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Found 2,693 results

  1. Celiac.com 11/05/2018 - ImmusanT, Inc. is a clinical stage company looking to deliver innovative peptide-based immunomodulatory vaccine therapies to patients with autoimmune diseases, initiated enrollment in Australia and New Zealand for its celiac disease vaccine. Along with Nexvax2, ImmusanT is working to develop vaccines for other HLA-associated autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. The Phase 2 trials will assess the safety, tolerability and efficacy of its celiac vaccine, Nexvax2, on celiac patients who carry the immune recognition genes for HLA-DQ2.5. Carriers of HLA-DQ2.5 account for approximately 90% of people with disease, and Nexvax2 is designed to protect these patients from the effects of gluten exposure. Nexvax2 is currently the only disease-modifying therapeutic candidate in clinical development for patients with celiac disease. Injections of Nexvax2 are designed to reprogram T cells that trigger an inflammatory response to gluten, thereby suppressing inflammation in patients with celiac disease. Phase 1 studies showed Nexvax2 to be safe and well-tolerated at even its highest dose levels. In Phase 2 clinical trials, ImmusanT hopes to confirm clinical efficacy of Nexvax2 administered by injection into the skin for treatment of celiac disease. The study plan consists of an initial screening period of 6 weeks, an approximately 16 week treatment period, and a 4 week post-treatment observational follow-up. The trials will be conducted at sites in Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide and Brisbane, in addition to sites in New Zealand. For the U.S. study researchers will enroll approximately 150 patients across the U.S., Australia and New Zealand. Phase 2 is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study of Nexvax2 in adults with confirmed celiac disease who have followed a gluten-free diet for at least a year prior to screening. “This trial is important in establishing clinical proof-of-concept for a treatment that would provide benefit beyond that of the gluten-free diet,” and will “test if Nexvax2 can specifically target the immune response to gluten in people with celiac disease and modify associated symptoms,” said Jason Tye-Din, MBBS, Ph.D., principal investigator at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and head of celiac research at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne, Australia. For more information about RESET CeD, including inclusion and exclusion criteria, please visit www.clinicaltrials.gov (Identifier: NCT03644069).
  2. Celiac.com 11/15/2018 - Gluten-free products, marketed as such, were largely unknown 20 years ago, but the gluten-free industry is set to reach an estimated $2.34 billion in sales by 2019. That’s more than double figures for 2014. The growth has been exponential. What sets gluten-free foods apart from other culinary trends or diet fads is that they address a legitimate health concern that affects millions of people around the world. With the massive influx of gluten-free products, and the expansion of “gluten-free” restaurant options, it’s easy to forget that gluten exists in some obvious and not so obvious places that people with celiac disease need to avoid. Here are 15 foods or food ingredients that many people wrongly assume are gluten-free: Beer Light or dark, lager, IPA or Stout, traditional beer is brewed with barley, and is not gluten-free. However, a number of major and micro breweries create tasty gluten-free alternatives. There are a number of tasty, award winning beers that are brewed from gluten-free ingredients and are fully gluten-free. There are also gluten-reduced beers. These beers are brewed like traditional beers and EU regulations allow for gluten-removed beer to be labeled as gluten-free. Plenty of people with celiac disease do fine drinking these beers, but many do not. Know your beer, know your body, and drink accordingly. Read more at Celiac.com's Oktoberfest Beer Guide! Gluten-free vs. Gluten-removed Beers. Barbecue Sauce Many barbecue sauces use artificial colors, flavorings or thickeners that may contain gluten, so it’s important to check labels, and even contact a manufacturer if you're not sure about something. Couscous, Tabbouleh and Falafel Couscous and bulgar are wheat and are used in many different Middle-eastern foods, and some people do not realize that they contain gluten. Bulgar or couscous are also used to make another popular Middle-eastern dish called tabbouleh (salad). Couscous or wheat flour are sometimes used to make falafel, so be sure to ask about the ingredients before eating. Candy Always be careful about candy. Many candies are safe and gluten-free, but many candies are not. Sometimes trusted products can change. Read labels, check websites, contact manufacturers as needed, and be careful! If you’re not sure, Celiac.com’s Annual Safe Gluten-Free Halloween Candy List is a good place to start. Cookie Dough This might seem obvious, but cookie dough, unless specifically gluten-free, almost always contains standard wheat flour and is not gluten-free. Dried Spices Some manufacturers actually use flour to keep their spices from clumping. Pay special attention to spice blends and mixes, including curry powders, which may contain wheat. Gravies, Soups, Sauces and Mixes—Packaged, Canned, or Jarred If you’ve ever made gravy from scratch, you might recall that it involves making a roux, a paste of butter and flour which thickens the gravy and gives it a nice sheen. Well, roux is also used as a thickening agent in many packaged, canned or jarred gravies, soups, sauces and mixes. Even some fresh soups may contain wheat or flour. Gazpacho, for example, can be made gluten-free, but most recipes call for a piece of bread soaked in sherry vinegar and blended into the soup. When it comes to gluten in soup, eater beware! Hot Dogs & Sausages The bun is an obvious source of gluten, but the dog itself can contain traces of wheat as well in the form of both filler and binder. So check labels, know the ingredients, and double-check when it comes to hot dogs and sausages. Ice Cream Although many ice creams are gluten-free, some may contain wheat in the form of added ingredients, like cookie dough, toppings or candy pieces. Double-check the ingredients to be safe. Packaged Deli Meats, Marinated or Pre-Seasoned Meats & Vegetable Proteins Packaged, marinated meat, fish, chicken, or other meats may contain gluten as a binder or hidden ingredient. Some vegetable-based proteins like Seitan contain gluten. Also, many deli meats claim to be gluten-free, but the same companies have released specific lines of gluten-free meats, raising the question of why they needed a separate product in the first place. Deli meats are controlled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, not the Food and Drug Administration, which currently uses a different gluten-free standard. Prescription Drugs, Vitamins and Supplements Even though they are not technically foods, and they are meant to keep you healthy, prescription drugs, vitamins and supplements may contain gluten as binders, typically in the form of wheat starch. Ask you pharmacist for guidance, read labels closely, and make phone calls to companies or visit their Web sites to be sure. Salad Dressings Many salad dressings have updated their recipes to exclude any wheat or barley-derived additives, but some still contain gluten, especially the powdered mix kind. Soy Sauce Most soy sauces contain wheat and should be avoided. Be sure to find a gluten-free soy sauce. Sushi Although raw fish by itself is gluten-free, there are many ingredients in sushi rolls and other items that contain soy sauce and other sources of gluten. The seaweed wrappers in sushi may contain soy sauce, and the wasabi or fake crab may contain gluten. Teriyaki sauce is another source of gluten because it is made with soy sauce. See our How to Safely Order Sushi article for more info. Teriyaki Sauce Teriyaki is nearly always made with made with soy sauce, and most commercial brands contain wheat, so be careful. Read more on: Celiac.com UNSAFE Food List Celiac.com SAFE Food List Celiac.com's SAFE and UNSAFE Halloween Candy List
  3. Celiac.com 11/07/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to explore the relationship between dermatitis herpetiformis, as a common extraintestinal manifestation of celiac disease, and a gluten-free diet as a path to overall dermatitis herpetiformis improvement. The research team included Timo Reunala, Teea T. Salmi, Kaisa Hervonen, Katri Kaukinen and Pekka Collin. They are variously affiliated with the Celiac Disease Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences at the University of Tampere, the Department of Dermatology, Tampere University Hospital, the Department of Internal Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, and with the Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital in Tampere, Finland. Dermatitis herpetiformis is a condition marked by itchy papules and vesicles on the elbows, knees, and buttocks. Dermatitis herpetiformis is a common in people with celiac disease. People who have just dermatitis herpetiformis alone rarely have obvious gastrointestinal symptoms. Dermatitis herpetiformis is easily diagnosed by immunofluorescence biopsy showing pathognomonic granular immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposits in the papillary dermis. One theory currently in play is that dermatitis herpetiformis is triggered by celiac disease in the gut and eventually develops into an immune complex deposition of high avidity IgA epidermal transglutaminase (TG3) antibodies, together with the TG3 enzyme, in the papillary dermis. The age at which people are diagnosed with dermatitis herpetiformis has risen steeply in recent decades to the current average of 40–50 years. The researchers found that the ratio of dermatitis herpetiformis to celiac disease is 1:8 in Finland and the United Kingdom (U.K.). Additionally, the incident rates of dermatitis herpetiformis are currently 2.7 per 100,000 in Finland and 0.8 per 100,000 in the U.K., is decreasing, whereas incidents of celiac disease are on the rise. One positive finding is that Dermatitis herpetiformis patients who are on a gluten-free diet face an excellent long-term outlook, with an even lower mortality rate than the general population. Read more in: Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 602; doi:10.3390/nu10050602
  4. What is Gluten? Gluten is a huge molecule held together by smaller molecules linked together called amino acids. A very tiny part of the gluten molecule can initiate a response. If each amino acid that makes up gluten is represented as a single letter that very tiny part would be: SGQGSFQPSQQ. There are other sequences of amino acids that cause a reaction in gluten sensitive individuals, but the point is, as tiny as this fragment is with respect to the entire gluten protein, it is still HUGE with respect to the size of ethanol (the stuff you are drinking). What is Alcohol? The alcohol you drink is ethanol. Ethanol is smaller than the size of the smallest amino acid in the smallest fragment of gluten that has been shown to initiate an autoimmune reaction. More specifically, ethanol is about 10 atomic mass units smaller than just the G in the sequence shown above. What are Amino Acids? The G is glycine, and by the way, each of these amino acids (represented by letters) by themselves is safe, and sold at most health food stores. For example Q = glutamine (yes, “L-glutamine,” the same amino acid mentioned in a recent post and used to heal intestinal damage). If the protein is viewed as beads on a string, then one of those beads might be good for you, but certain sequences strung together can initiate an allergic reaction of many types from acute peanut allergy to less-than-obvious gluten sensitivity. What is Distillation? When a distillation is performed, pure ethanol is separated away from all of the other “stuff” that forms as a result of fermentation. This is because ethanol is volatile (meaning it becomes a gas in the distillation process). Imagine a vat of fermentation products, you heat it, and only the volatile molecules like ethanol enter a tube attached to the vat. This tube is not just any tube - it is a curved condensation tube! Here is what it does: While the heated gas form of ethanol floats into it (because that is what gases do), the molecules are cooled and condense back into a liquid, and fall into a new sparkling clean vessel containing the stuff that intoxicates you and any other volatiles. So the fancier distillation columns that are actually used industrially also purify the ethanol away from other volatiles. Gluten does not stand a chance of “crossing over” because it is not volatile. Here is a simplified analogy. Let's say you put some sand in the bottom of your tea kettle. If you take the spout off your tea kettle, and attach a condensing tube to the opening (a curved tube would be the simplest type of condensing tube but there are many elaborate types), you could distill your water away from the sand. The condensing tube would be curved so as to open into a new clean pot. Let us pretend that the sand is gluten and the water is ethanol. When you heat to the boiling point, the liquid becomes gas so it travels into the condenser, cools and becomes liquid, then falls into the clean pot. Now having read that, is there any way that the new clean pot would contain any sand? No, and distilled alcohol (ethanol) does not contain any gluten. Remember, gluten is not volatile. Another non-volatile compound is table salt. So you could perform a distillation at home, with salt water. Has anyone ever inadvertently done this? Boiled a pot of salt water, perhaps to make some Tinkyada pasta, and walked away to do something else. You came back to find your pot almost empty with white crusty stuff (salt) all inside the pot. So the gluten is left behind in a distillation process. If malt is added to the distilled product it will be disclosed on the ingredients label. What is Vinegar? Vinegar is formed by fermentation in a similar way that ethanol is formed by fermentation. The process is to take ethanol and ferment it with bacteria. Later, there is a filtration to remove the bacteria. Rarely, vinegar is fermented from wheat-based alcohol. “Distilled vinegar,” gets its name from the fact that it was fermented from distilled alcohol. Why is Vinegar Still Questioned? The answer could be, perhaps, because so many people report a reaction to it and vinegar-based products. The never-ending fear is that cross-contamination during the fermentation process is leading to barely detectable amounts of gluten in the finished product (by barely detectable, I mean in terms of commercially available tests). Since the vinegar is rarely distilled post fermentation from the ethanol, the “messy” nature of the second fermentation step could pose a problem, especially for highly sensitive individuals. If the alcohol gets all used up by the bacteria, the bacteria go on to form carbon dioxide and water from the vinegar. So alcohol is periodically added in the fermentation process. Conceivably, one “shortcut” would be to just add beer at this juncture. Adding beer or some other form of cheap malted alcohol would keep the culture alive, and increase the “quality” and yield of the vinegar. Another fear is that the bacterial “mother” as it is called, contains trace gluten through cross-contamination. Claims that these practices actually take place are unsubstantiated by evidence. Why are Distilled Spirits Still Questioned?That is a good question, I do not know.Take a Short Quiz on this Topic: You bought mustard and pickles at the grocery store. These products contain “distilled vinegar” according to the ingredients labels, and the label does NOT say “contains: wheat.” Are the mustard and pickles gluten-free? Rum, gin, whiskey, and vodka are distilled beverages. If they are not flavored with something that contains wheat (would be declared on the label), rye, or barley (usually in the form of “malt”), are they gluten-free? What is wrong with the following statements (they have all been cut and pasted from various blogs and forums on the topic of celiac disease)?a. “Most alcohols are distilled in such a way that any wheat gluten is no longer present.”b. “Even trace amounts of gluten that make it past the filter system can be harmful.”c. “It seems improbable to me, too, that gliadin could survive the distillation process.” Answers: Yes, unless you have reason to believe otherwise, in which case you should simply avoid them. Yes. 3a. All alcohols, if distilled, have been removed from any type of gluten. 3b. Distillation is nothing like a filtration. We are not separating small from large, there is no filter. Filtration would be like how your coffee pot separates water from the coffee grains. A tear in the filter would result in a big problem, right? Filtration is a separation based on size, distillation is a separation based on volatility. 3c. Do we care whether gliadin (a name given to part of wheat gluten) “survives” the process or not? No, because it has been left behind to stew in its own juices in the distillation pot. Your stuff (the ethanol) has floated away, and entered a new, clean pot. Some people have this idea that we heat the fermented mixture to smithereens and it somehow decomposes the molecules of gluten. Clearly, such a process would be ineffective or else we could simply “cook,” “roast,” “fry,” or “burn” the gluten out of our foods, and we know that we cannot do that.
