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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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  1. Celiac.com 05/24/2018 - England is facing some hard questions about gluten-free food prescriptions for people with celiac disease. Under England’s National Health Plan, people with celiac disease are eligible for gluten-free foods as part of their medical treatment. The latest research shows that prescription practice for gluten-free foods varies widely, and often seems independent of medical factors. This news has put those prescribing practices under scrutiny. "Gluten free prescribing is clearly in a state of flux at the moment, with an apparent rapid reduction in prescribing nationally," say the researchers. Their data analysis revealed that after a steady increase in prescriptions between 1998 and 2010, the prescription rate for gluten free foods has both fallen, and become more variable, in recent years. Not only is there tremendous variation in gluten free prescribing, say the researchers, “this variation appears to exist largely without good reason…” Worse still, the research showed that those living in the most deprived areas of the country are the least likely to be prescribed gluten-free products, possibly due to a lower rate of celiac diagnosis in disadvantaged groups, say the researchers. But following a public consultation, the government decided earlier this year to restrict the range of gluten free products rather than banning them outright. As research data pile up and gluten-free food becomes cheaper and more ubiquitous, look for more changes to England’s gluten-free prescription program to follow. Read more about this research in the online journal BMJ Open.
  2. Celiac.com 05/25/2018 - People with celiac disease need to follow a lifelong gluten-free diet. However, once their guts have healed, they can still be sensitive to gluten. Sometimes even more sensitive than they were before they went gluten-free. Accidental ingestion of gluten can trigger symptoms in celiac patients, such as pain in the gut and diarrhea, and can also cause intestinal damage. A new drug being developed by a company called Amgen eases the effects of people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Researchers working on the drug have announced that their proof-of-concept study shows AMG 714, an anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody, potentially protects celiac patients from inadvertent gluten exposure by blocking interleukin 15, an important mediator of celiac disease, and leads to fewer symptoms following gluten exposure. The drug is intended for people with celiac disease who are following a gluten-free diet, and is designed to protect against modest gluten contamination, not to permit consumption of large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta. AMG 714 is not designed for celiac patients to eat gluten at will, but for small, incidental contamination. Francisco Leon, MD, PhD, study director and consultant for Amgen, says that their team is looking at AMG 714 “for its potential to protect against modest contamination, not deliberately eating large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta.” Amgen hopes that AMG 714 will help celiac patients on a gluten-free diet to experience fewer or less sever gluten-triggered events. Findings of the team’s first phase 2 study of a biologic immune modulator in celiac disease will be presented at the upcoming Digestive Disease Week 2018. Read more at ScienceDaily.com
  3. Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings. But that commitment came to an ignoble end recently as Starbucks admitted that their gluten-free sandwich was plagued by “low sales,” and was simply not sustainable from a company perspective. The sandwich may not have sold well, but it was much-loved by those who came to rely on it. With the end of that sandwich came the complaints. Customers on social media were anything but quiet, as seen in numerous posts, tweets and comments pointing out the callous and tone-deaf nature of the announcement which took place in the middle of national Celiac Disease Awareness Month. More than a few posts threatened to dump Starbucks altogether. A few of the choice tweets include the following: “If I’m going to get coffee and can’t eat anything might as well be DD. #celiac so your eggbites won’t work for me,” tweeted @NotPerryMason. “They’re discontinuing my @Starbucks gluten-free sandwich which is super sad, but will save me money because I won’t have a reason to go to Starbucks and drop $50 a week,” tweeted @nwillard229. Starbucks is not giving up on gluten-free entirely, though. The company will still offer several items for customers who prefer gluten-free foods, including Sous Vide Egg Bites, a Marshmallow Dream Bar and Siggi’s yogurt. Stay tuned to learn more about Starbucks gluten-free foods going forward.
  4. Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like. Ingredients: 1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions: Simmer quinoa in water and chicken broth until tender. Dish into bowls. Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!
  5. Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence. The latest major player to make the leap to allergen-free dining is Syracuse University. The university’s Food Services recently earned an official gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence for four of the University’s dining centers, with the fifth soon to follow. To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center. Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification. Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.” Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.” Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities. Read more.
