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Found 2,722 results

  1. I guess I'm what you'd call a coleslaw purist. I never liked it much as a kid, and once I started to like it as an adult, I developed a taste for the most basic coleslaws. I don't want any jalepeños, or other snappy flavors, like whacky, sun-dried tomato aioli in my coleslaw. In my distinctly modest opinion, coleslaw should never, ever be made with Miracle Whip. In my opinion, no one should ever even eat Miracle Whip, but, I digress. Here's a simple, tasty recipe for coleslaw that will make a proud hit at your next barbecue or fish-fry. Ingredients: 6 cups shredded cabbage 1 cup shredded carrot 1 cup mayonnaise ½ teaspoon celery seed ¼ cup white wine vinegar ¼ cup sugar Salt and pepper, to taste Directions: Combine cabbage and carrots in a large bowl. In a smaller bowl, combine mayonnaise, vinegar, celery seed, sugar, salt and pepper. Mix dressing into cabbage mixture to taste, and chill in the refrigerator. Serve alongside your favorite dishes.
  2. Celiac.com 09/14/2017 - Is your water hip? Is your water cool? Is your water gluten-free? Does it say so on the label? Does it matter? Gluten-free has become such a marketing buzzword that the words "gluten-free" are now appearing on all kinds of things that most certainly gluten-free, such as, yes, bottled water. Would you be more likely to buy water labeled "gluten-free?" Would you feel safer? More nourished? If the bottled water craze wasn't enough in itself, there is now the added marketing factor that turns plain, clean, pure bottled water into "premium" water that is not only gluten- and GMO-free, but also certified kosher and organic. Never mind that not a single drop in these bottle contains anything but plain water. Plain water, of course, is gluten-free, GMO-free, very much organic, and likely perfectly fine for kosher Jews. Basically, labels should help people make informed decisions, not confuse them with useless marketing information. Putting "gluten-free" labels on water likely doesn't help consumers make better decisions about the water they buy, it may just confuse people into believing (wrongly) that some water has, or might have, gluten in it; which is seriously unlikely. So, in our world, where the catchphrase seems to be caveat emptor, or, buyer beware, it falls on us as consumers to be informed and to resist the empty marketing promises made by products like "gluten-free" water. What's next, a label that says: Guaranteed Wet!? Got any good stories about confusing or useless "gluten-free" labels on products that clearly don't need them? Share them below.
  3. Celiac.com 01/08/2019 - Doritos are one of the perennially popular snacks. They are also a major favorite for Super Bowl parties. But are Doritos gluten-free? We’ve heard that question more than a few times. The answer varies by flavor. Some Doritos varieties are gluten-free, some are not, and other flavors are free of wheat, rye, barley and oats. Use this handy list to help you choose your gluten-free snacks when Super Bowl LIII kicks off on Sunday, Feb. 3rd. These flavors of Doritos are labeled as Gluten-Free: DORITOS Simply Organic White Cheddar Flavored Tortilla Chips DORITOS Toasted Corn Tortilla Chips The following flavors of Doritos contain No Wheat, Rye, Barley or Oat ingredients: DORITOS Blaze Flavored Tortilla Chips DORITOS Cool Ranch Flavored Tortilla Chips DORITOS Dinamita Chile Limón Flavored Rolled Tortilla Chips DORITOS Flamas Flavored Tortilla Chips DORITOS Jacked Ranch Dipped Hot Wings Flavored Tortilla Chips DORITOS Nacho Cheese Flavored Tortilla Chips DORITOS Poppin' Jalapeno Flavored Tortilla Chips DORITOS Salsa Verde Flavored Tortilla Chips DORITOS Simply Organic Spicy White Cheddar Flavored Tortilla Chips DORITOS Spicy Nacho Flavored Tortilla Chips DORITOS Taco Flavored Tortilla Chips DORITOS Tapatio Flavored Tortilla Chips To be 100% safe, those with celiac disease should only eat Doritos with "gluten-free" on the label. Although Frito-Lay does a thorough cleaning after each run, they cannot guarantee that the Doritos in the lower list are gluten-free below 20 ppm. Any Doritos flavor not listed above likely contains gluten. Check the Frito-Lay website to be sure.
  4. Celiac.com 11/08/2005 - York Nutritional Laboratories has introduced to the US a simple, unique and revolutionary finger-stick rapid test kit designed to detect the antibodies associated with Celiac Disease and gluten intolerance. Celiac disease is a gluten intolerance enteropathy caused by a permanent intolerance to gluten and specifically to its protein fragment known as gliadin. The ingestion of this protein in people with genetic predisposition induces a severe compromise to the intestinal mucosa that is historically characterized by one hyperplasia of cryptas with total or subtotal atrophy of the intestinal microvilli. Though the definitive diagnosis of the celiac disease is based in characteristic histological changes observed in intestinal biopsies, the serological tests, such as the detection of antibodies anti-gliadins, anti-tTG and anti-endomysium, represent methods of analyses cheaper and less invasive to the detection of the disease. According to John Kernohan, Director of York Nutritional Laboratories, This new rapid test is a great improvement over our original cdSCAN, which we introduced back in 2002. Individuals now have a even quicker, more convenient and reliable means to determine if Celiac Disease or gluten intolerance is the culprit behind their ill-health. The new and improved cdSCAN is able to analyze a tiny sample of whole blood, serum or plasma for IgA/IgG/IgM antibodies against human Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) and IgA antibodies against gliadin. The kit can be utilized in either the comfort of ones own home or at a doctors office, and the results are available in approximately 10 minutes. In addition to the approximate 1 million Americans suffering from classical Celiac Disease, there are an equal number of individuals with silent or latent Celiac Disease who are unaware of their condition because they do not have the signs and symptoms typically associated with celiac disease. These individuals run the risk of developing full-blown celiac disease later in life and complications such as bowel cancer, infertility and autoimmune diseases, making proper and early diagnosis very important. Information about the cdSCAN is available from York Nutritional Laboratories, Inc. Please contact John Kernohan at (888) 751-3388.
  5. After countless hours of R&D, Food For Life is pleased to release the first available gluten-free breads, which are made from sprouted grains such as quinoa, millet and chia. It has become clear that many of the gluten free breads on the market today, while being "gluten-free", are simply not addressing the overall health needs of consumers. You see, gluten free breads lack the main all love in bread. They lack the one component that gives bread that familiar soft chewy texture. And, that component is gluten. Without Gluten, manufacturers are forced to use alternative ingredients that mimic the elasticity that gluten provides. And, many of them are choosing to feature egg, milk and refined starches today. However, in their quest to achieve even greater elasticity in an effort to win out on the soft and chewy test, consumers are seeing an ever expanding list of gluten free breads made from ingredients which you wouldn't expect in "natural" breads, some of which are sadly devoid of many nutrients. Yes, the race to replace gluten is getting to the point where it really needed to be addressed for the benefit of the gluten intolerant consumer. And, that is really the inspiration behind Food For Life's Sprouted For Life™ Gluten-Free Breads. Finally, a completely gluten free bread line in (4) varieties specifically created with your health in mind. Not only are they gluten free, but they are also vegan, and are made from incredibly nutritious ingredients like, sprouted quinoa, sprouted millet and hydrated chia seeds. Sprouted to maximize nutrition and digestibility. Available soon in the frozen section. With just one bite, you'll know they're a food for life! For more info visit our site.
