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Found 4 results

  1. Celiac.com 11/15/2010 - Fermentation of wheat flour with sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases decreases the concentration of gluten in wheat. Depending on the level of hydrolyzation, gluten levels can be reduced as low as 8 parts per million. A team of researchers recently conducted a small study to assess whether people with celiac disease can eat baked goods made with wheat flour that is hydrolyzed via sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases during food processing. The team included L. Greco, M. Gobbetti, R. Auricchio, R. Di Mase, F. Landolfi, F. Paparo, R. Di Cagno, M. De Angelis, C. G. Rizzello, A. Cassone, G. Terrone, L. Timpone, M. D'Aniello, M. Maglio, R. Troncone, S. Auricchio. They are affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics and European Laboratory for the Study of Food Induced Diseases, University of Naples, Federico II in Naples Italy. The team evaluated the safety of daily administration of baked goods made from this hydrolyzed form of wheat flour for patients with celiac disease. Patients who volunteered for the study were assigned at random to consume 200 grams per day of baked goods from one of three groups. The did so every day for 60 days. The first group of six patients ate natural flour baked goods (NFBG), with a gluten content of 80,127 ppm gluten. The second group of 2 patients ate baked goods made from extensively hydrolyzed flour (S1BG), with a residual gluten content of 2,480 ppm. The third group of patients ate baked goods made from fully hydrolyzed flour (S2BG), with just 8 ppm residual gluten. In the first group, two of the six patients consuming baked goods made with natural flour (NFBG) discontinued the challenge because of adverse symptoms. All six patients in this group showed increased levels of anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies and small bowel deterioration. The two patients who ate baked goods made from extensively hydrolyzed flour (S1BG) had no clinical complaints, but biopsy showed intestinal damage in the form of subtotal villous atrophy. The five patients who ate baked goods made with made from fully hydrolyzed flour (S2BG), at just 8 ppm residual gluten had no clinical complaints. Also, they showed no increase in anti-tTG antibodies, and Marsh grades of their small intestinal mucosa showed no adverse change. Evidence with this small 60-day dietary study shows that people with celiac disease can safely consume baked goods made from fully hydrolyzed wheat flour, manufactured with sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases. This flour shows no toxicicity to patients with celiac disease. The team notes that a combined analysis of serologic, morphometric, and immunohistochemical parameters is the most accurate method to assess new therapies for this disorder. The results need to be borne out by further study, but, in the future, baked goods made with fully hydrolyzed wheat flour, manufactured with sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases may become another option for people with celiac disease. Source: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Oct 15. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2010.09.025
  2. Celiac.com 07/25/2017 - Enzymes are playing an increasing part in both the treatment of celiac disease, and in the manufacture of gluten-free baked goods. DSM recently showcased their new rice-based baker's enzyme, Bakezyme, at the annual meeting of Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) in Las Vegas. The product took DSM two years to develop and perfect, and promises to improve the softness and moistness of gluten-free bread. Bakezyme is so good, says DSM, and leaves gluten-free bread so soft and so moist that it can compete with wheat-based breads in texture. Designed to meet an array of manufacturer needs, Bakezyme is available in five different enzyme classes–amylase, protease, xylanase, glucose oxidase and amyloglucosidase. The version with amylase, an anti-staling enzyme, for example, will retain the softness for at least nine days. Fokke Van den Berg, DSM global business manager for baking says that Bakezyme grew out of DSM's efforts to tackle the two biggest consumer complaints about gluten-free bread, the hardness, and the dryness. While most baker's enzymes are derived from wheat, Bakezyme is made of fermentation-derived microorganisms added to rice flour, making it suitable for people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance. Because the enzymes are deactivated during baking, Bakezyme is regarded as a processing aid and thus is not required to be listed as an ingredient. DSM tested Bakezyme on two types of dough, oat and a mixture of potato and rice, with each requiring a slightly different formulation for similar results. Beyond the slight costs of ensuring that Bakezyme is gluten-free, its overall price is on par other enzyme ingredients, partly because such a small amount is needed. One kilo of Bakezyme is enough to produce 10,000 kilos of bread. The company expects most demand to come from the US and UK as well as other European countries, but the gluten-free trend is also spreading to Brazil, Turkey and Morocco, said Van den Berg. Read more at FoodNavigator.com.
  3. Celiac.com 08/15/2014 - Systech Illinois, which makes gas analysis instruments, has struck a deal with Ultrapharm gluten-free bakery to monitor Ultrapharm’s modified atmosphere packs. Ultrapharm will use Systech’s oxygen and carbon dioxide headspace analyzer to make sure their products are properly sealed, and to test the inert packaging atmosphere for maximum shelf life. Beth Faulkner, marketing manager, Systech Illinois, told FoodProductionDaily that Ultrapharm is the first gluten-free bakery to partner with Systech for atmospheric quality assurance testing. Systech’s Gaspace Advance uses a probe that is inserted into the gas pack to measure levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The results are then shown on an LCD display. Ultrapharm opened its gluten-free baking facility in Poland in 2005. Nearly all of the company’s gluten-free products are exported from the Polish manufacturing site to Italy, Germany, France, UK and Ireland. The baking facility uses modified atmospheric packaging to extend shelf life of up to six months for its frozen breads, rolls and filled pastries and pies. Testing the modified atmospheric packs helps to assure proper shelf life, and to keep the product looking its best. Systech Illinois also produces oxygen permeation and water vapor permeation analyzers for packaging film, finished package and PET bottles.
  4. Celiac.com 06/18/2012 - Following US approval (SA GRAS) of its natural potato protein isolates, Dutch ingredients firm Solanic is touting their protein as a way for manufacturers to craft higher quality gluten-free baked goods. The protein is approved at levels of .01 to 10% in manufactured baked goods. The product is designed to create softer breads that will stay fresh longer, and which look and feel much more like regular wheat-based breads. According to Solanic manager for gluten-free, Paul Hart, the protein could bring the shelf-life for gluten-free bread products up to one-week. The company also claims that their protein also boasts a favorable amino acid profile that may help boost the nutritional value of products in which it is included. Solanic's protein isolates have been on the European market since 2008 and in the US market since 2009. The company is working to develop a gluten-free bread prototype by October 2012, and to develop cake prototypes thereafter. Stay tuned to see if the company's efforts help to put better gluten-free baked goods on store shelves in the near future. Source: http://www.bakeryandsnacks.com/Formulation/Gluten-free-bakery-potential-for-Solanic-s-potato-protein-isolates-after-SA-GRAS-approval
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