  6. Celiac.com 05/16/2018 - Galectins are a family of animal lectins marked by their affinity for N-acetyllactosamine-enriched glycoconjugates. Galectins control several immune cell processes and influence both innate and adaptive immune responses. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the role of galectins, particularly galectin-1 (Gal-1), in the treatment of celiac disease. The research team included Victoria Sundblad, Amado A. Quintar, Luciano G. Morosi, Sonia I. Niveloni, Ana Cabanne, Edgardo Smecuol, Eduardo Mauriño, Karina V. Mariño, Julio C. Bai, Cristina A. Maldonado, and Gabriel A. Rabinovich. The researchers examined the role of galectins in intestinal inflammation, particularly in Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease patients, as well as in murine models resembling these inflammatory conditions. Maintaining the fine balance between host immunity and tolerance promotes gut homeostasis, and helps to prevent inflammation. To gain insight into the role of Gal-1 in celiac patients, the team demonstrated an increase in Gal-1 expression following a gluten-free diet along with an increase in the frequency of Foxp3+ cells. The resolution of the inflammatory response may promote the recovery process, leading to a reversal of gut damage and a regeneration of villi. Among other things, the team’s findings support the use of Gal-1 agonists to treat severe mucosal inflammation. In addition, Gal-1 may serve as a potential biomarker to follow the progression of celiac disease treatment. Gut inflammation may be governed by a coordinated network of galectins and their glycosylated ligands, triggering either anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory responses. That network may influence the interplay between intestinal epithelial cells and the highly specialized gut immune system in physiologic and pathologic settings. The team’s results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory and tolerogenic response associated with gluten-free diet in celiac patients is matched by a substantial up-regulation of Gal-1. This suggests a major role of this lectin in favoring resolution of inflammation and restoration of mucosal homeostasis. This data highlights the regulated expression of galectin-1 (Gal-1), a proto-type member of the galectin family, during intestinal inflammation in untreated and treated celiac patients. Further study of this area could lead to better understanding of the mechanisms behind celiac disease, and potentially to a treatment of the disease. Source: Front. Immunol., 01 March 2018. The researchers in this study are variously affiliated with the Laboratorio de Inmunopatología, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Centro de Microscopía Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina; the Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Córdoba, Argentina; the Laboratorio de Glicómica Funcional y Molecular, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME), Consejo de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Sección Intestino Delgado, Departamento de Medicina, Hospital de Gastroenterología Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo, Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Unidad de Patología, Hospital de Gastroenterología, Bonorino Udaondo, Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Instituto de Investigaciones, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina; and the Departamento de Química Biológica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  7. Celiac.com 05/11/2018 - Nestled in the foothills of Tuscany just a few miles north of Lucca, the Italian village of Fabbriche di Vallico is home to a famous chestnut mill that still produces chestnut flour. One of a very few in existence, and one of just two left in the region, the town’s mill is the only one to produce exclusively gluten-free flour. In fact, this quiet village about forty miles northwest of Florence has been making gluten-free chestnut flour since 1721. These days the town is known for for its hotels, such as the Renaissance Tuscany II Ciocco Resort & Spa that overlooks the Lucca valley. The hotel offers tours to the traditional Fabbriche di Vallico mill, which produces exclusively gluten-free flour, where guests can learn about the ancient tradition of grinding autumn chestnuts into sweet gluten-free chestnut flour and maybe even meet mill owner Fosco Bertogli, who's revived the nearly 300 year tradition. After the tour, visitors can learn to make pasta from these chestnuts with the property's head chef. Mr Bertogli tells me his "passion" is what got the mill running again in 1999. He sells the delicious, high quality chestnut flour for between ten and 12 euros for a one kilogram bag. Read more about this romantic gluten-free travel experience at DailyMail.co.uk.
  8. Celiac.com 05/02/2018 - Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder, not an allergy. Celiac disease affects abut 1 in 100 people, and requires professional diagnosis and treatment with a gluten-free diet. There is a good deal of confusion and inaccurate information about celiac disease and a gluten-free diet. Here are some important things to know about celiac disease: 1) Celiac Disease Doesn’t Always Have Obvious Symptoms People with celiac disease may have few or no symptoms. In fact, these days, most people diagnosed with celiac disease, report few or no symptoms. Classic gastrointestinal symptoms include bloating, diarrhea, gas, constipation, and gut pain after consuming wheat, barley or rye. Other prominent symptoms can include fatigue, headache, poor weight gain, and depression. Less classic, but still common celiac symptoms include one or more of the following: anemia, anxiety, skin rashes, infertility, irritability, joint pain, pale mouth sores, thin bones, tingling and/or numbness in hands and feet. 2) No Symptoms Doesn't Mean No Damage The level of celiac-related symptoms or complaints a person has does not equate to the level of gut damage. Few or no symptoms does not mean little or no gut damage. People can have severe celiac symptoms, yet relatively light gut damage on biopsy, or conversely, they can have light symptoms and still have serious gut damage on biopsy. 