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Found 2,645 results

  1. Hello! I am a 59-year-old, newly diagnosed with allergies (I also suspect that i have some form of celiac or gluten intolerance). I haven't done the food allergy tests or challenges yet - but from what i've read, i may have OAS when it comes to certain foods, but i'm not sure. I'm not sure I would do a celiac test at this point, because that would require me eating mostly gluten - i've been eating mostly gluten-free - i don't know what else to do and i need some tips - HELP!
  2. Celiac.com 06/04/2018 - Rates of contamination in commercial food advertised as gluten-free are improving, but nearly one in ten still show unacceptable levels of gluten. As part of a government mandated food sampling program, the city of Melbourne, Australia recently conducted a survey of 127 food businesses advertising gluten-free options. For the tests, government officers conduct unannounced site visits and take a sample of at least one food item declared to be gluten-free. Ridascreen Gliadin R5 ELISA analysis showed that 14 of 158 samples (9%) contained detectable gluten in excess of the official Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) definition of gluten-free. Nine of the 14 samples (6% overall) registered gluten above 20 parts per million, which exceeds the official threshold for foods labeled gluten-free in Europe and the United States. At one business, food labeled gluten-free registered above 80 ppm, even though they were asked directly for a gluten-free sample. These findings confirm the lack of understanding reported by many people with celiac disease. The good news is that rates of gluten non-compliance has improved over earlier audits, from 20% of samples in 2014 to 15% of samples in 2015. The survey team notes that one-third of the businesses in this study had previously been audited) and education seems to be paying off. In one burger chain alone, four of five venues which were non-compliant in 2014, were fully compliant in 2015 and 2016. The survey results showed that businesses that provided gluten-free training for staff showed 75% better odds of compliance. The overall good news here is that gluten-free compliance in commercial food businesses has improved steadily since the first surveys in 2014. One in ten odds of getting gluten contamination from food labeled gluten-free is still to high, but even though there is room for improvement more and more businesses are providing gluten-free training for their staff, and those that do are reaping benefits. Look for this trend to continue as more businesses offer training, gluten-free and celiac disease awareness increases, and more consumers demand safe gluten-free foods. Read more at: The Medical Journal of Australia
  3. I haven't browsed here in a while so there may be other threads about this but thought I would share a recent event. I have been using "assist/defense" pills for years. I never have been brave enough to truly "test" them to see if they really would keep me from getting sick if ate glutens. I am VERY sensitive and travel alot so I have to trust that things I'm eating have been made with TLC. When my local store quit carrying the Gluten Defense that I've taken before every meal when I'm not in control of the food preparation, I tried Me+My Gluten Assist from Wal-Mart (scary in itself). I know my local Wendy's has some CC issues on their fries due to the oil overflowing between nugget and fry vats. I was really craving their fries and sent through their drive thru. I came home, took 1 Gluten Assist and began eating. Within about 15 minutes I could tell I had CC fries as my gut started to turn inside out. The package from the pills says to take one before consuming.... an additional pill may be taken if needed. We always laughed about that as if needed meant in my case that it was too late. Well, I took a second one and within 15-20 minutes my gut had settled and balanced itself out and I did not have the massive reaction that I get when I eat glutens. Having been dx'd in 2005 I've been at this a long time and do realize that I could be harming my villa even if I'm not "getting sick" but considering the FDA allows companies to label things as gluten-free if they have less than the 20ppm, I feel that the minimal CC from the fry vats can't be doing too much damage for the occasional splurge like this night. I say all this to let you know that there is some validity to the "assist" pills that can help avoid a horrid reaction from the occasional CC. I can no longer find it at Wal-Mart but CVS has been carrying it near me. It was about $12 for 30 pills. I feel it's worth the $.40 per meal to have that little bit of help when I'm not in control of my food.
  4. Can I be cross contaminationed by purchasing resale items that have come in contact with gluten? Can I properly sanitize a bedding set without destroying the color/fabric? If so, how? I purchased a bedding set through a virtual yard sale, and my husband brought this question up. I've never thought of it in my 6 years as a diagnosed celiac. I couldn't find information about cleansing cloth (fully) from gluten, and I'd like to feel safe before picking the set up. Any info or direction would be greatly appreciated.
