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Found 2,234 results

  1. Celiac.com 08/14/2018 - Occasionally, Celiac.com learns of an amusing gluten-free story after the fact. Such is the case of the “Gluten-Free Fireworks.” We recently learned about a funny little event that happened leading up to Fourth of July celebrations in the town of Springdale in Northwest Arkansas. It seems that a sign advertising "Gluten Free Fireworks" popped up near a fireworks stand on interstate 49 in Springdale. In case you missed the recent dose of Fourth of July humor, in an effort to attract customers and provide a bit of holiday levity, Pinnacle Fireworks put up a sign advertising "gluten-free fireworks.” The small company is owned by Adam Keeley and his father. "A lot of the people that come in want to crack a joke right along with you," Keeley said. "Every now and then, you will get someone that comes in and says so fireworks are supposed to be gluten-free right? Have I been buying fireworks that have gluten? So then I say no, no they are gluten-free. It's just a little fun." Keeley said that their stand saw a steady flow of customers in the week leading up to the Fourth. In addition to selling “gluten-free” fireworks, each fireworks package sold by Pinnacle features a QR code. The code can be scanned with a smartphone. The link leads to a video showing what the fireworks look like. We at Celiac.com hope you and your family had a safe, enjoyable, and, yes, gluten-free Fourth of July. Stay tuned for more on gluten-free fireworks and other zany, tongue-in-cheek stories. Read more at kark.com
  2. Celiac.com 08/06/2018 - Okay, so it’s not a gluten-free donut, but Dunkin’ Donuts has announced the debut of a gluten-free fudge brownie, the company’s first-ever gluten-free bakery product, that will be available in all of Dunkin's 8,500 US stores. A company statement said that Dunkin’ Donuts recognizes "the importance of providing alternative choices for people with dietary restrictions or who choose a gluten-free diet." Gluten-free food sales are projected to exceed $2 billion in sales by 2020, up 20% from 2015, according to industry research group Packaged Facts. Dunkin's gluten-free brownie is one of several new items the company is introducing, although it is the only one that is gluten-free. Other new non-gluten-free items include waffle-breaded chicken tenders, pretzel bites and ham and cheese roll-ups. All of these items are priced at $2 each, as part of the chain's new Dunkin' Run menu, which the company hopes will draw customers beyond the usual breakfast rush. The latest menu changes are all part of a concerted effort by the company to rebrand, including ditching the ”Donuts" part of its name in some new stores, reducing its food offerings, emphasizing its drink selections, and pursuing plans to double the number of stores. Gluten-free donut lovers may have to wait indefinitely for a genuine gluten-free Dunkin’ donut, but a reliable, readily available gluten-free brownie is a good start. If you get a chance to try Dunkin’s new gluten-free brownie, please let us know your thoughts.
  3. Celiac.com 08/11/2018 - Need a quick, easy, reliable gluten-free dish that will satisfy everyone and leave the cook with plenty of time to relax? This recipe is sure to do the trick. Best of all, it's super easy. Just grab some chicken breasts, season them, hit them with a sprig of rosemary, wrap some bacon around them, and chuck them on the grill and call it dinner. Okay, you can add some rice and veggies. Ingredients: 4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves 4 thick slices bacon 4 teaspoons garlic powder 4 small sprigs fresh rosemary salt and pepper to taste Directions: Heat an outdoor grill to medium-high heat, and lightly oil the grate. Sprinkle 1 teaspoon garlic powder on a chicken breast and season with salt and pepper. Place a rosemary sprig on each chicken breast. Wrap the bacon around the chicken and the rosemary. Hold bacon in place with a toothpick or extra rosemary stem. Cook the chicken breasts until no longer pink in the center and the juices run clear, about 8 minutes per side. Keep an eye out for any grill flare ups from the bacon grease. Remove the toothpicks and serve with steamed rice and your favorite vegetables for a winning meal.
  4. Celiac.com 08/09/2018 - Whatever one might say about crawfish, shrimp and crustaceans in general, Americans don’t typically eat bugs. Can a former Ralph Lauren marketing executive turn the world on to flour made from crickets? Over the last few years, Americans have been presented with a buffet of alternative proteins and meals. Robyn Shapiro’s company, Seek, has created all-purpose, gluten-free, and Paleo blended flours, which can be used cup for cup in any recipe calling for flour. The company, which makes pure cricket powder for smoothies, ice creams, and other liquid-based foods, is now selling cinnamon-almond crunch cricket protein and snack bites. To get the public interested in its cricket protein and cricket flour products, Shapiro has collaborated with famous chefs to create recipes for The Cricket Cookbook. The book’s cast includes La Newyorkina chef Fany Gerson, a Mexico City native known for her cricket sundaes; noted Sioux chef and cookbook author Sean Sherman; and former Noma pastry chef Ghetto Gastro member, Malcolm Livingston, among others. Other companies have sought to promote the benefits of insect protein, including Chapul, which makes cricket protein bars and powders, and Exo, which makes dairy- and gluten-free cricket protein bars in flavors like cocoa nut and banana bread. These companies, along with others in the business tend to aim their products at Paleo dieters by promising more protein and no dairy. Seek’s chef-focused approach makes it unique. By pairing with noted chefs who already use bugs and bug protein in their cooking, Shapiro is looking to make the public more comfortable and confident in using bugs to cook and bake. So far, the response has been slow, but steady. Seek has already raised nearly $13,000 from 28 backers, well on its way toward its $25,000 goal. Seek’s cricket flours and other products will initially only be available via Kickstarter. If that goes well, the products will be sold on Seek’s website. Early backers will get a discount and a chance for a signed copy of the book. Seek hopes to debut their products nationwide starting in the fall. Could gluten-free cricket flour and the new cookbook be the next big gluten-free Christmas gift? Stay tuned for more on this and other gluten-free stories. Source: grubstreet.com
  5. Celiac.com 07/30/2018 - In what looks like great news for UK beer drinkers, beverage giant AB InBev has announced plans to launch a gluten-free version of its popular and widely distributed Stella Artois lager in the UK. Stella Artois Gluten Free will hit UK grocery shelves in August in 4-packs of 330ml bottles, before a more comprehensive roll out this fall. AB InBev said that Stella Artois Gluten Free “will maintain the high quality and exacting standards of the original Stella Artois recipe,” and will use the same four natural ingredients. The final product will use a specific protein to remove gluten, which the company claims has no affect on the beer’s flavor or other characteristics. Stella Artois Gluten Free will be displayed outside traditional alcohol aisles, raising brand visibility. AB InBev is clearly motivated by sales and revenues in the rapidly growing gluten-free market. The company noted that UK sales of free-from products grew 36% between 2016 and 2017, while revenues from gluten-free beer sales rose 83%. Stella Artois Europe marketing director Alexis Berger says that the company is “incredibly excited to be…making the UK’s favorite beer brand more accessible to those who follow a gluten-free lifestyle.” Making Stella Artois gluten-free will allow gluten-free consumers, to enjoy “the UK’s number one selling alcohol brand,” Berger added. No word on whether AB InBev will be making Stella Artois Gluten Free available in the United States. Read more in this press release. Are you a beer drinker who appreciates a good gluten-free lager? Let us know your thoughts on the news that Stella Artois Gluten Free will soon be a thing, if only in the UK for now. Also, please be sure to let us know your thoughts if you get a chance to try the product.
  6. Celiac.com 08/08/2018 - A number of studies have cataloged the numerous challenges faced by adolescents with celiac disease attempting to comply with a gluten-free diet. A team of researchers recently set out to reevaluate gluten-free dietary compliance and the current clinical condition of 123 now teenage celiac patients, who were diagnosed in the first three years of life and were followed up for at least 10 years to determine whether a less strict approach to a gluten-free diet can actually increase gluten-free dietary compliance. The research team included M Mayer, L Greco, R Troncone, S Auricchio, and M N Marsh. They are variously affiliated with the University Department of Medicine, Hope Hospital, Salford, Manchester, UK. The team used computerized image analysis to assess mucosal structure and lymphocytes in small intestinal biopsy specimens obtained from 36 subjects. Of these adolescents with celiac disease, 65% were adhering to a strict gluten free diet, 11.4% followed a gluten-free diet with occasional gluten intake, while nearly 25% ate a gluten containing diet. Patients on a gluten containing diet had more frequent clinical gluten-related symptoms, while patients on a semi-strict diet did not. Occasional intake of small amounts (0-06-2 g/day) of gluten did not produce increased concentrations of anti-gliadin antibodies, but did result in a substantially greater crypt epithelial volume and expanded crypt intraepithelial lymphocyte numbers. So, could a semi-strict gluten-free diet benefit celiac teenagers who eat a gluten containing diet? These numbers suggest that a semi-strict gluten-free diet may be better than no gluten-free diet at all. Of course, the best choice would always be a 100% gluten-free diet. Source: Gut
  7. Scott Adams

    White Bread (Gluten-Free)

    This recipe has been modified from Bette Hagemans Butter Basted White Bread (More From the Gluten-Free Gourmet, page 38). Here it is: Combine 2 cups white rice flour, ½ cup potato starch flour, ½ cup tapioca flour, 2 ½ teaspoon xanthan gum, 2/3 cup dairy milk powder, 1 ½ teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon sugar and 2 ¼ teaspoon saf-instant yeast granules thoroughly. In a separate bowl, combine 4 tablespoons melted butter, 1 cup warm water, 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar. Slowly add to dry mixture, then add 3 room temperature eggs, one at a time (the mix should feel a little warm). Beat on high for 2 minutes. Cover with plastic wrap and a towel, and rise until doubled (time varies). After the first rise, beat the dough again for 3 minutes on high. Fill a large loaf pan 2/3 full (can use extra dough in muffin tins) Let rise until slightly over top of pan; bake at 350 for 30-45 minutes, covering with alum foil after the first 10 minutes. Delicious, and freezes pretty well. This recipe comes to us from Marne L. Platt in New Jersey.
