn bread recipe similar to an oat/sorghum recipe minus the starches was created, but it became necessary to end the einkorn investigation when new research on einkorn came out showing that einkorn does contain gluten epitopes potentially harmful to celiacs. However, gluten content in einkorn is very low. The investigation produced no ill effects from consuming einkorn. Those with gluten sensitivity rather than celiac disease may well tolerate einkorn with no problems. Flaxseed Along with the Prime Grains einkorn samples sent from Saskatchewan, samples of golden and brown flaxseed were also sent. Using a coffee grinder to grind the flaxseed, the ground flaxseed was steeped in near-boiling water and used as egg replacer in GF bread recipes. The steeping releases mucilage from the outer coating of flaxseed to create a thick, slimy emulsion. Flaxseed mucilage seems to have a synergy with beta glucan in oats, a soluble fiber, forming a hydrocolloid combination that increases bread volume. When the Prime Grains flaxseed ran out, flaxseed was locally purchased. It was immediately noticed locally purchased flaxseed produced a much thinner emulsion than did the Prime Grains flaxseed. The local flaxseed had a much lower mucilage content. GF bread made with the local flaxseed had less volume and height and more sinking in the center than the Prime Grains flaxseed. Were it not for the flaxseed samples sent with the einkorn, the great variation in mucilage content in different varieties of flaxseed grown in different localities would have been missed. Little information is available on the mucilage content of flaxseed grown in North America. One study was found [2,3,4]. Prime Grains flaxseed is currently distributed through Farmer Direct Co-op [5] in Regina, Saskatchewan. High mucilage Farmer Direct Co-op flaxseed has been available from Whole Foods in the bulk foods section. Amazon's recent Whole Foods purchase may change that as bulk bin labels no longer state "Farmer Direct", only that it originates from Canada. However, the issue of high mucilage versus low mucilage flaxseed may be moot. The reason is buckwheat. Buckwheat, like flaxseed, also releases mucilage. It turns out buckwheat mucilage also increases bread height and volume, and, when used together with flaxseed, high mucilage flaxseed has no more effect on bread height and volume than lower mucilage flaxseed. More on buckwheat later. Deep Loaf Pans GF breads containing eggs and mostly starch can achieve high height and volume without collapsing using an ordinary loaf pan. But to achieve a full 4 inch loaf height using flaxseed as egg replacer and a low starch content requires a loaf pan with high sides. The deepest loaf pans available are 4 inch deep pullman loaf pans. Ideally a pan deeper than 4 inches is desired because GF breads tend to rise above the loaf pan and then fall during baking. Additionally, during baking, the loaf shrinks and pulls away from the pan side walls, more at the top than the bottom, resulting in a loaf narrowing toward the top rather than straight sides. Ideally the the sides of the loaf pan should taper so the bottom is narrower than the top. This cancels out the narrowing of the loaf at the top creating a finished loaf with straight sides. A small batch of 4-1/2 inch depth by 4-1/4 inch width by 8-1/2 inch and 13 inch length tapered heavy duty 16 gauge solid aluminum loaf pans were custom made by a USA baking pan manufacturer for this author to sell online. These long-life, heavy duty pans were ideal, but, unfortunately, high cost and price made for underwhelming online sales. The website was shut down years ago. However, a cheaper 13 inch long by 4 inch width by 4 inch depth aluminum-coated, folded thin steel pullman loaf pan should be adequate for the recipe which later follows. The cover is not needed. The following pans are suggested: USA Pan 13x4x4 Large Pullman Loaf Pan & Cover 1160PM-1 [6] or Chicago Metallic 44615 Pullman pan,single 13x4x4 [7]. Xanthan Gum and Konjac Glucomannan In the early development of oat and einkorn bread recipes, xanthan gum caused some problems. The use of xanthan gum alone often produced strange odd loaf shapes with concave sides. In one case an extra added teaspoon of xanthan gum caused the loaf to balloon well above the 4-1/2 inch deep loaf pan. When done, the sides of the loaf were sucked inwards and a cross section of loaf had the appearance of a giant mushroom. Konjac glucomannan powder [8] was then investigated. Konjac glucomannan is a natural, odorless soluble fiber that is found in the konjac plant and is the most viscous hydrocolloid available. Konjac used by itself produces a very firm loaf and restricts the bread height and volume. Xanthan gum produces a softer, more elastic bread. Konjac used together with xanthan gum have a synergy which allows the firmness of bread to be adjusted depending on their ratio and amounts. Konjac also "tames" xanthan gum so that the loaf has straight sides instead of turning into a mushroom. For a long time, 1-1/2 teaspoons each of konjac powder and xanthan gum, a one to one ratio, was used in the standard GF bread recipe. But this ratio and amount always resulted in at least some sinking in the center of the loaf. Recalling that additional xanthan gum creates a "mushroom" effect which results in a rounded top, the ratio was changed to 3 teaspoons of xanthan gum and 1 teaspoon konjac powder. This worked, resulting in a loaf with a slightly rounded or flat top, no longer sinking in the center. Psyllium husk was never tried as it generally decreases bread volume and height, not the desired effect [9]. Attempts That Did Not Work For years a standard GF bread recipe consisting of oat flour, sorghum flour, tapioca starch, potato starch, flaxseed, banana, low fat vanilla yogurt, molasses, sugar, canola margarine, cinnamon, ginger, salt, yeast, xanthan gum, konjac powder, apple cider vinegar, and water became standard daily fare. This recipe provided an acceptable GF bread, but was by no means perfect. It tended to crumble, required delicate handling, sank in the center, and had less volume and height than desired. It was not vegan or dairy free, and its taste could stand improvement. Deciding it was time for a change, numerous attempts to fix these short-comings were made. The attempts that failed included using citrus pectin, sugar beet fiber, gum arabic, and aquafaba (liquid from cooked chickpeas). High methoxyl citrus pectin did succeed in increasing height and volume and reducing crumbling, but its strong, bitter taste made it totally unacceptable. Choosing the Best GF Starches - Arrowroot and Potato Starch: Yes - Tapioca: No After the previous failures, investigations focused on how choice of starch affects GF bread volume. One especially interesting published research paper looked at GF breads made using a single starch in place of flour [10]. The study compared breads made with wheat, potato, tapioca, corn, and rice starch. Only wheat and potato starch produced any real bread structure. Corn starch had some bread structure. Tapioca and rice starch produced structures too far gone to be fully analyzed in the study. Tapioca starch produced a shapeless blob. Rice starch produced a crust circling a large empty center. The study revealed that potato starch would be the best GF starch for achieving greater volume and preventing sinking in the center. Unfortunately, the study did not look at arrowroot starch which later was found to be superior to tapioca starch. The standard oat/sorghum GF bread recipe used equal amounts of potato and tapioca starch. Two baking tests with these starches were performed using the standard GF bread recipe. One test used 3 parts potato to 1 part tapioca starch and the other test used 1 part potato to 3 parts tapioca starch. The test favoring potato starch produced a higher volume and height bread with reduced center sinking, as expected. The test favoring tapioca starch resulted in a drop in volume and height with increased center sinking. Potato starch has a bland, supposedly neutral taste. In the test favoring potato starch the "bland" taste dominated the entire taste of the bread covering up the taste of all other ingredients including molasses, spices, and banana, oats and sorghum, a totally unacceptable result. In the test favoring tapioca starch, a slight off taste was noted, but, worse, when toasted, the tapioca caused increased burning of the crust resulting in a bitter crust taste. It was concluded one should not make excessive use of potato starch and that tapioca starch may not be the best choice for a starch. This led to arrowroot starch as the next subject for investigation. Arrowroot and tapioca starches appear to be very similar. They definitely are not. Two baking tests were performed with arrowroot and potato starch. One test used 3 parts arrowroot to 1 part potato starch and the other test used equal parts of arrowroot and potato starch. In the test favoring arrowroot starch, the bread did not sink in the center or lose as much volume as when tapioca starch was favored. When toasted, the crust did not burn as with tapioca starch or produce any bitterness. Arrowroot starch also had no off taste as with tapioca starch. In the test with equal parts arrowroot and potato starch, there was a slight improvement in volume and less center sinking than with tapioca and potato starch at equal parts. The conclusion was that arrowroot starch is a superior choice over tapioca starch. Arrowroot may cost more than tapioca starch, but arrowroot starch now replaces tapioca starch as the preferred choice for a perfect GF bread recipe. Arrowroot starch can be found online in bulk at reasonable prices. Buckwheat - The Key to Volume, Height, Amazing Taste and a Bread That Does Not Sink or Crumble Still seeking the key to increasing bread volume and height, the world wide web was scoured for ideas. Intrigued by the impressive volume and height of GF breads made with buckwheat and rice flours by Strange Grains Gluten Free Bakery [11] in Perth, Australia, the question was asked, "Could buckwheat be the key?" Buckwheat had previously been rejected from consideration in the course of earlier oat bread recipe development due to a strong, unpleasant bitter taste. It turns out however, toasted buckwheat groats (kasha) were unknowingly used in that earlier trial years ago, a very bad and unfortunate choice. The world wide web provides many learning opportunities, one being that buckwheat flour does not have to taste awful. Buckwheat flour can be ground from three different forms of buckwheat, each having a completely different taste. The three forms are: 1) whole unhulled buckwheat; 2) raw dehulled buckwheat or buckwheat groats; 3) toasted buckwheat groats or kasha. The familiar earthy slightly bitter taste comes from the buckwheat hulls. In fact, some whole buckwheat flour contains added ground hulls for a stronger earthy flavor. The hulls create a greyish colored flour. Buckwheat groats are dehulled buckwheat seeds. Dehulling removes the source of the familiar earthy flavor. Flour from raw buckwheat groats has a creamy white color and a very mild sourdough rye flavor acceptable to just about everybody except for those who really miss having that earthy buckwheat hull flavor. Kasha or toasted buckwheat groats, on the other hand, has an extremely strong taste and odor that is popular in some cultures, but absolutely repulsive to most people. Kasha has a taste slightly suggestive of rye on the plus side but an odor strongly reminiscent of rotting food waste on the minus side. Kasha can easily be made by stirring raw buckwheat groats in a pan on medium heat for about 5 minutes until evenly brown and "fragrant". If the "fragrance" drives you out of your house into a freezing snowstorm, then you probably won't like kasha. Actually, after about a week of storage in a plastic bag in the refrigerator, the odor of rotting waste in bread made with kasha flour dissipates leaving the desirable sourdough rye flavor. Buckwheat flour can easily be made by grinding groats or whole buckwheat in a coffee grinder. Raw buckwheat groat flour is not readily available, especially gluten free certified flour, so a coffee grinder is needed. Gluten free whole buckwheat and raw buckwheat groats are readily available. Bob's Red Mill whole buckwheat flour is NOT certified gluten free (its groats are) but Anthony's Goods has certified gluten free whole buckwheat flour. Whole Foods has raw buckwheat groats in the bulk section at a very reasonable price. Bulk raw buckwheat groats are available online at reasonable prices. To test if buckwheat was the key to a perfect GF bread, a blend of one cup each of buckwheat, oat, and sorghum flours together with 2/3 cup each of potato and arrowroot starches went into the bread dough for the baking test. The buckwheat flour made the dough much more workable and elastic. Into to oven it went. The result? Success! Buckwheat indeed proved to be the missing key. The bread volume and height increased, reaching just over 4 inches tall. The use of 3 teaspoons xanthan gum and 1 teaspoon konjac powder contributed to a loaf with a slightly rounded top and absolutely no sinking in the center. The bread did not crumble. The rye-like taste was amazing. Why did buckwheat work? Buckwheat, like flaxseed, contains mucilage, and that slimy fiber likely gives buckwheat flour its high viscosity and unique baking properties [12]. Making GF Bread Dairy Free The final challenge was making the GF bread recipe vegan and dairy free. Low fat vanilla yogurt had been used to increase bread volume and protein. A substitute was needed. The latest trend in protein supplements is yellow pea isolate [13,14]. Yellow pea's protein amino acid profile compares favorably to that of dairy whey although it is not a totally complete protein. One study determined yellow pea protein added to GF bread had the highest level of sensory perception consumer acceptance compared to other proteins added to GF bread [15]. Yellow pea protein has also been used as the basis for a dairy free milk made by Ripple Foods [16]. Yellow pea protein is available from a number sources including Anthony's Goods, Bob's Red Mill, and Bulk Food Supplements. For the new GF bread vegan recipe, 2/3 cup of low fat vanilla yogurt was replaced with 1/4 cup yellow pea protein isolate powder plus 5 oz water. Yellow pea is a legume. If you have allergies to soy or peanuts (also legumes) use with caution, though yellow pea is considered to be much less likely to be an allergen. The yellow pea protein powder can be omitted with little effect on the overall GF bread recipe. Just replace it with another heaping tablespoon each of buckwheat, oat and, sorghum flours to maintain bread volume. Another vegan consideration is choice of oil. Canola oil, olive oil, coconut oil or a vegan buttery flavored spread like Smart Choice Original or Earth Balance Soy Free can be used. Smart Choice Original and Earth Balance Soy Free use yellow pea protein in place of dairy whey and sunflower lecithin in place of soy lecithin. Molasses or Maple Syrup? Molasses is used in the standard GF bread recipe to achieve a satisfying robust rye