Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'growth'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • Recipes by Continent / Country
    • Biscuits, Rolls & Buns (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Noodles & Dumplings (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Dessert Recipes: Gluten-Free Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Bread Recipes (Gluten-Free)
    • Flour Mixes (Gluten-Free)
    • Kids Recipes (Gluten-Free)
    • Snacks & Appetizers (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Muffins (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Pancakes (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Pizzas & Pizza Crusts (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Cooking Tips
    • Scones (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Waffles (Gluten-Free Recipes)
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
  • Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location


First Name


Last Name


City


State


Country


How did you hear about us?

Found 11 results

  1. Celiac.com 08/12/2017 - The latest research report from HTF Market Intelligence Consulting is titled "Global Celiac Disease Drugs Market 2017-2021." The report offers detailed information and analysis of the competitive market landscape, forecast and strategies. The report covers geographic analysis that includes regions like Americas, APAC, EMEA, along with important players, including F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Johnson & Johnson, Merck, and Pfizer. It provides information, market insights, future trends and growth prospects for forecast period of 2017-2021. The report presents a detailed picture of the market by way of study, synthesis, and summation of data from multiple sources, and research analysts project the global market for celiac disease drugs to grow at a CAGR of 24.22% during the period through 2021. The primary treatment for celiac disease is still a completely gluten-free diet. There are a small number of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drugs and nutritional supplements that are used as off-label, secondary treatments in celiac disease, but as yet, no drugs approved for primary treatment of celiac disease. Development of such treatments for celiac disease offers huge potential for profit to any company who can get a drug approved for the commercial market. The growth projections attempt to reflect the data behind a fast growing global market. Request a sample report at: htfmarketreport.com
  2. Celiac.com 06/07/2017 - After nearly a decade of high double-digit growth, the US market for gluten-free foods is set to level off to single digit rates in coming years, according to a study from Research and Markets. The firm's report, titled Gluten-Free Foods in the U.S., 5th Edition, looks at sales of gluten-free food across nine product categories, specifically traditional grain-based salty snacks and crackers, bread, pasta, cereal, making mix, cookies, flour and frozen dough. The report covers gluten-free food products sold through all types of retail outlets, including supermarkets, discount stores and super-centers, warehouse clubs, and mass merchandisers, along with convenience stores, drugstores, health and natural food stores, dollar stores, farms and farmers' markets. The report projects sales of more than $2 billion in 2020, up nearly $400 million from 2015. Researchers included products based on the possibility that they could be formulated with gluten, and whether they were clearly labeled and marketed as gluten-free. The company culls data for sales and market size from a proprietary Packaged Facts national online consumer survey conducted in July/August 2014; IRI sales tracking through U.S. supermarkets and grocery stores, drugstores, and mass merchandisers (including Target, Kmart, and Wal-Mart) with annual sales of $2 million or more; and from the Simmons National Consumer Survey from Experian Marketing Services. The report provides analysis of leading brands and marketers, key facts about gluten and how it can be avoided, gluten-free trends and opportunities, competition, food service markets, regulations and product development, and marketing trends. The full report is available at: Pizzamarketplace.com
  3. Celiac.com 04/01/2017 - Global Market Insights has just released its latest report on global gluten free food markets. The report is entitled Gluten Free Food Market Size, Industry Outlook Report, Regional Analysis (U.S., Germany, UK, Italy, Russia, China, India, Japan, South Korea, Brazil, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, UAE, South Africa), Downstream Application Development Potential, Price Trends, Competitive Market Share & Forecast, 2016 – 2023. The report uses comprehensive data to generate reports on gluten free markets and market segments through 2023. Some of the more general insights include: The global gluten free food market size was about 350,000 tons in 2014, and current report estimates that it will grow at a CAGR of more than 9%, to likely exceed 750 kilo tons by 2023. The market was valued at over 4 billion in 2014 and is likely to be worth more than 9 billion by 2023, growing at an estimated CAGR of over 10%. The largest sector was gluten-free bakery products, with 55% of the total market volume in 2014. The gluten-free bakery sector is set to see more than 7% growth through 2023. Cereals & snacks, pizzas, pastas and