  8. Celiac.com 08/02/2018 - For those who’ve been craving a juicy gluten-free social media story, crave no longer. None other than Kylie Jenner, younger sister to Kim and Kourtney Kardashian, has stepped up to oblige by labeling one of the shades of her eye shadow collection “Gluten Free.” It’s true, you can Google it. In case you, like me, have been out of the Kardashian loop lately, Kylie has most recently hitched her star to the growing makeup empire of sister Kourtney, after working with Kim and Khloe on their makeup lines. It seems that Kylie decided that one of the colors in their eye shadow palette was just begging to be called “Gluten Free.” Cue the reaction. Meanwhile, on Twitter some celiac folk thought it was hilarious, others less than funny. @paytoncalder tweeted: The fact that Kylie Jenner actually named a shade "gluten free" makes me cringe so hard. @business_poodle tweeted: Kylie Jenner is rly selling an eyeshadow called “gluten-free” and I’m working minimum wage????? For her own part, Kourtney explained on her app (who knew?) how she came to, embrace a gluten-free diet: “I have noticed a great positive change in behavior with my children when we stick to a gluten-free and dairy-free diet. I don’t think everyone needs to eat this way but we had muscle testing done, which showed we all have sensitivities to corn, gluten and dairy.” Between welcoming daughter Stormi Webster in February, Kylie and doing things like attending Coachella, Kylie has been busy as she looks to burnish her own makeup credentials. So, is Kylie’s eye shadow actually gluten-free? Let’s hope so, otherwise we’ll be back with more about this delicious, if un-nutritious story. Meantime, for more on this zany story de jour, Google it, or check your Twitter.
  9. Celiac.com 07/31/2018 - Using funds from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Canada Research Chairs Program, researcher Charlene Elliott, PhD, of the Department of Communication, Media, and Film, University of Calgary recently set out to assess the nutritional quality of gluten-free products specifically marketed for children. For her assessment, Elliott bought child-targeted gluten-free food products from two major supermarket chains in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Elliott used the Pan American Health Organization Nutrient Profile Model to compare the nutritional quality of products labeled gluten-free with those not so labeled. A secondary analysis compared the nutritional profile of child-targeted gluten-free products to their non-gluten-free “equivalents.” Elliott’s analysis showed that child-targeted gluten-free products generally had lower amounts of sodium, total fat, and saturated fat, However, those same foods also had less protein and about the same amount of calories from sugar as child-targeted products without a gluten-free claim. According to the Pan American Health Organization criteria, both gluten-free products and "regular" products designed for children can be classified as having poor nutritional quality (88% vs 97%). Compared to their non-gluten-free equivalents, products with a gluten-free claim had similarly high sugar levels, (79% vs 81%). So, the big picture is that gluten-free supermarket foods targeted at children are generally less nutritious than their non-gluten-free counterparts, and both types have alarmingly high sugar content. A gluten-free label is no guarantee of healthier, more nutritious food for kids, and it’s a mistake for parents to buy gluten-free products believing they are healthier than their non-gluten-free equals. The evidence shows that is simply not true. The takeaway here seems to be that, gluten-free or not, supermarket foods aimed at children are generally poor in nutrition and loaded with sugar, and parents should choose wisely when buying food for their children. Source: Pediatrics, July 2018
  10. Celiac.com 07/28/2018 - What do you get when you cross pico de gallo, guacamole and shrimp? The answer is this fresh, delightful ceviche that can also be served as a fancy salsa, and is sure to be the breakout star for your next food gathering. Ingredients: 1¼ pounds raw shrimp peeled and deveined 4 medium limes, juiced 2 medium/large avocados ½ Persian cucumber 4 medium fresh tomatoes 1 small onion diced ½ cup cilantro chopped 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ tsp salt and black pepper, or to taste Tortilla chips and gluten-free hot sauce of choice, as desired Directions: Season shrimp lightly with salt and pepper. Place a large skillet over medium high heat. Once the pan is hot, add 1 tablespoon olive oil. Add shrimp in a single layer and sauté about 1½ minutes on each side. When shrimp is cooked through, remove from the pan. Transfer shrimp to cutting board, coarsely chop and place into a large mixing bowl. Squeeze the lime juice over the shrimp, stir and set aside to marinate. As shrimp marinates, dice cucumber, tomato and avocado and add them to the mixing bowl with shrimp. Add dice onion and chopped fresh cilantro. Gently stir everything together until well combined. Serve in small bowls, with hot sauce and tortilla chips, as desired.
  11. Celiac.com 07/21/2018 - These easy-to-make tortilla wraps make a great addition to your lunchtime menu. Simply grab your favorite gluten-free tortillas, a bit of cream cheese, some charred fresh sweet corn, creamy avocado and ripe summer tomato. Add a bit of sliced roast beef and some mayonnaise and hot sauce, and you’re in business. And it's all ready in about half an hour. If you cook the corn the night before, they can be ready in just a few minutes. Ingredients: 12 ounces thinly sliced cooked beef, sliced 6 burrito-sized gluten-free tortillas 1 ripe medium avocado, diced 1 large tomato, diced ½ medium red onion, thinly sliced ¼ cup mayonnaise 2 ears sweet corn, husks and silk removed 1 teaspoon olive oil ¾ cup soft cream cheese spread 1-2 teaspoons gluten-free hot sauce of choice Sprouted pea greens, as desired fresh salsa, as desired Directions: Heat grill to medium-hot. Brush corn with olive oil. In a small dish, blend mayonnaise and hot sauce. Adjust mixture, and add fresh salsa, as desired. Grill corn for 8 to 12 minutes, turning as it browns and lowering heat as needed until corn is tender and charred in some places. Cool slightly; cut kernels from cobs. Spread 2 tablespoons cream cheese on one side of each tortilla to within ½-inch of edge; arrange beef slices to cover. Spread beef with mayonnaise hot sauce mixture as desired. Place a bit of grilled corn kernels, avocado, tomato and red onion in a 3-inch strip along one edge of each tortilla. Fold ends and roll into a burrito shape, and serve. I like to add sweet, crunchy pea greens for some extra crunch and nutrition.
  12. Celiac.com 07/19/2018 - Maintaining a gluten-free diet can be an on-going challenge, especially when you factor in all the hidden or obscure gluten that can trip you up. In many cases, foods that are naturally gluten-free end up contain added gluten. Sometimes this can slip by us, and that when the suffering begins. To avoid suffering needlessly, be sure to keep a sharp eye on labels, and beware of added or hidden gluten, even in food labeled gluten-free. Use Celiac.com's SAFE Gluten-Free Food List and UNSAFE Gluten-free Food List as a guide. Also, beware of these common mistakes that can ruin your gluten-free diet. Watch out for: Watch out for naturally gluten-free foods like rice and soy, that use gluten-based ingredients in processing. For example, many rice and soy beverages are made using barley enzymes, which can cause immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Be careful of bad advice from food store employees, who may be misinformed themselves. For example, many folks mistakenly believe that wheat-based grains like spelt or kamut are safe for celiacs. Be careful when taking advice. Beware of cross-contamination between food store bins selling raw flours and grains, often via the food scoops. Be careful to avoid wheat-bread crumbs in butter, jams, toaster, counter surface, etc. Watch out for hidden gluten in prescription drugs. Ask your pharmacist for help about anything you’re not sure about, or suspect might contain unwanted gluten. Watch out for hidden gluten in lotions, conditioners, shampoos, deodorants, creams and cosmetics, (primarily for those with dermatitis herpetaformis). Be mindful of stamps, envelopes or other gummed labels, as these can often contain wheat paste. Use a sponge to moisten such surfaces. Be careful about hidden gluten in toothpaste and mouthwash. Be careful about common cereal ingredients, such as malt flavoring, or other non-gluten-free ingredient. Be extra careful when considering packaged mixes and sauces, including soy sauce, fish sauce, catsup, mustard, mayonnaise, etc., as many of these can contain wheat or wheat by-product in their manufacture. Be especially careful about gravy mixes, packets & canned soups. Even some brands of rice paper can contain gluten, so be careful. Lastly, watch out for foods like ice cream and yogurt, which are often gluten-free, but can also often contain added ingredients that can make them unsuitable for anyone on a gluten-free diet. Eating Out? If you eat out, consider that many restaurants use a shared grill or shared cooking oil for regular and gluten-free foods, so be careful. Also, watch for flour in otherwise gluten-free spices, as per above. Ask questions, and stay vigilant.
