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Found 2,211 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love. Ingredients: 2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions. Directions: Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot. Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. Remove chicken to paper towels to cool. Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan. Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides. Remove from the oven when tender. Allow roasted cauliflower to cool. Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside. Chop cooled chicken and set aside. Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan. When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas. Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan. Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed. Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape. When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce. Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles. Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions. Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.
  2. Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home. "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. What do you think? Clever? Funny? Read more at Arizonafamily.com.
  3. ChildLife Essentials® provides a complete line of nutritional supplements designed specifically for infants and children. ChildLife Essentials® are made from the highest quality natural ingredients. Their products are all Gluten Free, Alcohol, Casein, and Dye, Free, No artificial, Sweeteners, Colorings or ingredients. No detectable levels of Mercury, Aluminum, Heavy Metals, Dioxins, PCB’s, Pesticides, Environmental Toxins and they are all GMO FREE. All have been 3rd party tested. Dr. Murray Clarke, the leading Holistic Pediatrician in the U.S., is the founder, and formulator of the CHILDLIFE ESSENTIALS complete line of Children’s nutritional supplements. Dr. Clarke has specialized in pediatrics in his homeopathic and nutritional clinic for the past twenty years. The ChildLife Essentials® line is literally the product of this experience. The sixteen products we offer are those, which have proven to be the most important, and the most effective in supporting healthy development and promoting natural immune strength in infants and children. Dr. Clarke is known for his work, and attention to children with challenging situations, which include: Autism, Allergies, Gluten Sensitivities, Environmental Allergies, ADHD, ADD, to name a few. The great taste of the products makes taking nutritional supplements an easy part of a child’s daily routine. These products are sold in natural stores, health food stores, pharmacies and online throughout America. Internationally, they are distributed throughout Asia, Europe Australia, and New Zealand in the South Pacific. We are very proud of this product line and are deeply committed to promoting improved nutrition for children as a foundation for good health and well-being. Some of the products recommended are: Multi Vitamin & Minerals Vitamin C Cod Liver Oil- Probiotics with Colostrum Aller-Care Liquid Calcium with Magnesium For Immune Support: First Defense, Echinacea, Formula 3 Cough Syrup Probiotics with Colostrum For more info visit: Visit Our Site.
  4. Wow. My older daughter, who is eating gluten-free these days, came to celebrate Father's Day last Sunday. We cooked our traditional pancake breakfast and she brought with her Walmart's Great Value Gluten-free Pancake and Waffle Mix. It was delicious! So happy to see (and taste) so much flavor improvement over the last 10 years for the gluten-free crowd! Here is a link to this mix: http://bit.ly/2tnQrzB Cheers, Travis Hiland
  5. Celiac.com 06/12/2018 - A life-long gluten-free diet is the only proven treatment for celiac disease. However, current methods for assessing gluten-free diet compliance are lack the sensitivity to detect occasional dietary transgressions that may cause gut mucosal damage. So, basically, there’s currently no good way to tell if celiac patients are suffering gut damage from low-level gluten contamination. A team of researchers recently set out to develop a method to determine gluten intake and monitor gluten-free dietary compliance in patients with celiac disease, and to determine its correlation with mucosal damage. The research team included ML Moreno, Á Cebolla, A Muñoz-Suano, C Carrillo-Carrion, I Comino, Á Pizarro, F León, A Rodríguez-Herrera, and C Sousa. They are variously affiliated with Facultad de Farmacia, Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain; Biomedal S.L., Sevilla, Spain; Unidad Clínica de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, Spain; Celimmune, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; and the Unidad de Gastroenterología y Nutrición, Instituto Hispalense de Pediatría, Sevilla, Spain. For their study, the team collected urine samples from 76 healthy subjects and 58 patients with celiac disease subjected to different gluten dietary conditions. To quantify gluten immunogenic peptides in solid-phase extracted urines, the team used a lateral flow test (LFT) with the highly sensitive and specific G12 monoclonal antibody for the most dominant GIPs and an LFT reader. They detected GIPs in concentrated urines from healthy individuals previously subjected to gluten-free diet as early as 4-6 h after single gluten intake, and for 1-2 days afterward. The urine test showed gluten ingestion in about 50% of patients. Biopsy analysis showed that nearly 9 out of 10 celiac patients with no villous atrophy had no detectable GIP in urine, while all patients with quantifiable GIP in urine showed signs of gut damage. The ability to use GIP in urine to reveal gluten consumption will likely help lead to new and non-invasive methods for monitoring gluten-free diet compliance. The test is sensitive, specific and simple enough for clinical monitoring of celiac patients, as well as for basic and clinical research applications including drug development. Source: Gut. 2017 Feb;66(2):250-257.  doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2015-310148.
  6. Celiac.com 06/11/2018 - Untreated celiac disease causes damage to the small intestine, which can interfere with proper nutrient absorption. Most patients can recover proper nutritional absorption via vitamins and mineral therapy, according to the CDF. Avoiding gluten is key. However, many people with celiac disease may not know that their pharmacist might just be one of their best allies in the fight to avoid gluten. Currently, there are no rules that require drug manufacturers to disclose the source of medication ingredients. Consumers can contact the manufacturer directly with questions, and some drug companies strive for clear, helpful answers, but getting correct information can be challenging. Many times though, an answer won't address possible cross contamination during the manufacturing process. This is where pharmacists can be a strong ally for patients with celiac disease. Here are a few way that pharmacists can help people with celiac disease to avoid hidden gluten in their prescriptions and over-the-counter drugs. The first thing pharmacists can do is to check ingredients on prescription medications these patients are taking. They can also share related information to help educate patients, and to improve their choices, and speak with drug manufacturers on patients’ behalf. In addition to assisting with prescription medicines, pharmacists can offer recommendations on vitamins and supplements. As with prescription drugs, both doctors and patients should do their best to review the ingredients used to manufacture vitamins and supplements, and to share this information with celiac patients. So, if you have celiac disease, definitely consider enlisting your pharmacist in an effort to get complete drug and supplement information. This simple tactic can help you to remain gluten-free during your course of drug treatment, however long that may last? Do you have a story about gluten in prescription drugs or supplements? Do you use your pharmacist to help you better understand your gluten-free drug and supplement options? Share your story with us. Source: medscape.com
  7. Celiac.com 06/04/2018 - Rates of contamination in commercial food advertised as gluten-free are improving, but nearly one in ten still show unacceptable levels of gluten. As part of a government mandated food sampling program, the city of Melbourne, Australia recently conducted a survey of 127 food businesses advertising gluten-free options. For the tests, government officers conduct unannounced site visits and take a sample of at least one food item declared to be gluten-free. Ridascreen Gliadin R5 ELISA analysis showed that 14 of 158 samples (9%) contained detectable gluten in excess of the official Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) definition of gluten-free. Nine of the 14 samples (6% overall) registered gluten above 20 parts per million, which exceeds the official threshold for foods labeled gluten-free in Europe and the United States. At one business, food labeled gluten-free registered above 80 ppm, even though they were asked directly for a gluten-free sample. These findings confirm the lack of understanding reported by many people with celiac disease. The good news is that rates of gluten non-compliance has improved over earlier audits, from 20% of samples in 2014 to 15% of samples in 2015. The survey team notes that one-third of the businesses in this study had previously been audited) and education seems to be paying off. In one burger chain alone, four of five venues which were non-compliant in 2014, were fully compliant in 2015 and 2016. The survey results showed that businesses that provided gluten-free training for staff showed 75% better odds of compliance. The overall good news here is that gluten-free compliance in commercial food businesses has improved steadily since the first surveys in 2014. One in ten odds of getting gluten contamination from food labeled gluten-free is still to high, but even though there is room for improvement more and more businesses are providing gluten-free training for their staff, and those that do are reaping benefits. Look for this trend to continue as more businesses offer training, gluten-free and celiac disease awareness increases, and more consumers demand safe gluten-free foods. Read more at: The Medical Journal of Australia
  8. Celiac.com 06/16/2018 - Summer is the time for chips and salsa. This fresh salsa recipe relies on cabbage, yes, cabbage, as a secret ingredient. The cabbage brings a delicious flavor and helps the salsa hold together nicely for scooping with your favorite chips. The result is a fresh, tasty salsa that goes great with guacamole. Ingredients: 3 cups ripe fresh tomatoes, diced 1 cup shredded green cabbage ½ cup diced yellow onion ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 jalapeno, seeded 1 Serrano pepper, seeded 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 garlic cloves, minced salt to taste black pepper, to taste Directions: Purée all ingredients together in a blender. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, as desired. Serve is a bowl with tortilla chips and guacamole.