  5. Celiac.com 11/12/2018 - Here’s an uplifting celiac story. Now, this happened a while back, but it's all just coming to light in the way that so many warm and fuzzy family stories do. It starts like this: Once upon a time, a simple check for celiac disease opened the door to parenthood for couple. Just over ten years ago, AnnMarie Bradley from Celbridge, Co Kildare, thought she’d never become a mother. After two devastating miscarriages over a decade, Bradley, who is 47 years old, and her husband Christopher (48) were at wit’s end. "I was just heartbroken,” said Ms Bradley. Then, a simple visit to her doctor changed everything. A blood test indicated she might have celiac disease, which further evaluation confirmed. She began a gluten-free diet, and less than a year later, Bradley was pregnant with her son, Cameron. “Being a mother had been everything I'd wanted," she said. Cameron is nearly 16 now, and has an 11-year old sister, Emily. And they all lived happily and gluten-free ever after. In the UK, the Coeliac Society advises women struggling to conceive to consider celiac testing. Read more at: Independent.ie
  6. Celiac.com 11/01/2018 - A terse one-star TripAdvisor review expressed outrage over the lack of gluten-free bread at a family funeral, and slammed the hotel that hosted the reception for the perceived offense. Complaining that, among other things, she had to "munch on some lifeless salad" after the wake reception failed to meet her dietary requirements, a user, known as "Jan" poured her frustration upon the Elmbank Hotel in York. According to Jan, the staff at the Elmbank informed her that why had no gluten-free option, and asked her to bring her own bread. She wrote that she called the hotel a few days before the event, and was “told they don't have gluten-free bread, but if I wanted to take my own they'd make a sandwich for me.” Apparently, Jan chose not to bring her own bread, as she was reportedly “shocked” to discover that they had no gluten free bread on offer. Her outrage on full display, Jan added that "In this day and age you'd think they 'd get their act together, it's quite a common dietary requirement, adding that she had to "sit there, at lunch time, munching on a chicken drumstick and some lifeless salad. Next stop Tesco's on the way past!" In all, Jan gave the funeral reception just one TripAdvisor star, and said that she would never go back again. It didn’t take long for the internet to reply with characteristic mockery. Jan’s review was tweeted by a woman who lives near the hotel who seemed to enjoy the reaction from other users. The tone-deaf nature of Jan’s "munch on some lifeless salad" comment was mentioned in one of the replies. One person wrote: "The genuine coeliacs I know would never complain about this sort of thing." Another said: "I'm glad she was so sensitive and didn't miss the real point of why she was there!" Commenters also took aim at Jan’s admission that she was gluten-free ‘by preference,’ with one user writing: "Glad you saw fit to add the *by preference. I don't know a coeliac who could be this insensitive, they know suffering and would never be so insensitive. Those who 'choose' are princesses." Okay, perhaps the funereal nature of the proceedings makes Jan’s complaint a bit tacky, but does she have a point in general about accommodations for gluten-free eaters? How about you? Been to any tough non-gluten-free funerals or other events lately? Read more in TheSun.co.uk
  7. Celiac.com 10/31/2018 - It’s official. Twitter official. Kourtney Kardashian has made peace with wheat and dairy, and called off her highly touted gluten-free, dairy-free diet. After several years of avoiding them like the plague, the celebrity is now on good terms with both gluten and dairy and is ready to accept them back into her diet. In a new post on her website, the ever busy Kardashian says she’s relaxing a bit, and allowing for dietary deviation and occasional indulgences "in moderation." Kardashian and gluten are not exactly new besties. For now, Kardashian says, she plans to remain gluten-free and dairy-free at home, but more flexible when traveling and dining out. "Lately, I've been less strict about avoiding gluten and dairy…Everything in my pantry is still free of dairy and gluten, so when I'm at home, it's still how I eat," she writes. "But when I go out, or have a craving, I'll have whatever I want. I try to do everything in moderation in my usual routine." In addition Kardashian noted recently on her website that, in addition to a few choice supplements, she usually starts her day with “one tablespoon of organic apple cider vinegar mixed into a glass of water." Can’t get enough? Follow Kourtney Kardashian on Twitter: @kourtneykardash
  8. Hi, i'm a 29 y/o male and basically to try and keep it as short as possible. For the last, i'd say 3-1/2 years i've had strange symptoms that don't fit to any definite diagnosis. I've had MRI'S, X-rays, EMG's, all the blood works done plus countless visits to neurologists and still I have no diagnosis and they're scratching their heads. It's been a nightmare stuck in limbo. I will list a few of my symptoms as i'm just wondering if anyone else can relate. I just want to say autoimmune runs in my family. Both my first cousin and aunt have Crohn's disease. It all started with severe burning in my right foot, then it spread to my left almost immediately and them started progressing upwards. When it got to my calfs, it started in my hands, only it's itching instead of burning. The burning an itching is still present, but for the last 2 years, my muscles (where the burning is) have been twitching and i've lost muscle mass, mostly in my feet, calves and hands, and shoulders, but it's progressing. I've had all the tests I can think of for ALS, MS, etc... I have a lot of sensory issues that have spread through my body, but no numbness, as well as ocular migraines which I get from time to time and a jagged line across my sight appears and then my vision goes in one eye. I suffer with depression and anxiety and all seems to have been triggered around the same time it's all started. Also I have noticed a mass of fruits I all of a sudden can't eat due to sensitivities that I never used to have. So i'll just bullet point symptoms, and I would really be appreciative if someone could give me their opinion or if someone has similar symptoms. Thank you in advance all :) *muscle wasting *muscle twitching/fasciculation's *chronic fatigue *unsteady walking & off balance *unable to empty bladder fully *constipation *itching *brain fog *irritability *ocular migraines *depression & anxiety *sudden food allergies *restless legs
  9. Celiac.com 11/02/2018 - In sensitive individuals, some foods can cause allergic or other immune system reactions. These reactions can be as mild as a little fatigue (many physicians believe the #1 symptom of allergies is fatigue), a mild headache, some congestion, or a ‘fuzzy brain’. Or, the reaction can be as severe as immobilizing migraines, asthmatic attacks and even life-threatening anaphylactic shock. Many of us have felt these types of reactions to foods. And if I tell the truth, I am guilty of many times in the past wondering, “how far can I push this? How much of this food (which isn’t good for me) can I eat without getting sick?” Researchers are now telling us, and studies are being published that gives answers to these questions. It seems to depend on the level of sensitivity. When a person has elevated antibodies to wheat or gluten, the evidence is suggesting ‘none at all’ is the answer to the question. In a recent paper entitled ‘A Milligram of Gluten a Day Keeps the Villous Healing Away’, the authors tell the story of a 32-year-old woman. Her symptoms of abdominal pain, diarrhea and weight loss were present for over 10 years. She also had a history of failure to thrive in childhood (one of the smallest children in the class throughout her education), late onset of menstrual cycles, recurring anemia, and hair loss. This is the history of a body physically ‘just barely getting by’. A positive blood test indicated elevated antibodies, and an endoscopic examination (biopsy of the intestines) confirmed Classic Celiac Disease. She had followed a wheat and gluten free diet for 16 months. Diarrhea and abdominal pain stopped completely and weight loss had been recovered. Some of her blood work had returned to normal. However anemia, hair loss, and increased antibodies suggestive of persistent Celiac Disease were still present. A focused interview revealed she was not on a strict gluten-free diet because she was taking a communion wafer and had several other unintentional dietary lapses. After discussion with her Doctor she refused to stop taking a daily fragment of communion wafer. Eighteen months after beginning a complete gluten-free diet, but still taking a communion wafer, her anemia, hair loss, diarrhea, and abdominal pains were gone. Most blood work was now normal. However some blood markers of possible Celiac Disease were borderline high. From how her body was functioning, one would think she was healed and her Celiac Disease was gone. However her repeat biopsy still showed the highest degree of severe intestinal damage—Marsh IV villous atrophy, and an increased number of intraepithelial lymphocytes, putting her at increased risk of osteoporosis and a severe form of cancer of the intestines (T-cell lymphoma). Her Doctors were concerned. She was following the diet perfectly. No hidden glutens in medications or foods. All of her symptoms were gone. She felt very good. But why weren’t her intestines healing? Could it be the fragment of communion wafer she refused to give up for religious reasons? She did not want to have this discussion and continued to refuse abstaining from the wafer fragment. An evaluation of the communion wafer revealed that it contained approximately 0.5 mg of Gliadin (1 milligram of gluten). That’s about 1/16 of a thumbnail. Now remember this woman’s symptoms had all but disappeared, she felt fine and her blood work was much improved (not quite normal, but close). She was very reluctant to give up her daily fragment of Communion wafer. Eighteen months later she returned and surprised her Doctors by announcing she had given up the wafer. A repeat biopsy now showed her intestines had healed and were completely normal. Discussion: What can we learn from this case? In sensitive individuals (with elevated antibodies to wheat or gluten), the symptoms are not just in the intestines. This person had suffered for years from anemia, hair loss, failure to thrive, weight loss, and hormone irregularities. Implementing a wheat and gluten free diet brought favorable results in eliminating all of the above symptoms Even with the elimination of symptoms and the return to normal of her blood work, ongoing very serious damage was occurring in the intestines without any noticeable symptoms. It only took 1/16th of a fingernail worth of gluten per day to stop intestinal healing and create great risk to life-threatening diseases. Blood antibody values that are border line may be an indicator of more aggressive damage occurring inside the body—not identifiable without an endoscopic exam. Conclusions One can be completely fooled as to whether they are having serious damage occur in their body if they just go by symptoms (or a lack of symptoms). Testing for wheat allergies and Celiac Disease must include comprehensive blood work and, when indicated, an endoscopic examination. If either test comes back positive, a complete elimination of wheat and gluten is necessary—not even 1/16th of a fingernail’s worth-not even a crouton on a salad can be considered harmless. Personal Note It is a necessity to do an endoscopic exam with positive blood work to wheat and/or gluten allergies. I’ve always thought doing the blood work was enough, especially in children. I was wrong. In researching this further I’ve found many studies that emphasize this necessity. Blood work comes first, but if positive, an endoscopic exam is essential. Otherwise, as in this study, severe damage may occur without any symptoms whatsoever.