  5. Celiac.com 05/30/2018 - One of the key aspects of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is that patients are diagnosed partly by the absence of celiac disease. That is, patients with NCGS, whatever their symptoms, do not have celiac disease. But could those patients still have some kind of gut damage, or permeability issues? Do people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity have distinct duodenal histological features? Researchers are seeking a better understanding of this still undefined condition. Some researchers have suggested that histology may play a key role in NCGS, but there is still no consensus. A recent review by Bardella et al. revealed that histology is not always reported in NCGS studies, and exclusion of celiac disease is generally done by showing negative serology and/or genetic typing. In June 2015, researchers published what is now called the Salerno Experts’ criteria, which proposes a double (or single)-blind, placebo-controlled, (DBPC), crossover gluten challenge as the gold standard to NCGS diagnosis In order to investigate histological findings of people with suspicion of NCGS, we retrospectively evaluated duodenal biopsies of a cohort of patients undergoing clinical diagnostic algorithm for NCGS as proposed by the Salerno consensus. The research team included B Zanini, V Villanacci, M Marullo, M Cadei, F Lanzarotto, A Bozzola, and C Ricci. They are variously affiliated with the Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Viale Europa 11, 25123, Brescia, Italy; and with the Institute of Pathology Spedali Civili, Piazzale Spedali Civili 1, 25123, Brescia, Italy. Their team’s main goal was to underline that the peculiar IEL distribution and the increased eosinophil count may represent a valid warning that help to identify patients with NCGS, given the absence of serological markers for NCGS. The team also performed a CD3 immunohistochemical evaluation of T lymphocytes confirming that the IEL numbers were normal, but their distribution is peculiar, as noted by the clusters of T lymphocytes in the superficial epithelium and linear disposition of T lymphocytes in the deeper part of the mucosa above the muscularis mucosae. They also note that their failure to fully match study subjects with placebo challenge is a limitation of this study, but stress the current uncertainty of the actual clinical diagnostic algorithm as supported by recent reviews of the literature. The team’s observations led them to note that histology may play a similar role in NCGS diagnosis as it does in celiac diagnosis. Researchers do know that, unlike with celiac disease, there is an absence of damage or change to intestinal mucosa in patients with NCGS, especially an absence of villous atrophy. In addition, the morphological exclusion of celiac disease is a crucial assessment, because some patients classified as NCGS show increased duodenal IEL count (> 25 IELs/100 enterocytes), corresponding to Marsh I, or grade A lesions of celiac histological classification. To properly diagnose NCGS, the team says it’s very important to confirm these features, to rule out any type of organic malabsorption diseases, and to definitively rule out celiac disease, via a negative celiac disease serology. Taken as a whole, the team’s results provide evidence that both intraepithelial lymphocytes and eosinophils play a role in the physiopathology behind NCGS. They are calling for more studies to confirm their findings and to determine whether the results they observed were specific to NCGS. Source: Virchows Arch. 2018 Apr 4. doi: 10.1007/s00428-018-2346-9
  6. Celiac.com 05/25/2018 - People with celiac disease need to follow a lifelong gluten-free diet. However, once their guts have healed, they can still be sensitive to gluten. Sometimes even more sensitive than they were before they went gluten-free. Accidental ingestion of gluten can trigger symptoms in celiac patients, such as pain in the gut and diarrhea, and can also cause intestinal damage. A new drug being developed by a company called Amgen eases the effects of people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Researchers working on the drug have announced that their proof-of-concept study shows AMG 714, an anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody, potentially protects celiac patients from inadvertent gluten exposure by blocking interleukin 15, an important mediator of celiac disease, and leads to fewer symptoms following gluten exposure. The drug is intended for people with celiac disease who are following a gluten-free diet, and is designed to protect against modest gluten contamination, not to permit consumption of large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta. AMG 714 is not designed for celiac patients to eat gluten at will, but for small, incidental contamination. Francisco Leon, MD, PhD, study director and consultant for Amgen, says that their team is looking at AMG 714 “for its potential to protect against modest contamination, not deliberately eating large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta.” Amgen hopes that AMG 714 will help celiac patients on a gluten-free diet to experience fewer or less sever gluten-triggered events. Findings of the team’s first phase 2 study of a biologic immune modulator in celiac disease will be presented at the upcoming Digestive Disease Week 2018. Read more at ScienceDaily.com
  7. Hi, I went to see my dermatologist today to get a biopsy of what she suspects to be DH on my elbows. She freaked me out because she said that if the test is positive my diet will be very restricted since I am a Vegetarian. She advised me to get a nutritionist. My question is should I also ask my PCP for a referral to a gastroenterologist as well, if I indeed do have Celiac? Thanks in advance.
  8. Hey, I was wondering if any of you knew - when you eat gluten when you have Celiac, do you take in the calories from the food? Before I was diagnosed, I was extremely malnourished because my body wasn't absorbing vitamins, but does the body absorb the calories? If so, how is so much weight loss possible?
  9. I was diagnosed with celiac disease about 2.5 years ago and was living alone at the time. I went gluten-free and lived in a completely gluten free house. I was asympotomatic when diagnosed but noticed improved health, energy, skin, mood, etc. after going gluten free and as time has gone on, it has been worth it to stick to the diet. But I still battle with frustration and anger in social situations where I cannot join others in eating some of my former favorite foods (pizza, bagels, Chinese, etc.). For the most part, I just avoided scenarios like that and was happier for doing so. Now, about a month ago, I moved in with my elderly father to take care of him as my mother has had to go into a nursing home. He loves his bagels and bread and is very messy, making my new living quarters covered in crumbs. I have expressed to him the importance of keeping gluten products contained to avoid cross-contamination but it seems no matter how I explain it to him, he doesn’t understand the importance and thinks I’m over-reacting. He says he doesn’t let the knife touch the bread when he’s putting peanut butter on it, or cream cheese on a bagel, so double dipping isn’t ruining anything. I have bought separate containers of these products now, all labeled gluten-free so he doesn’t contaminate them but I’m not sure I trust he is reading my labels. I have put his bread in a tray and provided another tray that I instructed him to only prepare foods on the contained area, but since I’ve been here, not a day has gone by that I haven’t seen crumbs on every surface. Although my celiac disease was asymptomatic when diagnosed, after years of living gluten-free, I can now notice the negative effects living in a gluten house. My skin has been awful, I’ve been getting headaches (including one migraine that lasted 3 days!), I’m always tired, the brain fog has made it hard to concentrate on anything, and I’ve been so depressed I can literally burst into tears at any moment for no damn reason. When I talk about feeling bad, my family says I’m being dramatic and I’m probably only depressed because my mother is in the nursing home. While yes, my mothers health is upsetting, she’s been declining for years and I’m definitely saddened by it, but this feeling of depression now does not feel tied to that. Or anything really. I don’t feel sad about anything in particular, except feeling misunderstood by my family, if anything. Sorry for the long rant, but I’m feeling hopeless. Does anyone have any advice on how to educate the elderly on this? Or how to help sensitize a family to one person’s needs? Is it possible to teach an old dog new tricks? I don’t want to take away my fathers bread, but I will also not be able to take care of him if I’m stuck in bed with migraines and depression. How can I find balance here??