  9. Celiac.com 10/17/2012 - This article originally appeared in the Winter 2012 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. It’s estimated that of the 3 million Americans with celiac disease, an autoimmune disease triggered by exposure to gluten-a protein component of wheat, barley, and rye-only 3% have been diagnosed. The good news for celiac patients who have been diagnosed is that the treatment for their condition is simple and doesn’t require the ingestion of drugs--a gluten-free diet. Unfortunately, celiac patients must deal with several challenges in maintaining a diet free of gluten, specifically the expenses involved. Compared with “regular” gluten-containing foods, gluten-free alternatives are more expensive. In fact, a study has indicated that gluten-free foods cost more than double their gluten-containing counterparts. In a study by the Dalhousie Medical School at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, prices were compared between food products labeled as “gluten-free” with comparable gluten-containing food products at two large-sized chain grocery stores. Unit prices of the food items in dollars per 100 grams were calculated for this purpose. According to the study, all the 56 gluten-free products were more expensive than their corresponding products. The average unit price for gluten-free products was found to be $1.71, compared with $0.61 for the gluten-containing products. This means that gluten-free products were 242% more expensive than gluten-containing items. Fortunately, celiac patients can receive tax deductions for certain expenses related with their gluten-free diet. To receive these benefits, celiacs must provide a doctor’s note confirming their celiac diagnosis and save their receipts for all their gluten-free foods and other products they purchase. The difference between the prices of gluten-free items compared to those of regular items is tax-deductible. Products that don’t have a gluten-containing counterpart, such as xanthan gum and sorghum flour, are totally tax-deductible. Shipping costs for online orders of gluten-free items are also tax-deductible. In order to file your claim, you should fill out a 1049 schedule A for medical deductions. For more information, contact a qualified accountant. There are other ways to avoid spending loads of money on gluten-free foods. For instance, stay away from gluten-free processed and “junk” foods such as snack foods and desserts made with refined carbohydrates and sugar and lacking nutrients. Not only will you save money, but you’ll safeguard your health. I recommend making meals comprised of nutritious, naturally gluten-free whole foods at home such as fruits, vegetables, dairy products, poultry, fish, meats, nuts and seeds, and eggs. These foods are packed with vital nutrients and don’t carry any additional costs. Make sure that no gluten has been added to such foods and they are safe from cross-contamination. Another way to save money is to make your own gluten-free mixes yourself, such as the ones I recommend on my gluten-free website. Instead of buying expensive commercial gluten-free baking mixes, you can create your own gluten-free flour mixes for a variety of foods such as pancakes, pizza, rolls, and muffins and store them conveniently in your refrigerator or freezer. I also recommend purchasing gluten-free ingredients in bulk online, as many websites offer great deals. These are just a few of the ways to save money on the gluten-free diet. It is unfortunate that gluten-free foods are more expensive than “regular” food items, especially to such an extraordinary degree, however savvy gluten-free dieters can through tax deductions and smart shopping choices cut down on their expenses. Perhaps in the future we will see a decrease in gluten-free food pricing, but one thing is for sure-we should consider ourselves lucky that we have found an answer to our health problems. Even if the gluten-free diet is expensive, at least it’s the road to greater health and quality of life.
  10. Celiac.com 05/24/2018 - England is facing some hard questions about gluten-free food prescriptions for people with celiac disease. Under England’s National Health Plan, people with celiac disease are eligible for gluten-free foods as part of their medical treatment. The latest research shows that prescription practice for gluten-free foods varies widely, and often seems independent of medical factors. This news has put those prescribing practices under scrutiny. "Gluten free prescribing is clearly in a state of flux at the moment, with an apparent rapid reduction in prescribing nationally," say the researchers. Their data analysis revealed that after a steady increase in prescriptions between 1998 and 2010, the prescription rate for gluten free foods has both fallen, and become more variable, in recent years. Not only is there tremendous variation in gluten free prescribing, say the researchers, “this variation appears to exist largely without good reason…” Worse still, the research showed that those living in the most deprived areas of the country are the least likely to be prescribed gluten-free products, possibly due to a lower rate of celiac diagnosis in disadvantaged groups, say the researchers. But following a public consultation, the government decided earlier this year to restrict the range of gluten free products rather than banning them outright. As research data pile up and gluten-free food becomes cheaper and more ubiquitous, look for more changes to England’s gluten-free prescription program to follow. Read more about this research in the online journal BMJ Open.
  11. Celiac.com 10/21/2014 - Insects offer one of the most concentrated and efficient forms of protein on the planet, and they are a common food in many parts of the world. So, could high-protein flour made out of crickets change the future of gluten-free foods? A San Francisco Bay Area company is looking to make that possibility a reality. The company, Bitty Foods, is making flour from slow-roasted crickets that are then milled and combined with tapioca and cassava to make a high-protein flour that is gluten-free. According to the Bitty Foods website, a single cup of cricket flour contains a whopping 28 grams of protein. So can Bitty Foods persuade gluten-free consumers to try their high protein gluten-free flour? Only time will tell. In the mean time, stay tuned for more cricket flour developments. What do you think? Would you give it a try? If it worked well for baking, would you use it?