3) A Simple Antibody Test Can Point the Way If you suspect celiac disease, be sure to talk with your doctor. A simple antibody test or two is usually sufficient to rule celiac disease in or out. If the test is positive, then a doctor will likely recommend a biopsy for confirmation. Recent studies show that a combination of two antibody tests may be better than biopsy. Usually, patients need to be eating wheat when they are tested for celiac disease, but that is changing. There are also some promising new approaches to blood testing for celiac disease. 4) Early Diagnosis is Key The longer you go without treatment, the higher the risk of gut damage, and the greater the likelihood of developing associated conditions. Early diagnosis is especially important in the elderly, as they have a greater risk of developing associated conditions and complications from untreated celiac disease. Still diagnosing celiac disease can be tricky and can take time, partly because the symptoms can be vague, seem unrelated, and can mimic other conditions. 5) No Cure Currently, there is no cure for celiac disease. Several companies are working to develop a vaccine, or other immune therapy for celiac disease, but until we see a major scientific breakthrough, there is no cure for celiac disease. 6) Gluten-Free Diet is Mandatory A gluten-free diet is the only treatment for celiac disease. For people with celiac disease, a gluten-free diet is mandatory, not optional. If people with celiac disease consume wheat, rye or barley proteins they risk causing serious damage to their health, including gut damage and potential cancer, especially in the long term. 7) Full Gut Healing Can Take Time Recent studies show that most people with celiac disease begin to see gut healing in the first year or year and a half. The vast majority of celiacs on a gluten-free diet heal within two to three years. Gut healing usually corresponds to healing in other affected parts of the body, such as improvements in bone microarchitecture, neuropathy, and other areas of celiac-associated damage. 8) Gluten Sensitivity Can Increase The longer you go without gluten, the more sensitive you may become to accidental gluten ingestion. It’s not uncommon for people with celiac disease to see their sensitivity to gluten increase in the weeks and even years after they give up gluten. That can mean that accidental gluten ingestion can bring on symptoms that are more severe than their original complaints. For many people, this sensitivity may slowly taper off and decrease over time. For others, sensitivity remains high and requires extra vigilance about to make sure food is gluten-free. Remember, increased gluten sensitivity does not equal increased gut damage. For some, a fully healed gut may be more sensitive to gluten than a damaged one, and vice versa. Among people on a gluten-free diet due to celiac disease, sensitivity can vary. 9) Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) is a Thing You can be sensitive to gluten and not have celiac disease. Researchers have recently confirmed a condition called non-gluten sensitivity. People with this condition experience celiac-like symptoms when they consume gluten. However, they typically do not test positive for antibodies to gliadin, and they typically have a clean biopsy, so no gut damage. Some studies have cast doubt on the existence of non-gluten-celiac sensitivity. Other studies have shown that many people with NCGS react to gluten. Still other studies show that Fructan has emerged as one possible culprit. 10) You Can Still Live a Healthy Life and Eat Delicious Food Having celiac disease means making some important adjustments to your diet, but it’s still possible to live a healthy life and eat tasty food. Read more about the best gluten-free breads, burgers, pizzas, and all your favorite gluten-free treats. Here is a list of SAFE and UNSAFE foods for people with celiac disease. Here is a list of easy, list of easy, delicious gluten-free recipes. Here is a list of great gluten-free sandwich breads. Here is a list of great gluten-free Mexican Fast Food Chains. Here's a recipe for a delicious gluten-free No-Bake Cheesecake. Knowledge is Power Use Celiac.com, and the Celiac.com Forums to get important information and to share your experience with others like you. Other great celiac disease resources include: The Mayo Clinic Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University Gluten Intolerance Group of North America
  9. Celiac.com 05/01/2018 - When you get the awful news that a loved one is impacted with a diagnosis such as celiac disease, you want to do everything in your power to help them! So, when one of my family members was diagnosed with celiac, I made it my personal goal to learn everything I could about it. I also looked for ways that I could help my family member and anyone else that was affected in the world with the same diagnosis. As an oral care scientist, I’d long dreamed of creating my own oral care line, with products that could help aide in the overall well-being of individuals. I envisioned creating products everyone could use, without sacrificing quality or price - products that avoided the use of harsh chemicals and abrasives. My dream was manifested in the form of SprinJene®, an oral care line I launched after years of research and development. SprinJene® toothpastes feature a patented formula of black seed oil and zinc, and are certified Gluten-Free, Vegan, Cruelty-Free, Halal and Kosher. SprinJene toothpastes are now offered in two product lines: SprinJene Original® and SprinJene Natural® (featuring options for adults and kids). While toothpaste isn’t ingested in large quantities, some will always remain in the mouth after brushing. For individuals with celiac, even a little bit of gluten can be harmful. Most people don’t realize that in some toothpastes gluten can be used as a stabilizer, binder or thickener. SprinJene's toothpastes are certified gluten-free by the International Certification Services (ICS). In addition, all of the toothpaste formulas are tested after they’re produced to make certain that they totally gluten-free before products hit store shelves. To learn more visit www.sprinjene.com. Order SprinJene at: Costco's Web Site or www.sprinjene.com.