  10. Celiac.com 10/26/2018 - Did you know that a new study shows people with celiac disease are more likely to suffer nerve damage? Jonas E. Ludvigsson, a clinical epidemiology Professor in Sweden, discovered that women with celiac disease are 2.5 times more likely to develop neuropathy or nerve damage. There is a real association between celiac disease and nerve damage. "We have precise risk assessments in a way we haven't had before" he stated last year. Yet even Sweden has its quandaries. 60% of women in Sweden who have celiac disease have neuropathy and they do not totally know why! Statistics vary from country to country, and even vary between specialists within that country. Nerve damage is no laughing matter, it presents with numbness and tingling of exterior areas (extremities). Basically, numbness in the nerve endings of the fingers and toes and other frustrating areas. Just try picking up pencils, or something hot out of the oven. If you do not feel the heat you will know that you may have nerve damage. Following a rigid gluten-free diet, however, can alleviate this problem to a certain degree, and that is why we keep repeating the mantra: “Eat Clean & Gluten-Free!” However, sometimes accidents happen, and people who have celiac disease, gluten sensitivity, or dermatitis herpetiformis get exposed to gluten. How to Recover From Accidental Gluten Exposure Kathy Holdman, M.S., R.N. and Certified Nutritional Therapist lists numerous ways to recover after gluten exposure. You need to take into account the amount of gluten exposure, length of time from last exposure, degree of gluten intolerance present, health of the digestive tract, existing inflammation or infection in the body and overall health status. Some people say they can recover in a few days, others say they may experience significant setbacks in their health that lasts weeks to months. For those with positive celiac disease it may take years for complete healing of the small intestine after gluten exposure, although "outward symptoms" may resolve sooner. Nurse Holdman suggests the following 10 tips to help alleviate symptoms from gluten exposure, and hopefully speed up recovery: Drink plenty of water, and this cannot be emphasized enough. Water is an essential nutrient for every cell in the body for proper function. Many people live in a state of chronic dehydration, which of course results in constipation. Then they take something to rid themselves of constipation and take too much and lose potassium, magnesium and throw out the balance of the salts in their body. When you have celiac disease you learn something new every week. Last week an Internist told me, after incurring my second bladder infection in eight weeks, that it could possibly be from the diarrhea following being glutened, and not totally washing myself. That made me a little sick just thinking about it. But, she told me an interesting fact about urinary tract infections and celiac disease. Celiacs do incur more frequent urinary tract infections due to more frequent diarrhea, no matter how meticulously clean we are. Taking four or five "Craisins" with each meal several times a day can limit the amount of bladder infections. I told her that I was also taking Cranberry tablets and she told me to throw them out because they are "useless." She said that you do not need to buy fresh cranberries, as they are "sour and expensive." Just buy a bag of the dried Craisins and eat some either before or after meals. Ingredients in the pure dried cranberries helps prevent bladder infections from occurring. Studies done in several Nursing Homes where many incontinent patients lived were given five Craisins either alone or in a salad twice daily and the decrease in urinary tract infections was nothing less than amazing. Get extra sleep and rest. Sleep is the time your body repairs itself. Avoid strenuous exercise, (the type that causes you to sweat). Exercise in moderation is what I think she wants to tell us. Drink bone broth. It is rich in minerals and gelatin and other nutrients that are soothing to the digestive system and nourishing to the entire body. Another health benefit of bone broth is hydration, and the more liquid intake the better. You can dress up bone broth with onions and garlic to improve the taste. Take epson salt baths. They contain magnesium, a mineral that can help the body to relax. The sulphate minerals found in Epson Salts are detoxifying, and they can stimulate the lymphatic system and support the immune system. Nurse Holdman also urges us to take digestive enzymes which can help modulate the symptoms of celiac disease. Take digestive enzymes. If taken immediately following the accidental consumption of gluten, some people believe that digestive enzymes can help to modulate the symptoms of celiac disease. It is well known that digestive enzymes soothe the stomach lining and ease the abdominal pain. Drink ginger or peppermint tea. They are both known to help relieve nausea and can be soothing to the digestive system. Drink a cup if you are having nausea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. Take activated charcoal. It is an over-the-counter-supplement that may be beneficial if taken immediately after an attack. It helps by binding with the offending food and preventing it from being absorbed into the body. This supplement can bind with medications so be sure to consult your licensed health care professional prior to taking it, especially if you take medications for other diseases or conditions. Eat fermented foods. Who knew!? Possibly the Koreans and their staple Kim Chi, or the Ukrainians/Romanians with their fermented red cabbage coleslaw of course! Fermented foods are high in nutrients that nourish the entire body. Start out with a small amount of fermented food and slowly increase it. Drink nettle leaf tea. It is an antispasmodic with antihistamine properties. It can help relieve muscle and joint pain, and relax your body naturally. Neither gluten intolerance nor celiac disease are mediated by histamine, but some people report that nettle leaf can help relieve symptoms of rash and itching following gluten exposure. It is a gentle diuretic and can be detoxifying. So if you experience dehydration symptoms it is time to drink more water. Get acupuncture treatments. It may relieve inflammation, especially in the abdominal area, and it can be relaxing. Only you can tell how many treatments are beneficial, and you need to take into consideration the cost factor because most health insurance plans do not cover acupuncture. Tips to Help People with Dermatitis Herpetiformis Recover from Accidental Gluten Exposure A suggestion from Me: If you have itching from dermatitis herpetaformis, try Scalpacin. I have been using it for years and nothing stops the itching in such a short time span. Once the sores start to appear, even just a slight "itch" is like a doorbell warning you ahead of time. I apply Scalpacin lotion, which is not a cream, but is a clear liquid. At first it stings but that is how I know that I have an impending outbreak. It is a non-fragrant liquid. You can use it on your scalp without totally ruining your hair style. Don't wash you hair with it, search out the spots, or, if you have a partner, they may be able to help you with the sores in your scalp, and you can point out itchy areas. For dermatitis herpetiformis itch you can also try a mix of baking soda and water by making it into a paste. This is not great for your scalp and hair, but it will ease the itching. It can be a little messy when it dries and the white powder flakes off on your floors, but you do not have to use it for hours at a time; it is a temporary method for temporary relief. You can also ask your physician if he or she will prescribe the prescription drug "Atarax" for you. It is a strong allergy medication and must be taken exactly as directed. It really helps the itch, but it can be sedating, especially when first trying it. Don't over-use the prescribed dosage. I would not suggest driving a car while taking Atarax, but if the itching, scabbing and bleeding have become so severe it definitely is the one allergy medication that helps with the itching from dermatitis herpetiformis. I have tried Benadryl, Claritin and other over the counter allergy medications, and nothing works as well as Atarax. Talk to your family physician about a prescription and read the instructions carefully. Hopefully these tips will prove helpful in the unfortunate event that you ever get cross-contaminated by gluten. I certainly hope this never happens to you!
  11. I have severe pain when I have pasta but not when I have bread. I have been tested for celiac disease numerous times as I have another auto immune disease and have had about 5 negative results over 4 years. Every doctor I get referred to does the celiac test before they consider trying anything else. I’ve had A camera and a CT scan (no problems found), and I am waiting for results for another test(malabsorption). Could it just be a simple intolerance? Is there something in pasta that could upset me more than bread or something that would just be in pasta and not bread?
  12. Celiac.com 10/17/2018 - In the interviews I conducted last year, the Celiac.com viewers shared with me some disturbing stories about how others either sabotaged their gluten-free diet or how their gluten-free requirements are continually scrutinized and doubted. Here are a few examples: A co-worker at my office ate a gluten-containing burrito and thought it would be funny to cross-contaminate my work space. With his gluten-coated hands, he touched my phone, desk, pencils, pens, etc. while I was not at my desk. I came back and was contaminated. I had to take several days off of work from being so sick. The waiter at a restaurant where I was eating dinner asked me if I was really “a celiac” or if I was avoiding gluten as a “fad dieter.” He told me the food was gluten-free when he served it, only to come up to me after I ate the dinner and admit there was “a little” gluten in it. My cleaning people were eating Lorna Doones (gluten-containing cookies) while cleaning my gluten-free kitchen, cross-contaminating literally everything in it. When I noticed I exclaimed, “I am allergic to gluten, please put your cookies in this plastic bag and wash your hands.” They chided, “You have insulted our food. We are hungry and we will eat anything we want to, when we want to.” At a family dinner, Aunt Suzie insisted that I try her special holiday fruit bread. In front of everyone around the table, she brushed off my protests and insisted that I over exaggerated my food sensitivities saying, “a little bit wouldn’t hurt you.” These are but a few of an exhaustive list of situations that we regularly contend with. What can possibly be the rationale for any of this conduct? I’m providing some recent headlines that may impact the attitudes of those we interact with and would like to hear what you think influence this behavior (see questions below). Recently, the New York Times published an article entitled, “The Myth of Big, Bad Gluten.” The title alone casts doubt on the severity of gluten exposure for those with CD (Myth, 2015) In his political campaign, Senator Ted Cruz stated that if elected President, he would not provide gluten-free meals to the military, in order to direct spending toward combat fortification (Wellness, 2/18/16). Business Insider.com called Tom Brady’s gluten, dairy free diet “insane” (Brady, 2017). Michael Pollen is quoted as saying that the gluten-free diet was “social contagion.” Further, he says, “There are a lot of people that hear from their friends, ‘I got off gluten and I sleep better, the sex is better, and I’m happier,’ and then they try it and they feel better too. [It’s] the power of suggestion” (Pollan, 2014). Jimmy Kimmel said, “Some people can’t eat gluten for medical reasons… that I get. It annoys me, but that I get,” and proceeded to interview people following a gluten-free diet, asking them “what is gluten.” Most interviewed did not know what gluten is. (ABC News, 2018). Do headlines like this enable others to malign those of us making our dietary needs known? Do these esteemed people talking about gluten cast doubt on what we need to survive? Humans are highly influenced by others when it comes to social eating behavior. Higgs (2015) asserts that people follow “eating norms” (p. 39) in order to be liked. Roth, et al. (2000) found that people consumed similar amounts of food when eating together. Batista and Lima (2013) discovered that people consumed more nutritious food when eating with strangers than when eating with familiar associates. These studies indicate that we are hypersensitive of what others think about what we eat. One can surmise that celebrity quips could also influence food-related behaviors. Part of solving a social problem is identifying the root cause of it, so please weigh in by answering the following questions: How do you handle scrutiny or sabotage of others toward your dietary requirements? Please speculate on what cultural, religious or media influences you suppose contribute to a rationalization for the sabotage and/or scrutiny from others when we state we are observing a gluten-free diet? Are people emulating something they heard in church, seen on TV, or read online? We welcome your answers below. References: ABC. (2018). Retrived from https://abcnews.go.com/Health/video/jimmy-kimmel-asks-what-is-gluten-23655461 Batista, M. T., Lima. M. L. (2013). Who’s eating what with me? Indirect social influence on ambivalent food consumption. Psicologia: Reflexano e Critica, 26(1), 113-121. Brady. (2017). Retrieved from https://www.businessinsider.com/tom-brady-gisele-bundchen-have-an-insane-diet-2017-2 Higgs, S. (2015). Social norms and their influence on eating behaviors. Appetite 86, 38-44. Myth. (2015). Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/05/opinion/sunday/the-myth-of-big-bad-gluten.html Pollan, M. (2014). Retrieved from https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/14/michael-pollan-gluten-free_n_5319357.html Roth, D. A., Herman, C. P., Polivy, J., & Pliner, P. (2000). Self-presentational conflict in social eating situations: A normative perspective. Appetite, 26, 165-171. Wellness. (2016). Retrieved from https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/ted-cruz-gluten-free-military-political-corectness_us_56c606c3e4b08ffac127f09f
  13. Celiac.com 10/16/2018 - Apparently, local St. Louis radio station Z1077 hosts a show called “Dirty Little Secret.” Recently, a woman caller to the show drew ire from listeners after she claimed that she worked at a local bakery, and that she routinely lied to customers about the gluten-free status of baked goods. The woman said she often told customers that there was no gluten in baked goods that were not gluten-free, according to local tv station KTVI. Apparently the woman thought this was funny. However, for people who cannot eat gluten because they have celiac disease, telling people that food is gluten-free when it is not is about as funny as telling a diabetic that food is sugar-free when it is not. Now, of course, eating gluten is not as immediately dangerous for most celiacs as sugar is for diabetics, but the basic analogy holds. That’s because many people with celiac disease suffer horrible symptoms when they accidentally eat gluten, including extreme intestinal pain, bloating, diarrhea, and other problems. Some people experience more extreme reactions that leave them in emergency rooms. As part of a story on the “joke” segment, KTVI interviewed celiac sufferer Dana Smith, who found the punchline to be less than funny. “It’s absolutely dangerous, somebody could get very sick,” said Smith. KTVI also interviewed at least one doctor, Dr. Reuben Aymerich of SSM St. Clare Hospital, who pointed out that, while celiac disease is “not like diabetes where you can reduce the amount of sugar intake and make up for it later, it’s thought you need to be 100 percent compliant if you can.” For her part, Smith sought to use the incident as a teaching moment. She alerted the folks at Z1077 and tried to point out how serious being gluten-free is for many people. Mary Michaels, owner of Gluten Free at Last Bakery in Maryville, Illinois, says it’s time people became more respectful. “I wouldn’t make fun of you if you had diabetes or a heart condition it’s kind of like that,” Michals said. We will likely never know if the radio station caller was telling the truth, or just putting listeners on. The Z1077 morning team did post a follow-up comment, which stated that they take celiac disease seriously, and that they did not intend to offend anyone. One host said his mom has celiac disease. It’s good to see a positive response from the radio station. Their prank was short-sighted, and the caller deserved to be called out on her poor behavior. Hopefully, they have learned their lesson and will avoid such foolishness in the future. Let us know your thoughts below.