  12. Celiac.com 06/08/2018 - A spat over gluten-free symbols turned legal recently, when Bob’s Red Mill filed a lawsuit against the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America in U.S. district court in Portland. Bob’s Red Mill is looking to continue using their current gluten-free logo without seeking permission from, or paying money to, the Gluten Intolerance Group (G.I.G.), which verifies and certifies gluten-free products through its Gluten-Free Certification Organization program. To date, the program has certified more than 30,000 products in 29 different countries. For its gluten-free labeling, Bob’s Red Mill currently uses a gluten-free circle symbol with “gluten-free” in larger letters in the middle. Above and below the gluten-free, in smaller font are the words “GLUTEN” and “FREE,” respectively. For their certification label, The Gluten Intolerance Group uses a similar “gluten-free” in a circle, with the words “Certified” and “Gluten-Free” in smaller letters above and below the circle, respectively. Bob’s Red Mill said in court documents that on May 17 it received a cease and desist e-mail from the G.I.G. The e-mail stated that G.I.G. has used their mark consistently in commerce since 2005, and demanded that Bob’s cease using their logo, saying it was similar to the G.I.G.’s logo and could confuse consumers into thinking the Group had certified the Bob’s Red Mill products, which it had not. The Food and Drug Administration’s says that a product labeled gluten-free must have less than 20 parts per million, and Bob’s Red Mill says they adhere to that standard. In court document, Bob’s said that “complying with G.I.G.’s demand would require a significant redesign and marketing process,” and that the “potential damages exceed $75,000.” The suit by Bob’s Red Mill claims that G.I.G. abandoned its application to register its gluten-free mark with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Feb. 13 of this year, and asks the court to declare that G.I.G.s gluten-free mark is unenforceable and merely descriptive. Basically, Bob’s seems to be launching a preemptive lawsuit to put G.I.G. on its heels before G.I.G has the chance to sue Bob’s. Stay tuned to see if this suit actually makes it to a trial, or if cooler heads prevail and the two sides work something out. The Gluten Intolerance Group was founded in 1974, and offers consumer support, advocacy and education to the gluten-free community. Bob’s Red Mill was founded in 1978, is a global provider of gluten-free milled grain products, and certified-organic milled grain products. Disclosure: Bob's Red Mill and G.I.G. have been sponsors of Celiac.com.
  13. I miss biscuits more thananything. Before going gluten-free, I loved to eat biscuits andgravy, strawberry shortcake (on homemade biscuits) and warm biscuitswith honey! There is nothing that compares with the satisfaction ofeating a warm homemade biscuit. Which is why the following recipe isso exciting. This is a recipe that can be manipulated to cater tospecific dietary restrictions-even mine! There are dairy-free,soy-free and egg-free options included. It might take a couple triesfinding the right combination for you, so spend a day making somedelicious gluten-free home-style biscuits. Home-style Drop Biscuits(Gluten-Free) Servings: 16 largebiscuits Ingredients: 1 ½ cup brown rice flour 2 cup corn starch orpotato starch or tapioca starch ½ cup soy flour orsorghum flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 ¾ teaspoons salt 1½ teaspoons teaspoons baking soda 2 teaspoons xanthan gum 1 stick of butter or gluten-free butter substitute(chilled in the freezer) 1 ¼ cup soy milk 1 ¼ cup water 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 1 egg, beaten (or the equivalent amount ofyour favorite egg replacement) To Make: *Note: 1. If you’re not vegan or dairy free, feelfree to use 1 c. buttermilk in place of the soy milk and vinegar. Ifyou’re allergic to soy, try using your usual milk substitute andkeep the vinegar in the recipe. Also reduce the liquid if necessary, you don't want the batter to be too runny. Preheat your oven to 350F degrees. In a large mixing bowl thoroughly combine the flour (a fork works well for this), bakingpowder, salt, baking soda, and xanthan gum. For an easiertime working with the butter, grate the butter into the flour usingthe small holed side of a box grater. Mix the butter into the flourso that there are no large balls of grated butter. Add the soy milk, water, vinegar and beaten egg to the flourand stir until the dry and liquid ingredients are combined. Using a large spoon, drop the dough onto agreased pan to make 16 biscuits. Cook at 350F degrees for 15 minutesor until golden brown.
  14. Celiac.com 07/27/2010 - Many businesses contact us here at Celiac.com, wanting to know how to start a gluten-free business. There are many important things to consider before you open your gluten-free business to celiac and gluten intolerant customers. The following information is intended to help those looking to comply with celiac standards of gluten-free food. Start-Up: To begin, it is important to take take inventory of celiac contamination requirements. Will your gluten-free business also sell gluten-containing foods? If so, cross contamination will be an issue. If your company will be solely a gluten-free accommodating business, it will make your challenges fewer, but there are other important factors to consider such as contamination, suppliers and certifications. Before you begin your journey into providing gluten-free products, it is important to think like a celiac. Contamination & Cross-Contamination: Cross-contamination occurs when a gluten-free product comes into contact with other gluten based products. Cross contamination can occur in a variety of ways, but it usually begins where food is prepared and packaged, such as with the supplier or the manufacturer. However, cross-contamination can occur from other sources as well. If you plan to sell gluten containing pizza and gluten-free pizza, for example, then you will have an entirely new set of concerns. If you make the pizza dough in-house, there is a very good chance that gluten flour will permeate in the air for hours after using, coating your surfaces and creating a health hazard for the gluten-free folks. And if you bake the gluten and non-gluten pizza's in the same oven, then you will also need to take that into consideration, as that is also a source of cross-contamination and can render your gluten-free pizza inedible for sensitive celiacs. If your gluten-free food is stored in the same place as the gluten-containing food, you may have also a health hazard on your hands. Basically, it's a good rule of thumb to follow the celiac guidelines set for keeping a gluten-free kitchen. There are many considerations to take into account when supplying gluten-free food and while keeping a pristine business will be your best friend, sometimes even that isn't enough. Suppliers: Suppliers are a very important factor when starting a gluten-free business. It is important to research the product sources before using an ingredient source. If an ingredient source is contaminated by gluten, then your products could also be contaminated by gluten. So if you are looking to buy gluten-free rice flour for example, the reliability of your rice flour to be gluten-free will depend greatly on your supplier. It is important to carefully research the product supplier before using them. There is nothing worse than buying large quantities of food labeled “gluten-free” that actually contain gluten. Remember, it is up to a product's manufacturer to guarantee that their products are gluten-free. They must research their ingredient suppliers, and follow-up with them periodically, as sources and ingredients can change at anytime without notice. Gluten-Free Certification: If you plan to operate a gluten-free business then getting your products certified gluten-free is the best way to go. Not all gluten-free certifications are created equal. There are various gluten-free labels ranging from legitimate to not so legitimate, so it is important to research the most reliable, and best gluten-free label for your products. Getting your product 'gluten-free' certified will put your consumers at ease and increase your sales. It will also put you at ease knowing that you are providing the best gluten-free product you possibly can.