  13. Celiac.com 07/18/2018 - Despite many studies on immune development in children, there still isn’t much good data on how a mother’s diet during pregnancy and infancy influences a child’s immune development. A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether changes in maternal or infant diet might influence the risk of allergies or autoimmune disease. The team included Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, Despo Ierodiakonou, Katharine Jarrold, Sergio Cunha, Jennifer Chivinge, Zoe Robinson, Natalie Geoghegan, Alisha Ruparelia, Pooja Devani, Marialena Trivella, Jo Leonardi-Bee, and Robert J. Boyle. They are variously associated with the Department of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease More Common in Women and Girls International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; the Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Section of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Centre for Statistics in Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; and Stanford University in the USA. Team members searched MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), Web of Science, Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) for observational studies conducted between January 1946 and July 2013, and interventional studies conducted through December 2017, that evaluated the relationship between diet during pregnancy, lactation, or the first year of life, and future risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. They then selected studies, extracted data, and assessed bias risk. They evaluated data using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). They found 260 original studies, covering 964,143 participants, of milk feeding, including 1 intervention trial of breastfeeding promotion, and 173 original studies, covering 542,672 participants, of other maternal or infant dietary exposures, including 80 trials of 26 maternal, 32 infant, or 22 combined interventions. They found a high bias risk in nearly half of the more than 250 milk feeding studies and in about one-quarter of studies of other dietary exposures. Evidence from 19 intervention trials suggests that oral supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of eczema. 44 cases per 1,000; 95% CI 20–64), and 6 trials, suggest that fish oil supplementation during pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of allergic sensitization to egg. GRADE certainty of these findings was moderate. The team found less evidence, and low GRADE certainty, for claims that breastfeeding reduces eczema risk during infancy, that longer exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced type 1 diabetes mellitus, and that probiotics reduce risk of infants developing allergies to cow’s milk. They found no evidence that dietary exposure to other factors, including prebiotic supplements, maternal allergenic food avoidance, and vitamin, mineral, fruit, and vegetable intake, influence risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. Overall, the team’s findings support a connection between the mother’s diet and risk of immune-mediated diseases in the child. Maternal probiotic and fish oil supplementation may reduce risk of eczema and allergic sensitization to food, respectively. Stay tuned for more on diet during pregnancy and its role in celiac disease. Source: PLoS Med. 2018 Feb; 15(2): e1002507. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507
  14. Celiac.com 06/29/2018 - Warning! If you crave the taste of "real" bread, this gluten free bread may be addictive. No rice flour here. This totally satisfying, wholesome, nutritious, hearty gluten free bread exudes the robust taste and firm, springy texture of rye bread. It really, really tastes like REAL bread, no exaggeration. The bread is absolutely delicious toasted or untoasted, keeps fresh for over 2 weeks in the refrigerator, and does not tear, sink in the center, dry out or crumble. This incredible 4 inch tall loaf can even be sliced nearly paper thin and still hold together. It is vegan, free of soy, corn, wheat, gluten, nuts, dairy, or eggs. Add caraway seeds and you'll want to break out the mustard, pickles, and coleslaw. It makes the perfect deli bread. Want pizza? Toasted slices of this bread make great pizza crusts for quick and easy gluten free mini pizzas. Even those not on a gluten free diet will find this bread utterly irresistible. A Quest Begins This outstanding GF bread is the result of a years long quest for the perfect GF bread recipe. It began with the classic GF bread recipe of rice flour, tapioca starch, corn or potato starch, powdered dry milk, eggs, oil, sugar, salt, xanthan gum, yeast and water. It later evolved to include bean flours. These early GF bread recipes, mostly starch and "empty" calories, simply tasted horrible and left a bitter aftertaste. Rice flour, bean flours and corn starch were quickly eliminated. After scientific studies concluded oats were gluten free and safe (except for possible wheat contamination), oat flour became a central ingredient. Starches were limited to no more than one third of the flour mix. Mashed banana, apple sauce, pumpkin puree, and yogurt were added to increase bread height and volume. Oat flour was blended with flour from other seeds and grains, including sorghum, millet, amaranth, quinoa, and buckwheat. A blend of oat and sorghum flour, tapioca and potato starch, mashed banana and low fat vanilla yogurt became standard GF bread recipe ingredients. Einkorn Einkorn an ancient form of wheat, was separately investigated. At that time, einkorn was considered potentially safe for celiacs. Samples of einkorn were obtained from Prime Grains [1] in Saskatchewan, Canada. Einkorn flour was found to have most of same height, volume, and sinking in the center problems as with any other gluten free flour blend in creating a GF bread. Einkorn bread, however, does not require the addition of starches. An oat/einkorn bread recipe similar to an oat/sorghum recipe minus the starches was created, but it became necessary to end the einkorn investigation when new research on einkorn came out showing that einkorn does contain gluten epitopes potentially harmful to celiacs. However, gluten content in einkorn is very low. The investigation produced no ill effects from consuming einkorn. Those with gluten sensitivity rather than celiac disease may well tolerate einkorn with no problems. Flaxseed Along with the Prime Grains einkorn samples sent from Saskatchewan, samples of golden and brown flaxseed were also sent. Using a coffee grinder to grind the flaxseed, the ground flaxseed was steeped in near-boiling water and used as egg replacer in GF bread recipes. The steeping releases mucilage from the outer coating of flaxseed to create a thick, slimy emulsion. Flaxseed mucilage seems to have a synergy with beta glucan in oats, a soluble fiber, forming a hydrocolloid combination that increases bread volume. When the Prime Grains flaxseed ran out, flaxseed was locally purchased. It was immediately noticed locally purchased flaxseed produced a much thinner emulsion than did the Prime Grains flaxseed. The local flaxseed had a much lower mucilage content. GF bread made with the local flaxseed had less volume and height and more sinking in the center than the Prime Grains flaxseed. Were it not for the flaxseed samples sent with the einkorn, the great variation in mucilage content in different varieties of flaxseed grown in different localities would have been missed. Little information is available on the mucilage content of flaxseed grown in North America. One study was found [2,3,4]. Prime Grains flaxseed is currently distributed through Farmer Direct Co-op [5] in Regina, Saskatchewan. High mucilage Farmer Direct Co-op flaxseed has been available from Whole Foods in the bulk foods section. Amazon's recent Whole Foods purchase may change that as bulk bin labels no longer state "Farmer Direct", only that it originates from Canada. However, the issue of high mucilage versus low mucilage flaxseed may be moot. The reason is buckwheat. Buckwheat, like flaxseed, also releases mucilage. It turns out buckwheat mucilage also increases bread height and volume, and, when used together with flaxseed, high mucilage flaxseed has no more effect on bread height and volume than lower mucilage flaxseed. More on buckwheat later. Deep Loaf Pans GF breads containing eggs and mostly starch can achieve high height and volume without collapsing using an ordinary loaf pan. But to achieve a full 4 inch loaf height using flaxseed as egg replacer and a low starch content requires a loaf pan with high sides. The deepest loaf pans available are 4 inch deep pullman loaf pans. Ideally a pan deeper than 4 inches is desired because GF breads tend to rise above the loaf pan and then fall during baking. Additionally, during baking, the loaf shrinks and pulls away from the pan side walls, more at the top than the bottom, resulting in a loaf narrowing toward the top rather than straight sides. Ideally the the sides of the loaf pan should taper so the bottom is narrower than the top. This cancels out the narrowing of the loaf at the top creating a finished loaf with straight sides. A small batch of 4-1/2 inch depth by 4-1/4 inch width by 8-1/2 inch and 13 inch length tapered heavy duty 16 gauge solid aluminum loaf pans were custom made by a USA baking pan manufacturer for this author to sell online. These long-life, heavy duty pans were ideal, but, unfortunately, high cost and price made for underwhelming online sales. The website was shut down years ago. However, a cheaper 13 inch long by 4 inch width by 4 inch depth aluminum-coated, folded thin steel pullman loaf pan should be adequate for the recipe which later follows. The cover is not needed. The following pans are suggested: USA Pan 13x4x4 Large Pullman Loaf Pan & Cover 1160PM-1 [6] or Chicago Metallic 44615 Pullman pan,single 13x4x4 [7]. Xanthan Gum and Konjac Glucomannan In the early development of oat and einkorn bread recipes, xanthan gum caused some problems. The use of xanthan gum alone often produced strange odd loaf shapes with concave sides. In one case an extra added teaspoon of xanthan gum caused the loaf to balloon well above the 4-1/2 inch deep loaf pan. When done, the sides of the loaf were sucked inwards and a cross section of loaf had the appearance of a giant mushroom. Konjac glucomannan powder [8] was then investigated. Konjac glucomannan is a natural, odorless soluble fiber that is found in the konjac plant and is the most viscous hydrocolloid available. Konjac used by itself produces a very firm loaf and restricts the bread height and volume. Xanthan gum produces a softer, more elastic bread. Konjac used together with xanthan gum have a synergy which allows the firmness of bread to be adjusted depending on their ratio and amounts. Konjac also "tames" xanthan gum so that the loaf has straight sides instead of turning into a mushroom. For