savories are all likely to show higher growth rates over the forecast period. With over 50% of the total gluten-free market by volume in 2014, the EU will continue to be a major player in the global gluten free food market. North America generated about 20% of total market volume in 2014, and is likely to show strong growth through 2023. The last major insight in their summary included the acknowledgement that the global gluten free food market share is only moderately consolidated among major companies, such as Kellogg’s Company, Boulder Brands, Dr Schar., Hain Celestial, Freedom Foods Group and General Mills. There is still room to grow, and room for consolidation, so look for potential synergy between major players and other prominent companies, such as Ener-G Foods and Genius Foods Ltd, Raisio PLC, Valeo Foods, Hero Group Ag and Kraft Heinz Company. The full report is available for purchase at GMInsights.com
  4. My 3 year old son was diagnosed with celiac at the beginning of May. He went from 75th percentile in height and weight to the 10th percentile since he was around 18 months old. Between 2 and 3 he only grew about 1.5 inches and actually lost a half pound. Since his 3 year appointment in March until today at an appointment with his regular pediatrician, he has only grown 3/4 inch but gained 2 lbs. She was pleased with the growth and weight gain but I guess as a mom, I'm still concerned. He had a bone scan at 3 and it showed his bone age was an entire year behind. I'm guessing this is a good thing since it means that he will most likely catch up to where his body is supposed to be? Does catchup growth really happen? He has been strictly gluten free for almost 3 1/2 months and we've only slipped up once or twice getting accidentally glutened by something that was supposed to be gluten free. Am I just being paranoid and it's still to early to see a major difference in height? He did go up a shoe size and by the looks of it, he will size up again within the next month or so.
  5. Celiac.com 04/08/2015 - The goal of growth-monitoring programs in children is the early detection of any disorders that affect growth. Celiac disease is under-diagnosed in kids whose symptoms include faltering linear growth, short stature, or poor weight gain. A team of researchers recently set out to develop new evidence-based parameters for screening for growth disorders and to evaluate the performance of these cutoffs among children with celiac disease measured regularly in a nationwide growth screening program. The research team included Antti Saari, MD; Samuli Harju, BM; Outi Mäkitie, MD, PhD; Marja-Terttu Saha, MD, PhD; Leo Dunkel, MD, PhD; and Ulla Sankilampi, MD, PhD. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, the Children’s Hospital at the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital in Helsinki, Finland, the Folkhälsan Research Centre in Helsinki, Finland, the Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, the Department of Pediatrics at Tampere University Hospital in Tampere, Finland, the Centre for Endocrinology at the William Harvey Research Institute of Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry at Queen Mary University of London in London, England and the Department of Pediatrics at Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Their longitudinal retrospective study included growth data of healthy children from primary health care providers, and children with celiac disease from primary health care, and three university hospital outpatient clinics in Finland, Kuopio University Hospital, Tampere University Hospital, and Helsinki University Hospital, from January 1, 1994, to April 9, 2009. Children of the reference population were under 20 years of age, while children in the celiac disease group were between 1 and 16 years of age. In the reference population of 51,332 healthy children, the team screened according to five age- and sex-specific growth parameters: height standard deviation score and body mass index standard deviation score, distance from the population mean, distance from target height, change in height standard deviation score, and change in body mass index standard deviation score. They evaluated these parameters and their combination in 177 children with celiac disease by analyzing longitudinal growth data from birth until diagnosis of celiac disease. They measured the screening accuracy for detecting abnormal growth in children with celiac disease by using receiver operating characteristics analysis expressed as the area under the curve. When the team screened using the combination of all 5 growth-screening parameters, they detected celiac disease with good accuracy ([95% CI] = 0.88 [0.84–0.93] for girls and 0.84 [0.77–0.91] for boys). When they set the screening specificity at 90%, they saw abnormal growth in 57% of the girls with celiac disease, and in 48% of the boys with celiac disease for two years prior to diagnosis. This study shows that most kids with celiac disease experience faltering growth prior to diagnosis. An effective growth-monitoring program could have detected celiac disease in these kids several years earlier. By using several growth-monitoring parameters in combination, preferably using computerized screening algorithms that are integrated into an electronic health record system, researchers can improve sreening accuracy. Source: JAMA Pediatr. 2015;169(3):e1525. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.25.