  15. This recipes comes to us from Melissa Boucher. 4 ½ cup gluten-free flour 1 ¾ cup sugar 7 teaspoons baking powder 2 teaspoons salt ½ teaspoon nutmeg ½ teaspoon cinnamon 3 eggs 2 teaspoons gluten-free vanilla 2 cup milk or water 1 cup oil Mix dry ingredients together. At medium speed beat eggs and vanilla. Add rest of wet ingredients. Add dry mixture. Makes about 2 dz. donuts. These freeze well and can be put in the microwave--80% power for 20-30 seconds.
  16. Celiac.com 06/09/2018 - If you haven’t tried savory porridge, then you’ve been missing out. This combination of brown rice, steel cut oats and quinoa makes a nice introduction. The perfectly boiled egg takes it to the top. Dress it up with as many vegetables as you like. You can make it a day or two ahead of time, and just top with vegetables to make a tasty, portable lunch. Ingredients: 4 large eggs, room temperature ⅓ cup brown rice, rinsed well ⅓ cup red quinoa, rinsed well ⅓ cup steel cut oats, rinsed well 2 ounces fresh pea sprouts 2 medium shallots, peeled, halved through root 1 1” piece ginger, peeled, crushed ¼ cup gluten-free tamari or soy sauce Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil, divided 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1½ cups spinach, wilted Sliced almonds, more fresh pea shoots, fresh cilantro leaves, and chopped scallions, as desired Directions: Bring shallots, ginger, rice, quinoa, oats, and 4 cups water and 4 cups of chicken broth to a boil in a large saucepan, reduce heat, and simmer for about 1½–2 hours, stirring often after the first hour of cooking to prevent sticking. Cook until mixture is thick like porridge and rice is very soft, and beginning to break down. Stir in more water as needed to achieve desired thickness. Discard shallots and ginger and stir in soy sauce; season with salt and pepper. Add pea shoots and cook just until shoots are wilted and tender, about 1 minute. Meanwhile, bring a large saucepan of water to a boil, then carefully add eggs. Boil exactly 6 minutes, then transfer eggs to a large bowl of ice water; saving hot water for wilting the spinach. Let eggs cool and peel. Serve porridge drizzled with oil and topped with soft-boiled eggs, wilted spinach, cucumber, radishes, peanuts, cilantro, and scallions, as desired. Note: You can cook the rice and quinoa up to 2 days ahead. Reheat in the microwave before adding soy sauce and remaining ingredients.
  17. Celiac.com 11/03/2015 - Many people today are dealing with the need to be gluten-free, whether from allergies, intolerance or celiac disease. Being gluten-free can be the difference between being healthy and having chronic, potentially debilitating, symptoms. However, sometimes being gluten-free is not enough. The challenge with a gluten-free diet is that many of the most popular gluten-free flours are actually high in oxalate! Oxalate is a toxin that occurs naturally in most plant foods, but at very different levels, some relatively safe, and some not. Oxalate can even kill at high enough doses. The scientific challenges in the oxalate field, as well as oxalate's potential relationship to celiac sprue, were discussed in the feature article by Susan Costen Owens which appeared in the Spring issue of this journal. In this follow up article, you'll find the practical advice on how you can reduce the level of oxalate in your gluten-free diet. A great example of a popular high oxalate gluten-free flour is almond flour. Almonds are one of the very highest oxalate foods, with about 300 mg of oxalate for one half cup of whole nuts. Given that you will actually have more nuts in a half cup of flour than you will in a half cup of whole nuts, you could have 400 or more milligrams of oxalate in that single half cup of flour. So, your daily morning muffin made with almond flour could be 200-250 mg of oxalate. This means that you may not feel as good on your gluten-free diet as you might expect because your digestive tract can be suffering with ongoing inflammation from a new source – oxalate. Now 250 mg of oxalate might not seem so bad – unless you consider that a low oxalate diet is defined as 40-60 mg of oxalate per day! That makes your morning muffin the equivalent of 4-5 days worth of oxalate, for someone who is eating a typical low-oxalate eating plan. If you've been eating a lot of nut flours, you might be wondering what you can substitute instead? The one nut flour that is low oxalate is coconut flour. This can be a great option, if you like the density of nut flours, and want a flour with higher nutrition. All other nut flours are high; most seed flours are high too. Nuts themselves are some of the highest oxalate foods in nature. Baked products made with nut flours will be particularly high in oxalate – and if you add chocolate, you compound the problem. Unfortunately, this is more bad news for lovers of chocolate baked goods. Chocolate is another extremely high oxalate ingredient: cocoa has more than 35 mg of oxalate per tablespoon and the substitute carob, is no better! Given that many baked goods could easily have 1-2 tablespoons of chocolate or carob per serving, you can see how your oxalate intake could really add up. Of course, this doesn't include the fact that many baked goods – like brownies – will combine both cocoa and nuts, for a double hit of oxalate. The same problem arises with many of our common gluten-free baking flours and spices. They can often add an overload of oxalate to each serving, with the potential for problems later as oxalate accumulates in the body. So, how can you avoid gluten, and not introduce more of a known toxin into your body? The trick is knowing enough about oxalate to avoid it effectively. The first thing to learn is how to get flavor in your food without the oxalate. Oils and extracts are typically much lower in oxalate than the whole herb or spice, and yet retain the flavor for baking and cooking purposes. The process by which oils are pressed and extracts are made appears to leave the oxalate behind. This rule of thumb gives us a way to get the taste we want, and avoid oxalate. For instance, to get a chocolate taste without too much cocoa, you can carefully craft a recipe that balances the use of cocoa with chocolate extract, chocolate flavoring and even a bit of coffee. Using food grade cocoa butter, which has zero oxalate, in place of butter or oil, is another way to boost that chocolate flavor. If you use the lowest oxalate flours as well, you leave some room for a bit more cocoa because you are not adding a lot of oxalate in the flour. By doing this, you can get the flavor you want while avoiding the oxalate. Another example of baking smart is an almond flavored cookie. You can actually make a cookie with almond oil as well as almond extract for extra taste – while almonds themselves are extremely high, both the oil and the extract have almost no oxalate at all! This concept of using oils and extracts is particularly important if you like the sweet taste of cinnamon. Cinnamon is a very high oxalate spice with over 38 mg of oxalate for just one teaspoon! Choose instead cinnamon oil or cinnamon extract. Cinnamon oil is available from various outlets that sell culinary oils. You can get cinnamon extract in the supplement section of your grocery or health food store – generally, it is sold in capsules. When cooking with it, you simply open the capsules and put the powdered extract into your dish. Substitute about the equivalent amount of dry extract for ground cinnamon. The second thing to learn is how to pick low oxalate flours. While many of the gluten-free flours are high in oxalate, the process of picking appropriate flours may not be as hard as it first appears. Oxalate is often present in the "bran" of a grain. As a result, most whole grain flours are actually high in oxalate. This seems strange to us because we are told to get more fiber and eat whole grain. But the truth is that not all whole grains are good for us and we can get our fiber in other ways not so tied to oxalate. Interestingly, most starches are low oxalate (even if they come from high oxalate whole foods), in the same way that oils are low oxalate. This means that starches are our friends when we want to cook! Most starches (including potato, corn, green bean and sweet potato) are low in oxalate, and can be used as part