a long time, 1-1/2 teaspoons each of konjac powder and xanthan gum, a one to one ratio, was used in the standard GF bread recipe. But this ratio and amount always resulted in at least some sinking in the center of the loaf. Recalling that additional xanthan gum creates a "mushroom" effect which results in a rounded top, the ratio was changed to 3 teaspoons of xanthan gum and 1 teaspoon konjac powder. This worked, resulting in a loaf with a slightly rounded or flat top, no longer sinking in the center. Psyllium husk was never tried as it generally decreases bread volume and height, not the desired effect [9]. Attempts That Did Not Work For years a standard GF bread recipe consisting of oat flour, sorghum flour, tapioca starch, potato starch, flaxseed, banana, low fat vanilla yogurt, molasses, sugar, canola margarine, cinnamon, ginger, salt, yeast, xanthan gum, konjac powder, apple cider vinegar, and water became standard daily fare. This recipe provided an acceptable GF bread, but was by no means perfect. It tended to crumble, required delicate handling, sank in the center, and had less volume and height than desired. It was not vegan or dairy free, and its taste could stand improvement. Deciding it was time for a change, numerous attempts to fix these short-comings were made. The attempts that failed included using citrus pectin, sugar beet fiber, gum arabic, and aquafaba (liquid from cooked chickpeas). High methoxyl citrus pectin did succeed in increasing height and volume and reducing crumbling, but its strong, bitter taste made it totally unacceptable. Choosing the Best GF Starches - Arrowroot and Potato Starch: Yes - Tapioca: No After the previous failures, investigations focused on how choice of starch affects GF bread volume. One especially interesting published research paper looked at GF breads made using a single starch in place of flour [10]. The study compared breads made with wheat, potato, tapioca, corn, and rice starch. Only wheat and potato starch produced any real bread structure. Corn starch had some bread structure. Tapioca and rice starch produced structures too far gone to be fully analyzed in the study. Tapioca starch produced a shapeless blob. Rice starch produced a crust circling a large empty center. The study revealed that potato starch would be the best GF starch for achieving greater volume and preventing sinking in the center. Unfortunately, the study did not look at arrowroot starch which later was found to be superior to tapioca starch. The standard oat/sorghum GF bread recipe used equal amounts of potato and tapioca starch. Two baking tests with these starches were performed using the standard GF bread recipe. One test used 3 parts potato to 1 part tapioca starch and the other test used 1 part potato to 3 parts tapioca starch. The test favoring potato starch produced a higher volume and height bread with reduced center sinking, as expected. The test favoring tapioca starch resulted in a drop in volume and height with increased center sinking. Potato starch has a bland, supposedly neutral taste. In the test favoring potato starch the "bland" taste dominated the entire taste of the bread covering up the taste of all other ingredients including molasses, spices, and banana, oats and sorghum, a totally unacceptable result. In the test favoring tapioca starch, a slight off taste was noted, but, worse, when toasted, the tapioca caused increased burning of the crust resulting in a bitter crust taste. It was concluded one should not make excessive use of potato starch and that tapioca starch may not be the best choice for a starch. This led to arrowroot starch as the next subject for investigation. Arrowroot and tapioca starches appear to be very similar. They definitely are not. Two baking tests were performed with arrowroot and potato starch. One test used 3 parts arrowroot to 1 part potato starch and the other test used equal parts of arrowroot and potato starch. In the test favoring arrowroot starch, the bread did not sink in the center or lose as much volume as when tapioca starch was favored. When toasted, the crust did not burn as with tapioca starch or produce any bitterness. Arrowroot starch also had no off taste as with tapioca starch. In the test with equal parts arrowroot and potato starch, there was a slight improvement in volume and less center sinking than with tapioca and potato starch at equal parts. The conclusion was that arrowroot starch is a superior choice over tapioca starch. Arrowroot may cost more than tapioca starch, but arrowroot starch now replaces tapioca starch as the preferred choice for a perfect GF bread recipe. Arrowroot starch can be found online in bulk at reasonable prices. Buckwheat - The Key to Volume, Height, Amazing Taste and a Bread That Does Not Sink or Crumble Still seeking the key to increasing bread volume and height, the world wide web was scoured for ideas. Intrigued by the impressive volume and height of GF breads made with buckwheat and rice flours by Strange Grains Gluten Free Bakery [11] in Perth, Australia, the question was asked, "Could buckwheat be the key?" Buckwheat had previously been rejected from consideration in the course of earlier oat bread recipe development due to a strong, unpleasant bitter taste. It turns out however, toasted buckwheat groats (kasha) were unknowingly used in that earlier trial years ago, a very bad and unfortunate choice. The world wide web provides many learning opportunities, one being that buckwheat flour does not have to taste awful. Buckwheat flour can be ground from three different forms of buckwheat, each having a completely different taste. The three forms are: 1) whole unhulled buckwheat; 2) raw dehulled buckwheat or buckwheat groats; 3) toasted buckwheat groats or kasha. The familiar earthy slightly bitter taste comes from the buckwheat hulls. In fact, some whole buckwheat flour contains added ground hulls for a stronger earthy flavor. The hulls create a greyish colored flour. Buckwheat groats are dehulled buckwheat seeds. Dehulling removes the source of the familiar earthy flavor. Flour from raw buckwheat groats has a creamy white color and a very mild sourdough rye flavor acceptable to just about everybody except for those who really miss having that earthy buckwheat hull flavor. Kasha or toasted buckwheat groats, on the other hand, has an extremely strong taste and odor that is popular in some cultures, but absolutely repulsive to most people. Kasha has a taste slightly suggestive of rye on the plus side but an odor strongly reminiscent of rotting food waste on the minus side. Kasha can easily be made by stirring raw buckwheat groats in a pan on medium heat for about 5 minutes until evenly brown and "fragrant". If the "fragrance" drives you out of your house into a freezing snowstorm, then you probably won't like kasha. Actually, after about a week of storage in a plastic bag in the refrigerator, the odor of rotting waste in bread made with kasha flour dissipates leaving the desirable sourdough rye flavor. Buckwheat flour can easily be made by grinding groats or whole buckwheat in a coffee grinder. Raw buckwheat groat flour is not readily available, especially gluten free certified flour, so a coffee grinder is needed. Gluten free whole buckwheat and raw buckwheat groats are readily available. Bob's Red Mill whole buckwheat flour is NOT certified gluten free (its groats are) but Anthony's Goods has certified gluten free whole buckwheat flour. Whole Foods has raw buckwheat groats in the bulk section at a very reasonable price. Bulk raw buckwheat groats are available online at reasonable prices. To test if buckwheat was the key to a perfect GF bread, a blend of one cup each of buckwheat, oat, and sorghum flours together with 2/3 cup each of potato and arrowroot starches went into the bread dough for the baking test. The buckwheat flour made the dough much more workable and elastic. Into to oven it went. The result? Success! Buckwheat indeed proved to be the missing key. The bread volume and height increased, reaching just over 4 inches tall. The use of 3 teaspoons xanthan gum and 1 teaspoon konjac powder contributed to a loaf with a slightly rounded top and absolutely no sinking in the center. The bread did not crumble. The rye-like taste was amazing. Why did buckwheat work? Buckwheat, like flaxseed, contains mucilage, and that slimy fiber likely gives buckwheat flour its high viscosity and unique baking properties [12]. Making GF Bread Dairy Free The final challenge was making the GF bread recipe vegan and dairy free. Low fat vanilla yogurt had been used to increase bread volume and protein. A substitute was needed. The latest trend in protein supplements is yellow pea isolate [13,14]. Yellow pea's protein amino acid profile compares favorably to that of dairy whey although it is not a totally complete protein. One study determined yellow pea protein added to GF bread had the highest level of sensory perception consumer acceptance compared to other proteins added to GF bread [15]. Yellow pea protein has also been used as the basis for a dairy free milk made by Ripple Foods [16]. Yellow pea protein is available from a number sources including Anthony's Goods, Bob's Red Mill, and Bulk Food Supplements. For the new GF bread vegan recipe, 2/3 cup of low fat vanilla yogurt was replaced with 1/4 cup yellow pea protein isolate powder plus 5 oz water. Yellow pea is a legume. If you have allergies to soy or peanuts (also legumes) use with caution, though yellow pea is considered to be much less likely to be an allergen. The yellow pea protein powder can be omitted with little effect on the overall GF bread recipe. Just replace it with another heaping tablespoon each of buckwheat, oat and, sorghum flours to maintain bread volume. Another vegan consideration is choice of oil. Canola oil, olive oil, coconut oil or a vegan buttery flavored spread like Smart Choice Original or Earth Balance Soy Free can be used. Smart Choice Original and Earth Balance Soy Free use yellow pea protein in place of dairy whey and sunflower lecithin in place of soy lecithin. Molasses or Maple Syrup? Molasses is used in the standard GF bread recipe to achieve a satisfying robust rye flavor. For an alternative subtle, delicate, sweet maple taste, grade A very dark and strong flavor maple syrup can be used in place of the molasses and granulated sugar. Pure maple syrup is a very pricey ingredient. The subtle change in taste using maple syrup may not really be worth the syrup's high cost, but the option is included in the recipe below, nonetheless. Maple syrup is sold in four grades: grade A golden color and delicate taste; grade A amber color and rich flavor; grade A dark color and robust flavor; and grade A very dark and strong flavor. Only use grade A very dark and strong flavor maple syrup for baking. The maple flavor of lighter shades of maple syrup is too weak to be tasted when used in most baked goods. The money spent using lighter