  14. Celiac.com 10/15/2018 - If you’re on a gluten-free diet for medical reasons, then you’re probably already cautious about eating out. A new study tells us exactly why people with celiac disease and other gluten-sensitive conditions have reason to be very careful about eating out. According to the latest research, one in three foods sold as "gluten-free" in U.S. restaurants actually contain trace levels of gluten. This is partly due to the fact that the gluten-free diet has become popular with many non-celiacs and others who have no medical need for the diet. That has led many restaurants to offer gluten-free foods to their customers, says study author Dr. Benjamin Lebwohl, of Columbia University's Celiac Disease Center. But, if this research is any indication, too many restaurants don’t do a good job with gluten-free. For the study, more than 800 investigators set out to assess the true gluten content of dishes listed as "gluten-free" on menus. Armed with portable gluten sensors, they tested for gluten levels that met or exceeded 20 parts per million, the standard cutoff for any gluten-free claim. Based on more than 5,600 gluten tests over 18 months, the investigators determined that 27 percent of gluten-free breakfast meals actually contained gluten. At dinner time, this figure hit 34 percent. The rise could reflect a steady increase in gluten contamination risk as the day unfolds, the researchers said. Off course, the risk is not all equal. Some restaurants are riskier than others. Unsurprisingly, the biggest culprit seems to be restaurants that offer gluten-free pastas and pizzas. Nearly half of the pizza and pasta dishes from those establishments contained gluten, according to the study. Why is that? Well, as most folks with celiac disease know all too well, kitchens aren’t really set up to segregate gluten, and "sharing an oven with gluten-containing pizza is a prime setting for cross-contamination," says Lebwohl. Also, too many restaurants use the same water to cook gluten-free pasta as they do for regular pasta, which contaminates the gluten-free pasta and defeats the purpose. Moreover, although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates gluten-free labels on packaged food products, there is currently no federal oversight of gluten-free claims in restaurants. The results of the study will be presented today at a meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, in Philadelphia. Research presented at meetings is usually considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. In the absence of federal enforcement at the restaurant level, the burden for making sure food is gluten-free falls to the person doing the ordering. So, gluten-free eaters beware! These results are probably not surprising to many of you. Do you have celiac disease? Do you eat in restaurants? Do you avoid restaurants? Do you have special tactics? Feel free to share your thoughts below. Read more at UPI.com
  15. Celiac.com 10/22/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to determine if there is any association between prenatal gluten exposure and offspring risk of type 1 diabetes in humans. The research team first designed a national prospective cohort study using the national health information registries in Denmark. They looked at data on pregnant Danish women enrolled into the Danish National Birth Cohort, between January 1996 and October 2002, and assessed maternal gluten intake, based on maternal consumption of gluten containing foods, as reported in a 360 item food frequency questionnaire at week 25 of pregnancy. The team gathered information on type 1 diabetes occurrence in the participants’ children, from 1 January 1996 to 31 May 2016 by linking to the Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes. Overall, their study included data on 101,042 pregnancies in 91,745 women, of whom 70,188 filled out the food frequency questionnaire. Once they corrected the figures to account for multiple pregnancies, pregnancies ending in abortions, stillbirths, lack of information regarding the pregnancy, and pregnancies with implausibly high or low energy intake, they included 67,565 pregnancies and 63,529 women. Gluten intake averaged 13.0 grams per day, ranging from under 7 grams per day to more than 20 grams per day. There were 247 children with type 1 diabetes among the group, for an incidence rate of 0.37%, with an average follow-up of 15.6 years. Risk of type 1 diabetes in offspring increased proportionally with maternal gluten intake during pregnancy per 10 grams per day increase of gluten. Compared to women with the lowest gluten intake of under 7 grams per day, those with the highest gluten intake who consumed 20 or more grams a day had double the risk for type 1 diabetes development in their children. These numbers indicate that high gluten intake by mothers during pregnancy may increase the risk of their children developing type 1 diabetes. However, the team is calling for further study to confirm the findings, preferably in an intervention setting. Read more in BMJ 2018;362:k3547. doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.k3547 The research team included Julie C Antvorskov, assistant professor, Thorhallur I Halldorsson, professor in food science and nutrition, Knud Josefsen, senior researcher, Jannet Svensson, associate professor5, Charlotta Granström, statistician, Bart O Roep, professor, Trine H Olesen, research assistant, Laufey Hrolfsdottir, director, Karsten Buschard, professor, and Sjudur F Olsen, adjunct professor of nutrition. They are variously affiliated with the Bartholin Institute, Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Centre for Foetal Programming, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark; the Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; the Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; the Copenhagen Diabetes Research Center (CPH-DIRECT), Department of Children and Adolescents, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev, Denmark; the Department of Diabetes Immunology, Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute at the Beckman Diabetes Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA, USA; the Departments of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, Netherlands; the Department of Education, Science, and Quality, Akureyri Hospital, Akureyri, Iceland; and the Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
  16. Celiac.com 06/13/2012 - In general, doctors and researchers know a good deal about how celiac disease works, and they are finding out more all the time. However, they know very little about non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). In an effort to learn more about non-celiac gluten sensitivity, a team of researchers recently carried out a study to measure the presence of somatization, personality traits, anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life in NCGS individuals, and to compare the results with celiac disease patients and healthy control subjects. They also compared the response to gluten challenge between patients with non-celiac gluten sensitivity and those with celiac disease. The research team included M. Brottveit, P.O. Vandvik, S. Wojniusz, A. Løvik, K.E. Lundin, and B. Boye, of the Department of Gastroenterology at Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål in Oslo, Norway. In all, the team looked at 22 patients with celiac disease and 31 HLA-DQ2+ NCGS patients without celiac disease. All patients were following a gluten-free diet. Over a three day period, the team challenged 17 of the celiac disease patients with orally ingested gluten. They then recorded the symptoms reported by those patients. They did the same with a group of 40 healthy control subjects. The team then had both patients and healthy control subjects complete questionnaires regarding anxiety, depression, neuroticism and lie, hostility and aggression, alexithymia and health locus of control, physical complaints, and health-related quality of life. Interestingly, patients with non-celiac gluten sensitivity reported more abdominal (p = 0.01) and non-abdominal (p < 0.01) symptoms after the gluten challenge than patients with celiac disease. The increase in symptoms in non-celiac gluten sensitivity patients was not related to personality. However, the two groups both reported similar responses regarding personality traits, level of somatization, quality of life, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Responses for both groups were about the same as for healthy controls. The results showed that patients with non-celiac gluten sensitivity did not show any tendencies toward general somatization, as both celiac disease patients and those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity showed low somatization levels. Source: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Apr 23.
  17. Celiac.com 10/11/2018 - Halloween is upon us once again, and that means it’s time for Celiac.com’s Safe Gluten-Free Halloween Candy list for 2018. This year, we’ve added candies to both the SAFE Gluten-Free Halloween Candy list, and to our UNSAFE Non-Gluten-Free Halloween Candy list. We’ve also added more manufacturer contact information to make getting answers to gluten-free questions easier. Taken together, we think it’s the best, most comprehensive and most up-to-date list of safe, gluten-free Halloween candies, and other candies to watch out for. Below our SAFE, GLUTEN-FREE Halloween candy list, you will find a list of UNSAFE, NON–GLUTEN–FREE candies, along with a partial list of major candy makers, links to their company websites, and other resources. As always, Celiac.com strives to make the Safe Gluten-Free Halloween Candy List as comprehensive as possible, please keep in mind that the list is by no means complete, or definitive, and should only be used as a guideline. Before eating any candy on the list, always read labels, check manufacturer information, and choose according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children. Feel free to comment below if you see any issues, or if you'd like us to take note of any information you may have about a product. Lastly, manufacturer information can change. That means that a product this is safely gluten-free at one point may suddenly be made with gluten ingredients. The opposite is also true, as many manufacturers are doing what they can to make products gluten-free when possible. That means it’s important to read labels, and check manufacturer websites for information on changes to any specific products. As always, Celiac.com wishes you and your loved ones a safe and happy gluten-free Halloween 2018! Gluten-Free Halloween Candy 2018: 3 Musketeers fun size 3 Musketeers Mint with dark chocolate A Act II Popcorn Balls Adams & Brooks Fun Pops Scooby Doo Ingredients free of: peanuts, tree nuts, egg, milk, wheat/gluten, soy Albert's Gummy Eyeballs Albert's Iced Halloween pops (lollipops) Alien Pop, Baseball Pop, Basketball Pop, Boo Pop, Carousel Pop, ColorBlaster Pop, Football Pop, Happy Heart Pop, Hoppin' Pop, Lickin' Lips Pop, Lolliday Pop, Lollinotes, Pop—A—Bear, Soccer Pop, Alien Glow Pop, Buggin' Glow Pop, Burstin Bits, and Ghostly Glow Pop Almond Joy — All Except ALMOND JOY PIECES Candy Almond Joy fun size bars Altoids (except for Altoids Smalls Peppermint) Amanda's Own Confections Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops Annie's Organic Bunny Fruit snacks Andes mints and candies Alter Eco Dark Twist Chocolate Bar Alter Eco Dark Truffle with Mint Filling Alter Eco Organic Salted Caramel Chocolate Truffle Alter Eco Organic Sea Salt Chocolate Truffle Alter Eco Salted Burnt Caramel Chocolate Bar Amella Agave Caramels Amella Carmel Bar with Roasted Almonds Amella Chocolate Fudge Caramels Amella Gingerbread Caramels Amella Gray Sea Salt, Milk Caramel Amella Gray Sea Salt, Dark Caramel Amella Naked Honey Gray Sea Salt Caramels Amella Naked Honey Salted Chocolate Caramels Amella Naked Honey Lavender Caramels Amella Naked Honey Vanilla Caramels Amella Naked Candy Cane Amella Peppermint Caramels Amella Roasted Almond Caramels Amella Siracha Original Spicy Caramels Amella Vegan Sea Salt Caramels Amella  Walnut Fudge Caramels Angell Crisp Candy Bar Dark Angell Candy Bar Snow Angell Candy Bar Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead B Baby Ruth original and fun size Barrels of Candy Bazooka Big Mix (includes bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops) Bazooka Ring Pops Bazooka Push Pops Bazooka Baby Bottle Pops Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot Wicked Webs Berry Wave mini feet Betty Crocker Halloween fruit flavored snacks, including Fruit Gushers, Fruit Roll–ups, and Mini Rolls Bit•O•Honey Big Blow bubblegum Black Forest Gummy Tarantulas Black Forest Gummy Fun Bugs Juicy Oozers Black Forest Organic Berry Medley Organic Fruit Snacks Black Forest Organic Caramel Hard Candy Black Forest Organic Fruit Chews Black Forest Organic Gummy Bears Black Forest Organic Gummy Cherries Black Forest Organic Gummy Cola Black Forest Organic Gummy Exotic Fruits Black Forest Organic Gummy Soda Black Forest Organic Gummy Tea Black Forest Organic Gummy Worms Black Forest Organic Halloween Mix Black Forest Organic Lollipops Black Forest Organic Mixed Fruit Hard Candy Black Forest Organic Sour Heads Little Monsters Black Forest Organic Sour Watermelon Black Forest Organic Sour Heads Brookside Dark Chocolate Acai and Blueberry Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Blood Orange and Peach Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Chardonnay Grape and Peach Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Covered Almonds Brookside Dark Chocolate Covered Blueberries Brookside Dark Chocolate Covered Cranberries Brookside Dark Chocolate Fruit & Nut Bar Blueberry with Açai Flavor and Other Natural Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Fruit & Nut Bar Cherry with Pomegranate Flavor and Other Natural Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Fruit & Nut Bar Cranberry with Blackberry Flavor and Other Natural Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Goji and Raspberry Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Mango and Mangosteen Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Merlot Grape and Black Current Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Pomegranate Flavor Brookside Milk Chocolate Covered Almonds Bubbly lollipop and gum Buckleberry Foods Chocolate Almond Butter Cups Buckleberry Foods Chocolate Mint Truffles Butterfinger bar, original and fun size C Cadbury Adams Swedish Fish Cadbury Adams Sour Patch Kids and Sour Patch Extreme Candy Checkers (made for Target) Caramel Apple Pops (made by Tootsie