  6. ChildLife Essentials® provides a complete line of nutritional supplements designed specifically for infants and children. ChildLife Essentials® are made from the highest quality natural ingredients. Their products are all Gluten Free, Alcohol, Casein, and Dye, Free, No artificial, Sweeteners, Colorings or ingredients. No detectable levels of Mercury, Aluminum, Heavy Metals, Dioxins, PCB’s, Pesticides, Environmental Toxins and they are all GMO FREE. All have been 3rd party tested. Dr. Murray Clarke, the leading Holistic Pediatrician in the U.S., is the founder, and formulator of the CHILDLIFE ESSENTIALS complete line of Children’s nutritional supplements. Dr. Clarke has specialized in pediatrics in his homeopathic and nutritional clinic for the past twenty years. The ChildLife Essentials® line is literally the product of this experience. The sixteen products we offer are those, which have proven to be the most important, and the most effective in supporting healthy development and promoting natural immune strength in infants and children. Dr. Clarke is known for his work, and attention to children with challenging situations, which include: Autism, Allergies, Gluten Sensitivities, Environmental Allergies, ADHD, ADD, to name a few. The great taste of the products makes taking nutritional supplements an easy part of a child’s daily routine. These products are sold in natural stores, health food stores, pharmacies and online throughout America. Internationally, they are distributed throughout Asia, Europe Australia, and New Zealand in the South Pacific. We are very proud of this product line and are deeply committed to promoting improved nutrition for children as a foundation for good health and well-being. Some of the products recommended are: Multi Vitamin & Minerals Vitamin C Cod Liver Oil- Probiotics with Colostrum Aller-Care Liquid Calcium with Magnesium For Immune Support: First Defense, Echinacea, Formula 3 Cough Syrup Probiotics with Colostrum For more info visit: Visit Our Site.
  7. Celiac.com Sponsor: Banner

    Authentic Foods Gluten-Free

    My name is Steven Rice and I am the President and Founder of Authentic Foods. I started Authentic Foods in 1993 when I heard about a group of people who had Celiac Disease and could not eat wheat or gluten. With a great deal of experience in the food industry and a background in biochemistry, I realized that I could develop baked goods that could help Celiacs get the proper nutrition in their diets with gluten-free baked goods that taste as close to, if not better than the same baked good with gluten. Since starting the company in 1993, my daughter has joined me in expanding Authentic Foods. We work hard to make sure all of the Authentic Foods baking mixes and flours are not just like any gluten free baking mix or flour, but that they’re better. Our goal is to make baking mixes that will keep you from wishing you could eat gluten again. We want you to be able to enjoy your baked goods like anyone else who is not on a gluten-free diet. We love food just like you. We want to share our love for baked goods with you. For more info visit our site.
  8. Jovial Foods offers organic gluten-free pasta, cookies and ancient grain flours. Finding healthy gluten-free foods shouldn't be a struggle. Jovial takes simple ingredients and turns them into healthy, wholesome foods you feel great eating and serving to your family. Jovial is introducing a completely new way to bake gluten free. Jovial Gluten Free Flours are made with real flour, and no added starches. Did you know that most gluten free flours contain up to 40% added starch, even though gluten free grains have as much starch as wheat? We challenged the notion that added starch is needed in gluten free flours and discovered that these unhealthy ingredients actually create the off-flavors and strange textures that are so common in gluten free bread. Our flour is made with an abundance of protein and fiber-rich ancient grains, for bread & pastries with true texture and flavor. Now offering Gluten Free Bread Flour & Whole Grain Bread Flour, Pastry Flour & Whole Grain Pastry Flour. Here's to a new and healthier future of delicious gluten free bread. Made with ancient grains Truer flavors and textures, your breads & pastries will stay fresh longer. 3g of protein and 1g of fiber per 30g serving of flour. Made in a facility completely free of all major allergens. Jovial also carries a complete gluten-free pasta, cookies, glass-packed tomatoes and extra virgin olive oil that are all certified gluten-free! As parents whose child struggled with gluten sensitivities, Carla and Rodolfo, the founders of Jovial Foods, only create products that they feel safe giving to their daughters, which is why so much thought is put into the making of these products starting from the seed. To encourage gluten-free cooking and baking, jovial also hosts Culinary Getaways in Italy, where Carla herself teaches a number of hands-on classes to the guests. It's a great opportunity to cook authentic Italian food- without the gluten, but with all the flavor! For more info visit our site
  9. The California Cider Company was founded in Graton, California in 1993. The ACE brands are ACE APPLE, ACE PERRY, ACE APPLE HONEY, ACE BERRY, ACE JOKER, ACE PUMPKIN, ACE PINEAPPLE, ACE BLACKJACK 21 and SPACE. The ciders range from the dry JOKER to the sweeter ACE BERRY and the champagne-like BLACKJACK 21 made with all local Sonoma apples. SPACE is a bloody orange mimosa at 6.9%abv. ACE Ciders are available in 46 states, go to acecider.com for more details. All our styles are all natural, all fruit and gluten-free and vegan. The ciders are unpasteurized but cold filtered 4 times so that they are fresh and clean to the taste. They are a lower calorie , lower alcohol alternative to wine and beer and very refreshing. The California Cider Company is the largest, independent, family owned cidery in the US, with we believe the best range of ciders for all tastes. Visit our site for more info: acecider.com.
  10. For BFree Foods, it wasn't enough to create wraps, rolls, bagels and bread loaves that were simply wheat and gluten-free alternatives. Instead the innovative company set out to develop gluten-free breads that taste just as delicious as their conventional counterparts and still have exceptional nutrition. Not to mention ones that won't disintegrate, crack or crumble mid-meal. Since using real, whole ingredients is the best way to bake, BFree's products have an impressive list of high-quality, non-GMO ingredients. Whether it's deriving protein and fiber from whole peas, apples and potatoes or using a unique blend of buckwheat and corn flours to provide gluten-like pliability, BFree provides matchless taste and nutrition and stays intact. BFree products are not only high fiber and low fat, they're also calorie-responsible; BFree Multigrain Wraps, for example, are only 100 calories per wrap, the lowest calorie count in the category. A list of what is not included in BFree products is almost as impressive as what is. BFree products do not contain wheat, dairy, eggs, nuts or soy, making the entire BFree product line free from all major allergens—and completely vegan. Select BFree products are rolling out to shelves at Ralphs, Lucky's, Raley's and Save Mart throughout California. For more information visit our site.