  10. I was at a Price Chopper today looking for Sir Kensington's condiments. (Thanks to Ennis for that recommendation ) I have been trying to find gluten-free, corn-free, soy-free, xantham gum-free condiments. The Sir Kensington's website has a store locator so that is really helpful. But at this store that is suppose to carry it, I couldn't find it. I was going to ask a store clerk, but happened to stumble upon another brand I noticed that mentioned gluten-free right on the label, and so I read the ingredients and was happily surprised - no soy, corn, or xanthan gum either. Yay! The brand is called Full Circle. There were a few different mustards (regular, dijon, spicy brown, and stone ground) and also a ketchup. It's not overly expensive either. And it's organic. I still have another store in town to look for the Sir Kensington, which I hope will indeed carry it, because I am still looking for a gluten-free, soy-free, corn-free, xantham gum-free mayo. But it's always nice to find more brands that are free of so many of the pesky ingredients some of us can't eat. If anyone knows of any other condiments free from all those ingredients, please feel free to share here. I am still working on going totally soy,corn, xanthan gum free. It does seem to take a little time to find all the foods and ingredients you love and use often. It's a nice feeling once you finally start getting there though. I LOVE this message board for people to share what they find. So, so far, gluten-free, soy-free, corn-free, xantham gum-free condiment brands - Sir Kensington: http://www.sirkensingtons.com/products Full Circle: http://fullcirclefoods.com/fc_products/condiments-sauces/ I did notice Full Circle has other foods like snack foods (chips, cookies, etc) and other things that might contain soy and I have no idea of any contain corn, etc. so check each ingredient list before buying. But as far as their condiments, all the ones I looked at so far are free from the above mentioned pesky ingredients. Kind of annoying that the Full Circle website doesn't seem to list ingredients for each product.
  11. Celiac.com 04/28/2018 - Looking for a tasty, memorable, gluten-free dish to star in your next breakfast or brunch production? This Spanish-style egg and potato omelette is just the thing. A simple blend of eggs, onions and potatoes is coaxed into a delicious, memorable entreé. For the eggs and potatoes: 1 pound Yukon Gold or other yellow potatoes 9 large eggs ¾ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 medium yellow onion Coarse sea salt Freshly ground black pepper For the herbed mayonnaise: Handful of fresh dill. Or any blend of any herbs you like, including mint, basil and thyme ⅓ cup mayonnaise ½ lemon For the eggs and potatoes: Heat the oil in a 9-inch cast-iron or ovenproof skillet, over medium heat. Rinse and cut the potatoes into ¼-inch rounds, placing them flat in the skillet as you work. Peel the onion and cut into thin slices, adding them to the pan. Cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally so the potatoes brown on both sides and don’t stick to the pan. Strain oil through a heatproof colander into a heatproof bowl. Position an oven rack 6 inches from the heated broiler element. Put aside at least 1 tablespoon of the onion-flavored oil; you can save the rest to use again later. Whisk the eggs in a large bowl, then season generously with salt and pepper. Add the drained potato-onion mixture and stir to coat. Coat the empty skillet with reserved oil and heat to medium high. Pour in the egg-potato mixture. Reduce the heat to medium-low; cook for about 5 minutes, until the edges are just set. Transfer to the oven and broil about 3 minutes, or until puffy and golden brown. Prepare the herbed mayo by mincing the dill or other herbs, and place in medium bowl, along with the mayo. Squeeze in the juice from the ½ lemon, stirring until well mixed. Use a thin spatula to loosen around the edges of the eggs and then under them. Slide cooked eggs and potatoes out of the pan and onto a cutting board. Sprinkle with a dash of salt, and allow to rest a few minutes. Cut into 6 equal wedges, and serve warm or at room temperature, with dollops of the dill mayonnaise.