  10. The following gluten-free carrot cake recipe is truly a traditional cake. Full of some of the most common allergens like, dairy, eggs and nuts. I tend to experiment with new recipes by replacing ingredients I can't tolerate, with ingredients I can. For example, many recipes allow you to substitute eggs with applesauce. The nuts can be left out-for those allergic to nuts, and the cream cheese can be substituted for dairy-free cream cheese. When substituting however, ratios will be different and it is a good idea to know what ratio of applesauce (for example) equals 4 eggs. Ratio quantities will also greatly depend on your taste buds, but if this recipe is okay for your diet, dig in and enjoy! Cake Ingredients: 1 cup pecans - toasted and finely chopped 2 ½ cups carrots - finely grated 2 cups gluten-free all purpose flour 1 tsp. baking soda 1 ½ tsp. baking powder 2/3 tsp. salt - finely ground 1 ½ tsp. cinnamon 4 large eggs - room temp 1 ½ cups granulated sugar 1 cup vegetable or canola oil 2 tsp. vanilla Cream Cheese Frosting Ingredients: 1/4 cup unsalted butter - room temperature 8 ounces cream cheese - room temp 2 cups powdered sugar 1 tsp. vanilla 1 lemon - finely grated lemon zest only To Make: Start by toasting the pecans in the oven at 350 degree F for 6-8 minutes. Remove from the oven, allow to cool and chop finely. Next, finely shred 2 ½ cups of carrots. Finally, combine the gluten-free flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon in a bowl, set aside. Beat the 4 eggs on medium speed for about 1 minute, reduce the speed and slowly pour in the granulated sugar. Once the sugar and eggs are combined (about 3-4 minutes) slowly pour in the oil and vanilla. Next, add the flour mixture and beat just until combined. Finally, use a spatula to fold in the carrots and toasted pecans. Divide the batter between two well greased 9 inch round cake pans. Bake at 350 F for 25-30 minutes. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes before inverting onto a cooling rack. Baking Directions: Divide batter between 2 well greased 9 inch round cake pans. Bake at 350 degrees F for25-30 minutes. Allow to cool in the pan for 10 minutes before inverting onto a cooling rack. * Note: This cake can also be made into a single layer 9x13 cake, simply increase baking time to 30-40 minutes. While the cake is cooling, beat together the butter and cream cheese. Next, add the powdered sugar, vanilla, and lemon zest. Beat until thoroughly combined. Place one layer of cake on a platter, spread an even layer of frosting on top of the cake. Add the second layer of cake. Use the remaining frosting to cover the top and sides of the cake. *Idea: Use remaining or extra pecans to decorate the outside of the cake.
  11. Celiac.com 05/15/2018 - There is a good amount of anecdotal evidence that people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity can tolerate sourdough bread, but there is no good science to support such claims. To determine if sourdough bread help conquer wheat sensitivity, the Alberta Wheat Commission (AWC) is funding a team of researchers to see if the sourdough fermentation process can reduce or eliminate wheat components that trigger wheat sensitivity. The project will study the way the sourdough bread fermentation process breaks down proteins and carbohydrates in wheat flour. Chair of the AWC Research Committee, Terry Young, said new research suggests that wheat protein may not be the cause of gluten sensitivity in people without celiac disease. Longer fermentation, aka sourdough fermentation, is more common in Europe. Young says that reports indicate that “incidents of non-celiac sensitivity…are actually lower in Europe." He adds the current research will focus on the fermentation, but the future may include the development of wheat varieties for gluten sensitive individuals. The research will be led by food microbiologist at the University of Alberta, Dr. Michael Gänzle, who said the use of sourdough bread in industrial baking reduces ingredient costs and can improve the quality of bread as well. Dr. Gänzle wants to assess anecdotal claims that people with non-celiac wheat or gluten intolerance can tolerate sourdough bread. His team wants to “determine whether fermentation reduces or eliminates individual wheat components that are known or suspected to cause adverse effects.” The team readily admits that their project will not create products that are safe for people with celiac disease. They may, however, create products that are useful for people without celiac disease, but who are gluten sensitivity. The AWC is collaboratively funding the project with the Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission, and the Minnesota Wheat Research Promotion Council, which will contribute $57,250, and $20,000, respectively. The research team will issue a report of its findings after the project is completed in 2021. Studies like this are important to shed light on the differences between celiac and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Stay tuned for more developments in this exciting area of research. Source: highriveronline.com
  12. Celiac.com 07/03/2015 - For people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, accidentally eating gluten can have numerous undesirable consequences. Symptoms of gluten-exposure among people with celiac disease can vary, but main problems and complaints include: upset stomach, stomach pain, inflammation, diarrhea, gas, bloating, indigestion, heart burn, skin rash or breakouts, and nerve and arthritis pain, among others. If you're one of these people, then you likely work pretty hard to make sure everything you eat is gluten-free. But what can you do if you accidentally eat gluten? Officially, beyond simply waiting it out, there is no clinically accepted treatment for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity who accidentally eat gluten. However, there are things that many people claim will reduce the suffering and promote healing when this happens. Here are the best home remedies for accidental gluten ingestion, as submitted by readers to our gluten-free forum. The main goal is to reduce or eliminate the worst immediate symptoms, including pain, inflammation, diarrhea, gas and or bloating, etc. The secondary goal is to rebuild gut health. So what works? Or, what do people say works for them? The remedies listed below are not ranked in any particular order of importance or efficacy. Fasting—Recent studies indicate that fasting for a couple of days can help to reset the immune system, which might be beneficial for those suffering from an adverse gluten reaction. Be sure to check with a doctor before fasting, just to be safe. Digestive Enzymes-- For many people, digestive enzymes seem to help the bloating. Many people claim that such enzymes help provide relief, especially against small amounts of gluten. Two such products are Eater's Digest by Traditional Medicinals, and Gluten Defense digestive enzymes. Green tea or peppermint tea. Many people have reported that green tea is also helpful. Peppermint tea is said to promote muscle relaxation, and can help for gassy stomach issues. Strong gluten-free peppermints will work in a pinch. Imodium seems to help some people control associated diarrhea. If you have diarrhea, be sure to drink water with electrolytes to help replace lost fluids. Pepto-Bismol—Some people take Pepto-Bismol to help relieve stomach upset. Marshmallow root can help to sooth stomach and gas pain. Antihistamines—Some people claim to find relief with antihistamines, such as Benedryl, Clatratin, or Zyrtec. Often these are used in combination with other remedies Probiotics—Many people find probiotics to be helpful, especially as part of a general gut maintenance program. Probiotics are generally more helpful in advance of accidental gluten exposure, but many people take them after exposure. Either way, it certainly can't hurt. Broth—Many people with celiac disease, gut and/or nutritional issues turn to broth for help in building gut health and proper nutrition. Good old fashioned beef, chicken or fish broth can be a beneficial part of a healthy gut regimen. Broth also has many health properties beyond gut healing. Tummy Rescue Smoothie: This recipe was developed by a celiac.com reader in response to his own "gluten emergency.” The healing properties of each ingredient are also listed. Puree in blender until smooth, and slightly thickened. It is