  11. The Nima Sensor is the first and only portable sensor that tests food for gluten in just a few minutes. Perfect for dining out, school cafeterias, and travel, Nima is an extra precaution that helps you feel confident about your food. Trusted science Nima is pioneering this new technology and has been awarded funding from the National Institutes of Health. The antibody-based chemistry was developed by MIT scientists to enable use right at the dinner table. Learn more → Easy to use Nima is the fastest and easiest lab test you'll ever run. Put a little bit of food into a new Nima gluten test capsule. Insert capsule into the sensor and press start. In a few minutes, Nima will display the test result. If gluten is detected, a wheat symbol will appear. Otherwise, a smile will show up if the sample contains less than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten. Nima users can then share their results to the Nima app and with the gluten-free community. With a growing map of Nima-tested restaurants and packaged foods, anyone can browse a myriad of gluten-free options at their fingertips! Learn more → What People Are Saying "I cannot say enough about this product. It has given myself and my daughter (both celiac) the confidence to eat outside of our own kitchen. We began avoiding eating out after being glutened time and time again without knowing exactly the source of the gluten. Now that we have our beloved Nima, we can be completely sure whether or not we are safe to eat the product we have tested. Seriously, this product has given us freedom that we haven't felt for many years since being diagnosed as celiac. We quite literally do not leave home without it. It is absolutely worth every penny.” — Vickie E. "We have two kids recently diagnosed with Celiac Disease. Nima makes the difficult adjustment to a gluten free diet so much easier. Since getting Nima, we have been able to take family trips and eat out at restaurants again. It was surprising to see how many things that say “gluten free” have cross-contamination." — Mark G. Payment plans and FSA/HSA Reimbursement Since Nima is an important part of living a gluten-free lifestyle, Nima’s Gluten Sensor and Test Capsules are FSA/HSA reimbursable. You can also pay through PayPal, or through a payment plan offered on their website. To get your own Nima Starter Kit and stay up-to-date with the latest Nima news and events, visit their site.
  12. Celiac.com 01/14/2019 - There are a number of new drugs in development that are designed to treat celiac disease. In addition to a possible vaccine, those drugs include enzymes and other drugs that are designed to reduce or eliminate the body’s adverse reaction to gluten through various mechanisms. Here's a 2019 status update for every drug for treating celiac disease currently in development: ALV003—Created by Alvine Pharmaceuticals, is a combination of two enzymes that break down gluten before it can provoke an immune reaction. The drug is a powder to be dissolved in water and taken before meals. ALV003 passed a phase 2 clinical trial, and results were published in the June 2014 issue of Gastroenterology. Post-trial biopsies showed that ALV003 prevented intestinal damage in 34 volunteers with celiac disease, each of whom ate 2 grams of gluten per day for six weeks, in addition to taking ALV-003. Phase 2b, a 12-week trial, is now underway. AN-PEP (aspergillus niger prolyl endopeptidase)—Created by DSM Food Specialties, AN-PEP is another enzyme that degrades gluten. AN-PEP is believed to work best when taken while gluten is still in the stomach. A 2013 study showed AN-PEP to be safe, but failed to show that the enzyme had any effect, so further study is under way. That study appeared in the World Journal of Gastroenterology. In a 2018 study, AN-PEP extensively degraded gluten concentrations of up to 80,000 mg/kg in rye flour, rye sourdough, and sourdough starter under specific temperatures and pH values, while leaving the microorganisms in the sourdough starter fully intact. ActoBiotics—Created by ActoGenX uses Lactococcus lactis as an expression system to locally secrete bio-therapeutics such as cytokines, antibodies, hormones, etc. Early pre-clinical work with a genetically altered L. lactis secreting a peptide derived from gliadin demonstrated an in vivo suppression of gluten sensitization. Specifically, Huigbregtse et al. engineered L. lactis to secrete a deamidated DQ8 gliadin epitope (LL-eDQ8d) and studied the induction of Ag-specific tolerance in NOD ABo DQ8 transgenic mice [34]. Although apparently not part of the ActoGenX development program, recent work by Galipeau et al. also deserves mention in this context. The group treated gluten-sensitive mice with elafin, a serine protease inhibitor, delivered by the L. lactis vector, and found normalization of inflammation, improved permeability, and maintained ZO-1 expression. There is speculation that this is due to reduced deamidation of gliadin peptide. AVX176—Created by Avaxia Biologics, is an investigational oral antibody drug patented to provide "Antibody Therapy for Treatment of Diseases Associated with Gluten Intolerance." The patent, which expires on May 27 2029. AVX176 provides broad coverage for treating celiac disease using orally administered antibodies produced by Avaxia's proprietary platform technology. BL-7010—by BioLineRx, is a novel co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, which significantly reduces the immune response triggered by gluten. This drug has been shown in mice to reduce the immune system response that leads to intestinal damage and villous atrophy in celiac disease. BL-7010 actually binds to the gluten protein, reducing the protein's toxicity.The drug, with the gluten molecule attached, then passes harmlessly through the digestive system to be expelled as stool. BL-7010 has undergone safety testing in humans and was found to be well tolerated. According to BioLineRx, testing will begin in mid-2015 to see if the drug works as expected to diminish gluten's effects on the body. However, BL-7010 is designed to protect only against gluten cross-contamination; it won't allow people with celiac disease to eat large amounts of gluten. CCR9—by Chemocentryx, is a drug called vercirnon, which is also known as Traficet-EN, or CCX282B), and was originally intended for patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease. CCR9 has completed one Phase 2 trial in 67 patients with celiac disease. However, despite the completion of the trial several years ago, no results relating to celiac disease have been made public or published. Egg Yolk Enzyme—Little is known about efforts to develop a celiac treatment that uses egg yolk to coat gluten and allow it to pass through the body undetected, thus preventing an adverse gluten reaction in sensitive individuals. Like most other drugs being developed, this treatment would work to prevent reactions to small amounts of gluten, rather than as a cure for celiac disease. Recent news shows that the egg yolk enzyme is safe for humans. GliadinX (Aspergillus niger)—GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin. GliadinX does not prevent or cure celiac disease. However, clinical research has shown that it effectively breaks down gliadin into small, harmless fragments before it can reach the small intestine. INN-202 (Larazotide Acetate)—Created by Alba Therapeutics and later acquired by Innovate Pharmaceutical, and renamed INN-202, larazotide acetate works by blocking a protein that carries pieces of gluten across the gut. Results of a phase 2 trial of larazotide acetate appear in the February 2015 edition of Gastroenterology. While INN-202 may greatly reduce the symptoms of gluten exposure in celiacs, it is unlikely that a permit consumption of unlimited amounts of gluten. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has fast-tracked the drug. Phase III clinical trials are currently underway. Results of the trial should be available soon. Nexvax2—Created by ImmusanT, Nexvax2 is touted as a vaccine, but works much like an allergy shot. Nexvax2 combines three proprietary peptides that elicit an immune response in celiac disease patients who carry the immune recognition gene HLA-DQ2. Similar to allergy shots, the vaccine is designed to reprogram gluten-specific T cells triggered by the patient's immune response to the protein. Nexvax2 exposes the immune system to gluten in a controlled way so that immune cells that are usually activated get turned off or eliminated. So far, Nexvax2 has completed a phase 1 trial showing it to be safe, and the company has begun Phase II trials on humans in Australia and New Zealand. Saliva Rothia—Researchers at the Henry M. Golden School of Dental Medicine were looking at how proteins in general break down in saliva when they discovered an enzyme in a bacterium called Rothia that pulverized gluten as if it were Pac Man. That happy accident has led to a new stream of study that has moved beyond petri dishes to study the effect of the so-called ‘subtilisin,’ or protein-ingesting enzyme on the tiny digestive systems of mice. In so doing, they have found another bacterium, B. subtilis, which produces an enzyme similar to the Rothia one and is already safely consumed in Japan in a fermented soybean dish called ‘natto.’ A 2018 Boston University report concludes that “oral Rothia bacteria to gliadin digestion and pharmaceutical modification can protect Sub-A from auto-digestion as well as from acidic insults, thus rendering the usefulness of coated subtilisins as a digestive aid for gluten degradation.” ZED1227—Created by Dr. Falk Pharma and Zedira recently announced the start of phase II clinical trials for the drug candidate ZED1227, a direct acting inhibitor of tissue transglutaminase. ZED1227 molecules work by targeting the dysregulated transglutaminase within the small intestine in order to suppress the immune response to gluten which drives the disease process. Sources: An Update on Every Celiac Disease Drug Currently in Development Inside The Race for a Celiac Disease Treatment Promising Celiac Disease Drugs in the Pipeline Development of drugs for celiac disease: review of endpoints for Phase 2 and 3 trials
  13. Celiac.com 12/25/2018 - Recently, a bit of a dustup kicked off in New Zealand, literally, over what celiac shoppers see as the placement of gluten-free flours beside or beneath standard wheat flours that are not gluten-free. The news website Newshub recently ran a photo of shelves at Ponsonby Countdown that showed gluten-free flour beside the regular flour. "That's bad, because flour puffs everywhere, contaminating everything near it," one shopper told Newshub, asking to remain anonymous. A Countdown spokesperson told Newshub on Tuesday the store will be reviewing the placement of gluten-free flour. In all fairness, with store shelf space a scarce commodity, stores have a tough job. In general, customers overwhelmingly like similar products placed close together. So, the thinking goes, gluten-free flour and standard flour are both flour, so they belong together on the shelf. Of course, for people with celiac disease, the two products are distinct, and most celiac want the products separated for safety reason. "However,” said the Countdown spokeswoman, “we completely understand how the placement of gluten-free flour next to plain flour may concern some customers and we'll review this." It sounds like the company will be listening to their gluten-free shoppers and looking to find a way to place their gluten-free flour safely for people with celiac disease. Stay tuned to see how the story resolves. Read more at: Newshub.co.nz
  14. Celiac.com 02/20/2015 (updated 12/31/2018- Here is Celiac.com's most up-to-date list of gluten-free beers and alcoholic beverages. The gluten status of the products listed below is accurate at the present time. However, as product formulations can change without notice, it is best to verify gluten-free product status by checking the ingredients yourself, or by contacting the manufacturer. Unless gluten is added after distillation, all distilled alcohols are gluten-free. However, US labeling laws prohibit beverages that use cereal grains at any point in the manufacturing process from advertising themselves as 'gluten-free.' Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid distilled beverages that use cereal grains in the manufacturing process, while many others drink them with no adverse effects. So, when you do see a 'gluten-free' label on a distilled beverage, it means that no gluten ingredients have been used at any point in the production process. A List of Naturally Gluten-free Beers Anheuser-Busch Redbridge Bard's Gold Bard's Tale Beer Brasserie Dupont Forêt Libre Brasseurs Sans Gluten Glutenberg Blanche Brunehaut Bio Ambrée Brunehaut Blonde Bio Brunehaut Blanche Burning Brothers Brewing Coors Peak Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales: Tweason'ale Drummond Gluten Free Epic Brewing Company: Glutenator Ghostfish Brewery Glutenberg American Pale Ale Glutenberg Blonde Glutenberg Belgian Double Glutenberg India Pale Ale Glutenberg Rousse Green's Discovery Amber Ale Green's Endeavour Green's Enterprise Dry-Hopped Lager Green's India Pale Ale Green's Quest Tripel Blonde Ale Ground Breaker Corsa Rose Gold Ale Ground Breaker IPA No. 5 Ground Breaker Dark Ale Holidaily Brewing Company Ipswich Ale Brewery: Celia Saison Joseph James Brewing Fox Tail Lakefront New Grist Ginger Style Ale Lakefront New Grist Pilsner Style Minhas Lazy Mutt Gluten Free Mongozo Premium Pilsener New Planet Belgian Style Ale New Planet Blonde Ale New Planet Pale Ale New Planet Raspberry Ale New Planet Seclusion IPA New Planet Tread Lightly Session Ale Nickel Brook Gluten Free Nouvelle France La Messagère Nouvelle-France Messagère Aux Fruits Nouvelle-France Messagère Red Ale Schnitzer Bräu Hirse Lemon