  6. Celiac.com 02/11/2014 - Looks like the gluten-free market will see growth again in 2014, at least, according to a survey conducted as part of the Market LOHAS MamboTrack Annual Natural & Organic Consumer Study, and funded by FreeBird Chicken and Plainville Farms Turkey, both part of the HAIN Corporation (Nasdaq: HAIN). Interestingly, the survey was not dedicated to gluten-free dieters, but to "health conscious" consumers. In the survey, at least seven out of ten said that they frequently purchased products labeled gluten-free, and at least four in ten stated they planned on purchasing more gluten-free products in the coming year. The survey they conducted also predicted more "farm-to-table" product requests, and an emphasis on natural farming techniques. How This Affects Gluten-free Consumers As the gluten-free lifestyle becomes more mainstream rather than niche, there will likely be an influx of products and services available to gluten-free consumers across the entire U.S., versus just in the trendier and more health-conscious West Coast and East Coast areas. Gluten-free items will eventually be making their way into smaller local grocers and hometown markets as both the demand from health conscious consumers and newly diagnosed celiac disease and Non-Celiac Gluten Intolerance sufferers continues. Grocery store shoppers will increasingly see gluten-free sections or aisles, or an increase in boxes and cans marked "Gluten-Free." One can only assume that the demand will not only increase availability, even in smaller gluten-free markets such as the "Bread Basket States" and the Midwest, but will also allow prices on gluten-free products will also level out. With the cost of gluten-free products being so much higher (sometimes as much as 30% more) than their traditional counterparts, this is a great thing for celiac patients and those with gluten intolerance. On the flip-side, though, there may also be a down-side to the increased availability of gluten-free products: the loss of nutritional quality at the expense of providing lower prices and meeting higher demands. The biggest fear is that no longer will these "gluten-free products" offer healthy alternatives, but rather, just non-gluten-containing versions of already nutritionally unstable foods. Most Americans are attracted to convenience foods, or "pre-boxed" or "pre-made" foods because of their affordability and quick preparation times that fit busy-lifestyles perfectly. Major food industry manufacturers of course know this applies to newly diagnosed Celiac and gluten-intolerant individuals as mush as it does to "average" consumers. And, so, many more "convenience foods" and "snack-type foods" are sure to appear in the coming months. As more major food industry players get involved in processing gluten-free foods, the gluten-free dieter will be given the opportunity to purchase MORE VARIETY, but not necessarily HEALTHIER or MORE NUTRITIONAL VARIEITIES of products. Instead, as of late, gluten-free consumers are seeing more "overly-processed" food options enter into the marketplace; which, by all means are gluten-free, but may be pretty scant when it comes to actual nutritional value. A white powdered prepackaged donut is still a donut, regardless of whether or not it is processed with gluten-free flour blends or is made with "traditional" white flour. In other words, a gluten-free donut is really no healthier than a non-gluten-free donut in terms of nutritional value. This is especially true if the manufacturer uses starches with relatively low-nutritional-value because they also happen to be "inexpensive" to produce food with. (Thus, still increasing their bottom line profits even if they appear to lower the price of gluten-free foods on the shelf.) Before the mass production of gluten-free products, one would have had to adjust their entire diet. (No donuts or traditional cakes and MSG- containing canned and frozen meals.) Therefore, those who became healthier from the diet became so by avoiding gluten AND by the necessity to make wiser food choices all together like fruits, veggies, nuts, seeds, homemade food and "small batch" gluten-free products made with high quality ingredients and sense of responsibility and concern for the gluten-free consumer’s response to their product as well as their health and well-being. This advent and introduction of new products and cheaper products by big industry (the pastas, breads, mixes, and myriad of ready-to-eat canned and frozen gluten-free options from big-box suppliers) might actually make it more complicated for consumers in the long run. While there are definite differences, there may be some parallels in the emergence of "gluten-free products" with the emergence of "sugar-free products" manufactured for the rising diabetic market. In 1980, 5.8 million people were diagnosed with diabetes (Source: CDC). No coincidence that this is the same time period that sugar substitutes and "sugar-free" versions really began to swarm the market. What might appear on the surface to be a "healthier" option to someone who is suffering from diabetes (or gluten intolerance) might later prove to be just a slick bandaid-type-solution to a much-deeper nutritional issue. In conclusion, while the expanding market promises new products and more availability, it is always wise to read labels carefully, eat whole, natural foods, and to educate yourself on nutrition and gluten intolerances whenever possible so that you can make informed decisions on your health instead of taking your cues from brands and advertisers.