shades of pricey maple syrup will only be wasted. Grade A very dark and strong flavor maple syrup is mostly used for cooking and not available in most grocery stores. It is readily available online and direct from maple syrup farms. Shipping from the east coast to the west coast may cost more than the maple syrup itself. Try to find an online deal with free shipping. RECIPES Oat-Sorghum-Buckwheat-Banana-Flaxseed GF Bread This recipe produces a 56 ounce (1.588 kg) gluten free bread loaf yielding 28 slices 7/16 inch (11.11 mm) thick. Preparation time is about 2 hours 15 minutes. Baking time is 1 hour 40 minutes. Kitchen Essentials: Coffee grinder (preferably burr-type) Electric mixer (preferably a stand mixer) Mixing bowl Pullman loaf pan, 13 inch x 4 inch x 4 inch (33.02 cm x 10.16 cm x 10.16 cm) Lidded 2 quart/liter (or larger) plastic food container Quart/liter glass or plastic measuring cups (2) 5 ounce (150 ml) glass measuring cup Potato/banana masher, ricer or food processor Hard rubber bowl scraper, specifically Rubbermaid FG1901000000 Scraper 9-1/2 inch 1 inch pastry brush A good set of stainless steel measuring cups and spoons 10 inch x 14 inch (25.4 cm x 35.56 cm) plastic food storage bags with twist ties Cooling rack Dry Ingredients: 1 cup (240 ml) oat flour 1 cup (240 ml) sorghum flour 1 cup (240 ml) buckwheat flour milled from raw dehulled buckwheat groats 2/3 cup (160 ml) potato starch 2/3 cup (160 ml) arrowroot starch ~3/4 cup (180 ml) (approx.) milled flaxseed freshly ground from 1/2 cup (120 ml) whole flaxseed 1/4 cup (60 ml) yellow pea protein isolate powder (* can be replaced with 1 heaping tablespoon (20 ml) each of oat, sorghum and buckwheat flour) 2 tablespoons (30 ml) granulated sugar (* omit granulated sugar if using maple syrup in place of molasses) 2 tablespoons (30 ml) caraway seed (* optional for deli rye flavor) 1-1/2 (7.5 ml) teaspoons salt 1-1/2 (7.5 ml) teaspoons ground cinnamon 1-1/2 (7.5 ml) teaspoons ground ginger 1 teaspoon (5 ml) baking soda 3 teaspoons (15 ml) xanthan gum 1 teaspoon (5 ml) konjac glucomannan powder 4 teaspoons (20 ml) fast acting yeast Wet Ingredients: 2 cups (480 ml) cold water to mix with milled flaxseed Additional water to mix with mashed banana and molasses (or maple syrup) to achieve 2 cups total mixture ~1 cup (240 ml) (approx.) mashed ripe banana (2 medium to large bananas) 4-1/2 tablespoons (67.5 ml) molasses, unsulphured, mild (or full flavor) to one's taste (* Alternately, omit molasses and use 3/4 cup (180 ml) maple syrup, grade A very dark and strong flavor) 2 + 1 tablespoons (30 + 15 ml) canola, olive or melted coconut oil or melted vegan buttery flavored spread Additional oil or vegan spread to grease loaf pan 1 teaspoon (5 ml) apple cider vinegar (as an antimicrobial, anti-mold agent) Directions: 1. Grind enough raw dehulled buckwheat groats in a coffee grinder to make 1+ cups (260 ml) buckwheat flour. 2. Grind 1/2 cup (120 ml) whole flaxseed in a coffee grinder. 3. Place 2 cups (480 ml) COLD water in a quart/liter measuring cup and stir in the ground flaxseed with a fork. 4. Heat water and flaxseed mixture in a microwave oven until near boiling. Let steep for 10 to 20 minutes. 5. Combine all dry ingredients EXCEPT flaxseed into a lidded 2 quart/liter (or larger) plastic food container. 6. Thoroughly shake and blend dry ingredients together in the food container holding lid down securely. 7. Mash, rice, or puree 2 medium to large bananas into a separate quart/liter measuring cup. 8. Using 5 ounce (150 ml) glass measuring cup, warm 4-1/2 tablespoons (67.5 ml) molasses in microwave oven to thin and add to mashed bananas, or, in place of molasses, add 3/4 cup (180 ml) maple syrup to mashed bananas 9. Add enough water to the bananas and molasses (or maple syrup) and stir together so that the liquid mixture measures 2 cups (480 ml). 10. Warm up the banana molasses (or maple syrup) mixture in a microwave oven for 2-3 minutes. 11. Melt 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of coconut oil or vegan spread in a microwave oven in a small bowl, if these oils used. 12. Stir banana molasses (or maple syrup) mixture and steeped flaxseed into a mixing bowl. 13. Add 2 tablespoons (30 ml) oil plus 1 teaspoon (5 ml) apple cider vinegar to the mixing bowl. 14. Grease a 13 inch x 4 inch x 4 inch pullman loaf pan. Use a pastry brush for applying liquid oil. 15. Using an electric mixer with a dough hook, blend liquids for 1-2 minutes at a high medium speed. 16. Stop mixer and add dry ingredients to the bowl. Start mixing at low speed for 15 seconds, then increase to a low medium speed and mix for 16 minutes to a smooth, thick, moist (not wet), elastic dough consistency. 17. Preheat oven to 300-325° F (150-160° C). 18. Using a hard rubber bowl scraper, transfer dough from mixing bowl to the greased pullman loaf pan. 19. Plunge the hard rubber bowl scraper up and down in the dough to level and even out the dough. 20. Melt remaining 1 tablespoon (15 ml) coconut oil or vegan spread in the microwave in a small bowl, if oils used. 21. Use a pastry brush to spread 1 tablespoon (15 ml) oil on top of the dough. Smooth and round the top of the dough with the pastry brush. 22. Allow the dough to rise to just above the top of the pullman loaf pan. 23. Place the pullman loaf pan (uncovered) in the preheated oven and bake for 1 hour 40 minutes maintaining an oven temperature slightly above 300° F (150° C) to avoid burning the crust. 24. When done, remove loaf pan from oven and allow the loaf to cool in pan for only about 10 minutes to avoid the crust becoming soggy from trapped pan moisture. 25. Remove loaf from pan, tapping pan bottom corner edges on counter to loosen loaf. Transfer loaf to cooling rack. 26. Allow bread to cool to room temperature before slicing the loaf into 2 halves with a sharp, smooth edged (not serrated) slicing knife. 27. Store each loaf half in 10 inch x 14 inch plastic food storage bags with twist ties and place in the refrigerator. 28. If you can wait, keep it in the refrigerator overnight before consuming. The bread taste and texture actually improve overnight as it firms up in the fridge. When firm, the bread can easily be sliced nearly paper thin without falling apart. The bread will keep fresh in the fridge for well over 2 weeks and seems to improve in taste as it ages. Quick and Easy Gluten Free Mini Pizzas Making mini pizzas using bread slices for crusts is nothing new. But finding a GF bread suitable for a pizza crust is somewhat elusive. Just finding a GF bread with tall enough slices is a challenge. The Oat-Sorghum-Buckwheat-Banana-Flaxseed GF Bread presented above works great! Its full size slices, taste, and texture make for a wonderful mini crust upon which to build an easy, tempting GF mini pizza. The recipe is simple. Key to this recipe is the use of a cooling rack on top of a metal baking sheet. The cooling rack raises the pizza crust above the surface of the baking sheet allowing hot oven air to circulate under the crust. This keeps the crust dry and crispy, preventing the crust from getting soggy due to moisture trapped between the crust and baking sheet. Directions for one 2-slice pizza serving: Prepare or slice any toppings you desire. Preheat the oven to 450° F (232° C). Toast 2 slices of Oat-Sorghum-Buckwheat-Banana-Flaxseed GF Bread to a golden brown. Place toast on top of a cooling rack sitting on top of a metal baking sheet. Spread a generous tablespoon of your favorite pizza sauce, canned or homemade, on each slice. Spread a layer of shredded mozzarella cheese on top of the sauce, about 1/3 cup (80 ml) per slice. Spread any other cheeses, such as diced or shredded sharp cheddar, on top of the mozzarella. Add your toppings and a touch more mozzarella. Slide the mini pizzas, cooling rack, and baking sheet together into the hot oven. Bake for 9 minutes until cheese melts and bubbles. Slide the baking sheet and rack out from the oven and transfer pizzas to a plate using a metal spatula. Serve. About Gluten Free Toasters Toasting gluten free bread in a typical kitchen 2 or 4-slice toaster cannot be completed in one toasting cycle. To achieve a golden brown toast requires 2 or even 3 toaster cycles. Typical toasters provide toasting times of no more than 2-1/2 minutes maximum per cycle. A few more expensive toasters can toast up to 3 minutes. It is common for GF breads to require a single cycle toasting time of more than 5 minutes to toast golden brown. It takes 5 minutes 15 seconds starting in a cold 1000 watt kitchen toaster to toast slices of Oat-Sorghum-Buckwheat-Banana-Flaxseed GF Bread to a golden brown in a single cycle. A toaster-oven can provide a longer single cycle toasting time, but may require 10 minutes or longer to toast GF bread golden brown. A toaster-oven is less efficient for toasting bread than a 2 or 4-slice toaster because it must heat up a much larger volume than a 2 or 4-slice toaster which has heating elements up against the bread. A few manufacturers have provided toasters with a "Gluten Free" button to extend the maximum single cycle toasting time. These include Crux 2 and 4-Slice Toasters [17] available exclusively at Macy's, Bella Pro Series and Ultimate Elite 2 and 4 Slice Toasters [18,19], and the Williams Sonoma Open Kitchen 2-Slice Stainless Steel Toaster [20]. There are several problems with these toasters. First, the maximum toasting times on the "Gluten Free" setting are still not long enough. Maximum toasting times provided by Bella for its Ultimate Elite Toaster are 3 minutes 50 seconds for the "Gluten Free" setting and 4 minutes 20 seconds for the "Gluten Free" + "Frozen" setting. Second, a gluten-free toaster for celiacs, by necessity, must be used exclusively for GF breads to avoid wheat contamination. A gluten free toaster does not need a "Gluten Free" button. A gluten free toaster simply requires a 6 minute maximum toasting time to adequately toast gluten free breads. One should not have to remember to push a "Gluten Free" button every time they toast bread. Is it so hard for manufacturers to offer a toaster with a 6 minute timer? For those with some basic electronic technical skills, there is a relatively easy solution to having a toaster with a sufficiently long 6 minute maximum toasting time for GF bread. The electronic toaster controller board in a toaster can be modified to extend the maximum toasting time by simply replacing a resistor and/or a capacitor on the board. First one needs to find a toaster in which the controller board can easily be accessed. It turns out the Nesco T1000 toaster [21] is well-suited to the task. As toasters go, almost all are made in China and tend to have a high percentage of manufacturing defects per customer product reviews. The Nesco T1000 is a nice looking, sturdy toaster with nice features. With the right screwdriver to remove the "tamper proof" screws, the controller board is easy to get to and easy to modify. The only flaw in the Nesco T1000 is that