Schnitzer Bräu Hirse Premium Sprecher Brewing Company's Shakparo Ale Steadfast Beer gluten-free Blonde and Pale Ales Steadfast Beer Company's Oatmeal Cream Stout To Øl Reparationsbajer Gluten Free Whistler Forager A List of Gluten-Removed Beers Alley Kat Scona Gold Kölsch Brunehaut Bio Tripel Estrella Damm Daura Estrella Damm Daura Marzen Lammsbräu Glutenfrei Lager Beer Mikkeller American Dream Gluten Free Mikkeller Green Gold Gluten Free Mikkeller I Wish Gluten Free IPA Mikkeller Peter, Pale And Mary Gluten Free New Belgium Glutiny brand Golden and Pale Ales Short's Brewing Space Rock Stone Delicious IPA Sufferfest Brewing Company Pale Ale and Lager Widmer Omission Lager Widmer Omission IPA Widmer Omission Pale Ale Wold Top Against The Grain Wold Top Marmalade Porter Wold Top Scarborough Fair IPA Gluten-Free Hard Cider Most ciders are fermented from apples or other fruits. Most are safe, however, some add barley for enzymes and flavor. Read labels! Gluten-free hard cider brands include: Ace Ciders Angry Orchard Blue Mountain Cider Company Blackthorn Cider Bulmer's Hard Cider Crispin Cider (including Fox Barrel products) Gaymer Cider Company Harpoon Craft Cider J.K. Scrumpy's Organic Hard Cider Lazy Jack's Cider Magner's Cider Newton's Folly Hard Cider Original Sin Hard Cider Spire Mountain Draft Cider Strongbow Cider Stella Artois Apple and Pear Hard Cidre Woodchuck Woodpecker Cider Gluten-Free Wine All wines, including brandy, champagne, cognac, port wine, sherry, and vermouth are safe for celiacs. Gluten-Free Wine Coolers The majority of wine coolers are made from barley products. Gluten-free versions include: Bartle & Jaymes - all EXCEPT malt beverages Boones - all EXCEPT their malt beverages Other Gluten-Free Alcoholic Brews, Wines and Spirits Include Brandy Campari Champagne Cognac—made from grapes Cointreau Grappa Midori Prosecco Khalua Coffee Liquer Kirschwasser (cherry liqueur) Old Deadly Cider Sambuca Vermouth Gluten-Free Distilled Alcohols Unless gluten is added after distillation, all distilled alcohols are free of gluten. However, US labeling laws prohibit beverages that use cereal grains at any point in the manufacturing process from advertising themselves as 'gluten-free.' So, when you do see a 'gluten-free' label on a distilled beverage, it means that no gluten ingredients have been used at any point in the production process. Gluten-Free Gin Most gins are made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final distilled product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid these beverages, while many others drink them with no adverse effects. Gluten-free gin brands include: Cold River Gin—distilled from potatoes Brands of standard gin include: Aviation American Gin Beefeater Bombay Bombay Sapphire Boodles British Gin Booth's Gin Gordon's Leopolds Gin New Amsterdam Gin Seagram's Tanqueray Gluten-Free Rum Distilled from sugar cane, most rums are gluten-free and safe for celiacs. Beware of pre-made drink mixes, such as those intended for piña coladas — many of these contain gluten ingredients as flavoring. Gluten-free rum brands include: Appleton Estate Jamaica Rum Bacardi—only Gold, Superior, 151, and flavored Bayou Rum Bundaberg Rum Captain Morgan Rum Cruzan Rum Malibu Rum Mount Gay Rum Meyer's Rum Gluten-Free Sake Fermented with rice and Koji enzymes. The Koji enzymes are grown on Miso, which is usually made with barley. The two-product separation from barley, and the manufacturing process should make it safe for celiacs. Gluten-Free Tequila Made from the agave cactus, all tequilas are gluten-free and safe for celiacs. Gluten-free tequila brands include: 1519 Tequila 1800 Tequila Cabo Wabo Cazadores Chimayo Don Julio El Jimador Herradura Hornitos Jose Cuervo Patron Sauza Gluten-Free Vodka Vodkas distilled from potatoes, gluten-free grains or other gluten-free ingredients contain no gluten ingredients and can be labeled as gluten-free. Gluten-free vodka brands include: Corn Vodka—Deep Eddy, Nikolai, Rain, Tito's, UV Grape Vodka—Bombora, Cooranbong Potato Vodka—Boyd & Blair, Cirrus, Chase, Chopin, Cold River Vodka, Cracovia, Grand Teton, Karlsson's, Luksusowa, Monopolowa, Schramm Organic, Zodiac Rice Vodka—Kissui Sugar Cane—Downunder, DOT AU Vodkas distilled from cereal grains include: Many vodkas made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid these beverages, while many others drink them with no adverse effects. Barley Vodka—Finlandia Grain Vodka—Absolwent, Blavod, Bowman's, Fleischmann's, Orloff, Polonaise, SKYY, Smirnoff, Stolichnaya, Wheat Vodka—Absolut, Bong Spirit, Danzka, Grey Goose, Hangar One, Ketel One, P.i.n.k Vodka Rye Vodka—Belvedere, BiaÅ‚a Dama, Platinka, Sobieski, Starka, Wisent, Wyborowa, Xellent Swiss, Å»ubrówka Gluten-Free Whiskey Nearly all whiskeys are made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid whiskey, while many others drink it with no adverse effects. Gluten-free whiskey brands include: Queen Jennie Whiskey, by Old Sugar Distillery is made entirely from sorghum Whiskeys distilled from cereal grains include: Bourbon—Benjamin Prichard's, Booker's, Buffalo Trace, Jim Beam, Early Times, Ezra Brooks, Jefferson's Bourbon, Knob Creek, Makers Mark, Old Crow, Old Forester, Old Grand-Dad Canadian Whiskey—Alberta Premium, Black Velvet, Canadian Club, Crown Royal, Tenesse Whiskey—Jack Daniels, George Dickel. Irish Whiskey—Bushmills, Jameson, Kilbeggan, Redbreast, Tullamore Dew Japanese Blended Whiskey—Hibiki, Kakubin, Nikka, Japanese Single Malt Whiskey—Hakushu, Yamazaki, Yoichi Rye Whiskey—Alberta Premium, Bulleitt Scotch Whiskey Blends—Ballentine's, Bell's, Black Grouse, Chivas Regal, Cutty Sark, Dewar's, Famous Grouse, Johnnie Walker, Teacher's, Whitehorse Scotch Whiskey Single Malts—Bowmore, Glenfiddich, Glen Grant, The Glenlivet, Glenmorangie, Highland Park, Knockando, Lagavulin, Laphroaig, Macallan, Monkey Shoulder, Singleton, Talisker Taiwanese Whiskey—Kavalan Classic Gluten-Free Drink Mixes Club Extra Dry Martini (corn & grape) Club Vodka Martini (corn & grape) Coco Casa and Coco Lopez Brands: Cream of Coconut Jose Cuervo Brand: Margarita Mix and All Jose Cuervo Blenders Master of Mixes Brand: Tom Collins, Whiskey Sour, Strawberry Daiquiri, Sweet & Sour Mixer, and Margarita Mix Mr. & Mrs. T—Except Bloody Mary Mix TGI Friday's Brand: On The Rocks, Long Island Ice Tea, Margarita, Mudslide, Pina Colada, and Strawberry Daiquiri. TGI Friday's Club Cocktails including: Gin Martini, Manhattan, Screwdriver, Vodka Martini, and Whiskey Sour mix. Other Gluten-free Beverages Mixes & Cooking Alcohol Club Tom Collins—made with corn Diamond Jims Bloody Mary Mystery Holland House - all EXCEPT Teriyaki Marinade and Smooth & Spicy Bloody Mary Mixes Mead—made from honey Mistico: Jose Cuervo Mistico—agave and cane Ouzo - made from grapes and anise Spice Islands - Cooking Wines - Burgundy, Sherry and White Also Godiva products contain gluten as do Smirnoff FMB's, Twisted V, and Smirnoff Ice.