most soothing when consumed while still warm from the hot tea. Tummy Rescue Smoothie: 1 cup hot freshly brewed nettle leaf tea (anti-histamine, anti-spasmodic) ¼ cup Santa-Cruz pear juice (flavoring/sweetener - pears are the least allergenic of fruits) ¼-½ teaspoon whole fennel seed (reduces gas & bloating) 2 Tablespoons slippery elm powder (healing & soothing to mucous membranes and the gut) 1 Tablespoon flax seed oil (soothing, anti-inflammatory) ¼ - ½ cup rice milk (hypoallergenic, use to thin to desired consistency) This smoothie is best consumed in small sips over an hour or so. Magnesium also helps with pain and relaxes muscle spasms, so taking a little extra magnesium may be of benefit. For severe symptoms, drink the smoothie while reclining in bed, with a warm castor oil pack over the abdomen, covered by a heating pad set on low. Do not leave the pack in place for more than an hour. Longer-term strategies include rebuilding intestinal health with an anti-inflammatory diet, taking supplements like L-Glutamine, coconut oil, fat-soluble vitamins A, E, D, and K, Calcium, Magnesium, B-Vitamins, Essential Fatty Acids (EFA's), and probiotics, including acidophilus for about a week to get intestinal flora back in order. This list is not intended to be authoritative or comprehensive. Nor is it intended as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice. As with any health remedy, do your research and make the choices that are right for you. If you have any thoughts or insights on how best to treat accidental gluten ingestion for people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, please share them in our comments section below.
  13. Celiac.com 02/08/2017 - "What if the kid you bullied at school, grew up, and turned out to be the only surgeon who could save your life?" --Lynette Mather If you ask any high school senior what in their life has changed the most since kindergarten, statistics show that many would answer moving from one school to another. However, the more drastic of changes are seen such as illnesses diagnosed during these critical school ages. In 2009 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, and that diagnosis has impacted my life in both positive and negative ways for my past, present, and future time at Indiana Area High School and beyond. Personally I have had to deal with bullying because of my disabilities. Bullying by definition is the use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others. I along with 20% of my peers nationwide in grades 9-12 (The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System) experience bullying in many different forms. Bullying can be teasing, hitting, leaving someone out, whispering behind backs, online harassment, shoving, remarks about race, sexuality, and disabilities. Before my diagnosis I was considered "normal" but as a result of my illness and "strange" dietary needs therefore I have been bullied. However, looking back on my experience I am happy to have dealt with the resistance because it has made me a better, more confident individual. I, like three million fellow Americans nationwide (National Celiac Disease), must deal with the stress of having celiac disease. I was diagnosed in 2009 after having lost my eyesight to a migraine. Celiac Disease is an often under-diagnosed autoimmune disease wherein the person cannot eat wheat, rye, barley, or oats, otherwise known as gluten, because their antibodies will attack their own system leading to other serious health issues such as cancer. Celiac Disease is spread through genes; my entire family, including my father, mother, and sister, has this disease. However, even with the growing awareness of celiac disease, there is also a growing skepticism. "Critics" of my disease claim that the gluten free diet is a fad. Many celebrities have tried to lose weight and failed to stay on this difficult diet. Restaurant chains are coming out with new gluten free menus every day to raise prices and profits, though they refuse to educate their servers about what someone with a gluten "allergy" cannot eat. While some people are sympathetic and know the outstanding facts about celiac disease, most of the population stays in the dark about this ailment. This causes frustration for people with celiac disease, like me, to have to deal with the resulting brick wall of resistance. In my small community it is very rare for someone to have such a disease that the public knows little about. This can cause doubt and disbelief, especially at a high school where everyone is just trying to "fit in". When I was diagnosed in 2009, I had just started ninth grade and I had also started playing two high school sports, softball and tennis. For the softball team it was a well-known fact that after every away game the softball boosters would buy each girl a twelve inch sub from a local deli to eat on the way home. Whenever my parents and I contacted the booster president to explain the situation with my disability and that I simply would like to have a salad, we were met with backlash. I did not understand at the time why a parent would refuse to supply another child with food after a physical activity when everyone else was getting a meal. This quickly made me an outcast on the softball team as the "strange girl with the made up disease", causing me to feel stressed and awful about myself over something that I could not control. I would have loved to have been able to "fit in" and eat the subs like my teammates rather than being different, especially after growing up able to eat gluten! It was a hard transition to make. I went from being able to eat the subs, donuts, pizza, and any other fast-food product to a strict dietary regime. After my long process through the education system, I finally got the meal I had a right to have. Unfortunately, the boosters' actions, forced us to go through the school system to "prove" I had a legitimate excuse not to eat the subs. I was distanced from other members of the team and, in subsequent years, had to deal with backlash from my teammates. They do not understand that it is not a personal choice to avoid gluten. I have a disability. I simply cannot eat it. Instead, they go back to the first year when I was eating the same foods they ate, and I get blamed for wanting to be "special" and get the more expensive food. I know that I am not alone in my struggle and that people with celiac disease around the world deal with what I deal with everyday - just like others who are bullied for being different. The after effects from my being bullied have shown themselves even in everyday situations. I have learned a great deal about myself and respect for other individuals' differences. I believe that if I had not been bullied I would not have the self-confidence, integrity, sense of right and wrong, or leadership skills that I have now. It has allowed me to go above and beyond in tough situations, knowing that I can overcome them. I know that even though the times are tough with my disability, and that while others may never understand mine, I can certainly understand and respect theirs. I respect and do not judge others simply based on what they can or cannot eat. I also know that just because someone does not "look" ill on the outside does not mean they are not dealing with something awful on the inside. This allows me to make friends easily and to understand others more effectively. Being bullied has also allowed me to learn new leadership skills that I use in my volunteer work. I am confident in myself that I can go forward into the world of higher education and succeed because of the values I now hold dear. The most drastic change I have encountered in my high school career is the diagnosis of celiac disease in 2009. This diagnosis has impacted my life in both positive and negative ways, in the past, present, and future at Indiana Area High School and beyond. I have had to deal with bullying because of my disabilities. Bullying, by definition. is the use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others. I along with 20% of my peers nationwide in grades 9-12 (The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System) experience bullying in many different forms. After dealing with the effects of my being bullied, I know that it has made me a better person. I can travel the world and make lasting relationships based on acknowledging and respecting differences in every person I encounter.