  12. Celiac.com 04/27/2018 - The latest market research shows that the gluten-free food boom is being driven by people looking to improve their diets with healthier, more nutritious food, rather than concerns about gluten intolerance or celiac disease. A recent survey showed that gluten-free items were the top bakery choice for consumers. That news led DuPont Nutrition & Health to begin trials in its bakery center in an effort to improve their product offerings. The company said in a news release that the trend was driven by people looking to improve their diets with healthier food, rather than concerns about gluten intolerance or celiac disease. Additionally, consumers are looking for better quality and wider availability in their favorite specialty foods. Even though just under 1% of the population avoids gluten due to celiac disease, more than 10% of people in Italy and the U.K. choose gluten-free products, while in France and Spain, about 8% of consumers choose gluten-free. Obviously, these numbers greatly exceed the number of people with celiac disease, and that is part of the power driving the rapid expansion of gluten-free products. According to DuPont’s reading of the Mintel study data shows “untapped potential for bakers to develop more and better-quality products with extra nutritional benefits,” including products that are high in fiber, devoid of added preservatives, and low in saturated fats, carbohydrates and calories. These numbers help to dispel the idea that the gluten-free food explosion is simply a passing fad. In any case, building an association between good nutrition and gluten-free bakery products can only help food makers with global consumers who are actively seeking one. Read more at: fooddive.com
  13. Celiac.com 04/26/2018 - Emily Dickson is one of Canada’s top athletes. As a world-class competitor in the biathlon, the event that combines cross-country skiing with shooting marksmanship, Emily Dickson was familiar with a demanding routine of training and competition. After discovering she had celiac disease, Dickson is using her diagnosis and gluten-free diet a fuel to help her get her mojo back. Just a few years ago, Dickson dominated her peers nationally and won a gold medal at Canada Games for both pursuit and team relay. She also won silver in the sprint and bronze in the individual race. But just as she was set to reach her peak, Dickson found herself in an agonizing battle. She was suffering a mysterious loss of strength and endurance, which itself caused huge anxiety for Dickson. As a result of these physical and mental pressures, Dickson slipped from her perch as one of Canada's most promising young biathletes. Eventually, in September 2016, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. Before the diagnosis, Dickson said, she had “a lot of fatigue, I just felt tired in training all the time and I wasn't responding to my training and I wasn't recovering well and I had a few things going on, but nothing that pointed to celiac.” It took a little over a year for Dickson to eliminate gluten, and begin to heal her body. She still hasn’t fully recovered, which makes competing more of a challenge, but, she says improving steadily, and expects to be fully recovered in the next few months. Dickson’s diagnosis was prompted when her older sister Kate tested positive for celiac, which carries a hereditary component. "Once we figured out it was celiac and we looked at all the symptoms it all made sense,” said Dickson. Dickson’s own positive test proved to be both a revelation and a catalyst for her own goals as an athlete. Armed with there new diagnosis, a gluten-free diet, and a body that is steadily healing, Dickson is looking to reap the benefits of improved strength, recovery and endurance to ramp up her training and competition results. Keep your eyes open for the 20-year-old native of Burns Lake, British Columbia. Next season, she will be competing internationally, making a big jump to the senior ranks, and hopefully a regular next on the IBU Cup tour. Read more at princegeorgecitizen.com
  14. Hi all! Just saw this giveaway on my Facebook homepage and thought I'd share. Enjoy Life, Gluten Free and More, Nima, Spokin, and Sittercity are giving away a free trip to Palm Springs (and it's allergy-friendly / gluten-free!). The post said you get free airfare for two, 3 night stay, free Nima starter kit, Enjoy Life snacks, + 3 month membership to the Sittercity babysitting app. Here's the link to enter: https://bit.ly/2qICWsV. I entered with 3 different emails. Good luck friends!
  15. Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers. "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims. Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods. The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods. Source: fdfworld.com
  16. CANNABIS AND GLUTEN

    Celiac.com 04/13/2018 - Is cannabis gluten-free? That is a frequent question I receive now that over 50% of the United States has approved medical cannabis and some states have also included recreational cannabis. Let's begin be describing cannabis as an oral medicine that has been used since the Chinese treatise on pharmacology described Emperor Shen Nung in 2737 BCE using it. In 1850 cannabis was listed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia as a cure for many ailments. By the early 1900's Squibb Company, Eli Lilly and Park-Davis were manufacturing drugs produced from marijuana for use as antispasmodics, sedatives, and analgesics (pain medication). Today, hemp seed and hemp oil products are widely available. They provide CBD or cannabidiol - the non-psychoactive cannabinoid from various Cannabis sativa strains grown for high CBD levels. In order to be legal in the U.S. these products must contain less than 0.3% THC, the psychoactive cannabinoid in cannabis. CBD products can be consumed as capsules, tinctures, "gummy" chewables, lollipops, and numerous edibles like brownies, chocolates, and granola bars. The nutritive value of cannabis is presently described as that of hemp seed since no scientific analysis of Cannabis sativa has been done. Hemp is one of the world's most nutritious foods with high quality protein and essential fatty acids found in its seeds. Hemp contains all eight essential amino acids and can be sprouted for use in salads and shakes. Celiacs with protein allergies to eggs and soy need to be cautious when adding hemp and CBD products to their diet regimes. The major proteins in hemp are albumen and edestin. Hemp is a nut so those celiacs with nut sensitivities need to consider that. Others may be limiting their lectin intake and need to limit CBD products until processing evaluations can indicate levels resulting in the products. CBD oils contain linoleic and linolenic fatty acids which are important in reducing inflammation. They can be used in salad dressings, mashed potatoes and substituted for olive oil in recipes. Since these essential fatty acids must be obtained in the diet, using hemp or cannabis CBD products can enhance health. Cannabis products- particularly CBD- have been overlooked by individuals needing symptom relief from neurological (Parkinson's, ALS, Multiple Sclerosis, migraine), immune (cancer), and gastrointestinal disorders (Crohn's disease, IBS). When choosing cannabidiol-CBD products be sure to check that they have been tested for pesticides, heavy metals, and microbiological contaminants. Today, more hemp is sold to pet owners as bird seed than used by humans. But as more individuals learn of the botanical benefits of cannabis, they should consider adding it to their diet and supplement regime. My book, Cannabis-A Clinician's Guide (CRC Press 2018) reviews the science and clinical uses of cannabis along with how to use it in recipes.