  15. Celiac.com 12/06/2018 - The growing popularity of gluten-free foods has led to numerous new products for consumers, but it has also led to some problems. One recent study showed that up to one-third of foods sold as gluten-free contain gluten above 20ppm allowed by federal law. Other studies have shown that restaurant food labeled as “gluten-free” is often contaminated with gluten. The problem of gluten in commercial food labeled gluten-free is not isolated to the United States. Recent studies abroad show that the problem exists in nearly every gluten-free market in every country. In Australia, for example, researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne found detectable gluten in almost 3% of 256 commonly purchased “gluten-free” manufactured foods, a study published in the Medical Journal of Australia on Monday says. Furthermore, the study shows that nearly 10% of restaurant dishes sold as "gluten-free" contain unacceptable levels of gluten. Now, the Australians have a stricter standard than nearly anyone else, so look for them to be on top of potential problems with gluten contamination in gluten-free products. The study did not name the food manufacturers responsible for the contaminated products, but did note that better, more frequent gluten testing by manufacturers would make gluten-free foods safer for people with celiac disease. In a related study, the same researchers found in May that nearly one in ten samples of “gluten-free” dishes from restaurants within the City of Melbourne contained gluten levels in excess of the official Food Standards Australia New Zealand definition of gluten-free. “It’s troubling to think that these foods could be hindering the careful efforts of patients trying their best to avoid gluten,” an author of the study, Dr Jason Tye-Din, said. A spokeswoman from Coeliac Australia said the organization was taking the findings seriously. “The research team that conducted this study has liaised with the food companies and is following up the positive samples with further retesting to ensure the issue is resolved,” she said. In addition to urging consumers to be diligent in reading labels, and to report any suspect products, “Coeliac Australia advises all people with coeliac disease to have regular medical check-ups as they do have a serious autoimmune condition and medical assessment is important to determine that their gluten-free diet is going well and no complications are developing.” Read more at: TheGuardian.com
  16. Celiac.com 01/02/2019 - Way back in 2011, a team genetic engineering researchers at the University of Washington began to develop a new treatment for celiac disease. The team’s early research suggested that an oral enzyme that could break down the gluten proteins would be an ideal therapy for celiac disease. Taken before meals by a person with celiac disease, such an enzyme would ideally neutralize all trace of gluten before they could trigger an immune response. Their search to develop such a treatment would take them nearly a decade of effort. To fuel their goals, the team made use of pioneering computer software, called the Rosetta Molecular Modeling Suite, that helps design new proteins, including enzymes. They began by selecting a protein-digesting enzyme that was already known to work well in acidic conditions. However, the selected enzyme lacked the gluten-killing ability the team sought. Using a video game-like interface to Rosetta called Fold-it, the team created versions of the enzyme that would target gluten proteins. The team then chose about 100 of their most promising enzyme designs. They then physically created each of those designer enzymes in the lab and tested their ability to break down gluten. By combining the best performing enzymes, the team was able to create a prototype gluten-degrading enzyme, which they named KumaMax, as it is derived from the starter enzyme, kumamolisin. After years of additional tweaking of the prototype enzyme at the University of Washington’s Institute for Protein Design, the team was able to begin Phase I clinical trials on KumaMax. If clinical trials go well, the team is looking to follow with testing on human celiac patients. The results could give rise to a new commercially available enzymatic treatment for celiac disease. Read more at: ASCH.ORG
  17. Celiac.com 01/01/2019 - 2018 was a very good year for people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance. There were a number of notable developments and breakthroughs this year, including major progress on a celiac disease vaccine, the fast-tracking of Timp-Glia, a drug for treating a celiac disease symptoms, and a new blood test that can spot celiac disease without the patient being forced to eat gluten beforehand. 2018 also brought us revelations that homemade yogurt can help to heal irritable bowel symptoms in most people; that people with autism have celiac disease rates twenty-times higher than the general population; that one in three restaurant food labeled ‘gluten-free’ may contain gluten; and that people with celiac disease are bad at judging gluten-exposure. In all, 2018 brought us numerous stories that can help us manage our celiac disease and to make better, smarter, gluten-free food decisions. Here are Celiac.com’s most popular stories of 2018: New Blood Test Will Spot Celiac Disease Without Gluten Consumption Fifteen Symptoms that can Make Celiac Disease Hard to Diagnose Who Makes America's Best Gluten-Free Pizza? Celiac Disease Rates 20 Times Higher in People with Autism 15 Foods People Wrongly Think Are Gluten-Free Starbucks Dumps Gluten-Free Breakfast Sandwich Promising Celiac Vaccine Nexvax2 Begins Phase Two Trials Celiac Disease Treatment TIMP-GLIA Wins Fast Track Status Gluten-Free Halloween Candy List for 2018 Homemade Yogurt Resolves Irritable Bowel Symptoms in Most Patients Gluten Insensitivity? Party City Stumbles with Offensive Pre-Super Bowl Ad Being Too Vigilant About Gluten-Free Diet Causes Stress in Teens and Adults with Celiac Disease Celiac.com’s 25 Most Popular Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes New Study Says One in Three 'Gluten-Free' Restaurant Foods Contain Gluten Celiac Patients Are Bad at Judging Gluten Exposure Based on Symptoms We hope you enjoyed this review of our most popular celiac and gluten-free articles for 2018. We look forward to bringing you more important information and breaking news and stories about celiac disease and gluten-free living in the New Year. Happy Holidays!
  18. 2018 was a very good year for people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance. There were a number of notable developments and breakthroughs this year, including major progress on a celiac disease vaccine, the fast-tracking of Timp-Glia, a drug for treating a celiac disease symptoms, and a new blood test that can spot celiac disease without the patient being forced to eat gluten beforehand. 2018 also brought us revelations that homemade yogurt can help to heal irritable bowel symptoms in most people; that people with autism have celiac disease rates twenty-times higher than the general population; that one in three restaurant food labeled ‘gluten-free’ may contain gluten; and that people with celiac disease are bad at judging gluten-exposure. In all, 2018 brought us numerous stories that can help us manage our celiac disease and to make better, smarter, gluten-free food decisions. Here are Celiac.com’s most popular stories of 2018: New Blood Test Will Spot Celiac Disease Without Gluten Consumption https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-diagnosis-testing-amp-treatment/new-blood-test-will-spot-celiac-disease-without-gluten-consumption-r4328/ Fifteen Symptoms that can Make Celiac Disease Hard to Diagnose https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/journal-of-gluten-sensitivity/journal-of-gluten-sensitivity-spring-2018-issue/fifteen-symptoms-that-can-make-celiac-disease-hard-to-diagnose-r4387/ Who Makes America's Best Gluten-Free Pizza? https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/miscellaneous-information-on-celiac-disease/conferences-publicity-pregnancy-church-bread-machines-distillation-beer/who-makes-america039s-best-gluten-free-pizza-r4318/ Celiac Disease Rates 20 Times Higher in People with Autism https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-amp-related-diseases-and-disorders/autism-and-celiac-disease/celiac-disease-rates-20-times-higher-in-people-with-autism-r4588/ 15 Foods People Wrongly Think Are Gluten-Free https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/miscellaneous-information-on-celiac-disease/additional-celiac-disease-concerns/15-foods-people-wrongly-think-are-gluten-free-r4595/ Starbucks Dumps Gluten-Free Breakfast Sandwich https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/miscellaneous-information-on-celiac-disease/additional-celiac-disease-concerns/starbucks-dumps-gluten-free-breakfast-sandwich-r4454/ Promising Celiac Vaccine Nexvax2 Begins Phase Two Trials https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-diagnosis-testing-amp-treatment/promising-celiac-vaccine-nexvax2-begins-phase-two-trials-r4615/ Celiac Disease Treatment TIMP-GLIA Wins Fast Track Status https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-diagnosis-testing-amp-treatment/celiac-disease-treatment-timp-glia-wins-fast-track-status-r4338/ Gluten-Free Halloween Candy List for 2018 https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/journal-of-gluten-sensitivity/journal-of-gluten-sensitivity-autumn-2018-issue/gluten-free-halloween-candy-list-for-2018-r4589/ Homemade Yogurt Resolves Irritable Bowel Symptoms in Most Patients https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-amp-related-diseases-and-disorders/irritable-bowel-syndrome-and-celiac-disease/homemade-yogurt-resolves-irritable-bowel-symptoms-in-most-patients-r4325/ Gluten Insensitivity? Party City Stumbles with Offensive Pre-Super Bowl Ad https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/miscellaneous-information-on-celiac-disease/additional-celiac-disease-concerns/gluten-insensitivity-party-city-stumbles-with-offensive-pre-super-bowl-ad-r4335/ Being Too Vigilant About Gluten-Free Diet Causes Stress in Teens and Adults with Celiac Disease https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-gluten-intolerance-research/being-too-vigilant-about-gluten-free-diet-causes-stress-in-teens-and-adults-with-celiac-disease-r4356/ Celiac.com’s 25 Most Popular Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/gluten-free-cooking/celiaccom’s-25-most-popular-gluten-free-dessert-recipes-r4543/ New Study Says One in Three 'Gluten-Free' Restaurant Foods Contain Gluten https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/miscellaneous-information-on-celiac-disease/additional-celiac-disease-concerns/new-study-says-one-in-three-gluten-free-restaurant-foods contain-gluten-r4593/ Celiac Patients Are Bad at Judging Gluten Exposure Based on Symptoms https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-gluten-intolerance-research/celiac-patients-are-bad-at-judging-gluten-exposure-based-on-symptoms-r4627/ We hope you enjoyed this review of our most popular celiac and gluten-free articles for 2018. We look forward to bringing you more important information and breaking news and stories about celiac disease and gluten-free living in the New Year. Happy Holidays!