  14. I went gluten-free over nine years ago. I was always thin - 5'9" and roughly a size eight. After years of chronic pain and mood issues and insomnia a doc caught the celiac. Soon after quitting gluten all symptoms subsided but I quickly gained A LOT of weight. It's been many years, many docs and MANY different diets. I can't lose the weight. I've tried every variation of diets and it doesn't budge. I exercise regularly and eat a fraction of what others eat. I'm so tired of people telling me "calorie in calorie out." It's BS! I've seen tons of docs, most of which don't believe my diet log. I did crossfit for five years. The more paleo I ate and the harder I exercised the more with I gained. Doc told me I blew my adrenals so I stopped and stuck to walking for eight months. I recently took up yoga and I'm gaining again. I like to about about 90% paleo, organic with minimal red meat. I also don't eat soy and I never drink coffee. My thyroid tests are normal and I've tried all the thyroid meds and they don't do anything. I'm about 40 lbs over weight and SOOOOO tired of it. I'm covered in a very fatty layer and look full of cellulite. I do supplements, cleanses, you name it. If I eat fruit, it's low glycemic. I only eat minimal nuts to avoid calories. It just doesn't add up. I'm pretty sure, whatever anyone suggests, I've tried it. I've seen the best docs in the area and they are baffled. I have high insulin but I'm not prediabetc. I have gorgeous blood work - It appears I'm very healthy. I've monitored my blood glucose and... normal. My A1C is 4.6! I have a team of naturopaths and no one can figure it out! Anyone else have this problem!?!? I'm fat as hell and I shouldn't be. If anyone wants to tell me I don't eat enough... I tried that route too (more food, more frequently to boost metabolism - nothing). IDEAS!?!?!?!?!?!?
  15. Hello all, So, long story short, in 2011 I started getting really really sick, with no discernible cause. Violent vomiting daily, rapid weight gain (40 pounds in one month) unbelievable exhaustion, depression, social anxiety to the point of not being able to leave the house, hives, acne, rashes, brain fog, and my LEAST favorite, the all-over bruised body feeling you get when you have the flu (that horrible bone deep aching that makes it uncomfortable to move at all, and any clothing touching you hurts.) Oh, and monstrous swelling of my face and stomach. I wound up figuring out through elimination of certain things in my diet that what was doing it was gluten and dairy. So, over the years I've cut them out (at first, after I cut them out, I was still getting horrendously sick, just less often and it took me too long to realize CROSS CONTAMINATION WAS A THING) So fast forward to now, I'm able to function like a human again by being INCREDIBLY strict with my diet and making almost all of my food myself and NEVER taking any chances with anything that was "processed in the same facility with..." etc etc I've also recently started going back to school, which means I have to be EXTRA careful, or I won't be able to attend classes or study because my brain, and my body just don't function when I've been exposed. However, I've always been a do it yourself girl, so after having endoscopies and colonoscopies years ago, and having a doctor tell me I had "acid reflux" (way to diagnose the symptom, not the cause, ya jerk) and having no doctors know why I was getting so sick, and eventually figuring it out myself, I never was tested for Celiac's Disease. So obviously, I'm scarred for life, and terrified to death of gluten and I was wondering; does anyone know of some way that I could be tested for it WITHOUT exposing myself to it? Thank you so much in advance
  16. This recipe comes to us from Fiddle-Faddle in the Gluten-Free Forum. This is an adaptation of Robyn Ryberg's biscuits, found here on celiac.com. Ingredients: 1/3 cup shortening ½ cup potato starch ¾ cup cornstarch 1 ¾ teaspoon xanthan gum 1 tablespoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon sugar ¾ cup milk ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese ¼ cup butter, softened (optional--makes a very fattening biscuit!) ********************************** Another ¼ cup butter, melted, mixed with ¼ - ½ teaspoon garlic powder Directions: Preheat oven to 375F. In medium bowl, blend all ingredients except for last two. Mix very well to remove any lumps. Dough will be quite soft and a bit sticky. Roll or pat our dough on a lightly floured (cornstarch) surface. Dough should be about ½ inch thick. Cut out biscuits with 2 ½ inch cookie cutters. An inverted glass will also do the job. Place biscuits on lightly-greased baking sheet. Bake for 12-15 minutes, until lightly browned. As soon as they come out of the oven, brush with melted butter/garlic combination. Makes 6-8 large biscuits.