flavor. For an alternative subtle, delicate, sweet maple taste, grade A very dark and strong flavor maple syrup can be used in place of the molasses and granulated sugar. Pure maple syrup is a very pricey ingredient. The subtle change in taste using maple syrup may not really be worth the syrup's high cost, but the option is included in the recipe below, nonetheless. Maple syrup is sold in four grades: grade A golden color and delicate taste; grade A amber color and rich flavor; grade A dark color and robust flavor; and grade A very dark and strong flavor. Only use grade A very dark and strong flavor maple syrup for baking. The maple flavor of lighter shades of maple syrup is too weak to be tasted when used in most baked goods. The money spent using lighter shades of pricey maple syrup will only be wasted. Grade A very dark and strong flavor maple syrup is mostly used for cooking and not available in most grocery stores. It is readily available online and direct from maple syrup farms. Shipping from the east coast to the west coast may cost more than the maple syrup itself. Try to find an online deal with free shipping. RECIPES Oat-Sorghum-Buckwheat-Banana-Flaxseed GF Bread This recipe produces a 56 ounce (1.588 kg) gluten free bread loaf yielding 28 slices 7/16 inch (11.11 mm) thick. Preparation time is about 2 hours 15 minutes. Baking time is 1 hour 40 minutes. Kitchen Essentials: Coffee grinder (preferably burr-type) Electric mixer (preferably a stand mixer) Mixing bowl Pullman loaf pan, 13 inch x 4 inch x 4 inch (33.02 cm x 10.16 cm x 10.16 cm) Lidded 2 quart/liter (or larger) plastic food container Quart/liter glass or plastic measuring cups (2) 5 ounce (150 ml) glass measuring cup Potato/banana masher, ricer or food processor Hard rubber bowl scraper, specifically Rubbermaid FG1901000000 Scraper 9-1/2 inch 1 inch pastry brush A good set of stainless steel measuring cups and spoons 10 inch x 14 inch (25.4 cm x 35.56 cm) plastic food storage bags with twist ties Cooling rack Dry Ingredients: 1 cup (240 ml) oat flour 1 cup (240 ml) sorghum flour 1 cup (240 ml) buckwheat flour milled from raw dehulled buckwheat groats 2/3 cup (160 ml) potato starch 2/3 cup (160 ml) arrowroot starch ~3/4 cup (180 ml) (approx.) milled flaxseed freshly ground from 1/2 cup (120 ml) whole flaxseed 1/4 cup (60 ml) yellow pea protein isolate powder (* can be replaced with 1 heaping tablespoon (20 ml) each of oat, sorghum and buckwheat flour) 2 tablespoons (30 ml) granulated sugar (* omit granulated sugar if using maple syrup in place of molasses) 2 tablespoons (30 ml) caraway seed (* optional for deli rye flavor) 1-1/2 (7.5 ml) teaspoons salt 1-1/2 (7.5 ml) teaspoons ground cinnamon 1-1/2 (7.5 ml) teaspoons ground ginger 1 teaspoon (5 ml) baking soda 3 teaspoons (15 ml) xanthan gum 1 teaspoon (5 ml) konjac glucomannan powder 4 teaspoons (20 ml) fast acting yeast Wet Ingredients: 2 cups (480 ml) cold water to mix with milled flaxseed Additional water to mix with mashed banana and molasses (or maple syrup) to achieve 2 cups total mixture ~1 cup (240 ml) (approx.) mashed ripe banana (2 medium to large bananas) 4-1/2 tablespoons (67.5 ml) molasses, unsulphured, mild (or full flavor) to one's taste (* Alternately, omit molasses and use 3/4 cup (180 ml) maple syrup, grade A very dark and strong flavor) 2 + 1 tablespoons (30 + 15 ml) canola, olive or melted coconut oil or melted vegan buttery flavored spread Additional oil or vegan spread to grease loaf pan 1 teaspoon (5 ml) apple cider vinegar (as an antimicrobial, anti-mold agent) Directions: 1. Grind enough raw dehulled buckwheat groats in a coffee grinder to make 1+ cups (260 ml) buckwheat flour. 2. Grind 1/2 cup (120 ml) whole flaxseed in a coffee grinder. 3. Place 2 cups (480 ml) COLD water in a quart/liter measuring cup and stir in the ground flaxseed with a fork. 4. Heat water and flaxseed mixture in a microwave oven until near boiling. Let steep for 10 to 20 minutes. 5. Combine all dry ingredients EXCEPT flaxseed into a lidded 2 quart/liter (or larger) plastic food container. 6. Thoroughly shake and blend dry ingredients together in the food container holding lid down securely. 7. Mash, rice, or puree 2 medium to large bananas into a separate quart/liter measuring cup. 8. Using 5 ounce (150 ml) glass measuring cup, warm 4-1/2 tablespoons (67.5 ml) molasses in microwave oven to thin and add to mashed bananas, or, in place of molasses, add 3/4 cup (180 ml) maple syrup to mashed bananas 9. Add enough water to the bananas and molasses (or maple syrup) and stir together so that the liquid mixture measures 2 cups (480 ml). 10. Warm up the banana molasses (or maple syrup) mixture in a microwave oven for 2-3 minutes. 11. Melt 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of coconut oil or vegan spread in a microwave oven in a small bowl, if these oils used. 12. Stir banana molasses (or maple syrup) mixture and steeped flaxseed into a mixing bowl. 13. Add 2 tablespoons (30 ml) oil plus 1 teaspoon (5 ml) apple cider vinegar to the mixing bowl. 14. Grease a 13 inch x 4 inch x 4 inch pullman loaf pan. Use a pastry brush for applying liquid oil. 15. Using an electric mixer with a dough hook, blend liquids for 1-2 minutes at a high medium speed. 16. Stop mixer and add dry ingredients to the bowl. Start mixing at low speed for 15 seconds, then increase to a low medium speed and mix for 16 minutes to a smooth, thick, moist (not wet), elastic dough consistency. 17. Preheat oven to 300-325° F (150-160° C). 18. Using a hard rubber bowl scraper, transfer dough from mixing bowl to the greased pullman loaf pan. 19. Plunge the hard rubber bowl scraper up and down in the dough to level and even out the dough. 20. Melt remaining 1 tablespoon (15 ml) coconut oil or vegan spread in the microwave in a small bowl, if oils used. 21. Use a pastry brush to spread 1 tablespoon (15 ml) oil on top of the dough. Smooth and round the top of the dough with the pastry brush. 22. Allow the dough to rise to just above the top of the pullman loaf pan. 23. Place the pullman loaf pan (uncovered) in the preheated oven and bake for 1 hour 40 minutes maintaining an oven temperature slightly above 300° F (150° C) to avoid burning the crust. 24. When done, remove loaf pan from oven and allow the loaf to cool in pan for only about 10 minutes to avoid the crust becoming soggy from trapped pan moisture. 25. Remove loaf from pan, tapping pan bottom corner edges on counter to loosen loaf. Transfer loaf to cooling rack. 26. Allow bread to cool to room temperature before slicing the loaf into 2 halves with a sharp, smooth edged (not serrated) slicing knife. 27. Store each loaf half in 10 inch x 14 inch plastic food storage bags with twist ties and place in the refrigerator. 28. If you can wait, keep it in the refrigerator overnight before consuming. The bread taste and texture actually improve overnight as it firms up in the fridge. When firm, the bread can easily be sliced nearly paper thin without falling apart. The bread will keep fresh in the fridge for well over 2 weeks and seems to improve in taste as it ages. Quick and Easy Gluten Free Mini Pizzas Making mini pizzas using bread slices for crusts is nothing new. But finding a GF bread suitable for a pizza crust is somewhat elusive. Just finding a GF bread with tall enough slices is a challenge. The Oat-Sorghum-Buckwheat-Banana-Flaxseed GF Bread presented above works great! Its full size slices, taste, and texture make for a wonderful mini crust upon which to build an easy, tempting GF mini pizza. The recipe is simple. Key to this recipe is the use of a cooling rack on top of a metal baking sheet. The cooling rack raises the pizza crust above the surface of the baking sheet allowing hot oven air to circulate under the crust. This keeps the crust dry and crispy, preventing the crust from getting soggy due to moisture trapped between the crust and baking sheet. Directions for one 2-slice pizza serving: Prepare or slice any toppings you desire. Preheat the oven to 450° F (232° C). Toast 2 slices of Oat-Sorghum-Buckwheat-Banana-Flaxseed GF Bread to a golden brown. Place toast on top of a cooling rack sitting on top of a metal baking sheet. Spread a generous tablespoon of your favorite pizza sauce, canned or homemade, on each slice. Spread a layer of shredded mozzarella cheese on top of the sauce, about 1/3 cup (80 ml) per slice. Spread any other cheeses, such as diced or shredded sharp cheddar, on top of the mozzarella. Add your toppings and a touch more mozzarella. Slide the mini pizzas, cooling rack, and baking sheet together into the hot oven. Bake for 9 minutes until cheese melts and bubbles. Slide the baking sheet and rack out from the oven and transfer pizzas to a plate using a metal spatula. Serve. About Gluten Free Toasters Toasting gluten free bread in a typical kitchen 2 or 4-slice toaster cannot be completed in one toasting cycle. To achieve a golden brown toast requires 2 or even 3 toaster cycles. Typical toasters provide toasting times of no more than 2-1/2 minutes maximum per cycle. A few more expensive toasters can toast up to 3 minutes. It is common for GF breads to require a single cycle toasting time of more than 5 minutes to toast golden brown. It takes 5 minutes 15 seconds starting in a cold 1000 watt kitchen toaster to toast slices of Oat-Sorghum-Buckwheat-Banana-Flaxseed GF Bread to a golden brown in a single cycle. A toaster-oven can provide a longer single cycle toasting time, but may require 10 minutes or longer to toast GF bread golden brown. A toaster-oven is less efficient for toasting bread than a 2 or 4-slice toaster because it must heat up a much larger volume than a 2 or 4-slice toaster which has heating elements up against the bread. A few manufacturers have provided toasters with a "Gluten Free" button to extend the maximum single cycle toasting time. These include Crux 2 and 4-Slice Toasters [17] available exclusively at Macy's, Bella Pro Series and Ultimate Elite 2 and 4 Slice Toasters [18,19], and the Williams Sonoma Open Kitchen 2-Slice Stainless Steel Toaster [20]. There are several problems with these toasters. First, the maximum toasting times on the "Gluten Free" setting are still not long enough. Maximum toasting times provided by Bella for its Ultimate Elite Toaster are 3 minutes 50 seconds for the "Gluten Free" setting and 4 minutes 20 seconds for the "Gluten Free" + "Frozen" setting. Second, a gluten-free toaster for celiacs, by necessity, must be used exclusively for GF breads to avoid wheat contamination. A gluten free toaster does not need a "Gluten Free" button. A gluten free toaster simply requires a 6 minute maximum toasting time to adequately toast gluten free breads. One should not have to remember to push a "Gluten Free" button every time they toast bread. Is it so hard for manufacturers to offer a toaster with a 6 minute timer? For those with some basic electronic technical skills, there is a relatively easy solution to having a toaster with a sufficiently long 6 minute maximum toasting time for GF bread. The electronic toaster controller board in a toaster can be modified to extend the maximum toasting time by simply replacing a resistor and/or a capacitor on the board. First one needs to find a toaster in which the controller board can easily be accessed. It turns out the Nesco T1000 toaster [21] is well-suited to the task. As toasters go, almost all are made in China and tend to have a high percentage of manufacturing defects per customer product reviews. The Nesco T1000 is a nice looking, sturdy toaster with nice features. With the right screwdriver to remove the "tamper proof" screws, the controller board is easy to get to and easy to modify. The only flaw in the Nesco T1000 is that the toasting time is shorter in a hot Nesco T1000 toaster than the toasting time in a cold Nesco T1000 toaster at the same browning setting, resulting in inconsistent browning. If toasting always begins in a cold toaster, browning is always consistent, and the browning setting need never be touched to achieve the same results every time. Below, instructions on modifying the Nesco T1000 are provided. A modified Nesco T1000 toaster has been perfectly toasting GF bread daily for over 4 years without a single problem. These notes are of a technical nature. Modifying the Nesco T1000 toaster will void the warranty. Any modifications you perform are done so at your own risk. If you are not familiar with electronic components or a soldering iron, do not attempt the modification. Find a friend or someone with the technical skills if you wish to have a modified Nesco T1000 toaster. Nesco T1000 Toaster Tech Notes - How to Increase the Toasting Cycle Time Summary: The browning control circuit of the Nesco T1000 toaster is designed around the AO201D toaster controller chip, an 8-pin DIP integrated circuit. Toaster cycle timing is achieved by adjusting the frequency of a timer oscillator on board the AO201D via an external RC circuit. The frequency is inversely proportional to RC. Increasing R (resistance) and/or C (capacitance) decreases frequency and increases the toasting cycle time. R in the Nesco toaster is a summation of a 250k potentiometer (variable resistor) in parallel with a 390k resistor (R6) in series with a 68k thermistor (NTC) in parallel with a 180k resistor (R5). C is a .033µf capacitor (C3). The Defrost button increases the toasting cycle time by switching in an additional .0047µf capacitor (C4) in parallel with C3. The thermistor decreases the resistance as the toaster ambient temperature rises and is supposed to help stabilize the oscillator frequency which is affected by heat. Ideally, temperature compensation provided by the thermistor and the AO201D should keep the oscillator frequency stable and browning shade the same from batch to batch as the toaster ambient temperature rises. Unfortunately, in the Nesco toaster, the oscillator frequency becomes unstable and increases as the toaster heats up, significantly reducing the toaster cycle time when the toaster is hot compared to the cycle time of a cold toaster. Hence, to maintain the same browning shade of a cold toaster, the browning control must be turned up higher when toasting in a hot toaster. The modifications below will increase the original factory maximum toasting cycle time of about 2.5 minutes to about 5.5 minutes when the toaster is cold. The Defrost button adds up to 30 seconds or so additional time. (Note: There is no datasheet available online for the AO201D chip. A datasheet in chinese is available for a similar MCU CMS12530 chip [22] with some diagrams and tables labelled in english. The Pericom PT8A2514A toaster controller chip [23] is also of interest with an english datasheet and a timer that can be adjusted from 30 sec to 10 min.) Tools Required: TA23 triangle head screwdriver (Silverhill Tools ATKTR4 Triangle Head 5 Size Screwdriver Set) #1 Phillips head screwdriver Mini needle nose pliers Mini wire cutter 25 watt taper point soldering iron Desolder bulb, wick, or tool 60/40 Tin/Lead rosin core solder Parts Required: .02µf 25v to 100v ceramic or polyester film capacitor 68k 1/4-watt resistor (blue-gray-orange) Disassembly: Lay some newspaper or a towel on the