the toasting time is shorter in a hot Nesco T1000 toaster than the toasting time in a cold Nesco T1000 toaster at the same browning setting, resulting in inconsistent browning. If toasting always begins in a cold toaster, browning is always consistent, and the browning setting need never be touched to achieve the same results every time. Below, instructions on modifying the Nesco T1000 are provided. A modified Nesco T1000 toaster has been perfectly toasting GF bread daily for over 4 years without a single problem. These notes are of a technical nature. Modifying the Nesco T1000 toaster will void the warranty. Any modifications you perform are done so at your own risk. If you are not familiar with electronic components or a soldering iron, do not attempt the modification. Find a friend or someone with the technical skills if you wish to have a modified Nesco T1000 toaster. Nesco T1000 Toaster Tech Notes - How to Increase the Toasting Cycle Time Summary: The browning control circuit of the Nesco T1000 toaster is designed around the AO201D toaster controller chip, an 8-pin DIP integrated circuit. Toaster cycle timing is achieved by adjusting the frequency of a timer oscillator on board the AO201D via an external RC circuit. The frequency is inversely proportional to RC. Increasing R (resistance) and/or C (capacitance) decreases frequency and increases the toasting cycle time. R in the Nesco toaster is a summation of a 250k potentiometer (variable resistor) in parallel with a 390k resistor (R6) in series with a 68k thermistor (NTC) in parallel with a 180k resistor (R5). C is a .033µf capacitor (C3). The Defrost button increases the toasting cycle time by switching in an additional .0047µf capacitor (C4) in parallel with C3. The thermistor decreases the resistance as the toaster ambient temperature rises and is supposed to help stabilize the oscillator frequency which is affected by heat. Ideally, temperature compensation provided by the thermistor and the AO201D should keep the oscillator frequency stable and browning shade the same from batch to batch as the toaster ambient temperature rises. Unfortunately, in the Nesco toaster, the oscillator frequency becomes unstable and increases as the toaster heats up, significantly reducing the toaster cycle time when the toaster is hot compared to the cycle time of a cold toaster. Hence, to maintain the same browning shade of a cold toaster, the browning control must be turned up higher when toasting in a hot toaster. The modifications below will increase the original factory maximum toasting cycle time of about 2.5 minutes to about 5.5 minutes when the toaster is cold. The Defrost button adds up to 30 seconds or so additional time. (Note: There is no datasheet available online for the AO201D chip. A datasheet in chinese is available for a similar MCU CMS12530 chip [22] with some diagrams and tables labelled in english. The Pericom PT8A2514A toaster controller chip [23] is also of interest with an english datasheet and a timer that can be adjusted from 30 sec to 10 min.) Tools Required: TA23 triangle head screwdriver (Silverhill Tools ATKTR4 Triangle Head 5 Size Screwdriver Set) #1 Phillips head screwdriver Mini needle nose pliers Mini wire cutter 25 watt taper point soldering iron Desolder bulb, wick, or tool 60/40 Tin/Lead rosin core solder Parts Required: .02µf 25v to 100v ceramic or polyester film capacitor 68k 1/4-watt resistor (blue-gray-orange) Disassembly: Lay some newspaper or a towel on the work surface. Have a container handy to keep the small screws and parts from getting lost. Remove the crumb tray (which makes 2 tabs on the plastic base that slip under the shell lip more visible). Lay the toaster upside down on the work surface. Using the TA23 screwdriver, remove the tiny black screw from the bottom of the chrome pop-up lever knob. Insert a tool slightly larger than the TA23 screwdriver into the screw hole (the TA27 driver if you have it) and push the black plastic insert out of the chrome portion of the pop-up lever knob to free the knob from the metal lever. Slip the knob off the metal pop-up lever. Remove the 4 triangle head screws which attach the black plastic base to the metal shell. Separate and lift the metal shell off the plastic base noting the 2 tabs that were under the crumb tray and the 4 metal tabs at the ends of the toaster slots that insert into small slots on top of the inner metal cage. Disconnect the 4-wire cable small white nylon connector connected to the browning control circuit board attached to the toaster shell. Completely separate the base and inner cage from the outer metal shell and set aside the base. Using the #1 Phillips screwdriver, remove the 2 broad head screws securing the insulation board to the browning control circuit board attached to the outer metal shell. Remove the 4 Phillips screws securing the browning control circuit board. Turn the browning control to an extreme so that you can easily realign it on reassembly. Lift up and slip the browning control circuit board from out behind the browning control knob and push buttons (the knob and buttons remain in place and do not have to be removed). Modifications: Desolder and remove the 390k resistor (orange-white-yellow) labelled R6 (no replacement needed). Desolder and remove the 180k resistor (brown-gray-yellow) labelled R5. Replace R5 with a 68k 1/4-watt resistor (blue-gray-orange). Locate capacitor C3 (.033µf) which is numbered 2A333J. Turn the circuit board over and on the back side solder a .02µf 25v to 100v ceramic or polyester film capacitor across the two C3 capacitor connections keeping the .02µf capacitor flat against the circuit board and trimming off excess leads. Reassembly: Before reassembling, take a look at the pop-up lever spring mechanism and make sure the small metal plate beneath the lever properly aligns with the electromagnet arms when lowered. If skewed, twist the the metal plate until it is properly aligned (the plate in my toaster was skewed at the factory which caused a glitch preventing the pop-up lever from latching when first testing the toaster out of the box). Reverse the steps used in disassembly. Be sure to reconnect the 4-wire connecter, use the 2 broad head screws for the insulator board, and carefully align and insert the 4 outer metal shell tabs into the inner metal cage slots. Make sure you properly align the small notch in the black plastic insert with metal pop-up lever notch before pressing it back into the chrome portion of the pop-up knob. Do not over-tighten the triangle head screws, especially the tiny black screw in the pop-up knob (tighten just enough to bottom-out the screw heads). Testing: Make sure all functions still work (you don't need bread in the toaster to test). Get a watch and time the toasting cycles at "1" and "6" settings both in hot and cold conditions (give the toaster plenty of time to cool to the touch for cold testing). At "1" you should get about 32 sec hot and 1 min 23 sec cold. At "6" you should get about 4 min 25 sec hot and 5 min 35 sec cold. Pressing the "Defrost" button will add additional time. SOURCES Prime Grains Inc. http://www.primegrains.com/about-us.htm Variation of Mucilage Content in the Flaxseed Coat; Diederichsen A, Raney JP, Duguid SD; Saskatchewan Flax Grower Oct 2003 Vol 5 No 1 https://saskflax.com/quadrant/media/Pdfs/Newsletters/flaxfall03.pdf Variation of mucilage in flax seed and its relationship with other seed characters; Diederichsen A, Raney JP, Duguid SD; Crop Science Feb 2005 Vol 46 No 1, p 365-371 https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/cs/abstracts/46/1/365 Selection for increased seed mucilage content in yellow mustard; J Philip Raney and Gerhard FW Rakow; (Describes method used for determining mucilage content in seed); The Regional Institute, Online Publications http://www.regional.org.au/au/gcirc/4/79.htm Farmer Direct Co-op http://www.farmerdirect.coop/ USA Pan 13x4x4 Large Pullman Loaf Pan & Cover 1160PM-1 https://www.usapan.com/13-x-4-x-4-large-pullman-loaf-pan-and-cover-1160pm Chicago Metallic 44615 Pullman pan,single 13x4x4 https://www.bundybakingsolutions.com/product/44615/ Konjac Glucomannan Powder http://www.konjacfoods.com/product/1.htm The Gluten-Free-Bread Baking-with-Psyllium-Husks-Powder Test by Annalise Roberts http://mygluten-freetable.com/2014/04/the-gluten-free-bread-baking-with-psyllium-husks-powder-test/ Fundamental Study on the Impact of Gluten-Free Starches on the Quality of Gluten-Free Model Breads; Horstmann SW, Belz MC, Heitmann M, Zannini E, Arendt EK; Foods. 2016 Apr 21;5(2) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5302342/pdf/foods-05-00030.pdf Strange Grains Gluten Free Bakery https://www.strangegrainsbakery.com.au/gluten-free-bread-perth Technological Properties of Pea and Buckwheat Flours and Their Blends; Ilze Beitane, Gita Krumina-Zemture, Martins Sabovics; Latvia University of Agriculture Research for Rural Development 2015, Annual 21st International Scientific Conference Proceedings Vol 1, p 137-42 http://llufb.llu.lv/conference/Research-for-Rural-Development/2015/LatviaResearchRuralDevel21st_volume1-137-142.pdf Northern Pulse Grower Association Pea Flour Brochure http://www.northernpulse.com/uploads\resources\661\pulse-flour-brochure.pdf USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council Brochures https://www.usapulses.org/brochures Non-gluten proteins as structure forming agents in gluten free bread; Ziobro R, Juszczak L, Witczak M, Korus J; J Food Sci Technol. 2016 Jan;53(1):571-80 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4711467/pdf/13197_2015_Article_2043.pdf Ripple Foods Pea Milk https://www.ripplefoods.com/ Crux Toasters http://www.cruxkitchen.com/crux_toaster_2slice.php Bella Pro-Series Toasters https://bellahousewares.com/products-bella/?taxonomy=productscategories&term=pro-series Bella Ultimate-Elite Toasters https://bellahousewares.com/products-bella/ultimate-elite-collection-2-slice-digital-toaster/ Williams Sonoma Open Kitchen Toaster https://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/willaims-sonoma-open-kitchen-2-slice-stainless-steel-toaster/ Nesco T1000 2-Slice Toaster http://www.nesco.com/products/Small-Appliances/Toasters/TWO-SLICE-TOASTER-THUNDER-GREY/ MCU CMS12530 toaster controller chip (in chinese) http://mcu.com.cn/uploads/file/2015/20150819163253_26043.pdf Pericom PT8A2514A toaster controller chip https://www.diodes.com/assets/Datasheets/PT8A2514A.pdf
  15. Just wanted to share that there’s a gluten-free nail lacquer brand that’s made by a Celiac. It’s called Lazzara Gluten-Free Nail Lacquer. I was so excited because my favorite (former) brands have hydrolyzed wheat in them. It’s also cruelty-free, vegan and made in the USA. The only drawback is that it’s more expensive but I think it’s worth it because I know it’s being made by someone who’s a Celiac and I love the quality. http://Lazzara.ca