  17. Celiac.com 08/22/2014 - It is often hard to tell if isolated case reports have anything to contribute to the larger understanding of celiac disease. However, some case reports are enough in themselves to cause reflection, whatever their contribution to the larger scientific understanding may be. For most people with celiac disease, symptoms disappear and healing begins with the adoption of a gluten-free diet. For one 9-year-old girl, however, the battle to beat her symptoms and feel better did not end with a gluten-free diet. The girl had initially complained of non-specific abdominal discomfort, and showed positive blood tests for celiac disease. Duodenal biopsies revealed Marsh 3B histopathology. So, she definitely had celiac disease with corresponding symptoms. Despite following a strict gluten-free diet, the girl continued to have symptoms and show positive blood tests for active disease. Gluten is a common additive in plastics. After some detective work, the team discovered that the child was being exposed to gluten from her orthodontic retainer that contained a plasticized methacrylate polymer. She discontinued its use and her symptoms disappeared and her celiac blood tests returned to normal. This case illustrates that, even for patients on the strictest gluten-free diet, exposure to non-dietary sources of gluten, such as those used to make plastics, dental equipment, and cosmetics, can trigger or exacerbate celiac disease symptoms. This case also emphasizes the importance of ferreting out and removing all possible sources of gluten, including non-dietary, when managing celiac disease. Source: Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2013 Nov;52(11):1034-7. doi: 10.1177/0009922813506254.
  18. Summary:History of gluten intolerance, symptoms have returned despite no change in diet after 5 years of the same gluten sensitivity, I now seemingly react to the smallest cross-contamination and am not getting symptom relief. Do I need to worry about refractory sprue? I posted this on the celiac sub-reddit about two weeks ago but now I thought I could get more input here. A little background. When I was 14 years old, I started having strange joint pains in my wrists, persistent neuropathies and tingling in my hands, and other strange symptoms. Pains were seemingly inflammation of the tendons, made worse by exercise, and the inflammation responded well to NSAIDs. Went to a ton of doctors, tested for RA, MS, and anything else under the sun, but everything came back negative. "We don't know." My digestive health wasn't too bad or too good: I got constipated and got diarrhea from time to time, but not too often. I didn't really experience severe abdominal pains on a consistent basis so I didn't think anything of my digestive symptoms. As a result, no one checked anything digestive. The inflammation went away with NSAIDS. The only lasting effect after was that I absolutely couldn't exercise without developing terrible tendonitis and Joint pain within a few days, which caused a lot of depression. The disease remained stable in nature for a while until when I turned 21 or so. The chronic tendinitis spread to my ankles in addition to my wrists. The inflammation began to happen without any exercise, just from me existing. I also began having some more severe digestive problems, loose stools, poorly-formed stools, stomach pains, and felt like I was in a fog all the time. I tested negative for everything rheumatological. During a late-night research session, I googled a bunch of my symptoms and found out that a lot of people with gluten intolerance experience these same symptoms. I immediately went gluten-free. Over the course of the next two weeks, my digestive health was completely restored, and my joint pains were decreased by about 80% after about 1-2 months. I had an enormous amount of energy. I felt like a new person. I went to the doctor and got tested for Celiac, but the antibody test came up negative. I was already on a gluten-free diet, so I know that probably meant little. I know that my symptoms are not reflective of traditional Celiac and I apologize for self-diagnosing (no positive test). All I know is that going gluten-free absolutely changed my life and restored my health. Over the past five years, I've had absolutely no baseline changes in my gluten sensitivity. I cook most of my food, and eat at places like Chipotle and occasionally eat at restaurants and make sure not to order anything with wheat, rye, or barley. I get "gluten-fee" pizza at pizza places knowing that it's cooked in the same ovens with bread and do fine. I avoid beer and am careful with my alcohol selection, but basically, I was always able to tolerate cross-contamination. On the one occasion when I did eat bread, I had diarrhea for a week or two and then was back to normal. I was still tremendously prone to repetitive strain injuries and inflammation, but not to the same degree I had been before and ONLY after exercise. I was living my life. ... Fast forward to about 2-3 months ago. I have been going through a very stressful period in my life, and I think the stress triggered something. Simultaneously, I have a "glutening:" for a period of a couple of weeks, on 3 or 4 occasions, I eat sushi with imitation crab meat and rice binder that has wheat in it. I start having the pains in my ankles again. X-rays have shown that my ankles are swollen, and I haven't done anything but stayed on my feet and walked. Start developing tendonitis in my wrists again. The loose stools and indigestion are back and I feel like my brain is in a fog. I only get a little bit of symptom improvement if I eat the food I cook for myself. . I now respond to foods I wasn't responding to before. Eating at the same cafeteria I was eating at 5 months ago without a problem now causes a reaction. I have seemingly become very sensitive to ANY cross-contamination whereas just half-a year ago I could tolerate it without a problem. This is after five years of absolutely no change in my baseline reactivity. What the hell is going on? I've HAD glutenings before years back, and they never caused my symptoms to return and persist as they have now! And they NEVER changed my baseline sensitivity to gluten. All of my rheumatological tests have come up negative. I finally spoke to gastroenterolist yesterday and he agreed that this could be Celiac's disease, but had no answer for me on whether my baseline sensitivity would improve. I'm not willing to gluten myself for 6 weeks to get a positive blood test. The symptoms are too much to bare and I am trying to finish graduate school. My question is... if I do have Celiac... Has it suddenly gotten worse? Is it normal to have a sudden worsening of this condition, after 5 years at steady-state? I feel like I'm losing my mind, and have no idea what to do. I'm in constant pain and it's miserable. Whatever this is, it has taken such a huge toll on my life now.