  17. Looking for something easy, off-beat, nutritious and gluten-free? Well, look no further than these baked sweet potato chips. Just grab a couple sweet potatoes, slice, bake slightly and then toast to desired crispness. Add your ingredients of choice, and chow down. Ingredients: 2-4 sweet potatoes Almond butter, peanut butter, or sunflower seed butter Blueberries Pomegranate seeds Directions: Heat your oven to 350°F. Use a knife, or vegetable slicer to slice your sweet potatoes to about ¼-inch thick. Place a wire baking rack on top of a large baking sheet and then place each slice on the wire rack. Bake for 20-25 minutes until they start to get soft, but tender enough to toast up later. Lightly toast each slice to desired crispness, then add almond, peanut or sunflower seed butter and top with blueberries or pomegranate seeds, as desired. Dig in! Storage tip: Cool any extra slices, pop them into a glass container, and store them in the fridge for up to a few days.
  18. Celiac.com 04/04/2018 - Meal kits are a growing business segment, and an increasingly popular part of dinner for many busy working people. Meal kits typically include the ingredients necessary to make a complete meal, delivered to your door on a regular basis. For example, a company called gFoodNow offers a variety of Gluten-Free Mealkits starting a only $6.99 per serving. Another company called Green Chef has now included gluten-free meal options. Business Insider’s Connie Chen recently tried Green Chef’s meal offerings, and wrote about her experience for the magazine. In the interest of transparency, Business Insider openly declares that it has an affiliate partnerships with Green Chef, which provides them with revenue. As such, their review should be taken with a grain of salt. That said, the idea of a reliable, good quality meal kit that is gluten-free, easy to prepare and tasty to eat will likely interest more than a few people with celiac disease. The meals Chen tried for one week included Orange Dijon Chicken, Hawaij-Rubbed Steak, and Red Lentil Tikka Masala. Each kit came with a recipe card that listed all meal ingredients, including known allergens, as well as the basic tools required to prepare each meal. The meals can be prepared with simple kitchen tools, including a knife, pot, measuring cup, sauté pan, baking sheet, oil, salt, and pepper. In addition to offering gluten-free meal kits, Green Chef offers six more two-person meal kits at the following price points: Omnivore, $11.99/meal Carnivore, $13.49/meal Gluten-free, $13.49/meal Vegan, $11.99/meal Paleo, $14.99/meal Vegetarian, $10.49/meal Keto, $14.99/meal Chen did not try the gluten-free meal kits, but instead tried the omnivore kits. We have yet to try Green Chef, but look forward to reaching out to the company. If you have tried Green Chef’s gluten-free meals, we would love to hear about your experience. Meantime, you can browse all of Green Chef’s meal plans here. You can read Connie Chen's report for Business Insider here.
  19. Celiac.com 04/03/2018 - A gluten-free diet is crucial to avoiding problems associated with celiac disease. However, many gluten-free foods come with drawbacks that are important to understand. Also, not all gluten-free food is created equal, not all gluten-free foods are healthy, and simply going gluten-free may not resolve all of your issues. Here are some things to keep in mind about a gluten-free diet: Gluten-Free food is more expensive than food made with wheat flour. In fact, gluten-free substitutes are about twice as expensive as standard foods. They are more costly to make, and they sell in lower volume, which pushes up retail prices. Like many of their non-gluten-free counterparts, gluten-free foods can be highly processed. Processed foods can promote inflammation, which is one of the things that people with celiac disease are trying to avoid. Gluten-Free does not automatically mean nutritious. In fact, gluten-free food is generally less nutritious than similarly processed foods made with wheat flour. Foods that are naturally gluten-free will generally be healthier than gluten-free substitutes. That may seem obvious, but if you look at the gluten-free food aisle in your local store, you will see many highly processed foods that are not any better than their gluten-containing counterparts in terms of general nutrition. Gluten-free foods are often higher in carbohydrates and calories than their non-gluten-free counterparts. Gluten-Free food is higher in salt than its non-gluten-free counterparts. Recent products tests show that most gluten-free snacks tested are far saltier than their non-gluten-free alternatives. Of 106 products surveyed, researchers found that many gluten-free snacks have up to five times more salt than non-gluten-free counterparts. Gluten-Free food is higher in fat than its non-gluten-free counterparts. Gluten-Free food is higher in sugar than its non-gluten-free counterparts. Gluten-Free ingredients don’t always mean gluten-free food. The news is riddled with stories about gluten contamination in restaurants, pizza joints, etc., that claim to use gluten-free ingredients. Examples of companies that rolled out gluten-free pizza only to be met with complaints by people with celiac disease include: California Pizza Kitchen, Domino’s pizza, and Papa John’s, among others. The longer you avoid gluten, the more sensitive you may become. For many people with celiac disease, the longer they avoid gluten, the more sensitive they become. This can mean stronger, more lengthy reactions to seemingly minor gluten ingestion, so be careful. A gluten-free diet will not reverse osteoporosis, or iron and calcium deficiency. If your celiac disease progressed for a long time before your diagnosis, then the odds are much more likely that you have suffered from osteoporosis, iron and calcium deficiency. A gluten-free diet alone will not reverse osteoporosis, or calcium deficiency. In such cases, you will need to consult your doctor for proper treatment. Osteoporosis is especially problematic in women with celiac disease.