of the flour combination in a baked good to get a lighter, fluffier result. Again, the explanation is similar to the explanation regarding oils and extracts: when we remove the starch from even a high oxalate food, we appear to leave the majority of the oxalate behind. But be careful to get starches and not flours when you are dealing with high oxalate whole foods – items like potato flour or sweet potato flour are extremely high in oxalate, and should be avoided. Only the starches are safe on a low-oxalate eating plan. You can consume some medium oxalate foods, and still remain low oxalate overall. This expands the possible flours that you can use. Good options include white masa (which is a corn flour), green pea, lupin, sorghum, and sweet rice flours. While buckwheat and quinoa are also common in gluten-free foods, these grains are very high in oxalate. You should ideally avoid them. So what do you do if you are used to baking with nut flours? If you want high nutrition flours that are much lower in oxalate than nut flours, look to legume flours. Consider black-eyed pea flour (also called cowpea bean flour), garbanzo bean flour, or yellow pea flour. All of these legume flours are low in oxalate. However, because legume flours can be heavy, combine them with low oxalate starches, like corn, rice, green bean, potato or sweet potato starch to get the right texture in your baked goods. When we combine the lowest oxalate flours with others that are medium (and sometimes small amounts of higher oxalate flours), we can get the right kind of flavor and texture, yet remain low in oxalate per serving. A great example is a flour mix that contains a variety of flours. One easy combination of flours is ½ cup of sweet rice flour (medium oxalate), with ½ cup of coconut flour (medium oxalate), ½ cup of potato starch (low oxalate) and ½ cup of cornstarch (low oxalate). This particular flour combination can be used in crepes, and results in a crepe that has the same kind of stretch that you have with gluten flours, because of the properties of the various flours used in the combination. While some of us will be experimental and will like the idea of playing with flours and starches to develop our own recipes, others will not. If you are looking for a good quality gluten-free flour mix that you can use at home, consider Orgran. Another great option for baking (as well as pancakes) is gluten-free Bisquick. So far we've presumed that you are baking or making your own gluten-free items. But what if you are buying packaged gluten-free foods? When looking at baked goods, look for starches in the first five ingredients. So, you should see low oxalate flours early in the ingredients, because these will be the largest components of your baked good. Avoid items with buckwheat flour, hemp, quinoa, sesame seeds, and teff in general. All of these ingredients are so high in oxalate, that even small amounts would be a problem. While tapioca starch and white rice flour are high in oxalate, in smaller amounts, they should be fine. If you are considering reducing oxalate in your diet, the best way to do that is slowly! When you reduce oxalate too quickly, you can experience stressful symptoms as the oxalate that is stored in your body leaves too quickly. The process of oxalate moving out of your tissues and into your blood, seeking then a site of secretion, is called "dumping" by our project since it is a very common experience. This can be the culprit behind digestive symptoms, fatigue, brain fog, rashes and other symptoms. Ideally, you would slowly phase high oxalate foods out of your diet. So rather than completely abandoning your morning muffin made with almond flour, you would slowly reduce your portion by ¼ of a muffin per week, until you were no longer eating an almond flour muffin after 4 weeks. During those 4 weeks, you slowly introduce your new morning muffin, ¼ at a time, which is now made with coconut flour. You would also want to remove only one food at a time in this way – so that oxalate is very slowly phased out, and you can also use up some of the high oxalate foods that you have in your home. It's not only easier on your body to do this change slowly, but it's also easier on your pocket book! Oxalate is not just an issue with grains and flours – it can also be an issue with other foods. So while this article has focused more on the specific issues with gluten-free baking and cooking, there are other high oxalate foods that you need to be aware of if you want to reduce oxalate in your overall diet. You may have heard or seen information that points at leafy greens as high oxalate foods. While such common staples as spinach, beets and Swiss chard are extremely high in oxalate, you can enjoy other greens in a healthy diet. Consider other leafy greens like arugula, turnip greens, mustard greens or certain varieties of kale, like dino / lacinto or purple, to get leafy veggies in your diet. Most lettuces are low in oxalate and high in nutrition, including romaine and leaf lettuce. Eating low oxalate does not have to mean removing whole food groups from your diet, nor losing all your high nutrition options! Many of the common fruits are lower in oxalate and can be incorporated in your diet – including berries. Many people have mistakenly heard that all berries are high oxalate. Testing done by Dr. Michael Liebman of the University of Wyoming shows this is not true! According to test results from his lab, both blueberries and strawberries are low oxalate, and raspberries are medium oxalate. So while you might want to avoid blackberries (which are very high in oxalate), you can safely eat other healthy berries. However, other fruit can be extremely high in oxalate. Citrus can be tricky because it's important to know not just which fruit you are eating, but which parts. Many citrus juices, like grapefruit, orange, lemon and lime, are low oxalate per serving, so you can still get the taste of these items when cooking with the juice. But don't eat a lot of grapefruit – the whole fruit is high oxalate. Similarly, if you use citrus zest for extra flavor, you'll find that it's a problem: the oxalate levels are too high. Sometimes you need to know the variety of a food, or need to watch your serving size. Pears are a great example. Some varieties of pears have tested low; others have tested high. When choosing pears, go for Bartlett (also called Williams pear). Many exotic and tropical fruits are high, including kiwi, figs, papaya, gauva, and pomegranate. Some are so high that they could be dangerous to consume in a single serving! Star fruit has this dubious distinction: it is so high that people have had seizures and even died from eating star fruit when their kidneys were in trouble. It is important to recognize that many of the foods that we think of as being the healthiest may also contain a lot of oxalate. Vegans can be particularly susceptible to eating a very high oxalate diet, as they may be getting their protein primarily from high oxalate legumes, including soybeans. If you want to include legumes in your diet for the fiber and nutritional benefits, focus on the low and medium oxalate legumes. That list includes red, green, brown and yellow lentils, green peas, red kidney beans, tofu, garbanzo beans, yellow and green split peas, lima beans and black-eyed peas. Note that tofu is okay – but whole soybeans are not. This is one of the most challenging aspects of the diet. Some foods are okay in the right form, or with the proper processing. So much as extracts, oils and starches are lower in oxalate than the whole foods they come from, some processed forms of foods are lower than the whole, unprocessed food. So you can eat tofu – but don't eat edamame. A last point that can help you to reduce oxalate in your diet is to consider how a food is cooked. When a food is boiled, you may actually reduce the amount of oxalate in the food. Oxalate can be soluble, and so it will leach into the cooking water, and can then be thrown away. There is no other cooking method that can reliably reduce oxalate, other than cooking or soaking in water. However, this flies in the face of current nutritional advice, which focuses on eating as many foods as possible raw. While you don't have to boil everything you eat – there are a number of very low oxalate veggies and