  19. Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals. If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease. Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD. However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers. Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals. Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.” Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018. So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals. Source: cnbc.com
  20. Celiac.com 03/20/2015 - Mexican food and tacos are one of my most consistent gluten-free food options. If I'm on the road, or pressed for time, sometimes fast food chains are the only option. But not all Mexican fast food chains are created equal when it comes to gluten-free options. Some do a good job, others do not. So here is a list of Mexican fast food chains that do a good job with gluten-free food options. As always, your individual experience at any of these restaurants may vary, so observe, ask questions about any item you're not sure about, and gauge your comfort level accordingly. If you have feedback, or know of any other Mexican fast food chains that offer good gluten-free food options, be sure to tell us in the comments below. Best Mexican Fast Food Chains: #1: Chipotle Chipotle gets high marks for gluten-free options. Pretty much everything that is not served with a flour tortilla is gluten-free. So, at Chiptole, that means all soft and hard corn taco shells, all meats, beans, vegetables and sides are gluten-free. #2: El Pollo Loco El Pollo Loco is another chain where you can get a good, healthy meal without thinking too hard about gluten. El Pollo Loco gluten-free menu includes their flame grilled Mexican chicken, corn tortillas, pinto beans, refried beans, avocado salsa, Cotija Cheese, mixed vegetables, and flan. Basically, avoid any flour tortillas, and you can easily eat gluten-free at El Pollo Loco. #3: Jimboy's Tacos Jimboy's has long been a favorite of mine, because they prepare all their food fresh from scratch and offer a pretty robust gluten-free menu that includes Jimboy's original tacos, including bean, ground beef, chicken, steak, and carnitas, Tacoburgers, Taquitos in both ground beef, and chicken, Tostadas, including bean, ground beef, chicken, and steak, Ground Beef Kid's Taco, Ground Beef Pepper Poppers, and Jimboy's Guacamole & Sour Cream. #4: Baja Fresh Baja Fresh offers a pretty good range of options for gluten-free eaters. Gluten-free options include Baja Tacos made with corn tortillas, any “Bare style” burrito, and any Baja Ensalada with choice of steak, chicken, or grilled shrimp, as well as grilled vegetables, carnitas, rice, and both varieties of beans. All Baja Fresh dressings and salsas are gluten-free. #5: Qdoba Qdoba is another fast Mexican food chain that offers a solid eating experience for gluten-free diners. Qdoba's gluten-free menu options include all Chicken, Chorizo, Flat Iron Steak, Ground Sirloin, Pork, and Seasoned Shredded Beef. Also gluten-free are their Soft White Corn Tortilla, Cilantro Lime Rice, Black Beans, Tortilla Soup, all Salsas and Dressings, 3 Cheese Queso and Guacamole. #6 Taco Cabana I had the good fortune of trying Taco Cabana on a trip to Albuquerque a while back. I was not disappointed. Taco Cabana does gluten-free eaters right with a wide variety of gluten-free options, including their Black, Borracho, and Refried beans, their Barbacoa, Chicken Fajita Meat, Rotisserie Chicken, Shredded Chicken Taco Meat in their Crispy Tacos, Chorizo, Chalupas or Nachos Steak Fajita Meat, Ground Beef Taco Meat (Crispy Tacos, Chalupas or Nachos), and Street Tacos in both Chicken & Steak. As with most places on this list, diners can substitute corn tortillas for flour tortillas in all tacos, fajitas, & plates. Other gluten-free options include Guacamole, Hash Brown Potatoes, Pico de Gallo, Rice, and Salsas – Fuego, Roja, Verde, Ranch, and Sour Cream. #7: Mighty Taco Mighty Taco makes it easy on gluten-free eaters by offering any taco with a corns shell, and most anything else on their menu except flour tortillas. Mighty Taco's gluten-free menu includes: Mighty Taco with Seasoned Ground Beef or Chicken, Mighty Pack with Seasoned Ground Chicken, Refried Bean and Cheese, Meatless Mighty, Veggies and Cheese, Seasoned Ground Chicken, Seasoned Ground Beef, Fajita Chicken, Buffito Chicken, and the Taco Beef Salad, Mighty Chicken Salad, Chicken Fajita Salad, and the Chicken Buffito Salad.
  21. I have an immensely difficult time finding gluten-free, vegan, sugar-free, yeast-free bread products, so the ingredient list for this recipe couldn't be more ideal for a celiac. The only ingredients: teff, salt, and water. Injera is the bread staple of Ethiopia and is eaten by most households everyday. Injera is traditionally made solely with teff grain, although some modern recipes call for yeast or all-purpose flour as well. The high iron content of teff makes it a perfect choice for a bread substitute. This recipe is very easy however, injera requires advanced planning and will not work for a last minute meal, as it can take up to three days for the teff to ferment before cooking is possible. Traditional Ethiopian Teff Injera (Gluten-Free) Servings: 20 Ingredients: 3 cups ground teff 4 cup distilled water Himalayan salt to taste Olive oil for the skillet Note: This is a large batch, as I like to have left-overs. Also, the fermentation process takes a while, so it's nice to have some injera for later. For a smaller batch, cut the ingredients in half. Mix ground teff with the water and let stand in a bowl covered with a dish towel at room temperature until it bubbles and has turned sour. The fermentation process will take approximately 1-3 days. The fermenting mixture should be the consistency of a very thin pancake batter. Stir in the salt, a little at a time, until you can barely detect its taste. Lightly oil a skillet 8 inches minimum but you can also use a larger one. Heat over medium heat. Pour in enough batter to cover the bottom of the skillet; About 1/4 cup will make a thin pancake covering the surface of an 8 inch skillet if you spread the batter around immediately by turning and rotating the skillet in the air; This is the classic French method for very thin crepes; Injera is not supposed to be paper thin so you should use a bit more batter than you would for crepes, but less than you would for a flapjack pancakes. Cook briefly, until holes form in the injera and the edges lift from the pan; Do not let it brown, and don't flip it over as it is only supposed to be cooked on one side. Remove and let cool. Place plastic wrap or foil between successive pieces so they don't stick together. To serve, lay one injera on a plate and ladle your chosen dishes on top. Serve additional injera on the side. Guests can be encouraged to eat their meal without utensils, instead using the injera to scoop up their food. Important: Please use caution when eating with your hands. To avoid contamination make sure your hands are very clean with gluten-free soap before eating.