Roll) Carmit Caramel clusters Carmit Gold Coins Carmit Raisin Clusters Cary's Of Oregon Coconut Toffee Bites Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Almond Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Coconut Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Espresso Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Hazelnut Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Coconut Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Vanilla Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Chai Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Toffee Bites Cella's Milk Chocolate Covered Cherries Cella's Dark Chocolate Covered Cherries Charleston Chew original and fun size Charms Blow Pops and Blow Pop Minis—may contain milk or soy Charms Pops Charms Squares Charms Sour Balls Charms Super Blow Pops Charms Candy Carnival Package—Blow Pops, Sugar Babies, Zip a Dee mini pops, Sugar Daddy, Pops, Sugar Mama Caramel, Tear Jerkers sour bubble gum, Blow Pop Bubble Gum—may contain milk or soy Charms Fluffy Stuff Spider Web cotton candy Cherryhead Chewy Atomic Fireballs Chewy Lemonheads and Friends Child's Play Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Coconut and Almond Snaps Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Hazelnut Butter Cups Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Salted Peanut Snaps Chocxo 70% Dark Chocolate Hazelnut Butter Cups Chocxo 70% Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Chocxo Double Dark Hazelnut Quinoa Cup Chupa Chups Fruit Lollipops Circus Peanuts by Spangler Cliff—Fruit Rope, all flavors "gluten-free" Coastal Bay Confections Candy Corn, Mellocreme Pumpkins, Autumn Mix Colombina Scary Eyeballs bubblegum Colombina Fizzy Pops Comix Mix Candy Sticks—Tom and Jerry, Flintstones, Scooby Doo, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Popeye Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts Crispy Cat Mint Coconut Candy Bar Crispy Cat Toasted Almond Candy Bar Crispy Cat Chocolate Marshmallow Candy Bar Crows CVS Brand Candy Bracelet with Pendant D Dagoba Products—All Daggoba Chocolate products are gluten-free Disney Halloween Candy Mix—jelly beans, gummies, candy bracelets and characters from Cars, Tinkerbell and Toy Story Dots Gumdrops—including Candy Corn Dots, Ghost Dots, and Bat Dots Dove pieces—Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate, Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate, Caramel Milk Chocolate Dream Almond Dark Chocolate Bar Dream Creamysweet Chocolate Bar Dream Pure Dark Dark Chocolate Bar Dream Raspberry Dark Chocolate Bar Dream Rice Crunch Chocolate Bar Dubble Bubble bubblegum Dum Dum Chewy Pops Dum Dum Lollipops (including Shrek Pops) E Enstrom Cappucino-Tiremisu Truffle Enstrom Cinnamon Truffle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Almond Belle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Almond Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Almond Toffee Petites Enstrom Dark Chocolate Butter Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Denver Mint Enstrom Dark Chocolate Espresso Belle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Espresso Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Peanut Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Peppermint Belle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Toffee Crumbs Enstrom Limoncello Truffle Enstrom Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee Petites Enstrom Milk Chocolate Butter Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Denver Mint Enstrom Milk Chocolate Espresso Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Mint Melt away Enstrom Milk Chocolate Peanut Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Toffee Belle Enstrom Milk Chocolate Toffee Crumbs Enstrom Mint Melt away Truffle Enstrom Mixed Almond Toffee Petites Enstrom Peppermint Cookie Belle Enstrom Peppermint Truffle Enstrom Pumpkin Pie Spice Truffle Enstrom Sugar Free Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee F Farley's Kiddie Mix — Smarties, SweetTarts, Now and Later, Jaw Breakers, Super Bubble and Lolli—pops Ferrara Pan Caramels Ferrara Pan Lemonhead & Friends candy mix—including Applehead, Cherryhead, Grapehead, Chewy Lemonhead & Friends, Chewy Atomic Fireball, and Red Hots FLIX Spooky Lip Pops Lollipops, Angry Birds Lollipops, Gummy Boo Bands, Monsters, Inc. Character Candies, Lollipops and Marshmallow Eyeballs Florida's Natural Healthy Treats Nuggets, Sour String, Fruit Stiks Fright Fingers Popcorn Kit Frankford's Bugs Gummy Candy Frankford's Gummy Body Parts Frankford's Marshmallow Pals Frooties Fun Dip Fun Dip Sour G Game Night boxes of candy game pieces (includes Operation, Sorry!, Monopoly, Life, and Clue) Gimbal's Fine Candies Jelly Beans, Sour Lovers, Cherry Lovers, Cinnamon Lovers, Licorice Scotties Goldenberg's peanut chews Go Max Go Buccaneer Candy Bar Go Max Go Cleo's Candy Bar Go Max Go Mahalo Candy Bar Go Max Go Snap! Candy Bar Go Max Go Thumbs Up Candy Bar Go Max Go Twilight Candy Bar Goobers Go Picnic Sea Salt Caramel Lollipops Go Picnic Orbites Dark Chocolate and Tangerine Grave Gummies (Yummy Gummies) Greenbriar Skull and Bones Fruit Hard Candy, Spooky Lollipop Rings, Grave Gummies Gummy Brush Paint Shop Gummy Pirate Choppers H Harrison's Original Fruit Slices Harrison's Original Fruit Smiles Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar and snack size — contains almonds Hershey's Air Delight Hershey’s - Baking Bars Hershey’s Semi Sweet Baking Bar Hershey’s Unsweetened Baking Bar Hershey’s and Reese's - Baking Chips Hershey’s Butterscotch Chips Hershey’s Cinnamon Baking Chips Mini Kisses Milk Chocolates Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Chips Hershey’s Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Chips Hershey’s Mint Chocolate Chips Hershey’s Premier White Chips Hershey’s Semi-Sweet Chocolate Baking Chips Hershey’s Special Dark Mildly Sweet Dark Chocolate Chips Hershey’s Sugar Free Semi-Sweet Baking Chips Reese’s Peanut Butter Baking Chips Hershey’s - Cocoa Hershey’s Cocoa Hershey’s Special Dark Cocoa Hershey’s Kisses Hershey’s Hugs Candy Hershey’s Kisses Milk Chocolate Filled with Caramel Hershey’s Kisses Milk Chocolate Filled with Cherry Cordial Crème Hershey’s Kisses Filled with Vanilla Crème Hershey’s Kisses Dark Chocolate Filled with Mint Truffle Hershey’s Kisses Pumpkin Spice Flavored Candies Hershey’s Kisses Carrot Cake Flavores Candies Hershey’s Kisses Meltaway Milk Chocolates Hershey’s Kisses Milk Chocolate Hershey’s Kisses Special Dark Mildly Sweet Chocolate Hershey’s Kisses Deluxe Chocolates Hershey’s Nuggets Hershey’s Nuggets Milk Chocolates Hershey’s Nuggets Milk Chocolate with Almonds Hershey’s Nuggets Special Dark Chocolate with Almonds Hershey’s Nuggets Extra Creamy Milk Chocolate with Toffee and Almonds Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Bar (1.55oz only) Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Bar with Almonds (1.45oz only) Hershey’s Milk Duds – All Hershey’s Spreads – All Except Hershey’s Chocolate Spread with Snacksters Graham Dippers Hershey’s and Reese's Toppings Hot Tamales Hot Tamales Spray Hubba Bubba Gum Humphrey Popcorn Balls I Ice Cream Dipper (Blue Raspberry, Strawberry) J Jelly Belly beans—gluten–free, dairy–free Jolly Rancher hard candy and Doubles Candy Jolly Rancher Hard Candy Stix, Lollipops and Fruit Chews Jujy’s Junior Caramels Junior Mints Just Born Jelly Beans Just Born marshmallow treats Justin's Nut Butters dark chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters milk chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters white chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters mini dark chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters mini milk chocolate peanut butter cups K KatySweet Chocolate Dipped Strawberries KatySweet Pecan Fudge KatySweet Plain Fudge KatySweet Raspberry Lemon Almond Bark KatySweet Walnut Fudge Kellogg's Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks Kenny's Green Apple Rings Kenny's Gummi Bears Kenny's Peach Rings Kenny's Sour Gummi Bears Kenny's Sour Gummi Worms Kenny's Sour Neon Gummi Worms Kenny's Watermelon Rings Kinder Surprise Eggs Kraft Caramels Kraft Jet–Puffed Boo Mallows and Ghost Mallows Kraft Swedish Fish Kraft Sour Patch Kids and Sour Patch Extreme L Laffy Taffy Plain, Stretchy & Tangy and Rope Lemonheads Lemonheads & Friends Conversation Hearts Tropical Chewy Lemonhead Chewy Lemonhead & Friends Berry Chewy Lemonhead Lifesavers LifeSavers Gummies including Big Ring Gummies, Sweet 'n' Sour, and Scary Assortment Lily's Sweets 40% Original Creamy Milk Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 40% Salted Almond Creamy Milk Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Almond Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Coconut Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Crispy Rice Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Dark Chocolate Bar with Cinnamon Lily's Sweets 55% Original Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Original Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Blood Orange Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Candy Cane Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Chipotle Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Sea Salt Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets Creamy Milk and Hazelnut Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets Milk and Gingerbread Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets Original Double Chocolate Crunch Bar Lily's Sweets Sour Cherry Double Chocolate Crunch Bar Lollipop Paint Shop Lovely Bananas Foster Lovely Black Licorice Lovely Caramel Apple Lovely Cashmels Lovely Chocolate Peppermint Lovely Chocolate Cherry Lovely Chewy Original Caramels Lovely Chocolate Swirl Caramels Lovely Fudgee Roll Lovely Fudgee Roll Raspberry Lovely Fruit Chews Lovely Halloween Cherry Licorice Lovely Halloween Juicy Chew Lovely Hula Chew Lovely Juicy Chew Original Lovely Juicy Chew Tropical Lovely Pumpkin Spice Lovely Salted Caramel Lovely Super fruit Chews M M&M's—original, peanut, peanut butter Manischewitz Fruit Slices Mars M&M's—except pretzel M&M's Mars Dove chocolate products (all flavors EXCEPT for milk chocolate cinnamon graham/cookies and cream, and some holiday varieties, such as milk chocolate truffles) Mars Munch Nut bar Mars Snickers, Snickers Dark bars, fun size and mini's—may contain almonds Mary Janes Mallo Cup Marvel Heroes Candy Sticks (Hulk, Spiderman, Wolverine) Mega Warheads Melster Chocolate Covered Marshmallow Melster Peanut Butter Kisses Melster Compound-Coated Marshmallow Melster Chocolate-Covered Creme Drops Melster Compound Coated Creme Drops Melster Salt Water Taffy Melster Peanut Butter Kisses Melster Circus Peanuts Melster Sanded Marshmallow Melster Coconut Toasties Milk Duds Milky Way Midnight Bar (not the original Milky Way Bar) Milky Way Caramel Bar Mike and Ike Mike and Ike Spray Mini Mentos Mini Sour Dudes Straws Monstaz Pops (jack–o–lantern lollipops) Monster Hunt plastic monster eggs filled with candy bones, skulls and pumpkins (made for Target) Mounds Bars – All Mounds dark chocolate fun size bars N Necco's Sky Bar 4 in 1 chocolate bar Necco Wafers Necco Mary Janes Necco Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses—does contain peanuts Necco Sweethearts Conversation Hearts (available for Valentine's Day only) Necco Canada Mint & Wintergreen Lozenges Necco Haviland Thin Mints and Candy Stix Necco Clark Bars Necco Skybars Necco Haviland Peppermint & Wintergreen Patties Necco Candy Eggs Necco Talking Pumpkins (available at Halloween only) Necco Squirrel Nut Caramels and Squirrel Nut Zippers Necco Banana Split and Mint Julep Chews Necco Ultramints Nestle Milk Chocolate fun size bars Nestle Baby Ruth Nestle Bit–O–Honey Nestle Butterfinger (NOT Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx) Nestle Goobers—does contain peanuts Nestle Nips (both regular and sugar–free) Nestle Oh Henry! Nestle Raisinets—made on equipment that processes peanuts Nestle Sno–Caps Nestle Toll House morsels and chunks (only if labeled gluten-free) Nestle Wonka Pixy Stix Nestle Wonka Laffy Taffy Nestle Wonka Lik–M–Aid Fun Dip Nestle Wonka Spree Nik—L—Nip wax bottles with juice Now and Later O Oh Henry! Operation Gummy Candy P Palmer Peanut Butter Cups—does contain peanuts Payday Candy – All Peanut M&M's Pearson's Bun candy—maple and roasted peanuts Pearson's Mint Patties, Pearson's Nut Goodies Pearson's Salted Nut Rolls Peeps Jack–O–Lanterns, Marshmallow Pumpkins, Marshmallow Ghosts, Marshmallow Tombstones, Chocolate Mousse Cats, Milk Chocolate Covered Pumpkins, Dark Chocolate Covered Pumpkins, and Milk Chocolate Dipped Orange Chicks—"Gluten Free" Pez candy—All PEZ products are "Gluten Free" Pop Rocks Popcorn Expressions Kettle Corn Snack Bags Pixie Stix Pure Fun Halloween Pure Pops R Rain Blo Bubble Gum Eyes of Terror Raisinets Razzles candy gum Red Bird Assorted Puffs Red Bird Dark Chocolate Peppermint Mini Red Bird Cinnamon Puffs Red Bird Cinnamon Sticks Red Bird Citrus Puffs Red Bird Cream Penny Sticks Red Bird Lemon minis Red Bird Lemon Sticks Red Bird Peppermint Puffs Red Bird Peppermint Sticks Red Hots Reese's Fast Break candy bars and snack size Reese’s Nutrageous Bar Reese's Peanut Butter Cups snack size and miniatures—Except Reese's Peanut Butter Cup Unwrapped Minis and Seasonal Shaped Items Reese's Pieces Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups – All Except Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup Unwrapped Minis and Seasonal Shaped Items Reese’s Pieces Candy - All Except Reese’s Pieces Eggs Reese’s Spreads – All Except Reese’s Spreads with Snacksters Graham Dippers Reese's Select Peanut Butter Cremes Reese's Select Clusters Reese's Whipps Riviera Spooky Candy Rings Rolo Caramels in Milk Chocolate Candies – All Except Rolo Minis Rolo chocolate covered caramels—Except ROLO Minis Russell Stover Salt Water Taffy Russell Stover Candy Corn Taffy Russell Stover Caramel Apple Taffy S Scharffen Berger Products – All Except Scharffen Berger Cocoa Powder Sidewalk Chalk Sixlets Skeleton Pops (lollipops) Skittles includes Original, Sour, Wild Berry, Fizzl'd Fruits, and Crazy Core, including fun—size Smarties—(the small pastel–colored candies sold in rolls and made by Ce De). Also Candy Money, Candy Necklace, Easter Smarties, Giant Smarties, Giant Smarties Pops, Love Hearts, Mega Smarties, Smarties in a Pouch, Tropical Smarties, Smarties Double Lollies, Smarties Mega Lollies, Smarties Parties, Smarties Pops, and X—TREME Sour Smarties. Manufacturer states: These products contains NO: gluten, milk, egg, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, or soy. (US only, NOT gluten-free in Canada). Skor Toffee Bars - All