fruits that can be eaten and enjoyed raw – boiling can be a valuable strategy to reduce this known toxin, and leave you with a more nutritious end result. If you have more questions about oxalate and your diet, please see the website www.lowoxalate.info. There is also an associated support group, which is currently at Yahoo, called Trying_Low_Oxalates. In addition, we have a Facebook group with the same name. On Facebook, we also have two additional recipe groups, one of which is focused specifically on vegan eating. These support groups can help you to make lower oxalate choices part of your diet and can also help you gain a perspective on how oxalate may have been affecting other issues in your health. Lower Oxalate Flours, Starches and Products Potato starch Cornstarch Green Bean starch Sweet Potato starch Flax meal / seed White masa corn flour Green pea flour Lupin flour White rice flour Sweet rice flour Coconut flour Black-eyed pea (cowpea) flour Garbanzo bean (chickpea) flour Water chestnut flour Yellow pea flour Low Oxalate per serving General Mills Corn Chex (1/2 cup) General Mills Rice Chex (1/2 cup) Arrowhead Mills gluten-free Popcorn (1 cup) Eden Kuzu Pasta (1/2 cup) Thai Kitchen Rice Noodles (1/2 cup) Annie's Homegrown Macaroni and Cheese, gluten-free (1/2 cup) Tinkyada White Rice Spaghetti (1/2 cup) Lotus Foods Bhutan Red Rice (1/2 cup cooked) Higher Oxalate Gluten-free Products Medium oxalate per serving Udi's White Sandwich Bread (1 slice) Nabisco Cream of Rice (1/4 cup dry) Envirokids Gorilla Munch (1 cup) Orville Redenbacher's Popcorn (1 cup) Mission Yellow Corn Tortillas (1) Tinkyada Brown Rice Spaghetti (1/2 cup cooked) Tolerant Foods Red Lentil Rotini (1/2 cup cooked) Lundberg Brown Jasmine Rice, boiled (1/2 cup) Extremely High Oxalate foods Beans (Anasazi, Black/Turtle, Cannellini, Great Northern, Navy, Pink, Pinto, Red, Soy, White) Cactus/Nopal Carob Cocoa Powder/dark and milk chocolate Fruits (Apricot, Blackberries, Figs, Guava, Kiwi, Pomegranate, Rhubarb, Star Fruit/Carambola) Grains (Amaranth, Buckwheat, Quinoa, Teff) Nuts (Almonds, Cashew, Brazil, Hazelnut/filberts, Macadamia, Peanuts/Spanish Peanuts, Pine) Seeds (Caraway, Chia, Hemp, Poppy, Sesame) Herbs/Spices (Allspice, Cinnamon, Clove, Cumin, Curry Powder, Ginger, Onion Powder, Turmeric) Potatoes (Russet, Burbank, Idaho, Fingerling) Vegetables (Artichoke, Beets, Eggplant, Hearts of Palm, Jerusalem Artichokes, Okra, Plantain, Swiss chard, Spinach, Sweet Potato/Yam) Guide to Lower Oxalate Substitutions (chart on substitutions is used by permission from: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Low-Ox-Coach/551330634959001/) High Oxalate Ingredient(s) What it's used for Lower Oxalate Substitution Spinach Greens in a stir fry Cooks down for sauces / dips ARUGULA. Similar flavour and consistency. Substitute one for one. Beets Greens in a stir fry Sweet root veggie Used for detox For stir-fries, try other greens, like turnip or kohl rabi. You can also use red cabbage for a red veggie (if you need something red). Try boiled carrots or parsnip for dishes that need a root veggie. If you want a gentle detox, try lemon juice in water to start your day. Swiss Chard Greens in a stir fry Steamed Boiled Dino / Lacinto Kale. Lowest ox when boiled. Can also try mustard greens or dandelion greens. Almonds Snack Baking Gluten free crusts For snacks, try pumpkin seeds. For baking, either go to coconut flour (rather than almond flour) or use a lower ox nut and smaller quantities. For bread, try pumpkin seed butter or sunflower seed butter. Pecans or walnuts are the lowest ox nuts. Almond or peanut butter Spread for bread Sunflower seed butter, macadamia nut butter, pumpkin seed butter, golden pea butter (golden pea is the lowest oxalate) Sesame seeds Used for both flavour and as the whole seed While sesame seeds are high, the oil is zero oxalate! So, try using either plain or toasted sesame seed oil to flavour dishes. Most dried beans, including red beans, adzuki beans, black beans, etc Chili Savory dishes Dips Try subbing lower ox legumes like black-eyes peas, red lentils, green and yellow split peas, garbanzo beans and lima beans. Brown rice Side dish Casseroles Stir-fries Sub with either brown rice that is soaked, drained and cooked like pasta (in lots of water), or use white rice. Uncle Ben's is one of the lowest rices. Chocolate / Cocoa Desserts of all kinds! Try lesser amounts of chocolate, or a combination of cocoa and chocolate flavoured stevia. Also, can sub white chocolate in many applications, like white chocolate chips for cookies. In a recipe, sub food grade cocoa butter in place of other specified oils / butter. Tomato sauce Sauces Casseroles Pastas Instead of 100% tomato sauce, sub with 1-2 tablespoons of tomato paste, ½ cup pumpkin or butternut squash puree and water to thin as required. Add appropriate spices for the dish. Black tea Beverages Decaf green tea, many herbal teas or coffee Nutmeg Spice Mace Black pepper Spice White pepper Sweet potatoes Dishes of all kinds Butternut squash or other suitable squash with the right texture and flavour. Onion, carrot and celery to use to start soup One of the most common combinations to start soup or stir fry Garlic, shallot and red pepper is a favourite. You can also use garlic, shallot and green cabbage. Lemon or orange rind Dishes of all kinds Lemon or orange juice, with a thickener. In some cases, lemon or orange extract. Cinnamon Dishes of all kinds Cinnamon extract (purchased in a dry capsule supplement at the health food store. Break open capsules and put contents in your dish). Regular potatoes Boiled, or used in dishes Baked You can boil new, red-skinned, white-fleshed potatoes and then add to dishes. You can also sub cauliflower or radishes, 1 to 1. (Radishes are great cooked!) To sub for a baked potato or for a dish that uses potato raw, try rutabaga or turnip (which can be scalloped or turned into a baked fry.) Regular pasta Usually for main dishes or side dishes Zucchini "noodles", or cornstarch noodles, or other tested and low ox pasta like Shiritaki noodles (which are also low carb and zero calories). You can get cornstarch "angel hair" pasta or Shiritaki noodles at Asian food markets. Oatmeal Breakfast Baking Sub with ½ oatmeal and ½ flax meal for cooked cereal with the same texture but lower oxalate. Turmeric Baking Flavor Sub with curcumin extract. This can be purchased as a health supplement in capsules. Capsules can be opened and the contents added to food and beverages. Ground ginger Baking Flavor Sub with fresh ginger or ginger root extract. From the author: If you have ever been diagnosed with an autoimmune disease and have been trying to lower oxalate, will you participate in the development of this science by filling out a survey? We would also like to find out whether reducing oxalate has affected your autoimmune condition. The link to our survey is here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/CMN5KK7
  18. Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings. But that commitment came to an ignoble end recently as Starbucks admitted that their gluten-free sandwich was plagued by “low sales,” and was simply not sustainable from a company perspective. The sandwich may not have sold well, but it was much-loved by those who came to rely on it. With the end of that sandwich came the complaints. Customers on social media were anything but quiet, as seen in numerous posts, tweets and comments pointing out the callous and tone-deaf nature of the announcement which took place in the middle of national Celiac Disease Awareness Month. More than a few posts threatened to dump Starbucks altogether. A few of the choice tweets include the following: “If I’m going to get coffee and can’t eat anything might as well be DD. #celiac so your eggbites won’t work for me,” tweeted @NotPerryMason. “They’re discontinuing my @Starbucks gluten-free sandwich which is super sad, but will save me money because I won’t have a reason to go to Starbucks and drop $50 a week,” tweeted @nwillard229. Starbucks is not giving up on gluten-free entirely, though. The company will still offer several items for customers who prefer gluten-free foods, including Sous Vide Egg Bites, a Marshmallow Dream Bar and Siggi’s yogurt. Stay tuned to learn more about Starbucks gluten-free foods going forward.