  22. Hello, everybody! It's my first post here on the forum. I'm 25 year old and I leave in Bulgaria, Europe. I've been gluten free for the last 5 years. Initially when I started my gluten-free journey I didn't have ataxia symptoms but I wasn't very careful then and I often got glutened. Then the ataxia showed up gradually. Now I have slight unsteadiness almost all of the time and when I get accidentally glutened my symptoms get worse. I wanted to share my experience and hear about your experience too so that I get a better understanding if it's really ataxia or it's something else. Here are some of my questions: How quickly does the ataxia symptoms return after you get glutened (mine come in a matter of minutes, if not seconds - and I am curious if that's even possible or my mind is playing tricks with me)? Is the ataxia the first symptom to show after a reaction (even before the abdominal cramps, etc.)? Or they are the last to show up for you (or they don't show up at all because you've healed, etc.)? After going gluten free did the ataxia completely resolved or it's still there but just less noticeable? ...And I can probably ask you a lot more things but that's a good start Any comments are welcome and appreciated because I've been fighting this battle on my own for years now – no one in my country is even aware of things like non-celiac gluten intolerance, gluten ataxia, etc. I should also point out that for the last 3 years I've been eating only WHOLE, REAL foods and nothing else. I am really careful about cross-contamination. So I feel like I am doing my absolute best to avoid all gluten but the unsteady feeling and lack of balance is still there. It's not like I am falling or anything, but it's very disturbing and sometimes scary – and most importantly it stops me from fulfilling my full potential and going after my dreams.
  23. Oops well I blew it big time. I failed to carefully read a supplement label. I saw that the company selling it said that it was gluten/soy free, but the ingredient list clearly showed that it wasn't. I took it for 200 days. I and my health care triangle couldn't figure out why I was swelling/ and gaining weight big time. The problems didn't stop there, we noted increased liver enzymes, and 3 months later sluggish kidney function. With treatment, the liver enzymes had gone down to normal levels. I kept taking the wrong supplement over last fall and winter. I felt more and more over-whelmed and unable to carry out my usual work. Finally recently, I went to order another several bottles of the supplement and discovered the ingredient list. I ran for my bottle in the freezer, oh sure, there it was. I quit taking the supplement right away. Then, it seemed like my real trouble began. My lymph system went wild, my thighs got enormous with ripples. I was cold and achy. This couldn't be from just one little bitty supplement? It was. A few months later, we tested my thyroid and found that it was working very hard. I wonder if anyone that has dealt with thyroid could answer this: Do we know the mechanism that brings a thyroid down. Is it always antibodies? We tested TPO which was negative, but didn't check the other kind of antibodies that I know of now. I am recovering so I am not sure if I should check the thyroid again and check the both antibodies or not. I can try a round of thyroid medicine to see if it helps, but would rather avoid it...well, unless I absolutely need it.
  24. Looking for a benadryl I can take thats soy and gluten free, about to take some antibiotics, like to have something to ease the side effects if I have any allergic reactions to it.
  25. Celiac.com 10/11/2012 - Would you be surprised to learn that a number of naturally brewed soy sauces are technically gluten-free? I was. I was recently doing some research for a catered even and needed to make a decision about what kind of soy sauce to use in the food preparation. Since the Korean food being served required a great deal of soy sauce for marinating purposes, the hosts were concerned that gluten-free tamari might end up costing too much. However, the event included a number of folks who eat gluten-free, and the hosts did want to provide food that everyone could eat. So, what to do? The restaurant making the food uses Kikkoman. Is Kikkoman safe to serve to people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance? In an effort to answer that question, I did a bit of research. I was a bit surprised when my research led me to an interesting article on the naturally fermented soy sauce made by Kikkoman and Lima Foods, which are two major manufacturers of soy sauce. There are two ways to manufacture soy sauce. The first uses natural fermentation. The second uses chemical hydrolysis. Both methods will break down the complex proteins including gluten into smaller components such as amino acids and polypeptides. However, the soy sauces tested for the article were produced using natural fermentation. That's because chemically produced (or artificial) soy sauce is may contain toxic and carcinogenic components produced by hydrochloric acid hydrolysis. The article said that the soy sauces made by these companies actually met Codex Alimentarius standards for gluten-free foods, and that tests show their gluten content to be well under the 20ppm required for gluten-free products. The people who produced the article sent samples out to a major laboratory in the Netherlands for gluten analysis, and the results were surprising. Gluten content in both samples was well under the acceptable detection limit of 5ppm (see report). According to a new European laws, any product labeled gluten-free must contain less than 20 ppm gluten. The FDA has proposed the same 20 ppm level for their rule, which they look set to implement very soon. That means that the naturally fermented soy sauces that were tested meet gluten-free standards, and will likely not trigger adverse reaction in gluten sensitive individuals, especially considering the small daily quantities of soy sauce consumed. Anyone who does not trust this can, of course, choose soy sauces that do not contain any wheat to start with. Tamari soy sauces are typically produced without wheat, but some brands do not follow this tradition and are not wheat-free, so: Buyer beware. As for the catered event, after talking with the gluten-free guests, the hosts decided to go with traditional Kikkoman. They have not received any reports of illness or adverse reactions, even in the several people with high gluten-sensitivity. I'm sure there are plenty of gluten-free eaters who have plenty to say about soy sauce. What's your take on the test results? Source: Soya.be LAB RESULTS