Snickers Bars (all flavors) Snickers Fudge bar Sno—Caps Sno—Cone Soda Pop So Delicious Dairy Free Coconut Milk Candy Corn So Delicious Dairy Free Coconut Milk Peppermint Star Sour Patch Spooky Candy Rings (eyeballs, Frankenstein heads and other shapes on rings) Starburst Fruit Chews and fun—size Starburst Gummibursts and Sour Gummibursts Stonyfield Organic Mixed Berry Fruit Snacks Stonyfield Organic Strawberry Fruit Snacks Sugar Babies Sugar Daddy Caramel Pops Sugar Mama Caramels Super Bubble bubble gum Surf Sweets Gummy Worms Surf Sweets Gummy Swirls Surf Sweets Gummy Bears Surf SweetsFruity Bears Surf Sweets Jelly Beans Surf Sweets Sour Worms Surf Sweets Sour Berry Bears Swedish Fish Sweet's All American Mint Taffy Sweet's Apple Fruit Sours Sweet's Banana Taffy Sweet's Black Licorice Taffy Sweet's Blue Raspberry Taffy Sweet's Bubble Gum Taffy Sweet's Buttered Popcorn Taffy Sweet's Candy Cane Taffy Sweet's Candy Corn Sweet's Candy Corn Taffy Sweet's Caramel Apple Taffy Sweet's Caramel Taffy Sweet's Cherry Cola Taffy Sweet's Cherry Fruit Sours Sweet's Cherry Hearts Sweet's Cherry Taffy Sweet's Chocolate Bridge Mix Sweet's Chocolate Cinnamon Bears Sweet's Chocolate Hazelnut taffy Sweet's Chocolate Peanut Clusters Sweet's Chocolate Peanuts Sweet's Chocolate Raisins Sweet's Chocolate Taffy Sweet's Chocolate Wonder Mints Sweet's Cinnamon Bears Sweet's Cinnamon Bunnies Sweet's Cinnamon Hearts Sweet's Cinnamon Lips Sweet's Cinnamon Santa's Sweet's Cinnamon Squares Sweet's Cinnamon Taffy Sweet's Cookie Dough Taffy Sweet's Cotton Candy Taffy Sweet's Egg Nog Taffy Sweet's Fish Sweet's Fruit Slices Sweet's Fruit Sours Sweet's Grape Fruit Sours Sweet's Guava Taffy Sweet's Gum Drops Sweet's Holiday Trees Sweet's Honey Taffy Sweet's Hot Shots Sweet's Huckleberry Taffy Sweet's Jelly Beans Sweet's Jelly Beans Sweet's Key Lime Taffy Sweet's Key lime Taffy Sweet's Lemon Fruit Sours Sweet's Marshmallow Bears Sweet's Natural Fish Sweet's Natural Lemonade rings Sweet's Natural Nummy Bears Sweet's Natural Sour Worms Sweet's Neapolitan Taffy Sweet's Orange Dark chocolate Jewels Sweet's Orange Milk chocolate Jewels Sweet's Orange Slices Sweet's Orange Slices Sweet's Orange Sticks Sweet's Orange/Vanilla Taffy Sweet's Peach Taffy Sweet's Peanut Clusters (available in both milk and dark chocolate) Sweet's Peppermint Taffy Sweet's Pink Grapefruit Sours Sweet's Raspberry Dark Chocolate Jewels Sweet's Raspberry Milk Chocolate Jewels Sweet's Raspberry Sticks Sweet's Raspberry Taffy Sweet's Red and Green fruit Sours Sweet's Red Licorice Taffy Sweet's Root Beer Taffy Sweet's Rum Taffy Sweet's S'more's Taffy Sweet's Scandinavian Swimmers Sweet's Sour Bunnies Sweet's Sour Stars Sweet's Sour Stars Sweet's Strawberry and Banana Taffy Sweet's Strawberry and Crème Taffy Sweet's Strawberry Taffy Sweet's Sugar free Cinnamon Bear cubbies Sweet's Sweet's Candy Pebbles Sweet's Vanilla Taffy Sweet's Watermelon Taffy Sweet's Wild berry Taffy Sweet's Wonder mints Sweethearts conversation hearts Forbidden Fruits (candy packaging of The Twilight Saga, New Moon the movie) Sweet's Candy Corn Taffy T Tasty Brand Fruit Gummies- Citrus Splash Tasty Brand Fruit Gummies- Smoothie Tasty Brand Fruit Gummies- Super fruit Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Citrus Splash Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Mixed Fruit Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Scary Berry Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Smoothie Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Spooky Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Super fruit Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Wild Berry Tic Tacs Tootsie Caramel Apple Pops Tootsie Pops—original and mini Tootsie Fruit Rolls Tootsie Peppermint Pops Tootsie Rolls Tropical Dots Tootsie Rolls Midgies and snack bars Topps — Baby Bottle Pop, Ring Pops, Push Pops, Ring Pop Gummies, Bazooka Gum, Bazooka Gum Nuggets Trader Joe's Citrus Gum Drops Trader Joe's Mango Taffy Trader Joe's Sour Gummies Transformers Candy Mix—gummy shields, fruit chews, candy shields, gum rocks Tropical Stormz Pops TruJoy Fruit Chews TruJoy Organic Choco Chews TruSweet Jelly Beans TruSweet Gummy Bears TruSweet Fruity Hearts TruSweet Fruity Bears TruSweet Gummy Worms TruSweet Sour Worms TruSweet Sour Berry Bears TruSweet Watermelon Rings TruSweet Peach Rings TruSweet Spring Mix Jelly Beans TruSweet Spooky Spiders TruSweet Organic Fruity Bears TruSweet Organic Fruity Hearts TruSweet Organic Jelly Beans TruSweet Organic Peach Rings TruSweet Organic Watermelon Rings Twist and Glow, Twist and Glow Heart, Twist and Glow Pumpkin Two Moms in the Raw Gluten Free Almond Butter Cacao Truffles Two Moms in the Raw Almond Butter Cayenne Truffles Two Moms in the Raw Almond Butter Green Tea Vanilla Truffles U Unreal Halloween Treats Unreal Dark Chocolate Almond Butter Cups Unreal Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Unreal Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups with Coconut Unreal Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups with Crispy Quinoa Unreal Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Unreal Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups with Crispy Quinoa V Vosges Haut Chocolate Bacon Dark Chocolate Bar Vosges Haut Chocolate Coconut & Cherry Caramel Bar Vosges Haut Chocolate Crispy Carrot Bar W Warheads Extreme Sour hard candy and Sour QBZ chewy cubes Warheads Sour Chewy Cubes Warheads Super Sour Spray, Sour Dippers, Double Drops Welches Fruit Snacks—All flavors Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter Banana Cup Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter and Cherry Cup Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter and Toasted Coconut Cup Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter and Smoked Salt Cup Wonka Bottlecaps Wonka Chocolate Laffy Taffy Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans Wonka Giant Pixy Stix Wonka Gobstopper Everlasting Wonka Gobstopper Chewy Wonka Fruit Tart Chews Wonka Fun Dip and Fun Dip Sour Wonka Laffy Taffy Ropes Wonka Mix–Ups Wonka Monster Mix–Ups—SweetTarts Skulls and Bones, Spooky Nerds, Howlin' Laffy Taffy Wonka Nerds—carry a cross contamination warning on the Spooky Nerds orange and fruit punch flavors Wonka Pixy Stix Wrigley's Gum Wrigley’s Creme Savers X X–scream Mouth Morphers Fruit Gushers Y York Peppermint Patties - All Except York Pieces Candy, York Minis, and York Shapes (5 oz.)s YumEarth Organic Fruit Snacks YumEarth Gummy Fruits Z Zed Candy Skulls and Bones Zip-A-Dee-Mini Pops With all these selections, finding some good, gluten–free candy should be a snap. As always, be sure to read labels, as some ingredients can vary. **WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN OR MAY CONTAIN GLUTEN: AIRHEADS Packaging states that Airheads are: "Manufactured in a facility that processes wheat flour." Airheads.com FAQs state that: "Airheads do not contain gluten; however, they are processed in a facility that uses wheat flour, so the company does not guarantee that Airheads are gluten-free. Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flour ALTOIDS Contain gluten as wheat maltodextrin ANNABELLE'S Abba Zabba—contains: peanuts, soybean oil and soy lecithin, wheat/gluten Big Hunk—Package statement: "made in a facility that uses milk, egg, tree nuts, wheat and peanuts" Look—Contains: milk, peanuts, soy lecithin, eggs, wheat/gluten Rocky Road, Rocky Road Mint, Rocky Road Dark—Contain wheat/gluten Uno—Contains: milk, almonds, soy lecithin, wheat/gluten AMERICAN LICORICE CO. Sour Punch Sticks, Twists, Bits, Bites, Straws—contains wheat/gluten Red Vines—all varieties and flavors contain wheat/gluten BEE INTERNATIONAL Zombee Bloody Bites (glow in the dark plastic fangs with oozing candy blood bags) Zombee Candy Corn (in a tall tube with plastic pumpkin lid) Package statement: "Made in a facility that also processes milk, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts." BRACH'S All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten–free! Please be careful, as I have seen Brach's candies included on gluten-free safe lists! Brach's Candy Corn, Brach's Jelly Bean Nougats, and Brach's Halloween Mellowcremes ARE all processed in a facility that processes wheat. CADBURY ADAMS Sour Patch Xploderz CHUCKLES Chuckles Ju Jubes CVS Candy Corn, Autumn Mix, Candy Pumpkins Ingredients free of: wheat/gluten, milk, tree nuts, peanuts Package statement: "This product was packaged in a facility where other products containing peanuts, tree nuts, milk, wheat, soy and egg are also packaged." DOVE CHOCOLATE Milk chocolate cinnamon graham/cookies and cream, and some holiday varieties, such as milk chocolate truffles FARLEY'S AND SATHERS Harvest Mix and Candy Corn—This product is made by Brach's. All Brach's candies are considered to contain gluten. See Brach's listings. Heide candies—Jujyfruits, Jujubes, Red Raspberry Dollars, Red Hot Dollars Wild Cherry, Heide Gummi Bears Super Bubble and Super Bubble Blast Trolli Gummi Bears, Trolli Sour Brite (Frite) Crawlers "Packaged on equipment that packages products containing traces of milk, wheat, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and/or soy protein." FERRERO Ferrero Rocher Chocolates FLIX Bag of Boogers Gummies — "Manufactured in a facility that processes gluten (wheat), milk, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and soy." FRANKFORD Frankford Fun Size Mix (Peanut Butter, Caramel and Crispy Chocolate Covered Candies) Crispy Candies SpongeBob Gummy Krabby Patties GOETZE Goetze's Caramel Creams, Cow Tales—Contain wheat flour, milk, and soy HARIBO Bears (the package now says: Dextrose - wheat or corn) Black Licorice Wheels Brixx Clark Bars Fruity Pasta Konfekt and Pontefract Cakes Red Licorice Wheels Sour S'ghetti HERSHEY Hershey Snack Sized Bars — ALL Kit Kat—contains wheat Mr. Goodbar Reese's Minis Reese's Peanut Butter Pumpkins Reese's Seasonal Rolo Minis Twizzlers—contains wheat Whoppers—contains barley malt and wheat flour Hershey's Bliss (Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Milk Chocolate with Meltaway Center, White Chocolate with Meltaway Center, Milk Chocolate with Raspberry Meltaway Center, Dark Chocolate)—No gluten ingredients, but not on Hershey's official gluten-free list. Hershey's Special Dark Bar (note that this is confusing, since several other Special Dark products are considered gluten-free, so make sure you know what you're buying) Hershey's Cookies 'N' Creme Bar Hershey's Milk Chocolate Drops Hershey's Miniatures (any flavor, including flavors that are considered gluten-free in larger sizes) Mr. Goodbar Symphony Bar Hershey's Extra Dark Chocolate Hershey's Kisses that do not appear on the gluten-free list above Hershey's Good & Plenty Hershey's Mr. Goodbar fun size Hershey's Twizzlers, Flavored Twists IMPACT CONFECTIONS Warheads Sour Twists—contain wheat/gluten, milk Warheads Sour Jelly Beans—made in facility shared with wheat, peanuts, milk, egg and soy Warheads Sour Candy Canes—contain soy; made in facility shared with wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, and soy Warheads Sour Coolers—contains oat fiber MARS and WRIGLEY Mars Bar Mars Combos (a snack mix) M&M White Chocolate, Mint and M&M Coconut flavors—Check individual packages to be sure M&M Pretzel flavor and some M&M seasonal flavors Milky Way—contains barley malt Twix—contains wheat NESTLE Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx—contains wheat flour Butterfinger Giant Bar Butterfinger Hearts Butterfinger Jingles Butterfinger Medallions Butterfinger Pumpkins Butterfinger Snackerz Butterfinger Stixx Chewy Spree Crunch—contains barley malt Everlasting Gobstopper Hundred Grand Bar—contains barley malt Kit Kat Bar 100 Grand Bar—contains barley malt Sweetarts—Contain both maltodextrin and dextrin, which can be made from wheat and barley, and are not listed on Nestle’s gluten-free candy list) Wonka Bar (all flavors) Wonka Gummies Wonka Kazoozles Wonka Nerds Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free. Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free. NEWMAN'S OWN Organic Dark Chocolate & Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups (Made on equipment that processes products containing peanuts, tree nuts, milk, wheat, soybean and egg products.) PALMER Palmer Bag of Boo's fudge bars Palmer Tricky Treats (mix of Googley Eyes, Boneheads, and Pumpkin Patch chocolate candies) Palmer Trick or Treat Mix Palmer Peppermint Patties RUSSELL STOVER'S—Russell Stover's products are produced on equipment that also processes peanuts, tree nuts, eggs and wheat gluten. YORK York Pieces, York Minis and York Shapes WONKA Wonka Bar Wonka Chewy Runts Wonka Chewy Spree Wonka Giant and Mini Chewy SweeTarts Wonka Nerds Wonka Oompas Wonka Runts Wonka Runts Chewy Wonka SweetTarts Wonka Sweetarts (regular) Wonka Sweetarts Chew Wonka Sweetarts Chewy Twists Wonka Sweetarts Giant Chewy Wonka Sweetarts Mini Chewy Wonka Shockers Wonka Sweetarts Gummy Bugs—contains wheat/gluten Wonka Sweetarts Rope—contains wheat/gluten Wonka Sweetarts Shockers Wonka Tart N Tinys Wonka Tart N Tinys Chew Wonka SweetTarts Boo Bag Mix Additional information and lists of gluten-free safe and unsafe Halloween candies can be found at: About.com Celiac.com Celiaccentral.com CeliacSupportAssociation.org Celiacfamily.com DivineCaroline.com Foodallergyfeast Glutenawayblog.com Glutenfreefacts Gluten Intolerance Group Medpedia Surefoodliving.com Urbantastebud.com Verywellfit.com Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them: Adams & Brooks American Licorice Co. BEE International Ferrara Candy Company Ferrero Rocher FLIX Gimbal's Fine Candies Goetze's Candy Company Hershey's. Here's a link to Hershey's official gluten-free list. Impact Confections Jelly Belly Just Born. Here's a link to Just Born Gluten-free FAQs Justin’s Nut Butters products are certified gluten-free by the Gluten-Free Certification Organization, which requires products to have less than 10 parts per million of gluten in them. Kraft Foods Mars Chocolate Necco Nestle USA Palmer Pearson's PEZ Pop Rocks Tootsie Roll —Tootsie Roll Industries, which also makes Charms products, says that, as of fall 2018, all of the company's confections are considered gluten-free except Andes cookies. "Tootsie does not use wheat, barley, rye, oats, triticale, spelt, or any of their components, either as ingredients or as part of the manufacturing process. Corn and soy products are used during the manufacturing process," the company says.