  19. What is Gluten? Gluten is a huge molecule held together by smaller molecules linked together called amino acids. A very tiny part of the gluten molecule can initiate a response. If each amino acid that makes up gluten is represented as a single letter that very tiny part would be: SGQGSFQPSQQ. There are other sequences of amino acids that cause a reaction in gluten sensitive individuals, but the point is, as tiny as this fragment is with respect to the entire gluten protein, it is still HUGE with respect to the size of ethanol (the stuff you are drinking). What is Alcohol? The alcohol you drink is ethanol. Ethanol is smaller than the size of the smallest amino acid in the smallest fragment of gluten that has been shown to initiate an autoimmune reaction. More specifically, ethanol is about 10 atomic mass units smaller than just the G in the sequence shown above. What are Amino Acids? The G is glycine, and by the way, each of these amino acids (represented by letters) by themselves is safe, and sold at most health food stores. For example Q = glutamine (yes, “L-glutamine,” the same amino acid mentioned in a recent post and used to heal intestinal damage). If the protein is viewed as beads on a string, then one of those beads might be good for you, but certain sequences strung together can initiate an allergic reaction of many types from acute peanut allergy to less-than-obvious gluten sensitivity. What is Distillation? When a distillation is performed, pure ethanol is separated away from all of the other “stuff” that forms as a result of fermentation. This is because ethanol is volatile (meaning it becomes a gas in the distillation process). Imagine a vat of fermentation products, you heat it, and only the volatile molecules like ethanol enter a tube attached to the vat. This tube is not just any tube - it is a curved condensation tube! Here is what it does: While the heated gas form of ethanol floats into it (because that is what gases do), the molecules are cooled and condense back into a liquid, and fall into a new sparkling clean vessel containing the stuff that intoxicates you and any other volatiles. So the fancier distillation columns that are actually used industrially also purify the ethanol away from other volatiles. Gluten does not stand a chance of “crossing over” because it is not volatile. Here is a simplified analogy. Let's say you put some sand in the bottom of your tea kettle. If you take the spout off your tea kettle, and attach a condensing tube to the opening (a curved tube would be the simplest type of condensing tube but there are many elaborate types), you could distill your water away from the sand. The condensing tube would be curved so as to open into a new clean pot. Let us pretend that the sand is gluten and the water is ethanol. When you heat to the boiling point, the liquid becomes gas so it travels into the condenser, cools and becomes liquid, then falls into the clean pot. Now having read that, is there any way that the new clean pot would contain any sand? No, and distilled alcohol (ethanol) does not contain any gluten. Remember, gluten is not volatile. Another non-volatile compound is table salt. So you could perform a distillation at home, with salt water. Has anyone ever inadvertently done this? Boiled a pot of salt water, perhaps to make some Tinkyada pasta, and walked away to do something else. You came back to find your pot almost empty with white crusty stuff (salt) all inside the pot. So the gluten is left behind in a distillation process. If malt is added to the distilled product it will be disclosed on the ingredients label. What is Vinegar? Vinegar is formed by fermentation in a similar way that ethanol is formed by fermentation. The process is to take ethanol and ferment it with bacteria. Later, there is a filtration to remove the bacteria. Rarely, vinegar is fermented from wheat-based alcohol. “Distilled vinegar,” gets its name from the fact that it was fermented from distilled alcohol. Why is Vinegar Still Questioned? The answer could be, perhaps, because so many people report a reaction to it and vinegar-based products. The never-ending fear is that cross-contamination during the fermentation process is leading to barely detectable amounts of gluten in the finished product (by barely detectable, I mean in terms of commercially available tests). Since the vinegar is rarely distilled post fermentation from the ethanol, the “messy” nature of the second fermentation step could pose a problem, especially for highly sensitive individuals. If the alcohol gets all used up by the bacteria, the bacteria go on to form carbon dioxide and water from the vinegar. So alcohol is periodically added in the fermentation process. Conceivably, one “shortcut” would be to just add beer at this juncture. Adding beer or some other form of cheap malted alcohol would keep the culture alive, and increase the “quality” and yield of the vinegar. Another fear is that the bacterial “mother” as it is called, contains trace gluten through cross-contamination. Claims that these practices actually take place are unsubstantiated by evidence. Why are Distilled Spirits Still Questioned?That is a good question, I do not know.Take a Short Quiz on this Topic: You bought mustard and pickles at the grocery store. These products contain “distilled vinegar” according to the ingredients labels, and the label does NOT say “contains: wheat.” Are the mustard and pickles gluten-free? Rum, gin, whiskey, and vodka are distilled beverages. If they are not flavored with something that contains wheat (would be declared on the label), rye, or barley (usually in the form of “malt”), are they gluten-free? What is wrong with the following statements (they have all been cut and pasted from various blogs and forums on the topic of celiac disease)?a. “Most alcohols are distilled in such a way that any wheat gluten is no longer present.”b. “Even trace amounts of gluten that make it past the filter system can be harmful.”c. “It seems improbable to me, too, that gliadin could survive the distillation process.” Answers: Yes, unless you have reason to believe otherwise, in which case you should simply avoid them. Yes. 3a. All alcohols, if distilled, have been removed from any type of gluten. 3b. Distillation is nothing like a filtration. We are not separating small from large, there is no filter. Filtration would be like how your coffee pot separates water from the coffee grains. A tear in the filter would result in a big problem, right? Filtration is a separation based on size, distillation is a separation based on volatility. 3c. Do we care whether gliadin (a name given to part of wheat gluten) “survives” the process or not? No, because it has been left behind to stew in its own juices in the distillation pot. Your stuff (the ethanol) has floated away, and entered a new, clean pot. Some people have this idea that we heat the fermented mixture to smithereens and it somehow decomposes the molecules of gluten. Clearly, such a process would be ineffective or else we could simply “cook,” “roast,” “fry,” or “burn” the gluten out of our foods, and we know that we cannot do that.