work surface. Have a container handy to keep the small screws and parts from getting lost. Remove the crumb tray (which makes 2 tabs on the plastic base that slip under the shell lip more visible). Lay the toaster upside down on the work surface. Using the TA23 screwdriver, remove the tiny black screw from the bottom of the chrome pop-up lever knob. Insert a tool slightly larger than the TA23 screwdriver into the screw hole (the TA27 driver if you have it) and push the black plastic insert out of the chrome portion of the pop-up lever knob to free the knob from the metal lever. Slip the knob off the metal pop-up lever. Remove the 4 triangle head screws which attach the black plastic base to the metal shell. Separate and lift the metal shell off the plastic base noting the 2 tabs that were under the crumb tray and the 4 metal tabs at the ends of the toaster slots that insert into small slots on top of the inner metal cage. Disconnect the 4-wire cable small white nylon connector connected to the browning control circuit board attached to the toaster shell. Completely separate the base and inner cage from the outer metal shell and set aside the base. Using the #1 Phillips screwdriver, remove the 2 broad head screws securing the insulation board to the browning control circuit board attached to the outer metal shell. Remove the 4 Phillips screws securing the browning control circuit board. Turn the browning control to an extreme so that you can easily realign it on reassembly. Lift up and slip the browning control circuit board from out behind the browning control knob and push buttons (the knob and buttons remain in place and do not have to be removed). Modifications: Desolder and remove the 390k resistor (orange-white-yellow) labelled R6 (no replacement needed). Desolder and remove the 180k resistor (brown-gray-yellow) labelled R5. Replace R5 with a 68k 1/4-watt resistor (blue-gray-orange). Locate capacitor C3 (.033µf) which is numbered 2A333J. Turn the circuit board over and on the back side solder a .02µf 25v to 100v ceramic or polyester film capacitor across the two C3 capacitor connections keeping the .02µf capacitor flat against the circuit board and trimming off excess leads. Reassembly: Before reassembling, take a look at the pop-up lever spring mechanism and make sure the small metal plate beneath the lever properly aligns with the electromagnet arms when lowered. If skewed, twist the the metal plate until it is properly aligned (the plate in my toaster was skewed at the factory which caused a glitch preventing the pop-up lever from latching when first testing the toaster out of the box). Reverse the steps used in disassembly. Be sure to reconnect the 4-wire connecter, use the 2 broad head screws for the insulator board, and carefully align and insert the 4 outer metal shell tabs into the inner metal cage slots. Make sure you properly align the small notch in the black plastic insert with metal pop-up lever notch before pressing it back into the chrome portion of the pop-up knob. Do not over-tighten the triangle head screws, especially the tiny black screw in the pop-up knob (tighten just enough to bottom-out the screw heads). Testing: Make sure all functions still work (you don't need bread in the toaster to test). Get a watch and time the toasting cycles at "1" and "6" settings both in hot and cold conditions (give the toaster plenty of time to cool to the touch for cold testing). At "1" you should get about 32 sec hot and 1 min 23 sec cold. At "6" you should get about 4 min 25 sec hot and 5 min 35 sec cold. Pressing the "Defrost" button will add additional time. SOURCES Prime Grains Inc. http://www.primegrains.com/about-us.htm Variation of Mucilage Content in the Flaxseed Coat; Diederichsen A, Raney JP, Duguid SD; Saskatchewan Flax Grower Oct 2003 Vol 5 No 1 https://saskflax.com/quadrant/media/Pdfs/Newsletters/flaxfall03.pdf Variation of mucilage in flax seed and its relationship with other seed characters; Diederichsen A, Raney JP, Duguid SD; Crop Science Feb 2005 Vol 46 No 1, p 365-371 https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/cs/abstracts/46/1/365 Selection for increased seed mucilage content in yellow mustard; J Philip Raney and Gerhard FW Rakow; (Describes method used for determining mucilage content in seed); The Regional Institute, Online Publications http://www.regional.org.au/au/gcirc/4/79.htm Farmer Direct Co-op http://www.farmerdirect.coop/ USA Pan 13x4x4 Large Pullman Loaf Pan & Cover 1160PM-1 https://www.usapan.com/13-x-4-x-4-large-pullman-loaf-pan-and-cover-1160pm Chicago Metallic 44615 Pullman pan,single 13x4x4 https://www.bundybakingsolutions.com/product/44615/ Konjac Glucomannan Powder http://www.konjacfoods.com/product/1.htm The Gluten-Free-Bread Baking-with-Psyllium-Husks-Powder Test by Annalise Roberts http://mygluten-freetable.com/2014/04/the-gluten-free-bread-baking-with-psyllium-husks-powder-test/ Fundamental Study on the Impact of Gluten-Free Starches on the Quality of Gluten-Free Model Breads; Horstmann SW, Belz MC, Heitmann M, Zannini E, Arendt EK; Foods. 2016 Apr 21;5(2) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5302342/pdf/foods-05-00030.pdf Strange Grains Gluten Free Bakery https://www.strangegrainsbakery.com.au/gluten-free-bread-perth Technological Properties of Pea and Buckwheat Flours and Their Blends; Ilze Beitane, Gita Krumina-Zemture, Martins Sabovics; Latvia University of Agriculture Research for Rural Development 2015, Annual 21st International Scientific Conference Proceedings Vol 1, p 137-42 http://llufb.llu.lv/conference/Research-for-Rural-Development/2015/LatviaResearchRuralDevel21st_volume1-137-142.pdf Northern Pulse Grower Association Pea Flour Brochure http://www.northernpulse.com/uploads\resources\661\pulse-flour-brochure.pdf USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council Brochures https://www.usapulses.org/brochures Non-gluten proteins as structure forming agents in gluten free bread; Ziobro R, Juszczak L, Witczak M, Korus J; J Food Sci Technol. 2016 Jan;53(1):571-80 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4711467/pdf/13197_2015_Article_2043.pdf Ripple Foods Pea Milk https://www.ripplefoods.com/ Crux Toasters http://www.cruxkitchen.com/crux_toaster_2slice.php Bella Pro-Series Toasters https://bellahousewares.com/products-bella/?taxonomy=productscategories&term=pro-series Bella Ultimate-Elite Toasters https://bellahousewares.com/products-bella/ultimate-elite-collection-2-slice-digital-toaster/ Williams Sonoma Open Kitchen Toaster https://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/willaims-sonoma-open-kitchen-2-slice-stainless-steel-toaster/ Nesco T1000 2-Slice Toaster http://www.nesco.com/products/Small-Appliances/Toasters/TWO-SLICE-TOASTER-THUNDER-GREY/ MCU CMS12530 toaster controller chip (in chinese) http://mcu.com.cn/uploads/file/2015/20150819163253_26043.pdf Pericom PT8A2514A toaster controller chip https://www.diodes.com/assets/Datasheets/PT8A2514A.pdf
  5. Celiac.com 10/13/2018 - Two important principles sort of collided in my brain the other day. One was the recent recommendation to increase our intake of whole grains based on the new food pyramid from the USDA. The other was our interest in time-saving prepared foods to make dishes that are at least partially homemade. About the same time these two ideas were melding in my brain, I realized how many wonderful new gluten-free cereals and crackers are now on the market. I wondered if we could boost our whole grain intake by using ready-made gluten-free cereals or crackers in home cooking. While not all of the cereals and crackers are truly “whole” grain, most are only partially refined and still quite nutritious. So, here’s my idea: One of my favorite desserts is a fruit crisp. You can make it any time of the year, using fruits in season (in my case, fruits that have sat on the kitchen counter past their prime, yet are still edible). In the fall it might be apples. Winter is perfect for pears. I like stone fruits during summer, such as peaches, plums, or cherries. Or, if you’re really desperate just open a can of whatever fruit appeals to you. Revving Up Your Home Cooking with Ready-Made Cereals Here’s where the new cereals come in. Prepare the fruit filling according to any fruit crisp recipe or use the recipe I provide here. For the topping, I like to toss Nutty Rice or the new Nutty Flax cereal from Enjoy Life Foods with maple syrup (or honey, brown rice syrup, or agave nectar). Add ground cinnamon to taste and then sprinkle it over the prepared fruit. Spray with cooking spray and bake at 350°F until the fruit is done and the topping is browned. Sometimes to speed things up, I microwave the covered fruit filling for 5-10 minutes on high, then uncover it, add the topping, and bake at 350°F for 15-20 minutes or until the fruit is soft and the topping is crisp and nicely browned. I particularly like the Nutty Flax cereal because it uses both flax and sorghum for a nutritious combination. Add extra spices such as 1/8 teaspoon each of nutmeg, allspice, or cloves for even more flavor. I also like to use the granola from Enjoy Life Foods as the topping for these fruit crisps. It’s already sweetened and flavored, available in Cinnamon Crunch, Very Berry Crunch, and Cranapple Crunch. All it needs is a little oil. Of course, if you prefer, you can toss it with a little extra cinnamon plus some maple syrup (or honey, brown rice syrup, or agave nectar) to heighten the sweetness. Add extra spices such as 1/8 teaspoon each of nutmeg, allspice, or cloves for even more flavor. Sprinkle over filling and spray with cooking spray. You can also add about ½ cup of this granola to your favorite bran muffins, cookies, or quick breads. The granola supplies a nice crunch and additional flavor and nutrients. Depending on your recipe, you may need to add more liquid to compensate for the cereal. Quinoa cereals by Altiplano Gold are packaged in individual serving packets, making them especially easy to incorporate into our baking. They come in three flavors––Organic Oaxacan Chocolate, Spiced Apple Raisin, and Chai Almond––and just need boiled water to make a hot cereal. Quinoa is a powerhouse of nutrients so I like to use the cereals in additional ways as well. Using the same concept for the fruit crisp above, I just sprinkle the Spiced Apple Raisin or Chai Almond dry cereal on the prepared fruit filling. Since the cereal is already sweetened and flavored, it only needs a little cooking spray. Bake at 350°F for 15-20 minutes. If your fruit needs additional cooking time (such as apples) try the microwave method I discuss above. You can add ½ cup of the Chocolate flavor to a batch of chocolate brownies or chocolate cookies for added fiber and nutrients. Depending on the recipe, you may need to add a little extra liquid to compensate for the cereal which counts as a dry ingredient. Creative Uses of Crackers in Home Cooking New crackers by the whimsical name of Mary’s Gone Crackers are chock-full of fiber and nutrients. They come in Original and Caraway flavors and are a nutritious treat by themselves. I also take them with me on trips because they travel so well. One creative way to use these crackers and appease your sweet tooth is to dip the whole Original-flavor cracker halfway into melted chocolate. Ideally, let the chocolate-dipped crackers cool on waxed paper (if you can wait that long) or else just pop them into your mouth as you dip them. You can also place a few crackers on a microwave-safe plate, top each with a few gluten-free chocolate chips and microwave on low power until the chips soften. Let them cool slightly so the chocolate doesn’t burn your mouth. These crackers also work great with dips and spreads. Aside from dipping in chocolate, these crackers have additional uses in baking. For example, finely crush the Original or Caraway flavor crackers in your food processor and use them as the base for a crumb crust for a quiche or savory tart. The Original flavor would also work great as a replacement for the pretzels typically used for the crust in a margarita pie. Just follow your crumb crust recipe and substitute the ground crackers for the crackers or pretzels. The crackers have very little sugar, but the Original flavor will work as a crumb crust for a sweet dessert as well. Again, just follow your favorite recipe which will probably call for melted butter or margarine plus sugar. Press the mixture into a pie plate and bake at 350°F for 10 minutes to set the crust. Fill it with a no-bake pudding, custard, or fresh fruit. The crushed crackers can also be added to breads and muffins for a fiber and nutrient boost. Depending on how much you add (I recommend starting with ½ cup) you may need to add more liquid to the recipe. I’ve just given you some quick ideas for ways to get more grains into your diet and streamline your cooking at the same time. Here is an easy version of the Apple Crisp I discuss in this article. I bet you can think of some other opportunities to make our gluten-free diet even healthier with wholesome cereals and crackers. Carol Fenster’s Amazing Apple Crisp You may use pears or peaches in place of the apples in this easy home-style dessert. If you prefer more topping, you can double the topping ingredients. This dish is only moderately sweet; you may use additional amounts of sweetener if you wish. Cereals by Enjoy Life Foods and Altiplano Gold work especially well in this recipe. The nutrient content of this dish will vary depending on the type of fruit and cereals used. Filling ingredients: 3 cups sliced apples (Gala, Granny Smith, or your choice) 2 Tablespoons juice (apple, orange) 2 Tablespoons maple syrup (or more to taste) ½ teaspoon cornstarch 1 teaspoon vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon salt Topping ingredients: ¼ cup ready-made cereal ¼ cup gluten-free flour blend of choice ¼ cup finely chopped nuts 2 Tablespoons maple syrup (or more to taste) 2 Tablespoons soft butter or margarine 1 teaspoon vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon salt Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 375F. Toss all filling ingredients in 8 x 8-inch greased pan. 2. In small bowl, combine topping ingredients. Sprinkle over apple mixture. Cover with foil; bake 25 minutes. Uncover; bake another 15 minutes or until topping is crisp. Top with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream, if desired. Serves 6.
  6. Celiac.com 10/12/2018 - Snack giant Nestlé has announced the debut of a new line of gluten-free snack bars called "Yes!" The bars are made with combinations of fruits, vegetables, and nuts, and will contain no artificial sweeteners, flavors, colors or preservatives. Some bars do contain added sugar, but those made with fruits and vegetables do not. The bars come in five flavors: Delicious Beetroot & Apple; Lively Lemon, Quinoa & Chilli; Tempting Sea Salt Dark Choc & Almond; Sumptuous Cranberry & Dark Choc; Delightful Coffee; and Dark Choc & Cherry. Yes! bars will be available in UK and Ireland. All Yes! bars are suitable for vegetarians, while the fruit and vegetable versions are vegan-friendly. No word yet on whether Nestlé plans to bring Yes! bars to the U.S. any time soon.