  18. Celiac.com 10/09/2018 - Remember that time George Clooney handcuffed himself to David Letterman, and Tom Waits showed up and stole the show and then spun into that wild riff on gluten, and everybody had a good laugh? We do. Tom Waits has long been a favorite, but when he shows up on David Letterman, fun times are guaranteed for all. Even when Waits pokes some of his chronic hipster brand fun at gluten. In case you missed it, it’s one of those great moments of television that just keeps on giving, and we can take the jokes. At well over half a million views and counting on one YouTube channel alone, the episode continues to please. The fun starts at 5:27: Get more on Tom Waits, including the latest Tom Waits news, album and concert information at: Tomwaits.com.
  19. Celiac.com 10/03/2018 - Gluten-related disorders include the full spectrum of adverse clinical symptoms and conditions triggered by eating gluten. A team of researchers recently set out to review the available medical literature concerning MDs and gluten sensitivity with and without enteropathy. The research team included A Vinagre-Aragón, P Zis, RA Grunewald, and M Hadjivassiliou, with the Academic Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK. Celiac disease or gluten sensitive enteropathy is the most common manifestation, but clinicians have reported a number of extra-intestinal manifestations, which may occur without enteropathy. Gluten sensitivity is another term that has been used to include all gluten-related disorders, including those where blood tests show antibodies to gluten in the absence of any enteropathy. Gluten ataxia is the most common extra-intestinal neurological manifestation, and has been well documented. Clinicians have reported movement disorders related to gluten sensitivity. To assess the current medical literature on movement disorders and gluten sensitivity, both with and without enteropathy, the team conducted a systematic search on the PubMed database, and included 48 articles that met the inclusion criteria into the present review. This review demonstrates that the range of gluten related movement disorders goes beyond gluten ataxia, and shows that the majority of patients with gluten-related disorders benefit from a gluten-free diet. Read the full review at: Nutrients. 2018 Aug 8;10(8). pii: E1034. doi: 10.3390/nu10081034.
  20. Celiac.com 09/20/2018 - Some people with celiac disease experience extreme symptoms when they eat gluten. These folks adopt various strategies for navigating the world. One of those strategies involves getting a gluten-sniffing service dog. We’ve done a few stories on gluten-sniffing dogs over the years. Dogs like Zeus and Hawkeye are famous for helping their owners sniff out gluten before they can eat it. Can Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Help People with Celiac Disease? The stories are always popular. People love the stories, and people love the dogs. After all, pretty much anyone with celiac disease who has ever read about gluten-sniffing dogs would love to have one. Who could say no to a warm, fuzzy dog that can take a sniff of your food and signal you when it contains gluten? The stories almost always generate plenty of feedback and more than a few questions. To answer some of those questions, we’ve decided to do an article that provides some facts about gluten-sniffing dogs. Here are a few factors to keep in mind about gluten-sniffing service dogs: Gluten-free Dog Status: One thing to remember is that proper gluten-sniffing dogs are professionally trained service animals, much like seeing-eye dogs or hearing-ear dogs. As professional service animals, the dogs must be trained and certified as service animals. The dogs may then accompany their master pretty much anywhere they go, and are available to assess all food and snacks. Gluten-free Dog Training: Proper training takes time, which equals money. Professional trainers might only train one or two dogs, and the training can take about a year. There are very few trainers for gluten-sniffing dogs, and there are also currently no official guidelines or certification. Gluten-free Dog Cost: In our recent story on the gluten-sniffing black Lab, Hawkeye, we noted that the dog cost $16,000, not including food, and vet bills. Gluten-free Dog Reliability: Nimasensor.com notes that “[g]luten-sniffing dogs may detect gluten in amounts as small as .0025 parts per million with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy.” The Mercola.com website says that Willow, a gluten-sniffing German shorthaired pointer in Michigan, can detect gluten with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. Read more on gluten-sniffing dogs: Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Are Game Changers for People With Celiac Disease Gluten-sniffing dogs help people with celiac disease What to Know About Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Gluten-Sniffing Assistance Dog Helps Celiac Sufferer Lead Normal Life
  21. Celiac.com 10/06/2018 - In a recent discussion of Dangerous Grains, we (Mike and Ron) began to speculate about future prospects for those who are gluten sensitive. We talked about future directions for research into how gluten impacts on human health, the growing focus on celiac disease excluding gluten sensitivity, and whether grain consumption is a factor in health problems among those who are not gluten sensitive (according to currently available testing). This inevitably led to debate about whether gluten grains are harmful to all humans. In the context of this discussion, we agreed to write this article inviting further discussion of this matter and offering some suggestions to researchers and contributors to gluten-related research. These include several of our personal concerns and a number of questions that remain unanswered. Where is the research taking us? Perhaps the most important lesson that current research teaches is that a great deal more research is needed if we are to fully understand this ubiquitous hazard to human physical and mental health. There are several emerging trends in the research literature that warrant our attention and further investigation. For instance, celiac disease research has been conducted on the margins for so long that the recent, very rapid expansion of this field may have helped foster neglect of related and equally important research into non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Previous issues of the Scott-Free Newsletter have contained articles outlining the importance of extensive and appropriate testing (and subsequent dietary compliance) for those who have non-celiac gluten sensitivity as identified by a variety of tests including IgG ELISA testing for common food allergies. Further, our growing reliance upon endomysium or tissue transglutaminase antibody testing alone risks overlooking a significant portion of the population with celiac disease. Several reports indicate that in cases where serology testing is negative but symptoms and signs suggest celiac disease, a series of jejunal biopsies should also be taken and assessed by a pathologist who is familiar with celiac disease and uses the Marsh system for evaluating intestinal biopsies. Research into the oats question reveals that known toxic proteins in celiac disease are absent from oats. Yet one small study showed that a significant percentage of celiac patients will develop intestinal lesions characteristic of celiac disease from eating pure oats in the context of an otherwise gluten-free diet. This suggests that we have not yet identified all of the toxic proteins in gluten grains. Some current research is also aimed at developing similar grains without the toxic proteins found in regular gluten grains. The problems associated with oats research have a clear bearing on this issue as well. If celiac patients are developing intestinal lesions from pure oats, which have repeatedly been shown to lack the known toxic proteins, then we do not yet know all the harmful proteins. Thus, genetic development of “safe” wheat is not yet possible. Still, this research may help in the identification of additional toxic proteins. Current research has also led to a growing awareness, among the medical community and the general public, of the connections between gluten consumption and type I diabetes, epilepsy, thyroid disease, osteoporosis and a host of previously unsuspected autoimmune ailments. This is raising many questions about the potential value of a gluten-free diet as part of the treatment protocol for many of these ailments. Current research into zonulin may be one of the most exciting areas of investigation. The work of Dr. Fasano and many others in this important area may well lead to a better understanding of the impact of gluten on schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder, autism, bi-polar disorder, and a variety of ailments that have shown improvement on a gluten-free, dairy-free diet. Where would we like to see the research go? Gluten research is largely overlooked by many of today’s scientists. Despite the growing body of research that discredits gluten grains as healthy foods, the widespread, erroneous assumption of their nutritional value continues to foster gluten consumption. There is a pressing need to dispel the myths that protectively shroud this issue. Our first priority is to see a clear delineation of the gluten-derived proteins and peptides that are currently known to threaten human health. The next logical step would be to initiate an extensive investigation of the various other gluten proteins and peptides in order to identify all of the harmful substances in gluten. The relevance of gluten research reaches far beyond the concerns of academia and the individuals diagnosed with gluten sensitivity or celiac disease. We now know that many health problems could be wholly or partly the result of gluten, making this field worthy of investigation as well. The driving force for people to pursue research of these topics might well be found in a broader awareness of the preliminary findings that connect this wide variety of health conditions to gluten consumption. Further research into this field would reveal many aspects of our current lifestyle. For instance, why are we facing such a widespread variety and increasing rates of psychoses? And how does gluten relate to the multitude of diseases, seldom seen until the advent of agriculture? Gathering more information about gluten and its effect on both gluten sensitive and non-gluten sensitive individuals may provide a greater understanding of modern illnesses. For instance, Dr. Hadjivassiliou’s extensive investigations of neurological diseases of unknown origin, in association with gluten sensitivity, reveal several important research concerns which include: Does current testing identify all important immune reactions to gluten? What other, as yet unidentified proteins are toxic to celiac patients? How often is gluten sensitivity/celiac disease considered in the context of these related ailments? What portion of the population is at risk of developing gluten sensitivity? What portion of the population is at risk of developing celiac disease? What other problems may be associated with gluten consumption? What is the cost-benefit of our escalating consumption of gluten? What vested interests are inhibiting the widespread recognition of health hazards associated with gluten consumption? Concurrent with this research, we would like to see investment in the development of safe, healthy, alternative food sources. Realistically, everyone would probably be better off on a diet of fruits, vegetables, and various meats. But is this possible for the world’s overwhelming and growing population? The necessary resources, including the cost to the consumer, would be prohibitive by current standards and methods of food production. New, more efficient food sources must be found, developed, and widely adopted. These foods must be a better fit with our evolutionary adaptations. This search will require considerable investment and social resolve. What questions should have priority? The question on peoples’ minds is how the research will directly affect them. This means that the research will have to explain the relevance of gluten proteins to such diseases as cancer, autoimmune disorders, obesity and food addiction. Each of these food-related topics is a common concern, widely discussed, and a key topic for gluten-related research. The many applications of food addiction research will attract widespread attention and discussion. The current spotlight on dieting in the popular press reflects a great deal of personal concern, among the general public, regarding this topic. Cancer and autoimmunity have been examined in great detail and a universal cure is still a distant dream. Yet the high rate of gluten sensitivity among these patients suggests a pressing need for research. Such investigations could provide a monumental step toward finding the causes and the explanations for these widespread, devastating health problems. Since these topics have yet to be explored, mainly due to limited research funding, a shift in research focus may yield the solutions to many of these conditions that plague our society. An important hurdle to overcome There is a dichotomy between governmental dietary recommendations that encourage gluten grain consumption and the growing body of research that discredits grains as a healthy food for a significant portion of the population. Unfortunately this is an area where progress is necessary for gluten research to really thrive. Since grain production, processing, and consumption constitute huge portions of various state economies, it is in the best interests of governing bodies to keep grains on everyone’s plate for many years to come. It will require a truly overwhelming body of knowledge, based on solid research proving the hazards of grains to topple the current, flawed structure of governmental dietary recommendations. Conclusion Without this vast array of research, leading to widespread recognition of the hazards of gluten, we can expect little social change. Thus, future prospects for gluten sensitive individuals may be somewhat dim. Increasing population densities may lead to escalating competition for finite food resources. Cheap and available foods derived from gluten grains will become increasingly attractive. Future generations of our families (remember that gluten sensitivity and celiac disease have a large genetic component) will be at risk. The best answer, as we see it, is to fund research aimed at the questions posed here, as well as those that arise out of these investigations. We have offered several directions that we consider important. Whether or not you agree with our priorities, we hope you agree that we need further research into the human health hazards posed by gluten grain consumption. This article was co-written by Mike Pearson.