  16. Celiac.com 07/09/2018 - In a seemingly innocuous case of gluten-contamination, an Australian woman was hospitalized with serious health issues after mistakenly eating a waffle she thought was gluten-free. The incident began when Williams and her husband Scott dined at a local Perth restaurant where they had eaten before. This time, though, after eating a meal of chicken and what she took to be gluten-free waffles, she became ill. The mistake caused her to lose consciousness several times, and resulted in mild kidney failure. Diagnosed as celiac at 12 months of age, the 27-year old Williams is a CrossFit fanatic, a fact she believes helped her to survive. “If I was already sick or if I was an elderly person and I had this sort of reaction, I could have died,” Ms Williams said. Williams wants to help spread the word that, for some people, celiac disease is a serious and potentially life-threatening medical condition. The owner of the restaurant seems to be taking the incident seriously, and has said she would be investigating what went wrong that day. “I’m trying to find out what happened because we’ve never had an issue with this,” she said, and that she “would never want to hurt anyone at all.” While the Perth restaurant’s menu did carry a disclaimer that gluten-free items may contain traces of gluten. The owner said the gluten-free options were not recommended for people who are “coeliac or really gluten intolerant.” The restaurant has offered Ms Williams a $40 refund with a confidentiality clause, which she intends to decline so she can speak out and educate others about the risks of dining out. Coeliac Australia’s Cathy Di Bella said restaurants can’t use a “may contain traces of” disclaimer to offset a claim that food is gluten-free. Any restaurant that advertises gluten-free food should take necessary measures to ensure that their gluten-free items are if fact free of gluten. This is an important point, as this incident comes amid recent news reports that indicate nearly one out of ten meals sold as gluten-free at cafes and restaurants across Melbourne were contaminated with gluten. For Ms Williams’ part, she said she has “lost faith in going out for dinner and it’s going to take me a long time to be able to go out and do that without fear of this happening.” Do you or a loved one have a gluten-free horror story to tell? Share it in our comments below. Read more at: Thewest.com.au
  17. Celiac.com 07/11/2018 - For people with celiac disease, finding decent gluten-free bread is like searching gold. Many have given up on bread entirely and others begrudgingly relate themselves to the ignominious frozen aisle at their supermarket and content themselves with one of the many dry, shriveled, flavorless loaves that proudly tout the gluten-free label. For these people, the idea of freshly baked bread is a distant, if comforting, memory. The idea of going to Paris and marching into a boulangerie and walking out with a warm, tasty, gluten-free baguette that was freshly baked on the premises that morning, is like a dream. Now, in some Parisian bakeries, that dream is becoming a reality. And the tear of joy from the thankful gluten-free masses are sure to follow. These days, a single sign on the awning speaks to hungry customers who peruse the tarts and chou buns, and the loaves that fill the cooling on racks behind a glass pane at Chambelland boulangerie and café in Paris’ 11th arrondissement. The sign lettered in French translates: “artisan baker; flour producer; naturally gluten free.” That’s right. Naturally gluten-free. At a bakery. In Paris. Only the flat, focaccia-style loaves, and the absence of baguettes, tells customers that this bakery is something different. Chambelland opened its doors in 2014 and continues to do a brisk business in delicious, freshly baked gluten-free breads and other goods. The boulangerie is the work of Narhaniel Doboin and his business partner, Thomas Teffri-Chambelland. They use flour made of grains including rice, buckwheat and sorghum to make delicious gluten-free baked goods. Doboin says that customers queued in the rain on the first day, hardly believing their eyes, some began to cry. For gluten-free Parisians, there was a time before Chambelland, and the time after. If you find yourself in Paris, be sure to search them out for what is sure to be a gluten-free delight. Or maybe book your ticket now. Read more at: Independent.co.uk
  18. Like barbecue, greens can be a touchy subject. Sweet? Tart? Savory? Ham? Bacon? Some people prefer mustard greens, others prefer collards. I'm one of those who prefer a mix of the two. Maybe that's equally sacrilegious, I don't know. But, in the interest of harmony, here's an easy recipe for an easy, delicious mix of mustard and collard greens. Ingredients: l pound of bacon 6 cups mustard greens 6 cups collard greens 1 cup chicken broth 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar 1 teaspoon of sugar ½ teaspoon pepper few dashes of red pepper hot sauce, such as Crystal or Trappey's salt and pepper to taste Directions: Rinse greens several times to remove all grit. Remove and discard thickest parts of stems. Chop greens coarsely. Brown bacon in a cast iron pot. Once bacon is brown, place on paper towels to drain. In the same pot, heat 2-3 teaspoons of bacon grease and olive oil to medium-high. Add the greens, chicken broth, sugar, pepper, hot sauce and vinegar. Put a tight fitting lid on the pot. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, and simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve immediately. Season individually with salt and pepper, hot sauce, or more sugar or vinegar, to taste.
  19. Celiac.com 07/14/2018 - If you’re looking for a simple, nutritious and exciting alternative to standard spaghetti and tomato sauce, look no further than this delicious version that blends ripe plum tomatoes, garlic, olive oil, basil, and firm sliced ricotta to deliver a tasty, memorable dish. Ingredients: 12 ounces gluten-free spaghetti 5 or 6 ripe plum tomatoes ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil 2 cloves garlic, crushed ¾ teaspoons crushed red pepper ¼ cup chopped fresh basil 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley Kosher salt and black pepper ⅓ cup pecorino Romano cheese, grated ½ cup firm ricotta, shaved with peeler Directions: Finely chop all but one of the tomatoes; transfer to large bowl with olive oil and ¼ teaspoon salt. Cook spaghetti until al dente or desired firmness, and drain, reserving ¼ cup cooking water. Meanwhile, chop remaining tomato, and place in food processor along with garlic, red pepper, and ½ teaspoon salt; puree until smooth. Gently stir mixture into the bowl of chopped tomatoes. Add cooked spaghetti, basil and parsley to a large bowl. Toss in tomato mixture, adding some reserved pasta water, if needed. Spoon pasta into bowls and top with Romano cheese, as desired.
  20. Celiac.com 07/12/2018 - Previous research has shown that the oral administration of Bifidobacterium infantis Natren Life Start super strain (NLS-SS) reduces of gastro-intestinal symptoms in untreated celiac disease patients. The reduction of symptoms was not connected with changes in intestinal permeability or serum levels of cytokines, chemokines, or growth factors. Therefore, researchers suspected that the reduction of symptoms might be related to the modulation of innate immunity. To test that hypothesis, a team of researchers set out to assess the potential mechanisms of a probiotic B.infantis Natren Life Start super strain on the mucosal expression of innate immune markers in adult patients with active untreated celiac disease compared with those treated with B. infantis 6 weeks and after 1 year of gluten-free diet. The research team included Maria I. Pinto-Sanchez, MD, Edgardo C. Smecuol, MD, Maria P. Temprano,RD, Emilia Sugai, BSBC, Andrea Gonzalez, RD, PhD, Maria L. Moreno,MD, Xianxi Huang, MD, PhD, Premysl Bercik, MD, Ana Cabanne, MD, Horacio Vazquez, MD, Sonia Niveloni, MD, Roberto Mazure, MD, Eduardo Mauriño, MD, Elena F. Verdú, MD, PhD, and Julio C. Bai, MD. They are affiliated with the Medicine Department, Farcombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; the Small Intestinal Section, Department of Medicine and the Department of Alimentation at Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo, Gastroenterology Hospital and Research Institute at the Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The team determined the numbers of macrophages and Paneth cells, along with the expression of a-defensin-5 expression via immunohistochemistry in duodenal biopsies. Their results showed that a gluten-free diet lowers duodenal macrophage counts in celiac disease patients more effectively than B. infantis, while B. infantis lowers Paneth cell counts and reduces expression of a-defensin-5. This study documents the differential innate immune effects of treatment with B. infantis compared with 1 year of gluten-free diet. The team calls for further study to better understand the synergistic effects of gluten-free diet and B. infantis supplementation in celiac disease. Source: J Clin Gastroenterol
  21. Celiac.com 06/30/2018 - It seems there’s a bit of a gluten-free and halal food controversy going on across the pond. For those who don’t know, ‘Halal’ is the Muslim equivalent of what Jewish folks call ‘Kosher.’ Basically, it means food prepared to certain standards and blessed for consumption. The Aureus School in Didcot, Oxfordshire, England is being decried by angry parents as “like a dictatorship” after the school banned packed lunches and began serving pupils gluten-free options, including halal meat, water and salad. The ruckus began when the school recently banned students from bringing lunches and snacks from home, and began a program to make sure that “all students have access to a daily nutritious home-cooked family meal.” This is fine in principal, say angry parents, but in practice has become “draconian.” One father, who asked not to be named, said that he and his wife were “thinking of taking [their daughter] out of the school, adding that the situation was “getting silly and more like a dictatorship. Their views are quite extreme.” The dad said that "It's about choice. It's supposed to be an inclusive school but they are only catering for one particular religion.” He added that he had tried unsuccessfully to get the policies changed since September. So, whereas in days past, lunch might mean whatever mom saw fit to pack, these days at Aureus School lunch means the choice of a hot halal meat meal, hot gluten-free vegetarian meal, a jacket potato, a salad, a pasta pot or a baguette. The school insists that only water be drunk on site because “hydrated brains learn better”. The school states that their Halal kitchen policy is simply a move to “celebrate the diversity of our country’s culture,” in addition to providing nutritious food for the children. What do you think? A gluten-free and Halal lunch bridge too far, or a good meal for the kids?