  20. Grindstone Bakery was founded in 1999 by Mario Repetto. Mario started in a small "garage" in Santa Rosa, California, experimenting with alternatives to modern wheat and creating fermentation cultures for an authentic sourdough process. Our fermentation cultures are the result of years of capturing and experimenting with different combinations of the wild lactic acid bacteria naturally present in the Sonoma Wine Country environment. We call them “Sonoma Cultures”. Each one has a particular ecosystem of several lactic acid bacteria strains allowing us to create different breads with a relatively lower acid content than most sourdoughs, rich in flavor and color and resistant to spoilage without the use of preservatives. Ancient Bread Making for Health and Delight Stone milling is the oldest, slowest, and best method of grinding Whole Grains. It is a gentle and cool process that preserves every good part of the grain. All the protein, oils, antioxidants and vitamins from the germ, all the sugars and starches from the endosperm, and the tiny bits of bran rich in antioxidants and fiber are there. Nothing is added and nothing is taken away. We slowly grind our Whole Grains using a small natural pink granite stone mill that never overheats the flour. We transform it into living dough within hours of being ground. In today’s completely automated milling process, steel rollers crush the grain at remarkably high speeds heating it to elevated temperatures and destroying vitamins and antioxidants. Whole Grains are seeds coming from plants that, over millions of years, have developed the capacity to synthesize myriad phytochemicals that help them resist pathogens, parasites and predators, or attract beneficial organisms. We call these beneficial phytochemicals antioxidants. Our modern understanding on how they function in plants is helping us to discover the mechanisms by which Whole Grains benefit human health beyond basic nutrition. More than 8,000 phytochemicals have been identified, but a large number still remain unknown. For more info visit: grindstonebakery.com.
  21. Celiac.com 03/31/2018 - If you’re gluten-free and need chocolate chip cookies, and you need them in a hurry, then this recipe for flourless chocolate chip cookies is your new best friend. Just toss some white beans, almond, peanut or sunflower butter together with a few other simple ingredients, toss them on a parchment covered baking sheet, and violá, gluten-free chocolate chip satisfaction. Ingredients: 1.33 ounce 70-85% dark chocolate bar, broken 1 can white beans (drained, rinsed) ⅓ cup almond butter, peanut butter or sunflower seed butter 2 tablespoons honey or maple syrup 1½ tablespoons vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon sea salt ¼ teaspoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon baking soda ¼ teaspoon xanthan gum Instructions: Heat oven to 350F. Use a food processor to blend all ingredients except chocolate. Take care to blend all of the white beans thoroughly, until smooth. Transfer to a mixing bowl and stir in dark chocolate pieces. Spoon dough onto baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Bake for 20-25 minutes, until golden brown. Makes 12 regular cookies or 24 mini cookies.
  22. Celiac.com 03/30/2018 - The latest Gluten-Free Food Market Report offers a comprehensive global market evaluation, including enabling technologies, key trends, market drivers, challenges, standardization, regulatory landscape, opportunities, future road map, value chain, ecosystem player profiles and strategies. The report also includes global gluten-free investment forecasts from 2017 to 2022. The report covers top gluten-free manufacturers, including General Mills, Hain Celestial Group, Dr. Schar, Freedom Foods, Gruma, Kellogg, Kraft Heinz, Doves Farm, Amy’s Kitchen, Blue Diamond Growers, Enjoy Life Foods, Boulder Brands, and Bob’s Red Mill. The report focuses on the global market for gluten-free food products, especially in North America, China, Europe, Southeast Asia, Japan, India. The report is divided into sections based on manufacturers, regions, type and application, and covers the categories of bakery, confectionery, cereals and snacks. It is targeted at supermarkets and hypermarkets, convenience stores, speciality stores, online retailers, other relevant retailers. The report offers analyses of the global Gluten-Free Food market and its commercial landscape, along with insights into the Gluten-Free Food production processes, major issues, and solutions that may help manufacturers to mitigate product development risk. It is designed to provide readers with a comprehensive understanding of the most relevant forces driving and restraining the gluten-free food market and their projected impact. Readers of the report will gain potentially valuable information about the market strategies being embraced by major gluten-free businesses, along with projected directions in the gluten-free food market. Anyone curious about the report may request a sample.