  7. Celiac.com 10/11/2018 - Halloween is upon us once again, and that means it’s time for Celiac.com’s Safe Gluten-Free Halloween Candy list for 2018. This year, we’ve added candies to both the SAFE Gluten-Free Halloween Candy list, and to our UNSAFE Non-Gluten-Free Halloween Candy list. We’ve also added more manufacturer contact information to make getting answers to gluten-free questions easier. Taken together, we think it’s the best, most comprehensive and most up-to-date list of safe, gluten-free Halloween candies, and other candies to watch out for. Below our SAFE, GLUTEN-FREE Halloween candy list, you will find a list of UNSAFE, NON–GLUTEN–FREE candies, along with a partial list of major candy makers, links to their company websites, and other resources. As always, Celiac.com strives to make the Safe Gluten-Free Halloween Candy List as comprehensive as possible, please keep in mind that the list is by no means complete, or definitive, and should only be used as a guideline. Before eating any candy on the list, always read labels, check manufacturer information, and choose according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children. Feel free to comment below if you see any issues, or if you'd like us to take note of any information you may have about a product. Lastly, manufacturer information can change. That means that a product this is safely gluten-free at one point may suddenly be made with gluten ingredients. The opposite is also true, as many manufacturers are doing what they can to make products gluten-free when possible. That means it’s important to read labels, and check manufacturer websites for information on changes to any specific products. As always, Celiac.com wishes you and your loved ones a safe and happy gluten-free Halloween 2018! Gluten-Free Halloween Candy 2018: 3 Musketeers fun size 3 Musketeers Mint with dark chocolate A Act II Popcorn Balls Adams & Brooks Fun Pops Scooby Doo Ingredients free of: peanuts, tree nuts, egg, milk, wheat/gluten, soy Albert's Gummy Eyeballs Albert's Iced Halloween pops (lollipops) Alien Pop, Baseball Pop, Basketball Pop, Boo Pop, Carousel Pop, ColorBlaster Pop, Football Pop, Happy Heart Pop, Hoppin' Pop, Lickin' Lips Pop, Lolliday Pop, Lollinotes, Pop—A—Bear, Soccer Pop, Alien Glow Pop, Buggin' Glow Pop, Burstin Bits, and Ghostly Glow Pop Almond Joy — All Except ALMOND JOY PIECES Candy Almond Joy fun size bars Altoids (except for Altoids Smalls Peppermint) Amanda's Own Confections Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops Annie's Organic Bunny Fruit snacks Andes mints and candies Alter Eco Dark Twist Chocolate Bar Alter Eco Dark Truffle with Mint Filling Alter Eco Organic Salted Caramel Chocolate Truffle Alter Eco Organic Sea Salt Chocolate Truffle Alter Eco Salted Burnt Caramel Chocolate Bar Amella Agave Caramels Amella Carmel Bar with Roasted Almonds Amella Chocolate Fudge Caramels Amella Gingerbread Caramels Amella Gray Sea Salt, Milk Caramel Amella Gray Sea Salt, Dark Caramel Amella Naked Honey Gray Sea Salt Caramels Amella Naked Honey Salted Chocolate Caramels Amella Naked Honey Lavender Caramels Amella Naked Honey Vanilla Caramels Amella Naked Candy Cane Amella Peppermint Caramels Amella Roasted Almond Caramels Amella Siracha Original Spicy Caramels Amella Vegan Sea Salt Caramels Amella  Walnut Fudge Caramels Angell Crisp Candy Bar Dark Angell Candy Bar Snow Angell Candy Bar Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead B Baby Ruth original and fun size Barrels of Candy Bazooka Big Mix (includes bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops) Bazooka Ring Pops Bazooka Push Pops Bazooka Baby Bottle Pops Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot Wicked Webs Berry Wave mini feet Betty Crocker Halloween fruit flavored snacks, including Fruit Gushers, Fruit Roll–ups, and Mini Rolls Bit•O•Honey Big Blow bubblegum Black Forest Gummy Tarantulas Black Forest Gummy Fun Bugs Juicy Oozers Black Forest Organic Berry Medley Organic Fruit Snacks Black Forest Organic Caramel Hard Candy Black Forest Organic Fruit Chews Black Forest Organic Gummy Bears Black Forest Organic Gummy Cherries Black Forest Organic Gummy Cola Black Forest Organic Gummy Exotic Fruits Black Forest Organic Gummy Soda Black Forest Organic Gummy Tea Black Forest Organic Gummy Worms Black Forest Organic Halloween Mix Black Forest Organic Lollipops Black Forest Organic Mixed Fruit Hard Candy Black Forest Organic Sour Heads Little Monsters Black Forest Organic Sour Watermelon Black Forest Organic Sour Heads Brookside Dark Chocolate Acai and Blueberry Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Blood Orange and Peach Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Chardonnay Grape and Peach Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Covered Almonds Brookside Dark Chocolate Covered Blueberries Brookside Dark Chocolate Covered Cranberries Brookside Dark Chocolate Fruit & Nut Bar Blueberry with Açai Flavor and Other Natural Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Fruit & Nut Bar Cherry with Pomegranate Flavor and Other Natural Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Fruit & Nut Bar Cranberry with Blackberry Flavor and Other Natural Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Goji and Raspberry Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Mango and Mangosteen Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Merlot Grape and Black Current Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Pomegranate Flavor Brookside Milk Chocolate Covered Almonds Bubbly lollipop and gum Buckleberry Foods Chocolate Almond Butter Cups Buckleberry Foods Chocolate Mint Truffles Butterfinger bar, original and fun size C Cadbury Adams Swedish Fish Cadbury Adams Sour Patch Kids and Sour Patch Extreme Candy Checkers (made for Target) Caramel Apple Pops (made by Tootsie Roll) Carmit Caramel clusters Carmit Gold Coins Carmit Raisin Clusters Cary's Of Oregon Coconut Toffee Bites Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Almond Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Coconut Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Espresso Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Hazelnut Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Coconut Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Vanilla Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Chai Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Toffee Bites Cella's Milk Chocolate Covered Cherries Cella's Dark Chocolate Covered Cherries Charleston Chew original and fun size Charms Blow Pops and Blow Pop Minis—may contain milk or soy Charms Pops Charms Squares Charms Sour Balls Charms Super Blow Pops Charms Candy Carnival Package—Blow Pops, Sugar Babies, Zip a Dee mini pops, Sugar Daddy, Pops, Sugar Mama Caramel, Tear Jerkers sour bubble gum, Blow Pop Bubble Gum—may contain milk or soy Charms Fluffy Stuff Spider Web cotton candy Cherryhead Chewy Atomic Fireballs Chewy Lemonheads and Friends Child's Play Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Coconut and Almond Snaps Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Hazelnut Butter Cups Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Salted Peanut Snaps Chocxo 70% Dark Chocolate Hazelnut Butter Cups Chocxo 70% Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Chocxo Double Dark Hazelnut Quinoa Cup Chupa Chups Fruit Lollipops Circus Peanuts by Spangler Cliff—Fruit Rope, all flavors "gluten-free" Coastal Bay Confections Candy Corn, Mellocreme Pumpkins, Autumn Mix Colombina Scary Eyeballs bubblegum Colombina Fizzy Pops Comix Mix Candy Sticks—Tom and Jerry, Flintstones, Scooby Doo, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Popeye Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts Crispy Cat Mint Coconut Candy Bar Crispy Cat Toasted Almond Candy Bar Crispy Cat Chocolate Marshmallow Candy Bar Crows CVS Brand Candy Bracelet with Pendant D Dagoba Products—All Daggoba Chocolate products are gluten-free Disney Halloween Candy Mix—jelly beans, gummies, candy bracelets and characters from Cars, Tinkerbell and Toy Story Dots Gumdrops—including Candy Corn Dots, Ghost Dots, and Bat Dots Dove pieces—Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate, Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate, Caramel Milk Chocolate Dream Almond Dark Chocolate Bar Dream Creamysweet Chocolate Bar Dream Pure Dark Dark Chocolate Bar Dream Raspberry Dark Chocolate Bar Dream Rice Crunch Chocolate Bar Dubble Bubble bubblegum Dum Dum Chewy Pops Dum Dum Lollipops (including Shrek Pops) E Enstrom Cappucino-Tiremisu Truffle Enstrom Cinnamon Truffle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Almond Belle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Almond Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Almond Toffee Petites Enstrom Dark Chocolate Butter Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Denver Mint Enstrom Dark Chocolate Espresso Belle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Espresso Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Peanut Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Peppermint Belle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Toffee Crumbs Enstrom Limoncello Truffle Enstrom Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee Petites Enstrom Milk Chocolate Butter Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Denver Mint Enstrom Milk Chocolate Espresso Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Mint Melt away Enstrom Milk Chocolate Peanut Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Toffee Belle Enstrom Milk Chocolate Toffee Crumbs Enstrom Mint Melt away Truffle Enstrom Mixed Almond Toffee Petites Enstrom Peppermint Cookie Belle Enstrom Peppermint Truffle Enstrom Pumpkin Pie Spice Truffle Enstrom Sugar Free Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee F Farley's Kiddie Mix — Smarties, SweetTarts, Now and Later, Jaw Breakers, Super Bubble and Lolli—pops Ferrara Pan Caramels Ferrara Pan Lemonhead & Friends candy mix—including Applehead, Cherryhead, Grapehead, Chewy Lemonhead & Friends, Chewy Atomic Fireball, and Red Hots FLIX Spooky Lip Pops Lollipops, Angry Birds Lollipops, Gummy Boo Bands, Monsters, Inc. Character Candies, Lollipops and Marshmallow Eyeballs Florida's Natural Healthy Treats Nuggets, Sour String, Fruit Stiks Fright Fingers Popcorn Kit Frankford's Bugs Gummy Candy Frankford's Gummy Body Parts Frankford's Marshmallow Pals Frooties Fun Dip Fun Dip Sour G Game Night boxes of candy game pieces (includes Operation, Sorry!, Monopoly, Life, and Clue) Gimbal's Fine Candies Jelly Beans, Sour Lovers, Cherry Lovers, Cinnamon Lovers, Licorice Scotties Goldenberg's peanut chews Go Max Go Buccaneer Candy Bar Go Max Go Cleo's Candy Bar Go Max Go Mahalo Candy Bar Go Max Go Snap! Candy Bar Go Max Go Thumbs Up Candy Bar Go Max Go Twilight Candy Bar Goobers Go Picnic Sea Salt Caramel Lollipops Go Picnic Orbites Dark Chocolate and Tangerine Grave Gummies (Yummy Gummies) Greenbriar Skull and Bones Fruit Hard Candy, Spooky Lollipop Rings, Grave Gummies Gummy Brush Paint Shop Gummy Pirate Choppers H Harrison's Original Fruit Slices Harrison's Original Fruit Smiles Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar and snack size — contains almonds Hershey's Air Delight Hershey’s - Baking Bars Hershey’s Semi Sweet Baking Bar Hershey’s Unsweetened Baking Bar Hershey’s and Reese's - Baking Chips Hershey’s Butterscotch Chips Hershey’s Cinnamon Baking Chips Mini Kisses Milk Chocolates Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Chips Hershey’s Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Chips Hershey’s Mint Chocolate Chips Hershey’s Premier White Chips Hershey’s Semi-Sweet Chocolate Baking Chips Hershey’s Special Dark Mildly Sweet Dark Chocolate Chips Hershey’s Sugar Free Semi-Sweet Baking Chips Reese’s Peanut Butter Baking Chips Hershey’s - Cocoa Hershey’s Cocoa Hershey’s Special Dark Cocoa Hershey’s Kisses Hershey’s Hugs Candy Hershey’s Kisses Milk Chocolate Filled with Caramel Hershey’s Kisses Milk Chocolate Filled with Cherry Cordial Crème Hershey’s Kisses Filled with Vanilla Crème Hershey’s Kisses Dark Chocolate Filled with Mint Truffle Hershey’s Kisses Pumpkin Spice Flavored Candies Hershey’s Kisses Carrot Cake Flavores Candies Hershey’s Kisses Meltaway Milk Chocolates Hershey’s Kisses Milk Chocolate Hershey’s Kisses Special Dark Mildly Sweet Chocolate Hershey’s Kisses Deluxe Chocolates Hershey’s Nuggets Hershey’s Nuggets Milk Chocolates Hershey’s Nuggets Milk Chocolate with Almonds Hershey’s Nuggets Special Dark Chocolate with Almonds Hershey’s Nuggets Extra Creamy Milk Chocolate with Toffee and Almonds Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Bar (1.55oz only) Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Bar with Almonds (1.45oz only) Hershey’s Milk Duds – All Hershey’s Spreads – All Except Hershey’s Chocolate Spread with Snacksters Graham Dippers Hershey’s and Reese's Toppings Hot Tamales Hot Tamales Spray Hubba Bubba Gum Humphrey Popcorn Balls I Ice Cream Dipper (Blue Raspberry, Strawberry) J Jelly Belly beans—gluten–free, dairy–free Jolly Rancher hard candy and Doubles Candy Jolly Rancher Hard Candy Stix, Lollipops and Fruit Chews Jujy’s Junior Caramels Junior Mints Just Born Jelly Beans Just Born marshmallow treats Justin's Nut Butters dark chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters milk chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters white chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters mini dark chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters mini milk chocolate peanut butter cups K KatySweet Chocolate Dipped Strawberries KatySweet Pecan Fudge KatySweet Plain Fudge KatySweet Raspberry Lemon Almond Bark KatySweet Walnut Fudge Kellogg's Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks Kenny's Green Apple Rings Kenny's Gummi Bears Kenny's Peach Rings Kenny's Sour Gummi Bears Kenny's Sour Gummi Worms Kenny's Sour Neon Gummi Worms Kenny's Watermelon Rings Kinder Surprise Eggs Kraft Caramels Kraft Jet–Puffed Boo Mallows and Ghost Mallows Kraft Swedish Fish Kraft Sour Patch Kids and Sour Patch Extreme L Laffy Taffy Plain, Stretchy & Tangy and Rope Lemonheads Lemonheads & Friends Conversation Hearts Tropical Chewy Lemonhead Chewy Lemonhead & Friends Berry Chewy Lemonhead Lifesavers LifeSavers Gummies including