  7. Lancet 2000;356:399-400. (Celiac.com 08/13/2000) According to a recent study by Dr. Antonio Gasbarrini and colleagues from Gemelli Hospital, Catholic University, in Rome, celiac disease may play a role in recurrent spontaneous abortion and intrauterine fetal growth retardation. The researchers studied 44 patients who had a history of spontaneous abortion, 39 patients who had fetuses with intrauterine growth retardation and 50 normal controls. For each group the researchers measured serum concentrations of IgA anti-endomysial and IgG anti-transglutaminase. According to Dr. Antonio Gasbarrini: The patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion and those with intrauterine fetal growth retardation had a significantly higher frequency of serological markers of celiac disease than controls, as reported in the July 29th issue of The Lancet. Further, they found that three patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion (8%) and six patients whose fetuses had growth retardation (15%) tested positive for celiac disease. In addition, nine of the patients also underwent an endoscopy (jejunal biopsy), and eight were positive for celiac disease. Of the positive endoscopy group three patients showed duodenal mucosa with chronic inflammation and subtotal villous atrophy and five patients presented with severe mucosal atrophy. The researchers also point out that while about 1 in 1000 people in Europe have some symptomatic gluten-sensitivity, it is now becoming clear that a greater proportion of individuals have a clinically silent form of the disease, and probably many others have a minor form of enteropathy. Their research shows that it is important to recognize celiac disease as a possible risk factor for recurrent spontaneous abortion and intrauterine fetal growth retardation, but it remains to be seen whether the removal of gluten from the diet will decrease the incidence of both problems for women with celiac disease.
  8. Celiac.com 09/19/2012 - Researchers have documented rising rates of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). A research team recently tried to assess the effect of celiac disease on growth and glycemic control in patients with T1D, and to determine the effects of a gluten-free diet on these parameters. The research team included I. Taler, M. Phillip, Y. Lebenthal, L. de Vries, R. Shamir, and S. Shalitin. They are affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics B, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel in Petach Tikva, Israel. To do so, they conducted a longitudinal retrospective case-control study, in which they reviewed the medical data on 68 patients with T1D and duodenal-biopsy-confirmed celiac disease. They looked at weight, height, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), frequency of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), and severe hypoglycemic events before and after diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease. They then compared their findings with 131 patients with T1D alone, who were all matched for age, gender, and duration of diabetes. In all, 5.5% patients with T1D who attended the center during the study period were diagnosed with celiac disease, while 26% of the patients with celiac disease were symptomatic. The data showed no significant differences in glycemic control or frequency of severe hypoglycemia or DKA events between the study group and control subjects. Body mass index-standard deviation score (SDS), height-SDS, and HbA1c values were insignificantly higher in the control group than in the study group, and similar in celiac disease patients with good or fair/poor adherence to a gluten-free diet during follow-up. Patients with T1D and celiac disease and following a gluten-free diet have growth and metabolic control similar to those with T1D with no celiac disease. To determine whether a gluten-free diet is appropriate for asymptomatic celiac patients or only symptomatic patients must be assessed against possible short- and long-term consequences of no intervention, and the decision should be based on more evidence from larger randomized studies. Source: Pediatr Diabetes. 2012 May 7. doi: 10.1111/j.1399-5448.2012.00878.x.