  22. Celiac.com 07/10/2018 - As part of its 50th Anniversary activities, Celiac UK has launched a research fund and accompanying fundraising appeal to support new research and development. The fund has already received an injection of £500k from Innovate UK, in addition to £250k from the charity. Together, Coeliac UK and Innovate UK have opened applications for grants from the £750,000. Researchers and businesses can apply for a grants ranging from £50k to £250k for healthcare diagnostics, digital self-care tools and better gluten free food production. Food businesses can receive grants by developing more nutritious and affordable gluten free food, by using new ingredients, improving nutritional value, flavor and/or texture, and creating better methods of preservation. The three main goals of the program are: To improve celiac disease diagnostics; to improve the quality of gluten-free foods, and to promote digitally supported self-care for people with celiac disease. The matching industry funds will bring spending for new research on the growing global gluten-free foods market to nearly £1m. Ultimately, Coeliac UK is looking to raise £5 million to improve understanding and treatment of celiac disease and gluten related autoimmune conditions. Sarah Sleet, Chief Executive of Coeliac UK said: “With the global diagnosis for coeliac disease increasing year on year, this is a chance for UK business and researchers to get ahead and develop competitive advantages in innovation which will be of benefit to a badly underserved patient group. Read more at: NewFoodMagazine.com
  23. Celiac.com 07/07/2018 - Summer means many things, but among them, summer means peaches and fresh salsa. This happy salsa blends roasted tomatoes, peaches, and onion with a dash of jalepeño pepper for a tasty refreshing summertime salsa treat. Ingredients: 2-3 8-ounce fresh peaches, pitted and peeled—about 2 cups 4-5 medium tomatoes—about 1½ cups ½ medium red onion, diced small 1 small or ½ large jalapeño or Serrano pepper, stemmed, seeded Small handful cilantro Juice of 2-3 fresh limes 1 teaspoon kosher salt, or more as needed Tortilla chips, for serving Note: Goes great with guacamole! Directions: In a cast iron skillet or pan, roast 8-10 tomatoes, jalapeño and onion. Add add peach chunks last, Roast tomatoes, pepper, onion, until blackened and soft. Roast peaches until browned, or even a bit charred. In a blender, combine about 1 cup of roasted tomatoes, peaches, red onion, pepper, cilantro, lime juice and salt, and purée until smooth. Adjust flavor with additional ingredients or salt, as needed. Serve with tortilla chips and guacamole, as desired.
  24. Jefferson Adams

    What Exactly is Gluten, Anyway?

    Celiac.com 07/04/2018 - For the vast majority of people, gluten is nothing to worry about. However, for people with celiac disease, gluten triggers an immune reaction that can be uncomfortable and lead to damage of the intestinal lining, and, left untreated, other conditions, including certain types of deadly cancers. Actually, the real offender is a protein in gluten called gliadin. It's the gliadin that triggers the immune reaction in people with celiac disease. For our purposes today, I will talk about gluten, even though it's really gliadin that's the culprit. Still, avoiding gliadin means avoiding gluten, so let's just keep it simple, if a bit unscientific, for now. There are some people who are sensitive to gluten, but who don’t have celiac disease, a condition know as Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS). When people with NCGS eat gluten, they often experience symptoms similar to those with celiac disease, yet they lack the same antibodies to gluten, as well as the intestinal damage seen in celiac disease. People with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity need to follow a gluten-free diet that excludes all products containing wheat, barley and rye ingredients. These people can still enjoy a healthy diet filled with fruits, vegetables, meats, poultry, fish, beans, legumes and most dairy products. Many delicious foods are naturally gluten-free, and safe for people with celiac disease. That said, gluten is found in a wide variety of foods, even those you wouldn’t expect, such as soy sauce and even some french fries. Foods containing wheat, barley or rye contain gluten, but the protein can also be hidden in many foods as an additive, especially processed foods. Gluten can also sometimes be found in certain medications, personal hygiene products and more. For people with celiac disease, even tiny amounts of gluten can cause damage to the small intestine and prevent nutrients from being absorbed into the bloodstream. The safest bet is to purchase naturally gluten-free grains, flours and starches labeled gluten-free and, when possible, certified gluten-free by a third party. For a more complete list, see Celiac.com’s gluten-free Safe Foods List and the non-gluten free Unsafe Foods List. What Foods and Products Contain Gluten? Gluten is found in any products with ingredients derived from wheat, barley and rye. This includes: 1) Wheat products (Triticum), including: All species of wheat contain gluten, including durum, semolina, spelt, kamut, einkorn, faro and triticale, which is a hybrid of wheat and rye. 2) Barley Products (Hordeum vulgare) 3) Rye Products (Secale) 4) Any bakery item, beer, breads, candy (not all), cereal, flour, pastas, non-dairy milk (not all), sauces (not all), soups (not all), or other product made with wheat, rye, barley, including the following ingredients: Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum) Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types) Atta Flour Barley Grass (can contain seeds) Barley Hordeum vulgare Barley Malt Beer (most contain barley or wheat) Bleached Flour Bran Bread Flour Brewer's Yeast Brown Flour Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts) Bulgur Wheat Cereal Binding Chilton Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum) Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Cookie Crumbs Cookie Dough Cookie Dough Pieces Couscous Criped Rice Dinkle (Spelt) Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate Durum wheat (Triticum durum) Edible Coatings Edible Films Edible Starch Einkorn (Triticum monococcum) Emmer (Triticum dicoccon) Enriched Bleached Flour Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour Enriched Flour Farik Farina Farina Graham Farro Filler Flour (normally this is wheat) Freekeh Frikeh Fu (dried wheat gluten) Germ Graham Flour Granary Flour Groats (barley, wheat) Hard Wheat Heeng Hing Hordeum Vulgare Extract Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Kamut (Pasta wheat) Kecap Manis (Soy Sauce) Ketjap Manis (Soy Sauce) Kluski Pasta Maida (Indian wheat flour) Malt Malted Barley Flour Malted Milk Malt Extract Malt Syrup Malt Flavoring Malt Vinegar Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Matza Matzah Matzo Matzo Semolina Meripro 711 Mir Nishasta Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum) Orzo Pasta Pasta Pearl Barley Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum) Perungayam Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum) Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum) Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used) Roux Rusk Rye Seitan Semolina Semolina Triticum Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Small Spelt Spirits (Specific Types) Spelt (Triticum spelta) Sprouted Wheat or Barley Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Strong Flour Suet in Packets Tabbouleh Tabouli Teriyaki Sauce Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii) Triticale X triticosecale Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil Udon (wheat noodles) Unbleached Flour Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Vital Wheat Gluten Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum Wheat Amino Acids Wheat Bran Extract Wheat, Bulgur Wheat Durum Triticum Wheat Germ Extract Wheat Germ Glycerides Wheat Germ Oil Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Wheat Grass (can contain seeds) Wheat Nuts Wheat Protein Wheat Triticum aestivum Wheat Triticum Monococcum Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract Whole-Meal Flour Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim) Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides)
  25. Celiac.com 06/25/2018 - The latest studies show that celiac disease now affects 1.2% of the population. That’s millions, even tens of millions of people with celiac disease worldwide. The vast majority of these people remain undiagnosed. Many of these people have no clear symptoms. Moreover, even when they do have symptoms, very often those symptoms are atypical, vague, and hard to pin on celiac disease. Here are three ways that you can help your healthcare professionals spot celiac disease, and help to keep celiacs gluten-free: 1) Your regular doctor can help spot celiac disease, even if the symptoms are vague and atypical. Does your doctor know that anemia is one of the most common features of celiac disease? How about neuropathy, another common feature in celiac disease? Do they know that most people diagnosed with celiac disease these days have either no symptoms, or present atypical symptoms that can make diagnosis that much harder? Do they know that a simple blood test or two can provide strong evidence for celiac disease? People who are newly diagnosed with celiac disease are often deficient in calcium, fiber, folate, iron, magnesium, niacin, riboflavin, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and zinc. Deficiencies in copper and vitamin B6 are less common, but still possible. Also, celiac disease is a strong suspect in many patients with unexplained nutritional anemia. Being aware of these vague, confusing symptoms of celiac disease can help people get bette advice, and hopefully speed up a diagnosis. 2) Your dentist can help spot celiac disease Does your dentist realize that dental enamel defects could point to celiac disease? Studies show that dental enamel defects can be a strong indicator of adult celiac disease, even in the absence of physical symptoms. By pointing out dental enamel defects that indicate celiac disease, dentists can play an important role in diagnosing celiac disease. 3) Your pharmacist can help keep you gluten-free Does your pharmacist know which medicines and drugs are gluten-free, and which might contain traces of gluten? Pharmacists can be powerful advocates for patients with celiac disease. They can check ingredients on prescription medications, educate patients to help them make safer choices, and even speak with drug manufacturers on patients’ behalf. Pharmacists can also help with information on the ingredients used to manufacture various vitamins and supplements that might contain wheat. Understanding the many vague, confusing symptoms of celiac disease, and the ways in which various types of health professionals can help, is a powerful tool for helping to diagnose celiac disease, and for managing it in the future. If you are suffering from one or more of these symptoms, and suspect celiac disease, be sure to gather as much information as you can, and to check in with your health professionals as quickly as possible.