  23. Celiac.com 03/22/2018 - If you haven’t already heard about Kidfresh, you probably will. In case you’re not familiar, Kidfresh is basically a conspiracy between parents pediatric nutritionists and top chefs to slip hidden vegetables and extra nutrition into tasty frozen meals for kids. Kidfresh offers a line of children's favorites reinvented and enriched with hidden vegetables, and wholesome ingredients, without any artificial flavors, colors, or preservatives. The Kidfresh line of frozen meals is nationally distributed and available in over 10,000 stores. Founded by Matt Cohen and Gilles Deloux, two fathers looking to create better, more nutritious frozen meal choices for children. Kidfresh looks to offer convenient, tasty meal options for busy parents, while delivering more nutritious, healthier products than leading brands. Kidfresh grew from a single concept store in New York City to become a nationwide brand, now available in over 10,000 grocery stores across the country. The reason you’ll likely be hearing more about Kidfresh in the near future is that they are launching a new line of gluten-free and organic products. Beginning in spring 2018 Kidfresh will introduce a new Gluten Free White Mac 'n Cheese, to be followed by several new certified organic items, including a Wagon Wheels Mac 'n Cheese. "We're so excited to introduce these new products," says co-founder Matt Cohen. "Kidfresh moms have asked us about Gluten Free options and we've worked hard to develop the best tasting White Mac 'n Cheese out there. Getting into organic is also strategic for Kidfresh, broadening our appeal towards Millennials that are more focused on organic ingredients." So keep your eye out for Kidfresh products, and be sure to let us know how you think they are doing in the gluten-free department. Read more at PRNewswire.com.
  24. Celiac.com 03/20/2018 - Juicy, delicious scallops get the cold-weather treatment with this delightfully simple recipe. These lightly spiced scallops are a perfect way to celebrate the approach of spring, while winter still digs in for a fight. They go great with your favorite white wine, and are sure to leave your diners smiling. Butternut squash and warm spices make a base for fresh sea scallops in this tasty gluten-free entree . Ingredients: 12 medium sea scallops 1 package butternut squash 1 tablespoon butter 1 pinch cayenne pepper ½ teaspoon ground ginger, separated ½ teaspoon ground coriander ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 tablespoon quality cooking oil salt pepper Directions: Bring salted water to a boil in a covered stockpot. Add squash; cook 13 to 15 minutes or until very tender. Drain well. Transfer to food processor along with butter, cayenne, ⅛ teaspoon ground ginger, and ⅛ teaspoon salt. While squash cooks, pat scallops dry with paper towels. In small shallow bowl, combine coriander, cinnamon, ¼ teaspoon ginger, and ¼ teaspoon black pepper. Sprinkle scallops with ¼ teaspoon salt to season both sides. Press 1 side of each scallop into spice mixture; set aside, spice sides up. In 12-inch skillet, heat oil on medium-high to a point just below smoking. Add scallops, spice sides down. Cook 2 to 3 minutes or until browned. Turn over; cook 2 minutes or until golden brown and opaque in center. Remove from heat. Purée squash until smooth. Divide between serving plates, and top with scallops. Garnish with chives. Grab your favorite wine or gluten-free beer, and dig in.
  25. Celiac.com 03/17/2018 - If you’re looking for a dish that is easy, elegant, tasty, and also happens to be gluten-free, then look no further than this simple cheese ball. This easy to make cheese ball needs just a coupe of hours in the fridge and bag, you’re ready to knock’em for a loop. Just grab your favorite gluten-free crackers, or gluten-free bread, and maybe a glass of your favorite wine or champagne, and you are ready to roll. Ingredients: 8 ounces brick cream cheese, softened 1 cup crumbled feta cheese 3 tablespoon finely chopped fresh dill 2 teaspoons lemon juice Directions: With mixer, beat cream cheese, feta cheese, dill, and lemon juice. By 2-tablespoon portions, scoop and roll into balls. Roll until coated with finely chopped fresh dill. Refrigerate cheese balls for a couple of hours, and as long as 2 days. Let stand 15 minutes at room temperature before serving. Serve with your favorite gluten-free crackers, or toasted gluten-free bread, especially sourdough.