  9. Clinical Endocrinology, March 2005, vol. 62, no. 3, pp. 372-375(4) Celiac.com 04/29/2005 – In an effort to determine the occurrence of growth hormone deficiency (GFD) in children with celiac disease, Italian researchers evaluated 1,066 children who were diagnosed with short stature. All patients were screened for celiac disease using anti-endomysial antibodies (EMA), and those with positive results were given a follow-up biopsy. The researchers found that 210 or 19.7% of the children had GHD, and of these12 also had positive EMA and biopsy and were diagnosed with celiac disease. After one year on a gluten-free diet 9 of these 12 children showed marked growth improvement, while the remaining 3 showed no catch-up growth. Additional tests found an isolated GHD in one of the children, and multiple GHDs in the other 2 children. Growth hormone therapy was initiated in addition to a gluten-free diet in these 3 children, which led to an increase in their growth rate. The researchers conclude that growth hormone should be evaluated in those with celiac disease whose growth does not improve on a gluten-free diet, and growth hormone therapy should be started in these individuals while on a gluten-free diet.
  10. Celiac.com 11/22/2007 - Faced with a lack of data on growth rates and histological recovery in Asian children with celiac disease, a team of doctors led by Surender K. Yachna set out to evaluate the result of a gluten-free diet. The study findings appear in the Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology. The research team looked at forty-two children with celiac disease. The team chronicled weight and height as weight for height (WFH) and height standard deviation scores (HSDS) deviation scores. 25 of the 42 children underwent duodenal biopsies after 1 and 2 years, while 14 of the children underwent a third biopsy after being on a gluten-free diet for 3-7 years. The research team measured compliance with a gluten-free diet in the children using regular interviews & IgA anti-endomysial antibody estimation (EMA). The average HSDS was 3.3 + 1.6 with 76% showing an HSDS of <-2, with 60% of the children undernourished, with an average WfH of 81.6 + 5.7. Over an average follow-up span of 3.7 years, the HSDS improved significantly to -1.3 + 1.7, with 84% of cases achieving normal nutrition. The average growth rate was 13.9 cm for the first year, and 5.6 cm in the following years. The small bowel biopsies conducted upon diagnosis revealed Marsh IIIb subtotal villous atrophy in 18, or 72%, of the patients, and partial villous atrophy in 7, or 28%. Follow-up biopsy after 1-2 years revealed a change to partial villous atrophy in 17 of the 18 who originally showed Marsh IIIb subtotal villous atrophy. One patient showed a normal biopsy. All 7 patients who originally showed partial villous atrophy showed improvement. 81% of the patients showed negative results for IgA endomysial antibody. Follow-up biopsies conducted after 5 years of Gluten-free Diet showed improvement to Marsh I-II, but no normalization. From these results, the team concluded that most children with celiac disease exhibit normal nutritional uptake and growth patterns with the introduction of a gluten-free diet, and that most also show significant improvement in small bowel histology, but none show normalization, even after 5 years of a dedicated gluten-free diet. Journal of Gastroenterology Hepatology. 2007; 22(8): 1300-1305
  11. Arch Dis Child 2004;89:871-876. Celiac.com 07/12/2005 – Australian researchers have determined that a gluten-free diet in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus and celiac disease can improve both growth and diabetes control. In the study 21 children (mean age 7.5 years) with both conditions went on a gluten-free diet for 12 months, and their growth and insulin dosages were carefully measured and compared with that of two matched diabetic, non-celiac controls. The group on a gluten-free diet showed significant increases in weight and body mass index compared with the control group, although an increase in height found in the study was not found to be significant. At the time of diagnosis insulin dosages for the celiac disease group were less than that of the control group, but became similar to the controls once a gluten-free diet was started—although the increase in insulin dosage had no effect on HbA1c levels. The researchers conclude: “Identification and dietary treatment of celiac disease in children with diabetes improved growth and influenced diabetic control. Evaluation of the outcome of treatment of celiac disease in diabetics should include assessments of gluten intake.” Obviously all children (and everyone) with celiac disease should be on a gluten-free diet, but what is noteworthy about this study is that a connection was found between insulin levels, diabetes control, and the gluten-free diet.
×
×
  • Create New...