Big Ring Gummies, Sweet 'n' Sour, and Scary Assortment Lily's Sweets 40% Original Creamy Milk Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 40% Salted Almond Creamy Milk Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Almond Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Coconut Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Crispy Rice Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Dark Chocolate Bar with Cinnamon Lily's Sweets 55% Original Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Original Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Blood Orange Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Candy Cane Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Chipotle Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Sea Salt Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets Creamy Milk and Hazelnut Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets Milk and Gingerbread Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets Original Double Chocolate Crunch Bar Lily's Sweets Sour Cherry Double Chocolate Crunch Bar Lollipop Paint Shop Lovely Bananas Foster Lovely Black Licorice Lovely Caramel Apple Lovely Cashmels Lovely Chocolate Peppermint Lovely Chocolate Cherry Lovely Chewy Original Caramels Lovely Chocolate Swirl Caramels Lovely Fudgee Roll Lovely Fudgee Roll Raspberry Lovely Fruit Chews Lovely Halloween Cherry Licorice Lovely Halloween Juicy Chew Lovely Hula Chew Lovely Juicy Chew Original Lovely Juicy Chew Tropical Lovely Pumpkin Spice Lovely Salted Caramel Lovely Super fruit Chews M M&M's—original, peanut, peanut butter Manischewitz Fruit Slices Mars M&M's—except pretzel M&M's Mars Dove chocolate products (all flavors EXCEPT for milk chocolate cinnamon graham/cookies and cream, and some holiday varieties, such as milk chocolate truffles) Mars Munch Nut bar Mars Snickers, Snickers Dark bars, fun size and mini's—may contain almonds Mary Janes Mallo Cup Marvel Heroes Candy Sticks (Hulk, Spiderman, Wolverine) Mega Warheads Melster Chocolate Covered Marshmallow Melster Peanut Butter Kisses Melster Compound-Coated Marshmallow Melster Chocolate-Covered Creme Drops Melster Compound Coated Creme Drops Melster Salt Water Taffy Melster Peanut Butter Kisses Melster Circus Peanuts Melster Sanded Marshmallow Melster Coconut Toasties Milk Duds Milky Way Midnight Bar (not the original Milky Way Bar) Milky Way Caramel Bar Mike and Ike Mike and Ike Spray Mini Mentos Mini Sour Dudes Straws Monstaz Pops (jack–o–lantern lollipops) Monster Hunt plastic monster eggs filled with candy bones, skulls and pumpkins (made for Target) Mounds Bars – All Mounds dark chocolate fun size bars N Necco's Sky Bar 4 in 1 chocolate bar Necco Wafers Necco Mary Janes Necco Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses—does contain peanuts Necco Sweethearts Conversation Hearts (available for Valentine's Day only) Necco Canada Mint & Wintergreen Lozenges Necco Haviland Thin Mints and Candy Stix Necco Clark Bars Necco Skybars Necco Haviland Peppermint & Wintergreen Patties Necco Candy Eggs Necco Talking Pumpkins (available at Halloween only) Necco Squirrel Nut Caramels and Squirrel Nut Zippers Necco Banana Split and Mint Julep Chews Necco Ultramints Nestle Milk Chocolate fun size bars Nestle Baby Ruth Nestle Bit–O–Honey Nestle Butterfinger (NOT Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx) Nestle Goobers—does contain peanuts Nestle Nips (both regular and sugar–free) Nestle Oh Henry! Nestle Raisinets—made on equipment that processes peanuts Nestle Sno–Caps Nestle Toll House morsels and chunks (only if labeled gluten-free) Nestle Wonka Pixy Stix Nestle Wonka Laffy Taffy Nestle Wonka Lik–M–Aid Fun Dip Nestle Wonka Spree Nik—L—Nip wax bottles with juice Now and Later O Oh Henry! Operation Gummy Candy P Palmer Peanut Butter Cups—does contain peanuts Payday Candy – All Peanut M&M's Pearson's Bun candy—maple and roasted peanuts Pearson's Mint Patties, Pearson's Nut Goodies Pearson's Salted Nut Rolls Peeps Jack–O–Lanterns, Marshmallow Pumpkins, Marshmallow Ghosts, Marshmallow Tombstones, Chocolate Mousse Cats, Milk Chocolate Covered Pumpkins, Dark Chocolate Covered Pumpkins, and Milk Chocolate Dipped Orange Chicks—"Gluten Free" Pez candy—All PEZ products are "Gluten Free" Pop Rocks Popcorn Expressions Kettle Corn Snack Bags Pixie Stix Pure Fun Halloween Pure Pops R Rain Blo Bubble Gum Eyes of Terror Raisinets Razzles candy gum Red Bird Assorted Puffs Red Bird Dark Chocolate Peppermint Mini Red Bird Cinnamon Puffs Red Bird Cinnamon Sticks Red Bird Citrus Puffs Red Bird Cream Penny Sticks Red Bird Lemon minis Red Bird Lemon Sticks Red Bird Peppermint Puffs Red Bird Peppermint Sticks Red Hots Reese's Fast Break candy bars and snack size Reese’s Nutrageous Bar Reese's Peanut Butter Cups snack size and miniatures—Except Reese's Peanut Butter Cup Unwrapped Minis and Seasonal Shaped Items Reese's Pieces Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups – All Except Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup Unwrapped Minis and Seasonal Shaped Items Reese’s Pieces Candy - All Except Reese’s Pieces Eggs Reese’s Spreads – All Except Reese’s Spreads with Snacksters Graham Dippers Reese's Select Peanut Butter Cremes Reese's Select Clusters Reese's Whipps Riviera Spooky Candy Rings Rolo Caramels in Milk Chocolate Candies – All Except Rolo Minis Rolo chocolate covered caramels—Except ROLO Minis Russell Stover Salt Water Taffy Russell Stover Candy Corn Taffy Russell Stover Caramel Apple Taffy S Scharffen Berger Products – All Except Scharffen Berger Cocoa Powder Sidewalk Chalk Sixlets Skeleton Pops (lollipops) Skittles includes Original, Sour, Wild Berry, Fizzl'd Fruits, and Crazy Core, including fun—size Smarties—(the small pastel–colored candies sold in rolls and made by Ce De). Also Candy Money, Candy Necklace, Easter Smarties, Giant Smarties, Giant Smarties Pops, Love Hearts, Mega Smarties, Smarties in a Pouch, Tropical Smarties, Smarties Double Lollies, Smarties Mega Lollies, Smarties Parties, Smarties Pops, and X—TREME Sour Smarties. Manufacturer states: These products contains NO: gluten, milk, egg, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, or soy. (US only, NOT gluten-free in Canada). Skor Toffee Bars - All Snickers Bars (all flavors) Snickers Fudge bar Sno—Caps Sno—Cone Soda Pop So Delicious Dairy Free Coconut Milk Candy Corn So Delicious Dairy Free Coconut Milk Peppermint Star Sour Patch Spooky Candy Rings (eyeballs, Frankenstein heads and other shapes on rings) Starburst Fruit Chews and fun—size Starburst Gummibursts and Sour Gummibursts Stonyfield Organic Mixed Berry Fruit Snacks Stonyfield Organic Strawberry Fruit Snacks Sugar Babies Sugar Daddy Caramel Pops Sugar Mama Caramels Super Bubble bubble gum Surf Sweets Gummy Worms Surf Sweets Gummy Swirls Surf Sweets Gummy Bears Surf SweetsFruity Bears Surf Sweets Jelly Beans Surf Sweets Sour Worms Surf Sweets Sour Berry Bears Swedish Fish Sweet's All American Mint Taffy Sweet's Apple Fruit Sours Sweet's Banana Taffy Sweet's Black Licorice Taffy Sweet's Blue Raspberry Taffy Sweet's Bubble Gum Taffy Sweet's Buttered Popcorn Taffy Sweet's Candy Cane Taffy Sweet's Candy Corn Sweet's Candy Corn Taffy Sweet's Caramel Apple Taffy Sweet's Caramel Taffy Sweet's Cherry Cola Taffy Sweet's Cherry Fruit Sours Sweet's Cherry Hearts Sweet's Cherry Taffy Sweet's Chocolate Bridge Mix Sweet's Chocolate Cinnamon Bears Sweet's Chocolate Hazelnut taffy Sweet's Chocolate Peanut Clusters Sweet's Chocolate Peanuts Sweet's Chocolate Raisins Sweet's Chocolate Taffy Sweet's Chocolate Wonder Mints Sweet's Cinnamon Bears Sweet's Cinnamon Bunnies Sweet's Cinnamon Hearts Sweet's Cinnamon Lips Sweet's Cinnamon Santa's Sweet's Cinnamon Squares Sweet's Cinnamon Taffy Sweet's Cookie Dough Taffy Sweet's Cotton Candy Taffy Sweet's Egg Nog Taffy Sweet's Fish Sweet's Fruit Slices Sweet's Fruit Sours Sweet's Grape Fruit Sours Sweet's Guava Taffy Sweet's Gum Drops Sweet's Holiday Trees Sweet's Honey Taffy Sweet's Hot Shots Sweet's Huckleberry Taffy Sweet's Jelly Beans Sweet's Jelly Beans Sweet's Key Lime Taffy Sweet's Key lime Taffy Sweet's Lemon Fruit Sours Sweet's Marshmallow Bears Sweet's Natural Fish Sweet's Natural Lemonade rings Sweet's Natural Nummy Bears Sweet's Natural Sour Worms Sweet's Neapolitan Taffy Sweet's Orange Dark chocolate Jewels Sweet's Orange Milk chocolate Jewels Sweet's Orange Slices Sweet's Orange Slices Sweet's Orange Sticks Sweet's Orange/Vanilla Taffy Sweet's Peach Taffy Sweet's Peanut Clusters (available in both milk and dark chocolate) Sweet's Peppermint Taffy Sweet's Pink Grapefruit Sours Sweet's Raspberry Dark Chocolate Jewels Sweet's Raspberry Milk Chocolate Jewels Sweet's Raspberry Sticks Sweet's Raspberry Taffy Sweet's Red and Green fruit Sours Sweet's Red Licorice Taffy Sweet's Root Beer Taffy Sweet's Rum Taffy Sweet's S'more's Taffy Sweet's Scandinavian Swimmers Sweet's Sour Bunnies Sweet's Sour Stars Sweet's Sour Stars Sweet's Strawberry and Banana Taffy Sweet's Strawberry and Crème Taffy Sweet's Strawberry Taffy Sweet's Sugar free Cinnamon Bear cubbies Sweet's Sweet's Candy Pebbles Sweet's Vanilla Taffy Sweet's Watermelon Taffy Sweet's Wild berry Taffy Sweet's Wonder mints Sweethearts conversation hearts Forbidden Fruits (candy packaging of The Twilight Saga, New Moon the movie) Sweet's Candy Corn Taffy T Tasty Brand Fruit Gummies- Citrus Splash Tasty Brand Fruit Gummies- Smoothie Tasty Brand Fruit Gummies- Super fruit Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Citrus Splash Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Mixed Fruit Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Scary Berry Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Smoothie Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Spooky Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Super fruit Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Wild Berry Tic Tacs Tootsie Caramel Apple Pops Tootsie Pops—original and mini Tootsie Fruit Rolls Tootsie Peppermint Pops Tootsie Rolls Tropical Dots Tootsie Rolls Midgies and snack bars Topps — Baby Bottle Pop, Ring Pops, Push Pops, Ring Pop Gummies, Bazooka Gum, Bazooka Gum Nuggets Trader Joe's Citrus Gum Drops Trader Joe's Mango Taffy Trader Joe's Sour Gummies Transformers Candy Mix—gummy shields, fruit chews, candy shields, gum rocks Tropical Stormz Pops TruJoy Fruit Chews TruJoy Organic Choco Chews TruSweet Jelly Beans TruSweet Gummy Bears TruSweet Fruity Hearts TruSweet Fruity Bears TruSweet Gummy Worms TruSweet Sour Worms TruSweet Sour Berry Bears TruSweet Watermelon Rings TruSweet Peach Rings TruSweet Spring Mix Jelly Beans TruSweet Spooky Spiders TruSweet Organic Fruity Bears TruSweet Organic Fruity Hearts TruSweet Organic Jelly Beans TruSweet Organic Peach Rings TruSweet Organic Watermelon Rings Twist and Glow, Twist and Glow Heart, Twist and Glow Pumpkin Two Moms in the Raw Gluten Free Almond Butter Cacao Truffles Two Moms in the Raw Almond Butter Cayenne Truffles Two Moms in the Raw Almond Butter Green Tea Vanilla Truffles U Unreal Halloween Treats Unreal Dark Chocolate Almond Butter Cups Unreal Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Unreal Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups with Coconut Unreal Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups with Crispy Quinoa Unreal Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Unreal Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups with Crispy Quinoa V Vosges Haut Chocolate Bacon Dark Chocolate Bar Vosges Haut Chocolate Coconut & Cherry Caramel Bar Vosges Haut Chocolate Crispy Carrot Bar W Warheads Extreme Sour hard candy and Sour QBZ chewy cubes Warheads Sour Chewy Cubes Warheads Super Sour Spray, Sour Dippers, Double Drops Welches Fruit Snacks—All flavors Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter Banana Cup Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter and Cherry Cup Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter and Toasted Coconut Cup Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter and Smoked Salt Cup Wonka Bottlecaps Wonka Chocolate Laffy Taffy Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans Wonka Giant Pixy Stix Wonka Gobstopper Everlasting Wonka Gobstopper Chewy Wonka Fruit Tart Chews Wonka Fun Dip and Fun Dip Sour Wonka Laffy Taffy Ropes Wonka Mix–Ups Wonka Monster Mix–Ups—SweetTarts Skulls and Bones, Spooky Nerds, Howlin' Laffy Taffy Wonka Nerds—carry a cross contamination warning on the Spooky Nerds orange and fruit punch flavors Wonka Pixy Stix Wrigley's Gum Wrigley’s Creme Savers X X–scream Mouth Morphers Fruit Gushers Y York Peppermint Patties - All Except York Pieces Candy, York Minis, and York Shapes (5 oz.)s YumEarth Organic Fruit Snacks YumEarth Gummy Fruits Z Zed Candy Skulls and Bones Zip-A-Dee-Mini Pops With all these selections, finding some good, gluten–free candy should be a snap. As always, be sure to read labels, as some ingredients can vary. **WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN OR MAY CONTAIN GLUTEN: AIRHEADS Packaging states that Airheads are: "Manufactured in a facility that processes wheat flour." Airheads.com FAQs state that: "Airheads do not contain gluten; however, they are processed in a facility that uses wheat flour, so the company does not guarantee that Airheads are gluten-free. Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flour ALTOIDS Contain gluten as wheat maltodextrin ANNABELLE'S Abba Zabba—contains: peanuts, soybean oil and soy lecithin, wheat/gluten Big Hunk—Package statement: "made in a facility that uses milk, egg, tree nuts, wheat and peanuts" Look—Contains: milk, peanuts, soy lecithin, eggs, wheat/gluten Rocky Road, Rocky Road Mint, Rocky Road Dark—Contain wheat/gluten Uno—Contains: milk, almonds, soy lecithin, wheat/gluten AMERICAN LICORICE CO. Sour Punch Sticks, Twists, Bits, Bites, Straws—contains wheat/gluten Red Vines—all varieties and flavors contain wheat/gluten BEE INTERNATIONAL Zombee Bloody Bites (glow in the dark plastic fangs with oozing candy blood bags) Zombee Candy Corn (in a tall tube with plastic pumpkin lid) Package statement: "Made in a facility that also processes milk, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts." BRACH'S All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten–free! Please be careful, as I have seen Brach's candies included on gluten-free safe lists! Brach's Candy Corn, Brach's Jelly Bean Nougats, and Brach's Halloween Mellowcremes ARE all processed in a facility that processes wheat. CADBURY ADAMS Sour Patch Xploderz CHUCKLES Chuckles Ju Jubes CVS Candy Corn, Autumn Mix, Candy Pumpkins Ingredients free of: wheat/gluten, milk, tree nuts, peanuts Package statement: "This product was packaged in a facility where other products containing peanuts, tree nuts, milk, wheat, soy and egg are also packaged." DOVE CHOCOLATE Milk chocolate cinnamon graham/cookies and cream, and some holiday varieties, such as milk chocolate truffles FARLEY'S AND SATHERS Harvest Mix and Candy Corn—This product is made by Brach's. All Brach's candies are considered to contain gluten. See Brach's listings. Heide candies—Jujyfruits, Jujubes, Red Raspberry Dollars, Red Hot Dollars Wild Cherry, Heide Gummi Bears Super Bubble and Super Bubble Blast Trolli Gummi Bears, Trolli Sour Brite (Frite) Crawlers "Packaged on equipment that packages products containing traces of milk, wheat, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and/or soy protein." FERRERO Ferrero Rocher Chocolates FLIX Bag of Boogers Gummies — "Manufactured in a facility that processes gluten (wheat), milk, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and soy." FRANKFORD Frankford Fun Size Mix (Peanut Butter, Caramel and Crispy Chocolate Covered Candies) Crispy Candies SpongeBob Gummy Krabby Patties GOETZE Goetze's Caramel Creams, Cow Tales—Contain wheat flour, milk, and soy HARIBO Bears (the package now says: Dextrose - wheat or corn) Black Licorice Wheels Brixx Clark Bars Fruity Pasta Konfekt and Pontefract Cakes Red Licorice Wheels Sour S'ghetti HERSHEY Hershey Snack Sized Bars — ALL Kit Kat—contains wheat Mr. Goodbar Reese's Minis Reese's Peanut Butter Pumpkins Reese's Seasonal Rolo Minis Twizzlers—contains wheat Whoppers—contains barley malt and wheat flour Hershey's Bliss (Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Milk Chocolate with Meltaway Center, White Chocolate with Meltaway Center, Milk Chocolate with Raspberry Meltaway Center, Dark Chocolate)—No gluten ingredients, but not on Hershey's official gluten-free list. Hershey's Special Dark Bar (note that this is confusing, since several other Special Dark products are considered gluten-free, so make sure you know what you're buying) Hershey's Cookies 'N' Creme Bar Hershey's Milk Chocolate Drops Hershey's Miniatures (any flavor, including flavors that are considered gluten-free in larger sizes) Mr. Goodbar Symphony Bar Hershey's Extra Dark Chocolate Hershey's Kisses that do not appear on the gluten-free list above Hershey's Good & Plenty Hershey's Mr. Goodbar fun size Hershey's Twizzlers, Flavored Twists IMPACT CONFECTIONS Warheads Sour Twists—contain wheat/gluten, milk Warheads Sour Jelly Beans—made in facility shared with wheat, peanuts, milk, egg and soy Warheads Sour Candy Canes—contain soy; made in facility shared with wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, and soy Warheads Sour Coolers—contains oat fiber MARS and WRIGLEY Mars Bar Mars Combos (a snack mix) M&M White Chocolate, Mint and M&M Coconut flavors—Check individual packages to be sure M&M Pretzel flavor and some M&M seasonal flavors Milky Way—contains barley malt Twix—contains wheat NESTLE Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx—contains wheat flour Butterfinger Giant Bar Butterfinger Hearts Butterfinger Jingles Butterfinger Medallions Butterfinger Pumpkins Butterfinger Snackerz Butterfinger Stixx Chewy Spree Crunch—contains barley malt Everlasting Gobstopper Hundred Grand Bar—contains barley malt Kit Kat Bar 100 Grand Bar—contains barley malt Sweetarts—Contain both maltodextrin and dextrin, which can be made from wheat and barley, and are not listed on Nestle’s gluten-free candy list) Wonka Bar (all flavors) Wonka Gummies Wonka Kazoozles Wonka Nerds Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free. Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free. NEWMAN'S OWN Organic Dark Chocolate & Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups (Made on equipment that processes products containing peanuts, tree nuts, milk, wheat, soybean and egg products.) PALMER Palmer Bag of Boo's fudge bars Palmer Tricky Treats (mix of Googley Eyes, Boneheads, and Pumpkin Patch chocolate candies) Palmer Trick or Treat Mix Palmer Peppermint Patties RUSSELL STOVER'S—Russell Stover's products are produced on equipment that also processes peanuts, tree nuts, eggs and wheat gluten. YORK York Pieces, York Minis and York Shapes WONKA Wonka Bar Wonka Chewy Runts Wonka Chewy Spree Wonka Giant and Mini Chewy SweeTarts Wonka Nerds Wonka Oompas Wonka Runts Wonka Runts Chewy Wonka SweetTarts Wonka Sweetarts (regular) Wonka Sweetarts Chew Wonka Sweetarts Chewy Twists Wonka Sweetarts Giant Chewy Wonka Sweetarts Mini Chewy Wonka Shockers Wonka Sweetarts Gummy Bugs—contains wheat/gluten Wonka Sweetarts Rope—contains wheat/gluten Wonka Sweetarts Shockers Wonka Tart N Tinys Wonka Tart N Tinys Chew Wonka SweetTarts Boo Bag Mix Additional information and lists of gluten-free safe and unsafe Halloween candies can be found at: About.com Celiac.com Celiaccentral.com CeliacSupportAssociation.org Celiacfamily.com DivineCaroline.com Foodallergyfeast Glutenawayblog.com Glutenfreefacts Gluten Intolerance Group Medpedia Surefoodliving.com Urbantastebud.com Verywellfit.com Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them: Adams & Brooks American Licorice Co. BEE International Ferrara Candy Company Ferrero Rocher FLIX Gimbal's Fine Candies Goetze's Candy Company Hershey's. Here's a link to Hershey's official gluten-free list. Impact Confections Jelly Belly Just Born. Here's a link to Just Born Gluten-free FAQs Justin’s Nut Butters products are certified gluten-free by the Gluten-Free Certification Organization, which requires products to have less than 10 parts per million of gluten in them. Kraft Foods Mars Chocolate Necco Nestle USA Palmer Pearson's PEZ Pop Rocks Tootsie Roll —Tootsie Roll Industries, which also makes Charms products, says that, as of fall 2018, all of the company's confections are considered gluten-free except Andes cookies. "Tootsie does not use wheat, barley, rye, oats, triticale, spelt, or any of their components, either as ingredients or as part of the manufacturing process. Corn and soy products are used during the manufacturing process," the company says.
  8. Celiac.com 10/08/2018 - A new population based study reveals that celiac disease is associated with a wide range of medical conditions, including liver disease, glossitis, pancreatitis, Down syndrome, and autism, according to a database study of more than 35 million people. Moreover, people with autism have celiac disease at rates almost 20 times higher than in those without autism, reported lead investigator Daniel Karb, MD, a second-year resident at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland. That raises the question of whether people with autism should be screened for celiac disease, and whether they might benefit form a gluten-free diet. "If you have a patient who is autistic and they have all these unusual symptoms, you might want to screen them for celiac disease," Dr. Karb told the World Congress of Gastroenterology last year. It is known that there are unusual symptoms of celiac disease, which include anything outside the classic symptoms of malabsorption, steatorrhea, malnutrition, abdominal pain, and cramping after eating, "but this is putting numbers to it," said Dr Karb. For their study, Karb and his fellow researchers used the Explorys database to pull health record data from 26 major integrated healthcare systems in the United States. Their search covered the period from 2012 to 2017. Of 35,854,260 people in the database, they found 83,090 with diagnosed celiac disease. Overall, the age-adjusted prevalence of celiac disease in that group was 0.22%, which is much lower than the 1% to 2% range previously estimated. Those numbers are not unusual, said Dr. Karb says that the researchers “don't think there are fewer people with celiac disease, just that it may be under-diagnosed.” The rates are, he says, “what you might expect when you screen asymptomatic people." Overall, the team found a significant connection between celiac disease and 13 other autoimmune disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, celiac disease is associated with every autoimmune disease the team looked at, except for primary biliary cholangitis, Dr Karb says. This is some pretty startling study data. We knew that celiac disease was linked to other autoimmune conditions, and there has been some surprising data about gluten-free diets helping patients with autism, but these numbers are enlightening. It seems that people with autism should definitely be screened for celiac disease, and placed a gluten-free diet, if tests confirm celiac disease. Stay tuned for more information on this important celiac disease topic. Source: World Congress of Gastroenterology 2017
  9. Celiac.com 10/05/2018 - This short quiz includes basic celiac facts, recent celiac and gluten-free news and other information that appeared in the last few months on Celiac.com. The answers are in the section below the quiz, so don't peek! True or False? A tainted gluten-free meal nearly killed an Australian woman. Bifidobacterium infantis NLS super strain reduces a-Defensin-5 expression in celiac disease patients. Vitamin A and D deficiency common in kids with newly diagnosed celiac disease. New UK fund promotes celiac research and gluten-free food improvement. Easy to spot tooth wear and enamel defects point to celiac disease. Undiagnosed celiac disease more common in women and girls. Research indicates 1.4% of humans have celiac disease. A new urine test can spot gluten in the blood of people with celiac disease. Women's diet during pregnancy has little impact on celiac disease risk in their infants. Gluten-Free condoms are available for people concerned about topical exposure to gluten. A Phoenix realtor recently advertised a house as 'gluten-free.’ Current screening methods miss significant cases of celiac disease. A new vaccine makes it safe for people with celiac disease to safely consume gluten. A long-distance conversation with a guru can help treat your celiac disease. Food made with gluten-free ingredients is safe for people with celiac disease. Celiac disease is a food allergy. Celiac disease rarely affects people of non-European ancestry. Celiac disease is a children’s condition. Celiac disease can be painful, but isn't life-threatening. A little gluten is okay for people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance to eat. ANSWERS Here are the answers for our short quiz above on basic celiac facts, recent celiac news and other information. True or False? A tainted gluten-free meal nearly killed an Australian woman. TRUE Bifidobacterium infantis NLS super strain reduces a-Defensin-5 expression in celiac disease patients. TRUE Vitamin A and D deficiency common in kids with newly diagnosed celiac disease. TRUE New UK fund promotes celiac research and gluten-free food improvement. TRUE Easy to spot tooth wear and enamel defects point to celiac disease. TRUE Undiagnosed celiac disease more common in women and girls. TRUE Research indicates 1.4% of humans have celiac disease. TRUE A new urine test can spot gluten in the blood of people with celiac disease. TRUE Does Diet During Pregnancy Have Any Impact on Celiac Disease Risk in Infants? TRUE Gluten-Free condoms are available for people concerned about topical exposure to gluten. TRUE A Phoenix realtor recently advertised a house as 'gluten-free.’ TRUE. Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena recently advertised a house as 'gluten-free’. Current screening methods miss significant cases of celiac disease. TRUE A new vaccine makes it safe for people with celiac disease to safely consume gluten. FALSE. While several such vaccines are under development, with some even undergoing clinical and human trials, no such drug has been proven to work and approved by the FDA. Hopefully the clinical tests will work and this will one day be an alternative for some people. A long-distance conversation with a guru can help treat your celiac disease. FALSE Food made with gluten-free ingredients is safe for people with celiac disease. FALSE. Just because food is made with gluten-free ingredients does not necessarily make it safe for people with celiac disease. Case in point, Domino’s Pizza recently introduced gluten-free pizza crusts. However, these pizzas are prepared in the same areas and ovens as Domino’s regular pizzas, and may be contaminated with gluten from wheat flour. These pizzas are not considered safe for people with celiac disease. There are many similar cases in the restaurant world. Contamination is a serious issue for some celiacs, so buyers be aware and be wary. Celiac disease is a food allergy. FALSE. Celiac disease is not a food allergy or an intolerance, it is an autoimmune disease. People with celiac disease suffer damage to the lining of the small intestine when they eat wheat, rye or barley. They also face higher risks for many other auto-immune conditions. Celiac disease rarely affects people of non-European ancestry. FALSE. Celiac disease is more common in people of northern European ancestry, but it affects all ethnic groups and is found in southern Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and South America. Celiac disease is a children’s condition. FALSE. Celiac disease can develop at any age. In fact, celiac disease is most commonly diagnosed in people aged 40-60 years old. Celiac disease can be painful, but isn't life-threatening. FALSE. It’s true that classic celiac disease symptoms, like stomach pain, bone pain, fatigue, headaches, skin rash, and digestive issues, won’t kill patients outright. However, undiagnosed or untreated, celiac disease can trigger other autoimmune disorders, and leave patients at much greater risk of developing certain types of deadly cancer. A little gluten is okay for people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance to eat. FALSE. Gluten levels above 20 parts per million can cause adverse immune reactions and chronic damage in people with celiac disease. Read more about celiac disease, gluten, gluten-free and gluten intolerance facts at Celiac.com.