  19. Celiac.com 06/06/2018 - Endometriosis is an often painful medical condition in which tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus, known as the endometrium, begins to grow outside the uterus. There is a bit of research data to support the idea that a gluten-free diet can improve the symptoms of endometriosis for some people. Mainly a 2012 clinical study that showed 75 percent of endometriosis patients reported major improvements after 12 months without gluten. That bit of news has prompted more than a few women to try the diet, and more than a few to blog about it. One example is this blog entry by Lindsay Burgess. According to Burgess, She adds that gluten can “increase inflammation and can also cause digestive issues such as bloating and constipation,” which are common complaints from many who suffer from endometriosis. The basic theory is that endometriosis involves a good deal of inflammation, and that a gluten-free diet will somehow help to reduce inflammation in general, and that the overall result will be a reduction of symptoms and an overall improvement in the endometriosis. Burgess says the endometriosis diet is largely about “cutting down/out inflammatory foods and replacing them with foods that can really support our bodies.” So, it’s not just about eliminating gluten, it is also about eating foods that promote overall health. Nothing wrong with promoting overall health by eating more nutritious foods. A more general question might be: Can eating a more nutritious diet help to improve overall health and thus help to improve symptoms of endometriosis? Perhaps, but eating a more nutritious diet is always a good idea. There’s still no solid medical evidence to show that eliminating gluten alone will help to improve endometriosis, tough, it’s certainly worth a try. Remember, though, that many gluten-free foods are highly processed, and many are high in salt, sugar and fat, compared with their non-gluten-free counterparts. That means that simply giving up gluten likely won’t improve your diet, to say nothing of your endometriosis. So, the take away here is that eating a more nutritious diet is never a bad idea, and that diet can include gluten-free foods, and these foods may improve your general health or your endometriosis. Endometriosis can be a painful, frustrating experience, but going gluten-free is unlikely to improve your condition, and very unlikely to “cure” it. Officially, for people who do not have medical condition that requires them to avoid gluten, it’s probably best to resist the gluten-free diet. So, the short of it is that, if you wish to eat gluten-free, then go ahead. But if you don’t have celiac disease or some other gluten sensitivity, don’t expect health or medical miracles, even for endometriosis. Any benefits gained by a more nutritious diet can likely be gained with a diet that is not gluten-free. Of course, a balanced and nutritious gluten-free diet likely won’t harm you. Otherwise, you can choose to eat an anti-inflammatory diet that is not gluten-free and probably get similar results. In any case, be careful, choose carefully, and pay attention to your body. There’s a good article on this at EndometriosisNews.com. They also have a helpful link about getting started on a gluten-free diet for endometriosis.
  20. Celiac.com 05/29/2018 - The quest for gluten-free product glory just took an interesting turn. Certainly, the explosion of gluten-free products, and their corresponding popularity among consumers is not news. Gluten-free products are a multi-billion dollar industry, and the vast majority of gluten-free products are purchased by people who do not have celiac disease or a dietary sensitivity to gluten. Consumers can now buy nearly every kind of product imaginable in a gluten-free version. There are gluten-free make-ups, gluten-free shampoos, conditioners, and lotions. There’s even been some research to suggest that gluten in orthodontic retainers might be an issue, and so maybe we can expect to see gluten-free retainers soon. But gluten-free condoms? Yes, gluten-free condoms are a thing. And not just one single thing. Numerous organic condom manufacturers are touting their condoms as gluten-free. Brands include Glyde, Green Condom Club, Sustain, and now Lola. Lola is an all-natural personal care company that just launched a line of condoms that claim to be free of paraben, fragrance, casein, and, of course, gluten. Do condoms actually have gluten in the first place? Maybe not. According to Lola co-founders Alex Friedman and Jordana Kier, while most condoms don't contain gluten, those that contain lubricant might. That’s because gluten is commonly used as an emulsifier, stabilizer, and/or filler in personal care products. Because the Food and Drug Administration classifies condoms as medical devices, condom regulations don’t require manufacturers to declare gluten as an ingredient. Certainly there are numerous areas where hidden gluten can be a concern for some consumers, especially those with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity. And personal beauty care products, prescription and over the counter drugs, and other health care products are one of those areas. Making a strong claim to be gluten-free may be a way for manufacturers like Lola to differentiate itself from products that may contain gluten, or other products that may not include gluten, but may also not declare that clearly. So, for anyone worried about such things, and willing to pay a premium price (a 12 pack of Lola’s gluten-free condoms retail for $11), then gluten-free condom bliss awaits you; or something like that. What do you think? Are gluten-free condoms a genuine product advance? Just another marketing gimmick? A product you would try? More info is at: menshealth.com
  21. Celiac.com 06/04/2018 - Spring means fresh vegetables, and fresh vegetables mean soup. Minestrone soup is one of the great dishes of spring. There are many versions, and many of them are delicious. I tend to favor those with a lighter touch. This version makes a clear, light, delicious minestrone broth that is perfect for showing off your fresh garden vegetables. The gluten-free meatballs help take this soup to eleven. Ingredients: 3 ounces ground beef 3 ounces ground pork 5 cups chicken broth ½ cup fresh gluten-free breadcrumbs 6 tablespoons finely grated Parmesan, divided, plus more for garnish 1 large egg, whisked 4 garlic cloves, 2 minced, 2 sliced thin 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon Italian dried seasoning 1 leek, white and pale-green parts only, cut into ¼-inch rounds 1 cup carrots, peeled and cut to ½-inch rounds 1 cup (packed) baby spinach Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions: Mix chicken, beef, egg, gluten-free breadcrumbs,, Italian seasoning, 3 tablespoons Parmesan, 2 minced garlic cloves, chives, ¾ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper in a medium bowl. Form into meatballs ½-inch-diameter. Heat oil in a small pot over medium heat. Cook meatballs about 3 minutes, until golden brown. Move meatballs to a paper towel to drain away cooking oil. Add leek to pot and cook, stirring often, until beginning to soften, about 3 minutes. Add 2 thinly sliced garlic cloves; cook for 1 minute. Add broth and 2 cups water; bring to a boil. Stir in carrots, add meatballs, and simmer until carrots are tender, and meatballs are cooked through, about 3 minutes. Add spinach and remaining 3 tablespoons Parmesan; stir until spinach wilts and Parmesan melts. Season with salt and pepper. Ladle soup into bowls. Garnish with grated Parmesan.