  22. Celiac.com 10/05/2018 - This short quiz includes basic celiac facts, recent celiac and gluten-free news and other information that appeared in the last few months on Celiac.com. The answers are in the section below the quiz, so don't peek! True or False? A tainted gluten-free meal nearly killed an Australian woman. Bifidobacterium infantis NLS super strain reduces a-Defensin-5 expression in celiac disease patients. Vitamin A and D deficiency common in kids with newly diagnosed celiac disease. New UK fund promotes celiac research and gluten-free food improvement. Easy to spot tooth wear and enamel defects point to celiac disease. Undiagnosed celiac disease more common in women and girls. Research indicates 1.4% of humans have celiac disease. A new urine test can spot gluten in the blood of people with celiac disease. Women's diet during pregnancy has little impact on celiac disease risk in their infants. Gluten-Free condoms are available for people concerned about topical exposure to gluten. A Phoenix realtor recently advertised a house as 'gluten-free.’ Current screening methods miss significant cases of celiac disease. A new vaccine makes it safe for people with celiac disease to safely consume gluten. A long-distance conversation with a guru can help treat your celiac disease. Food made with gluten-free ingredients is safe for people with celiac disease. Celiac disease is a food allergy. Celiac disease rarely affects people of non-European ancestry. Celiac disease is a children’s condition. Celiac disease can be painful, but isn't life-threatening. A little gluten is okay for people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance to eat. ANSWERS Here are the answers for our short quiz above on basic celiac facts, recent celiac news and other information. True or False? A tainted gluten-free meal nearly killed an Australian woman. TRUE Bifidobacterium infantis NLS super strain reduces a-Defensin-5 expression in celiac disease patients. TRUE Vitamin A and D deficiency common in kids with newly diagnosed celiac disease. TRUE New UK fund promotes celiac research and gluten-free food improvement. TRUE Easy to spot tooth wear and enamel defects point to celiac disease. TRUE Undiagnosed celiac disease more common in women and girls. TRUE Research indicates 1.4% of humans have celiac disease. TRUE A new urine test can spot gluten in the blood of people with celiac disease. TRUE Does Diet During Pregnancy Have Any Impact on Celiac Disease Risk in Infants? TRUE Gluten-Free condoms are available for people concerned about topical exposure to gluten. TRUE A Phoenix realtor recently advertised a house as 'gluten-free.’ TRUE. Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena recently advertised a house as 'gluten-free’. Current screening methods miss significant cases of celiac disease. TRUE A new vaccine makes it safe for people with celiac disease to safely consume gluten. FALSE. While several such vaccines are under development, with some even undergoing clinical and human trials, no such drug has been proven to work and approved by the FDA. Hopefully the clinical tests will work and this will one day be an alternative for some people. A long-distance conversation with a guru can help treat your celiac disease. FALSE Food made with gluten-free ingredients is safe for people with celiac disease. FALSE. Just because food is made with gluten-free ingredients does not necessarily make it safe for people with celiac disease. Case in point, Domino’s Pizza recently introduced gluten-free pizza crusts. However, these pizzas are prepared in the same areas and ovens as Domino’s regular pizzas, and may be contaminated with gluten from wheat flour. These pizzas are not considered safe for people with celiac disease. There are many similar cases in the restaurant world. Contamination is a serious issue for some celiacs, so buyers be aware and be wary. Celiac disease is a food allergy. FALSE. Celiac disease is not a food allergy or an intolerance, it is an autoimmune disease. People with celiac disease suffer damage to the lining of the small intestine when they eat wheat, rye or barley. They also face higher risks for many other auto-immune conditions. Celiac disease rarely affects people of non-European ancestry. FALSE. Celiac disease is more common in people of northern European ancestry, but it affects all ethnic groups and is found in southern Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and South America. Celiac disease is a children’s condition. FALSE. Celiac disease can develop at any age. In fact, celiac disease is most commonly diagnosed in people aged 40-60 years old. Celiac disease can be painful, but isn't life-threatening. FALSE. It’s true that classic celiac disease symptoms, like stomach pain, bone pain, fatigue, headaches, skin rash, and digestive issues, won’t kill patients outright. However, undiagnosed or untreated, celiac disease can trigger other autoimmune disorders, and leave patients at much greater risk of developing certain types of deadly cancer. A little gluten is okay for people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance to eat. FALSE. Gluten levels above 20 parts per million can cause adverse immune reactions and chronic damage in people with celiac disease. Read more about celiac disease, gluten, gluten-free and gluten intolerance facts at Celiac.com.
  23. Celiac.com 09/25/2018 - In a patent application that could have a huge impact on the gluten-free industry, General Mills, Inc. has described its method and system for removing foreign, gluten-containing grains to establish gluten-free oats. Current FDA guidelines require all products labeled gluten-free to have a maximum gluten content of 20 parts per million (ppm). Published August 23rd, patent application No. US 20180236453 A1 details a method for producing oat grains with gluten levels below 20 ppm and, more preferably, below 10 ppm. Natural oats generally do not contain gluten, but after harvest, transport and storage, large batches of raw oats may contain small amounts of gluten-containing grains, such as wheat, barley, rye and triticale. These can sometimes occur at levels exceeding 20 ppm. The General Mills patent application describes a method of arranging mechanical oat sorting operations in series, or in both series and parallel operations. The multi-step process best includes width grading, multiple length grading steps, along with a potential de-bearding step. The resulting oats will be gluten-free to under 20 ppm, and possibly to under 10 ppm, and are suitable for the production of gluten-free oat food products, including cereals and granolas. To receive a patent, General Mills will have to prove that their process does what they say it does. A successful patent for General Mills could have a huge effect on the gluten-free oat foods industry. For one, it may allow General Mills to become a major supplier of gluten-free oats for other manufacturers. The benefits of larger scale, more economical gluten-free oat production could include more, and more readily available, gluten-free oat products, along with lower prices for both manufacturers and consumers. Stay tuned for more developments on this and related stories. Read more at Justicia.com
  24. Celiac.com 10/01/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to establish the rates of epilepsy in patients with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and vice versa and to characterize aspects of the epileptic syndromes presented by these patients. The research team included Thomas Julian, Marios Hadjivassiliou, and Panagiotis Zis. They are variously affiliated with the Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience University of Sheffield in Sheffield, UK; and the Academic Department of Neurosciences Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust Sheffield, UK. The team conducted a systematic computer-based literature search on the PubMed database, and gathered information on rates, demographics and epilepsy phenomenology. Patients with celiac disease are nearly twice as likely to have epilepsy as the general population. Celiac disease is twice as common in epilepsy patients as in the general population. Researchers still need to do more studies to assess rates of gluten sensitivity in epilepsy patients. The data indicate that the prevalence of celiac disease or gluten sensitivity is higher for certain epilepsy scenarios, including childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms, adult patients with fixation off sensitivity (FOS) and those with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis. Epilepsy in the context of gluten-related disorders is a syndrome of celiac disease, epilepsy and cerebral calcification (CEC syndrome), which is frequently described in the literature. The good news is that gluten-free diet helps to control epilepsy in 53% of cases, either reducing seizure frequency, enabling reduced doses or even termination of anti-epileptic drugs. Patients with epilepsy of unknown cause should receive blood tests for markers of gluten sensitivity, and may benefit from a gluten-free diet. Read more at: Springer.com
  25. Celiac.com 06/22/2015 - Currently available digestive enzymes do not fully degrade gluten, and are thus of questionable use for people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, say a team of researchers. Prior research had shown that post-proline cutting enzyme effectively degrade the immunogenic gluten peptides. Several existing digestive enzyme supplements claim to promote gluten degradation. The research team set out to assess the degradation of immunogenic gluten epitopes by currently available digestive enzymes. The team included G. Janssen, C. Christis, Y. Kooy-Winkelaar, L. Edens, D. Smith, P. van Veelen, and F. Koning. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands, DSM Food Specialties in Delft, The Netherlands, and DSM Food Specialties in South Bend, Indiana, USA. For their study, they assessed five commercially available digestive enzyme supplements along with purified digestive enzymes. They assessed these enzymes using enzyme assays and mass spectrometric identification. They monitored gluten epitope degradation using R5 ELISA, mass spectrometric analysis of the degradation products, and T cell proliferation assays. They found that the enzyme supplements leave the nine immunogenic epitopes of the 26-mer and 33-mer gliadin fragments largely intact. This is due to the high proline content of gluten molecules, which prevents gastrointestinal proteases from fully degrading them, leaving large proline-rich gluten fragments intact, including an immunogenic 33-mer from α-gliadin and a 26-mer from γ-gliadin. These latter peptides can trigger pro-inflammatory T cell responses resulting in tissue remodeling, malnutrition and a variety of other complications. In contrast, the pure enzyme AN-PEP effectively degraded all nine epitopes in the pH range of the stomach at much lower dose. From these results, the team concludes that most of the currently available digestive enzyme supplements are ineffective in degrading immunogenic gluten epitopes, but the AN-PEP do effectively degrade gliadin fragments. Source: PLoS One. 2015 Jun 1;10(6):e0128065. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0128065.
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