  10. Celiac.com 10/04/2018 - Do a reality check. Remember, this is a choice you have to commit to. If you want to feel lousy for the rest of your life and potentially get worse as time goes on, that’s your choice—but I wouldn’t recommend it for many reasons. The goal is 100 percent. Yes, it is a process, but the ultimate goal is to be 100 percent free of gluten and any other food allergens and intolerances. This is the only way your body will heal, so let’s start the healing journey! Did you know that, as we mentioned earlier, once the gluten intolerant body is exposed to the tiniest amount of gluten it sets off your B cells, which causes an inflammatory response that can take several months to calm down? That’s why the goal is 100 percent. For some food intolerances, such as eggs, for example, you would want to wait at least three to six months then bring them back in and retest to see how the body responds. This is a sensitive experiment, so please work with someone who specializes in this area. As far as gluten, based on what I know and have seen, there is no reason to ever go back to eating wheat. Give it time. Healing takes time. I’ve been on my gluten free journey for more than ten years now, and I have to say I have never purposely eaten gluten but I can sure tell when I get cross-contamination. I’m one of those people who is all in—100 percent—once I make up my mind on something. I guess if you have been seriously ill for a while like I was, you will do what it takes to be healthy again. For some, that’s not the case; it takes many tries to get there and that’s okay, as long as the long-term goal is always in mind. If you are better with shorter-term goal setting, do a sixty-day challenge. Within this time frame you will notice the brain fog getting better. Your body will start adjusting to a healthy weight. In most cases, you will lose the bloating and weight around your middle, as it is typically linked to dysbiosis (overgrowth of harmful bacteria). One of my patients who has celiac disease was overweight by at least forty pounds. She carried most of the extra weight in her midsection. She was only about twenty years old at the time and was having skin rashes, dizzy spells, and nausea. We got her off gluten and within a few months she was a new person. She lost all the extra weight and her skin cleared up. She had no more dizzy spells and now looks amazing! She is committed and can definitely tell when her body gets cross-contaminated with gluten. Don’t be discouraged if it takes a little longer than expected to feel 100 percent. Think of peeling that onion one layer at a time. That’s the journey to wellness I tell my patients about continually. A general rule is: for every year you deal with a health issue, it takes at least a month to start healing. Because everyone is unique, it could take longer for you or it could happen a lot sooner than you think: for example, I spoke with a woman who lost seventy pounds in just a few months after going gluten free and has kept it off for years. And I had one patient who went off gluten and his headaches went away immediately! However, it happens for you, it’s worth it! For me, it took a while because I had so many layers to work through. But I will say, I was seeing a lot better and my eyes started healing within a few months. When I went back to the eye doctor he was blown away at the difference and asked what I had done. I told him I went off gluten for starters! You should have seen the confused look in his eyes. That was the beginning of my amazing journey. Keep a food journal. You may need to keep a food journal for a week or two if you don’t have one already. It doesn’t have to be time consuming. A one-page journal example is included at the end of this book—or you can download one of many different journaling apps on your smart phone or do it online. When working with my patients, I find reviewing their journals to be a very useful tool. The key is to keep track of what you’re eating and how you feel, which is especially important for those who do not get food intolerance panels done. Journaling helps you stay in tune with what you put in our body on a daily basis. It also helps identify the foods that work for you and that offer optimal healing—I call these the medicine foods. We tie emotions into the journals because anxiety is often related to food sensitivity. To take your journal to another level, include environmental influences such as mold exposure, seasonal flare ups, body care products, cleaning products, etc. This is part of a home revamp which we will talk about below. Stick to whole foods to heal the gut. We have options depending on how much inflammation is going on in the gut and, quite honestly, how fast we want to heal. I suggest you drop bakery goods as well as all processed foods and sugar for a while to allow your gut to heal. Eating cooked foods in addition to drinking a quality bone broth is very healing to the gut. This helps calm things down when we are inflamed. A lot of raw foods are awesome but the body has to work hard at digesting them— which isn’t a bad thing, unless you have some inflammation going on in the gut. So, take it easy on raw foods for a while. The Recipes section has some good recipes that use functional ingredients. Treat yourself to exotic organic dark chocolate that is GF. Look for 70 percent or higher. Dark chocolate is full of antioxidants. The darker the chocolate, the less sugar. Keep in mind that chocolate is on the cross-reactive list, in case you have a reaction to it. Some raw treats such as kale chips are a much better choice than potato chips or crackers. I will say when I give into chips I opt for the non-GMO ones that are either baked or cooked in coconut oil. Be on the lookout for healthy meals on your current menus or the menus of friends and family that are naturally gluten free—roasted chicken (without seasoning), baked sweet potatoes and steamed veggies, for example—and make them a staple on your new menus. Surf the internet, watch cooking shows, and browse magazines for ideas you can adapt as you see fit. Karmic Health (www.karmic-health.com) has a great resource and links page with a list of gluten free food companies, blogs, and recipe sites under Holistic Resources. We also have a recipe page. Go through your pantry and refrigerator at home. Make a list of foods and meals already in your diet that are gluten free. Be sure to list condiments, produce, snacks, and other foods. This list will be helpful as you create menus around your new restrictions, and will give you encouragement that you’re already on the right track and have choices! We have a great video under the Media page on www.karmic-health.com with yours truly talking about optimal foods. At the same time, clear out all foods that have gluten, wheat, wheat flour, oats, oat flour, rye, semolina, or modified food starch as an ingredient. If in doubt, throw it away. If you have family members living with you who will not go gluten free, you might consider giving the offending edibles to them to be put in another part of the house while you learn to live and think gluten free. This step becomes very important if you are dealing with celiac disease. With that being said, your toaster can be a problem if you are sharing it with someone who is not gluten free. They do have toaster bags you can purchase to protect your gluten free bread. I personally don’t have gluten in my house—it’s just my husband and myself, which is obviously a lot easier than having a large family. Do what you can to protect yourself. The same goes for pots and pans and utensils. More on this in the cross-contamination section. The goal is to cook for the entire family without using gluten. Most of the time they won’t be able to tell the difference—and they may be surprised they actually like gluten free, healthy meals. They will feel better and the taste might pleasantly surprise them. Ideally, the whole family will join you on this journey from the beginning—at the least at home. We can’t always control how they’ll eat outside the house. In most cases, once everyone understands the importance of going gluten free and its potential for healing, they will be on board. I don’t have any gluten or cow dairy in my house and my husband is fine with it—not to mention a lot healthier because of it. He does have his cheats occasionally, but he does pay for it with a swollen belly. Give yourself permission to eat things you may have restricted from your diet before your diagnosis, as long as you are not experiencing inflammation. Tortilla chips or cookies may not be appropriate for some people, but they are a treat in a GF diet—in small doses, of course. This becomes important with children. As soon as you can get comfortable, opt for healthier snacks. The Recipes section includes some great treats for both kids and adults, as well as a list of wonderful recipe blogs you can find on the internet. The sooner you can get to using functional ingredients, the more quickly you will heal. I see a lot of people in social media groups posting their gluten free food options, but honestly, a lot of those may be unhealthy and full of other inflammatory ingredients. Be careful. An excerpt from Sandi Star’s book Beyond Gluten – A Healing Transition walks you through healthy steps in going gluten free.
  11. Celiac.com 09/25/2018 - In a patent application that could have a huge impact on the gluten-free industry, General Mills, Inc. has described its method and system for removing foreign, gluten-containing grains to establish gluten-free oats. Current FDA guidelines require all products labeled gluten-free to have a maximum gluten content of 20 parts per million (ppm). Published August 23rd, patent application No. US 20180236453 A1 details a method for producing oat grains with gluten levels below 20 ppm and, more preferably, below 10 ppm. Natural oats generally do not contain gluten, but after harvest, transport and storage, large batches of raw oats may contain small amounts of gluten-containing grains, such as wheat, barley, rye and triticale. These can sometimes occur at levels exceeding 20 ppm. The General Mills patent application describes a method of arranging mechanical oat sorting operations in series, or in both series and parallel operations. The multi-step process best includes width grading, multiple length grading steps, along with a potential de-bearding step. The resulting oats will be gluten-free to under 20 ppm, and possibly to under 10 ppm, and are suitable for the production of gluten-free oat food products, including cereals and granolas. To receive a patent, General Mills will have to prove that their process does what they say it does. A successful patent for General Mills could have a huge effect on the gluten-free oat foods industry. For one, it may allow General Mills to become a major supplier of gluten-free oats for other manufacturers. The benefits of larger scale, more economical gluten-free oat production could include more, and more readily available, gluten-free oat products, along with lower prices for both manufacturers and consumers. Stay tuned for more developments on this and related stories. Read more at Justicia.com
  12. Celiac.com 10/02/2018 - With fall looming just over the horizon, we’re taking moment to share our six most popular gluten-free soup recipes. These delicious gluten-free soups have satisfied thousands of hungry gluten-free eaters, and they make great go-to recipes. They will help to anchor your gluten-free eating through the cold winter months. Make extra and freeze for a quick reliable gluten-free meal at home or on the fly. Just heat it up and dig in! Celiac.com’s Six Most Popular Gluten-Free Soup Recipes are: Gluten-Free Easy Chicken Soup This gluten-free chicken soup will have you coming back for more. Perfect for a cold day, or for a day when you have a cold. Just Like Lipton's Onion Soup Mix (Gluten-free) This gluten-free version of good old Lipton’s Onion soup is one of my favorites. Make it ahead of time, and store for instant soup goodness. Works for all those recipes that call for Lipton’s soup. Great for dips, etc. Blend with yogurt for a great low-cal dip. Gluten-Free Split Pea Soup What’s cold weather without good split-pea soup? This tasty gluten-free version of traditional pea soup will have you wishing for a cloudy day. Gluten-Free Vegetable Beef Soup This hearty vegetable beef soup will help nourish you body and soul. Really Good Gluten-Free Potato Soup This rich, hearty delicious potato soup will warm your tummy and make your mouth smile. Gluten-Free Creamy Tomato Soup When you need a good, creamy gluten-free tomato soup, this recipe is your new best friend.
  13. Celiac.com 10/01/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to establish the rates of epilepsy in patients with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and vice versa and to characterize aspects of the epileptic syndromes presented by these patients. The research team included Thomas Julian, Marios Hadjivassiliou, and Panagiotis Zis. They are variously affiliated with the Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience University of Sheffield in Sheffield, UK; and the Academic Department of Neurosciences Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust Sheffield, UK. The team conducted a systematic computer-based literature search on the PubMed database, and gathered information on rates, demographics and epilepsy phenomenology. Patients with celiac disease are nearly twice as likely to have epilepsy as the general population. Celiac disease is twice as common in epilepsy patients as in the general population. Researchers still need to do more studies to assess rates of gluten sensitivity in epilepsy patients. The data indicate that the prevalence of celiac disease or gluten sensitivity is higher for certain epilepsy scenarios, including childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms, adult patients with fixation off sensitivity (FOS) and those with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis. Epilepsy in the context of gluten-related disorders is a syndrome of celiac disease, epilepsy and cerebral calcification (CEC syndrome), which is frequently described in the literature. The good news is that gluten-free diet helps to control epilepsy in 53% of cases, either reducing seizure frequency, enabling reduced doses or even termination of anti-epileptic drugs. Patients with epilepsy of unknown cause should receive blood tests for markers of gluten sensitivity, and may benefit from a gluten-free diet. Read more at: Springer.com
  14. Celiac.com 09/29/2018 - With berry season in full swing, this recipe will help you deliver a tasty, vibrant, refreshing salad in a heartbeat. Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries frolic with baby spinach, almonds, avocado, cilantro, and goat cheese to deliver a super-fresh summertime salad. Ingredients: 9 oz baby spinach, torn 1 cup sliced strawberries, sliced 1 cup raspberries 1 cup blueberries 1 cup blackberries ½ cup sliced almonds, toasted ⅓ cup cilantro, lightly chopped 1 avocado, chopped 4 oz goat cheese, crumbled Directions: Place baby spinach on each plate, then top with berries, almonds, cilantro and chopped avocado. Crumble goat cheese on top then drizzle with balsamic vinegar and olive oil. Enjoy!
  15. Celiac.com 09/27/2018 - Microscopic colitis is a frequent culprit in cases of chronic watery diarrhea among elderly patients. Although patients with microscopic colitis seem to have higher rates of celiac disease, researchers haven’t done much research on the relationship between dietary gluten consumption, and risk of microscopic colitis in people who do not have celiac disease. A team of researchers recently prepared a prospective study of US women without celiac disease. The research team included Po-Hong Liu MD, MPH; Benjamin Lebwohl MD, MS; Kristin E. Burke MD; Kerry L. Ivey PhD; Ashwin N. Ananthakrishnan MBBS, MPH; Paul Lochhead MBChB, PhD; Ola Olen MD, PhD; Jonas F. Ludvigsson MD, PhD; James M. Richter MD; Andrew T. Chan MD, MPH; & Hamed Khalili MD, MPH. The research team studied 160,744 US women without celiac disease who were enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and the NHSII. They then estimated dietary gluten intake using validated food frequency questionnaires at four year intervals. They confirmed cases of microscopic colitis through a review of medical records. The team used Cox proportional hazard modeling to estimate the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The researchers found 219 cases of microscopic colitis over more than 20 years of follow-up covering 3,716,718 person-years, for a crude incidence rate of 5.9 cases per 100,000 person-years, in NHS and NHSII. Most significantly, they found that dietary gluten intake did not influence the risk of developing microscopic colitis. Compared to individuals in the lowest quintile of energy-adjusted gluten intake, the adjusted HR of microscopic colitis was 1.18 for the middle quintile and 1.03 for the highest quintile. Even adjusting the figures to account for primary gluten sources, including refined and whole grains, made no substantial difference in the effect estimates. Further, there was no difference in association rates according to lymphocytic or collagenous subtypes; nor were the rates changed by age, smoking status, or body mass index. The good news from this study is that gluten intake plays no role in promoting microscopic colitis in adult women without celiac disease. Read more at: The American Journal of Gastroenterology (2018)
  16. Celiac.com 09/22/2018 - We’ve done recipes for Caprese salad. We’ve done recipes for peaches. We’ve never done one for peach Caprese salad. This gluten-free treat adds fresh peaches for a sweet summery-sweet twist on classic Caprese salad. Easy to make and wonderfully tasty, this recipe is sure to be a hit at your next barbecue or grill session. Ingredients: 1 ripe tomato 1 ripe peach 12-14 leaves of fresh basil 6 oz. ball fresh mozzarella Balsamic vinegar Extra virgin olive oil Directions: Slice tomato, peach and mozzarella into ½″ slices. Layer the tomato, peach and cheese slices with whole leaves of fresh basil. Drizzle with extra virgin olive and balsamic vinegar. Season with salt and pepper.