  22. Celiac.com 06/01/2018 - Sharon Stone is gluten-free and glamorous. Even at 59, the veteran screen star manages to look great and keep landing new work. Stone is in the news recently, promoting her work in two new projects. Stone currently stars in Steven Soderbergh’s innovative murder mystery “Mosaic,” which began as an app and evolved into a full-blown HBO mini-series. She also stars in the romantic comedy “All I Wish,” which premiered at the end of March. A recent article in the New York Times details Stone’s picks for makeup, hair and beauty products, along with some tips on diet and fitness. Among her diet tips, the seasoned star shares the fact that she has celiac disease, so she eats gluten-free. She also avoids processed food, caffeine, and rarely drinks soda or alcohol. For more on Sharon Stone, including her beauty and health routines, check out other recent articles.
  23. Geefree the only all natural Gluten free Puff Pastry Dough, Franks in a Blanket, Spanakopita, Cheeseburger Bites, and Chicken Pot Pie is excited to announce the launch of our new line of microwaveable pockets. Cheese Pizza. Buffalo Chicken. Sausage Egg and Cheese. You can feel good knowing our products are nitrate, hormone, and antibiotic free. We use no corn or soy. Our dough can be baked, boiled, fried and steamed and always come out perfect. We are also in the final stages of getting our Project Non GMO Certification. Don’t be fooled by others. Always check that it is CERTIFIED gluten free and CERTIFIED NON GMO and not just a claim. As we continue to grow please check our locator at geefree.com to find a store near you. If we are not there yet we ship to 45 states and are working on the last few. Retailers that have recently joined the Geefree Family Bristol Farms EarthFare Nuggets Haggens Market of Choice Dagastino’s Foodtown Metcalfes Strack & Van Til New Seasons Markets and New Leaf Markets If your local grocery store doesn’t carry us…Don’t be shy, ask the store manager for Geefree! Help us to help you. Let the gluten free nation grow! Check out some new gluten free recipes on our web site. We will always strive to make the most delicious gluten free food and keep it healthy. The Geefree Team For more details visit their site.
  24. Celiac.com 05/25/2018 - People with celiac disease need to follow a lifelong gluten-free diet. However, once their guts have healed, they can still be sensitive to gluten. Sometimes even more sensitive than they were before they went gluten-free. Accidental ingestion of gluten can trigger symptoms in celiac patients, such as pain in the gut and diarrhea, and can also cause intestinal damage. A new drug being developed by a company called Amgen eases the effects of people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Researchers working on the drug have announced that their proof-of-concept study shows AMG 714, an anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody, potentially protects celiac patients from inadvertent gluten exposure by blocking interleukin 15, an important mediator of celiac disease, and leads to fewer symptoms following gluten exposure. The drug is intended for people with celiac disease who are following a gluten-free diet, and is designed to protect against modest gluten contamination, not to permit consumption of large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta. AMG 714 is not designed for celiac patients to eat gluten at will, but for small, incidental contamination. Francisco Leon, MD, PhD, study director and consultant for Amgen, says that their team is looking at AMG 714 “for its potential to protect against modest contamination, not deliberately eating large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta.” Amgen hopes that AMG 714 will help celiac patients on a gluten-free diet to experience fewer or less sever gluten-triggered events. Findings of the team’s first phase 2 study of a biologic immune modulator in celiac disease will be presented at the upcoming Digestive Disease Week 2018. Read more at ScienceDaily.com
  25. The following gluten-free carrot cake recipe is truly a traditional cake. Full of some of the most common allergens like, dairy, eggs and nuts. I tend to experiment with new recipes by replacing ingredients I can't tolerate, with ingredients I can. For example, many recipes allow you to substitute eggs with applesauce. The nuts can be left out-for those allergic to nuts, and the cream cheese can be substituted for dairy-free cream cheese. When substituting however, ratios will be different and it is a good idea to know what ratio of applesauce (for example) equals 4 eggs. Ratio quantities will also greatly depend on your taste buds, but if this recipe is okay for your diet, dig in and enjoy! Cake Ingredients: 1 cup pecans - toasted and finely chopped 2 ½ cups carrots - finely grated 2 cups gluten-free all purpose flour 1 tsp. baking soda 1 ½ tsp. baking powder 2/3 tsp. salt - finely ground 1 ½ tsp. cinnamon 4 large eggs - room temp 1 ½ cups granulated sugar 1 cup vegetable or canola oil 2 tsp. vanilla Cream Cheese Frosting Ingredients: 1/4 cup unsalted butter - room temperature 8 ounces cream cheese - room temp 2 cups powdered sugar 1 tsp. vanilla 1 lemon - finely grated lemon zest only To Make: Start by toasting the pecans in the oven at 350 degree F for 6-8 minutes. Remove from the oven, allow to cool and chop finely. Next, finely shred 2 ½ cups of carrots. Finally, combine the gluten-free flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon in a bowl, set aside. Beat the 4 eggs on medium speed for about 1 minute, reduce the speed and slowly pour in the granulated sugar. Once the sugar and eggs are combined (about 3-4 minutes) slowly pour in the oil and vanilla. Next, add the flour mixture and beat just until combined. Finally, use a spatula to fold in the carrots and toasted pecans. Divide the batter between two well greased 9 inch round cake pans. Bake at 350 F for 25-30 minutes. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes before inverting onto a cooling rack. Baking Directions: Divide batter between 2 well greased 9 inch round cake pans. Bake at 350 degrees F for25-30 minutes. Allow to cool in the pan for 10 minutes before inverting onto a cooling rack. * Note: This cake can also be made into a single layer 9x13 cake, simply increase baking time to 30-40 minutes. While the cake is cooling, beat together the butter and cream cheese. Next, add the powdered sugar, vanilla, and lemon zest. Beat until thoroughly combined. Place one layer of cake on a platter, spread an even layer of frosting on top of the cake. Add the second layer of cake. Use the remaining frosting to cover the top and sides of the cake. *Idea: Use remaining or extra pecans to decorate the outside of the cake.