  20. 12/13/2018 - Is wine gluten-free? Wine Spectator recently weighed in on gluten and wine. The article is worth a read, and there’s a link at the bottom of this page. Meantime, here’s a quick rundown of the basics of wine and gluten. Wine is generally regarded as gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease and other gluten-related sensitivities. That said, there are a couple of ways that wine could come to contain gluten; but they are mostly due to old and discontinued wine making practices. First, in the old days, barrel makers used to seal barrels with with wheat paste, which contains gluten. Wine aged in these barrels could contain trace amounts of gluten. However, these days, nearly every winery in the world now uses non-gluten-based wax products to seal their barrels. Even if barrels commonly contained wheat paste, a 2012 test run by Tricia Thompson, founder of GlutenFreeWatchdog.org, found that gluten levels of two different wines finished in wheat paste–sealed barrels contained under 5ppm gluten—thus meeting the FDA gluten-free standard. So, that method of possible contact with gluten is unlikely to be a problem for most people with celiac disease or a medical gluten-sensitivity. Another way wine could be exposed to gluten is if wheat gluten is used for a process called ‘fining.’ However, these days, the use of wheat gluten in fining is practically nonexistent. And even if wheat gluten were used for fining, it is unlikely to be an issue. A 2011 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that wines fined with gluten contained either extremely low, or undetectable, levels of gluten. Furthermore, "even if any traces of gluten would accidentally enter a wine—let's say the winemaker falls into a tank holding a whole-wheat sandwich—as a protein, gluten would react with [wine's] phenolics," said Dr. Christian Butzke, a professor of enology at Purdue University. So, the vast majority of wines are gluten-free and likely safe for with celiac disease or a medical gluten-sensitivity. "One thing for consumers to watch for is any wine or wine product that contains added colors or flavors, or that is made from barley malt, such as bottled wine coolers," says Marilyn Geller, CEO of the nonprofit Celiac Disease Foundation. Bottom line: Check the label. If the product is a straight red or white or rosé wine, then it is almost certainly gluten-free. Watch out for coolers or wine with added ingredients. Read labels. If you still have questions, do not hesitate to contact the winery directly. Read more at: WINESPECTATOR.COM
  21. Celiac.com 12/14/2018 - As the popularity of gluten- and allergen-free foods have exploded, so has the list of manufacturers rushing new products to market. Several studies have shown that numerous restaurant and commercial foods labeled as ‘gluten-free’ contain unacceptable gluten levels. Meanwhile, other news has revealed that many supermarket products labeled gluten-free in fact contain unacceptable levels of wheat. Now, news in from the UK says that manufacturers were forced to recall sixty-eight products linked to potentially lethal allergies or food intolerances due to being improper labeling. There have been several cases of accidental exposure to allergens causing death. Partly as a result, a renewed diligence among grocers and manufacturers has led to a number of product recalls. Recalled products include yogurt, salad dressing, supermarket croissants, biscuits and cottage pies. The figures suggest that companies may have supply, formulation, and/or manufacturing issues that leave them out of touch with the ingredients in their products. Recent major product recalls in the UK include: Sainsbury's in-store bakery All Butter Croissant recalled over undeclared almonds. Quorn’s recall packs of Gluten Free Burgers due to undeclared gluten. M&S’s recall of Gluten Free Scotch Eggs due to undeclared gluten. Mary Berry's Salad Dressing’s recall due to undeclared egg. Tesco’s recall of Hearty Food Company Cottage Pie and Hearty Food Company Sausage and Mash due to undeclared milk. Tim Lang, professor of food policy at City, University of London, said: "The recent deaths ought to be a wake-up call. Labeling is not working and confidence is falling. This is not a good state of affairs." The Food & Drink Federation (FDF), which speaks for manufacturers, said that, under UK regulations, “If a pre-packed food or drink product contains any of the 14 food allergens it must be declared and emphasized within the ingredients list.” The FDF advises that "In the unlikely event that once a product has shipped, a business discovers that this labeling has not been done correctly, it is their responsibility to inform the Food Standards Agency and immediately recall the product." The British Retail Consortium, which speaks for the major chains, said: "Supermarkets are fully aware of how crucial allergen labeling is. That's why in the small number of cases where an ingredient is not correctly labeled, retailers withdraw the product and notify the FSA." With numerous studies, products recalls, and news stories calling attention to the problem of gluten contamination in gluten-free food, look for retailers and manufacturers to take a more aggressive role in policing their labels, if only to escape the action of regulators and litigators.
  22. Hey folks, I'm new here, and hoping to get some fresh ideas or insight into my situation. Gluten free going on 13 months, now. I have DH (severe on my hands) and I've come to realise I'm extremely sensitive, some "gluten free" processed foods and even rice trigger a reaction, so I've reverted to a basic paleo diet. All meat and all veges. Anyway, up until almost two months ago everything was great. I'd given up the rice (seemed to have withdrawal symptoms from stopping it) and felt really good - lots of energy, no fatigue etc. Also, my new girlfriend and her six year old moved into our home. Now, I know what you may be thinking or suggest, but we don't have gluten in our home. My girlfriend was inadvertently eating gluten free anyway due to eating an paleo type diet, and her son follows suit, so I'm sure they're not contributing to my glutening symptoms. Which started when we started redocorating the home. It all began when I stripped the old wallpaper off the walls for new paper - my DH Rash that was healed flared, so I stopped. Then we had two new wardrobes built in each bedroom which required knocking walls down and extending them which had dust everywhere. Within sleeping in that environment for a week things got bad. So, we both cleaned every inch of the house making sure there was no dust, then had new carpets all through the house - but I'm still sick! My DH is back with a vengeance and I have stomach cramping/knotting like when I did my gluten challenge along with fatigue and headaches. I keep saying the house can't be making me I'll, but then I stay at my mum's to test this theory and I improve. The headaches go and my DH goes pink then heals and fades. What could it be? I'm being driven insane. Am I going to have to move home? It's ridiculous. I personally thought it was the drywall dust, but surely with the cleaning and new carpet it should be gone?. Everything I eat is fresh. Meet and vegetables and soups all prepared by me. My main staples are chicken, sweet potatoes, carrots, swede, brocolli, mushrooms and kale. So it's not my diet. All thoughts and suggestions would be appreciated. I don't know if paint can contain gluten, but we used a Valspar V500 paint mix to re paint the house. Cheers. Elliott.
  23. This recipe comes to us from Jay Perlman. Yield: 12 cookies. Ingredients: l egg 1/3 cup sugar 2 tablespoons corn oil 2 tablespoons water ¼ cup cornstarch Directions: Have fortunes prepared in advance. Beat egg on low speed until frothy. Beat in sugar, a little at a time, and continue beating until mixture is a very light yellow and thick. Fold in corn oil. Blend water and a little of the egg mixture into cornstarch, then stir into the remaining egg mix. Heat in a heavy, well seasoned griddle to 350F, or until drops of water bounce when dropped on the griddle (For griddles without temperature control, keep heat between low and medium), Drop heaping tablespoon of batter on the griddle and spread with the back of a spoon to about 4 inches wide and 1/8 inch thick. Cook until edges are slightly brown and cookies can be easily lifted from griddle with a spatula—about 5 to 8 minutes.. If they stick the bottoms need to cooked a little longer. Turn and cook the other side, until light brown. Be careful to keep temperature even. Place fortune paper on cookie as soon as it is removed from the griddle. Folding is easier to do than to describe, but the end result is shaped like a horseshoe. Fold opposite edges together, forming a semicircle. Crease crosswise at the center of the straight edge to form a flattened side, then bend the opposing corners together for the traditional shape. Set in a small glass or muffin tin until cookie cools and holds its shape. Wipe griddle and stir batter. Repeat. Good luck. Be careful, I think I burned my finger a few times but they are great.
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