  17. Celiac.com 09/21/2018 - The English as a Second Language (ESL) pie is so large in countries such as South Korea that there seem to be enough helpings for anyone interested. However, these generous slices may be off limits to individuals with severe food allergies or intolerances, including those with celiac disease. If you have diet restrictions and are thinking of heading to South Korea or another Asian country, the following information will help you decide whether or not this move is a good idea. One might think that Asia, the land of rice-based meals, would be a celiac’s paradise. As one naïve dietician told me before I moved to Seoul, “You couldn’t be going to a better place.” This assumption could not be further from the truth. If cooked with traditional ingredients, many local dishes are gluten-free. However, in Korea, wheat flour is now cheaper than other kinds of flour, despite the fact that it has to be imported. Wheat flour and barley are currently the two most common ingredients in Korean food products. In Korea, eleven major food allergens must be included on product labels: poultry eggs, milk, buckwheat, peanuts, soybean, wheat, mackerel, crab, pork, peaches, and tomatoes. As for anything else, the Korean Food and Drug Administration states that only the five major ingredients in a product have to be labeled. Furthermore, a label need only include intentional ingredients, not things accidentally mixed into a product through cross-contamination. So you can say goodbye to warnings like: “this product may contain traces of peanuts.” Stricter labeling regulations will be put into effect in September 2006. However, these laws will remain less stringent than those in North America and Europe. According to a source at the KFDA, labeling restrictions are similar in Japan and more lax in China and South East Asia. One can easily learn Korean for “I’m allergic to ____” in any phrasebook or from a Korean coworker, friend, or even the guy in the next seat on your Korean Air flight. Yet it is the cultural barrier, not the language barrier, which poses the most difficulties for a celiac. Korean culture revolves around the sharing of food due to food shortages during the Japanese occupation; Koreans do not ask, “How are you?” but, “Have you had your meal?” Co-workers, friends, and even the occasional stranger will offer to share food. The politest way to refuse is by saying, “Thank you, but I can’t. I’m allergic.” Also, rather than saying you are allergic to something in Korean—allerugi—it is much more effective to say you cannot have it. (see the list of useful phrases). Unfortunately, even these statements are unlikely to be fully effective when eating Korean food. Many Koreans are completely unaware that frequently-used ingredients such as tashida soup flavouring and soybean powder contain wheat. Most Koreans I spoke with were shocked to hear that, as a celiac, I could not eat food which had so much as touched gluten. Generally, they assume that people with food allergies are still able to consume a product with a 1-2% trace of the allergen. Food allergies, celiac disease, vegetarianism, and other kinds of diet restrictions are rare in this country and are not taken very seriously. Furthermore, according to gastroenterologist Dr. Kim of Severance Hospital in Seoul, only two people were ever diagnosed with celiac disease in Korea. The world of North American restaurants, where servers cater to those with food allergies, food sensitivities, and plain old picky eaters, is very far away. Koreans generally order what is on the menu without making any special requests. Even Westerners who learn enough of the Korean language to explain their diets often end up being served something they asked specifically not to have. Furthermore, Korean food is not served on personal plates: everyone at the table reaches his or her chopsticks into the various communal dishes, causing cross-contamination. I was at a restaurant with some Korean friends and was trying to explain my gluten-intolerance to them, when one young man told me he was so sensitive to peaches that he could not so much as touch a peach without breaking out into a rash. Five minutes later I saw him eat a dish containing peach slices. This is the attitude of Koreans to food allergies—both theirs and yours. The gluten-free meal which is safest and easiest to find in Korea is samgyupsal. This dish features fatty, thick slices of pork cooked over a clean grill right at your table. Just make sure that all sauces are kept off the grill. Bibimbop is a rice, vegetable, and egg dish usually served with kochujang, a red pepper paste which unfortunately contains wheat. Bibimbop can be ordered, however, with the kochujang on the side. Most foreigners are in Korea to work rather than visit, and having an apartment provides the extra advantage of having one’s own cooking space. There are a few of us who have managed the gluten-free diet in Korea. However, it has not been easy. If you have celiac disease or food allergies and are thinking of moving to this part of the world, I can guarantee you that it will be a monumental challenge. Useful Korean phrases: Thank you, but I can’t. I’m allergic: kamsa hamnida man, allerugi issoyo. I cannot have barley, rye, or wheat: chonun pori hago homil hago mil motmuhgeyo. Barley: pori Wheat: mil Rye: homil Bibimbop with the red pepper paste on the side: bibimbop kochujang garu Grilled Pork: samgyupsal
  18. Celiac.com 09/19/2018 - Great news for gluten-free cookies lovers! Girl Scouts has announced the debut of a new gluten-free cookie to its enormously popular cookie brand. The new Caramel Chocolate Chip is a chewy cookie that contains caramel, semi-sweet chocolate chips, and a hint of sea salt. also happens to be gluten-free. The new gluten-free treat will be available in select areas during the 2019 cookie-selling season; which typically runs from February to April each year. The gluten-free Caramel Chocolate Chip joins the Girl Scouts’ two other gluten-free offerings: Toffee-tastic, a buttery cookie with sweet and crunchy golden toffee bits, and Trios, a peanut butter oatmeal cookie with chocolate chips. The Girl Scouts of America has been around for over 100 years and now hosts more than 1.8 million girl members. Every year, about 100 million scouts between the ages of five and 18 sell approximately 200 million boxes of cookies nationwide. According to the Girl Scouts website, that money stays local to develop local leadership training activities, summer camps, and more activities. According to a 2016 study conducted by the Girl Scout Research Institute, approximately 85% of Girl Scouts surveyed said that Girl Scout Cookie Program helped them learn how to set goals and meet deadlines, while 88% said it helped them become effective decision-makers. Another 88% said they learned how to manage money, while 94% said the program helped them to learn business ethics. The Girl Scouts have also added online sales and iOS and Android apps that allow people to find cookies or order from their phones.
  19. Celiac.com 09/18/2018 - With a number of major tennis stars singing the praises of a gluten-free diet, including top players like Novak Djokovic, Swiss great Roger Federer weighed in on the topic. The 20-time Grand Slam winner says that he’s never tried the gluten-free diet, and that he doesn’t not “even know what that all means…I eat healthy, and I think that's what people should do, too, if they have the options. It's sure important the right diet for an athlete.” Djokovic, the 2018 US Open winner has been gluten-free since 2011, and calls the diet his biggest key to his success. For Federer, diet is helpful, but not the whole story. “[Diet] can help you, you know. I mean, I think every athlete should be in good shape. I don't think we should have any fat athletes, to be honest. We do too much sports and we should be too professional to let that happen to ourselves. If it happens, well, we should wake up. You don't have the right entourage. They're not telling you that you're a bit fat. Players try different things, and whatever works for them. I do my thing. It's been very easy and natural and healthy, and it's worked.” So, while Novak Djokovic, and a number of other athletes, have gone gluten-free and continue to tout the benefits, look for Federer to remain faithful to his generally nutritious non-gluten-free diet. Read more at: TennisWorldUSA.org
  20. Celiac.com 09/12/2018 - Many people with celiac disease develop peripheral neuropathy, also known as gluten neuropathy. A team of researchers recently set out to determine rates of neuropathic pain in patients with seemingly idiopathic peripheral neuropathy and gluten sensitivity, and to make note of any contributing factors. They included patients with positive antigliadin, endomysial, and/or transglutaminase antibodies, with or without enteropathy. The research team included P Zis, PG Sarrigiannis, DG Rao, and M Hadjivassiliou. They are affiliated with the Academic Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Rd, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK. They invited all consecutive patients with gluten neuropathy attending a specialist gluten/neurology clinic to participate in the study. They used the DN4 questionnaire and the visual analog scale to assess pain levels. They used the Overall Neuropathy Limitations Scale to assess the severity of neuropathy, along with the Mental Health Index (MHI-5) to assess patients' general mental health status. A total of 33 out of 60 patients with gluten neuropathy showed neuropathic pain. The team found no significant differences between the painful, and the non-painful groups in terms of age, gender, neuropathy severity and neuropathy type. Over half of patients with painless gluten neuropathy followed a strict gluten-free diet, compared with just 21.2% of those with painful neuropathy. Patients with painful gluten neuropathy also showed significantly worse MHI-5 scores. After adjusting for age, gender and MHI-5 scores, multivariate analysis showed that, strict gluten-free diet lowered the odds of peripheral neuropathic pain by nearly 90%. Most patients with gluten neuropathy commonly have neuropathic pain, which is associated with poorer mental health status. A strict gluten-free diet might substantially reduce rates of peripheral neuropathic pain in patients with gluten neuropathy. Read more at: J Neurol. 2018 Jul 21. doi: 10.1007/s00415-018-8978-5.PMID: 30032386
  21. Celiac.com 09/17/2018 - Her name is Hawkeye, she’s a black lab, and her mission is to detect gluten for a young man named Toby, who gets terribly sick if he eats food that contains gluten. Hawkeye is up to 98% accurate at detecting gluten with just a few sniffs. Hawkeye was also expensive, costing a princely $16,000, not including food, and vet bills. That may sound expensive, but, says Toby’s mom, Amy "when you think about it trainers are often training only one to two dogs at a time and our trainer, she only trained one dog at a time and it took a year.” In Toby’s case, the community rallied to raise the money to buy Hawkeye, who is a registered service dog, and so can accompany Toby nearly everywhere. Everyone loves Hawkeye and her role in Toby’s life. Amy calls Hawkeye a “life-giver, and says that Amy continued “she's breathed life and confidence into Toby that we haven't seen in a really long time." She adds that the family has “really seen just growth and development in him because he's not getting sick as often and he's now able to learn more. So he can now say his alphabet, learn his numbers and colors, things that just a year ago he wasn't doing." Gluten-sniffing dogs are rare, but their numbers are growing. The Mercola.com website says that Willow, a gluten-sniffing German shorthaired pointer in Michigan, can detect gluten with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. The website Nimasensor.com notes that “[g]luten-sniffing dogs may detect gluten in amounts as small as .0025 parts per million with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy.” Love the idea of a gluten sniffing dog, but maybe daunted by the price, logistics or commitment? There are portable gluten sensors currently on the market, with greater accuracy than Hawkeye, for a few hundred dollars. Disclosure: Nima Labs is a paid advertiser for Celiac.com
  22. Celiac.com 09/13/2018 - Bob’s Red Mill finds itself under fire by two women who claim the company knowingly hides the presence of an allegedly cancer-causing weed killer in its steel cut oat and rolled oat products, and falsely advertises those products as healthy. Tamara Frankel and Natasha Paracha filed a federal class action in San Francisco, alleging that parent company Bob’s Red Mill Natural Foods knows that its oat products contain or likely contain glyphosate, but fails to disclose it on the label. The women cite a recent report by the Environmental Working Group, an environmental research and advocacy group, which claimed to find traces of controversial herbicide glyphosate in Cheerios, Quaker Oats and other oat-based breakfast foods. The women contend that Bob’s uses labels such as “gluten free,” “wheat free” and “purity tested,” which lead consumers to falsely believe them to be healthy. Both U.S. and European regulators have concluded that glyphosate is safe, while that World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies it as a probable human carcinogen. Bayer subsidiary Monsanto, maker of the glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup has faced numerous lawsuits over its product. A San Francisco jury recently found that exposure to Roundup caused the cancer of a school groundskeeper, and awarded him $289 million in damages. Shortly after that verdict, the Environmental Working Group released a report claiming that 31 of 45 oat-based food samples tested positive for glyphosate, and that levels exceeded safety limits of 160 parts per billion. EWG applies a more stringent standard than the 2 mg/kg/day of glyphosate standard used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the 1.1 mg per day standard used by the State of California. Frankel and Paracha are represented by Patricia Syverson of the San Diego law firm Bonnett, Fairbourn, Friedman & Balint. Stay tuned for more developments on this and related stories.
  23. I was pleasantly surprised how great Biena Chickpeas taste—they are light and crunchy, and are much easier on your teeth than traditional snacks like corn nuts. They are lightly roasted, and, combined with a bit of salt, have a very pleasant flavor. In addition to their great flavor, they are also very healthy. They contain only chickpeas, sunflower oil, and sea salt. One serving contains 6 grams protein, and 6 grams (24% of RDA) of fiber. They are also low in fat, and contain 70% less fat than peanuts. It's rare to find such a great tasking snack that also happens to be so healthy. Visit their site for more info.
  24. In my house, fall and winter cooking means lots of stews, soups and casseroles. Beef stew is one of my true favorites, and one that I can almost never order at a restaurant, because it almost always contains wheat, either as a thickener, or to dredge the meat for browning. Beef stew is a dish that goes well by itself, or which can be served over rice or gluten-free noodles for a heartier meal. Here is a recipe that will deliver a delicious gluten-free stew that will keep your hungry eaters coming back for more. Ingredients: 2 pounds stew beef 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 cups water 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 gluten-free beef bouillon cube (I often use Celifibr's Vegetarian) 5 tablespoons Just Like Lipton's Gluten-Free Soup Mix (Recipe below) 3 whole cloves garlic, peeled 2 bay leaves 1 large onion, sliced 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon pepper ½ teaspoon paprika ¼ teaspoon ground allspice 4-5 large carrots, sliced 3-4 potatoes, cubed 3 celery stalks, chopped 2 tablespoons cornstarch Directions: Heat oil in a large stew pot. Stir in meat and cook lightly until meat browns. Add water, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, bay leaves, onion, salt, sugar, pepper, paprika, soup mix, bouillon cube, and allspice. Cover and simmer on low heat for 1½ hours. Remove bay leaves and garlic cloves. Add potatoes, carrots and celery. Cover and cook another 30 to 40 minutes. To thicken gravy, get a large bowl, and mix ¼ cup water and the cornstarch until smooth. Slowly whisk in 2 cups of liquid from the stew pot. Slowly stir mixture into the stew pot. Stir and cook until it reaches desired thickness. Gluten-free Dry Onion Soup Mix Ingredients: 1½ cups dried minced onion ¼ cup beef bouillon powder (gluten-free) 2½ tablespoons onion powder ½ teaspoon crushed celery seed ½ teaspoon sugar Directions: Combine all ingredients and store in an airtight container. About 5 tablespoons equals a single 1¼-ounce package of Lipton's mix.
  25. Celiac.com 09/10/2018 - Anyone diagnosed with celiac disease needs to eat a gluten-free diet if they hope to see their condition improve, and not lead to worse outcomes. So, how much gluten exposure do celiacs get on a gluten-free diet? William F. Balistreri, MD, Director Emeritus, Pediatric Liver Care Center; Medical Director Emeritus, Liver Transplantation at Cincinnati Children's Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio presented data at this year's Digestive Disease Week that focused on the challenges celiac patients face in trying to follow a gluten-free diet. Gluten-free standards and labels help improve awareness, but even so, eating gluten-free can be a challenge. Anyone with celiac disease can tell you that the chances of accidental gluten contamination are many, and that consent vigilance is required. Even ”gluten-free foods" are not always free from variable amounts of gluten, whether by imprecise food production, processing, packaging, or preparation. Accidental gluten exposure can also come via non-foods, such as lipstick, shampoo, toothpaste and the like. Regular, low-level gluten exposure can cause many celiac patients to have mucosal inflammation despite maintaining a gluten-free diet. Product by product, gluten levels are generally well-known, but not much is known about how much gluten exposure levels in people with celiac disease who are following a gluten-free diet. Such information could be quite helpful in designing disease management and patient follow-up strategies. Gluten immunogenic peptide (GIP) analysis provides direct and quantitative measurement of gluten exposure, has proven useful in diagnosis and clinical management of non-responsive or refractory celiac patients. To figure out the amounts of gluten ingested by highly motivated, educated celiac patients following a gluten-free diet, the research team measured levels of GIPs in food, urine, and stool. They noted the connections between gluten exposure and persistent villous atrophy or related conditions. The study also analyzed food samples from restaurant “doggie bags" saved by the study subjects. The team detected gluten in at least one food sample from nearly 90% of patients consuming a gluten-free diet. That indicates that nearly nine out of ten people with celiac disease, who are trying hard to follow a gluten-free diet, as being exposed to gluten when they eat out. Overall, approximately 33% of food samples tested positive for GIPs above 20 ppm, and the estimated GIPs ingested ranged from 0.23 mg to > 40 mg per exposure. This new information confirms what many people with celiac disease have long suspected. Namely, that avoiding gluten is really hard to do, even for who are highly aware of gluten-related celiac disease issues, and who work hard to avoid gluten. Read more at: Medscape.com
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