Jump to content
Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease Read more... ×
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'guide'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
    • Lists of Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Addison's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Anemia and Celiac Disease
    • Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Celiac Disease
    • Arthritis and Celiac Disease
    • Asthma and Celiac Disease
    • Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease
    • Attention Deficit Disorder and Celiac Disease
    • Autism and Celiac Disease
    • Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease
    • Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease
    • Candida Albicans and Celiac Disease
    • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) & Celiac Disease
    • Casein / Cows Milk Intolerance and Celiac Disease
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
    • Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Depression and Celiac Disease
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Diabetes and Celiac Disease
    • Down Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Dyspepsia, Acid Reflux and Celiac Disease
    • Epilepsy and Celiac Disease
    • Eye Problems, Cataract and Celiac Disease
    • Fertility, Pregnancy, Miscarriage and Celiac Disease
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Flatulence (Gas) and Celiac Disease
    • Gall Bladder Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Celiac Disease
    • Geographic Tongue (Glossitis) and Celiac Disease
    • Growth Hormone Deficiency and Celiac Disease
    • Heart Failure and Celiac Disease
    • Infertility, Impotency and Celiac Disease
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Intestinal Permeability and Celiac Disease
    • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Kidney Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Liver Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Lupus and Celiac Disease
    • Malnutrition, Body Mass Index and Celiac Disease
    • Migraine Headaches and Celiac Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis Celiac Disease
    • Obesity, Overweight & Celiac Disease
    • Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Bone Density and Celiac Disease
    • Psoriasis and Celiac Disease
    • Refractory Celiac Disease & Collagenous Sprue
    • Sarcoidosis and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma and Celiac Disease
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sepsis and Celiac Disease
    • Sjogrens Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Skin Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sleep Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Celiac Disease
    • Thyroid & Pancreatic Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Tuberculosis and Celiac Disease
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Winter 2019 Issue
    • Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Summer 2018 Issue
    • Spring 2018 Issue
    • Winter 2018 Issue
    • Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Summer 2017 Issue
    • Spring 2017 Issue
    • Winter 2017 Issue
    • Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Summer 2016 Issue
    • Spring 2016 Issue
    • Winter 2016 Issue
    • Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Summer 2015 Issue
    • Spring 2015 Issue
    • Winter 2015 Issue
    • Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Summer 2014 Issue
    • Spring 2014 Issue
    • Winter 2014 Issue
    • Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Summer 2013 Issue
    • Spring 2013 Issue
    • Winter 2013 Issue
    • Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Summer 2012 Issue
    • Spring 2012 Issue
    • Winter 2012 Issue
    • Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Summer 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2006 Issue
    • Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
    • United States of America: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Organizations
    • Outside the USA: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Contacts
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com
    • History of Celiac.com Updates Through October 2007
    • Your E-mail in Support of Celiac.com 1996 to 2006

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 10 results

  1. Celiac.com 08/12/2018 - Receiving a celiac disease diagnosis or being told you need to be on a gluten-free diet can be an overwhelming experience, and it is certainly not for the faint of heart. Most people get frustrated with the transition, and many don't know where to begin. While eating gluten-free can improve your health, I must emphasize that it is not recommended to attempt a gluten-free diet without a doctors supervision, as there are many potential health risks involved with making drastic changes to your diet, which can be avoided with assistance of a qualified doctor and/or nutritionist. If you suspect gluten-intolerance to be the culprit for your health problems, get examined by a doctor and get tested for celiac disease before initiating a gluten-free diet. It is very important to continually consume gluten while you are undergoing testing for celiac disease because many of the tests require you to be consuming gluten to get accurate results. Prescription: A Gluten-Free Diet Now that you have your diagnosis and need to eliminate gluten, you can make the transition to a gluten-free diet with confidence. The following information is a guideline of what you will need to know to get started. I must emphasize that this is only a guideline, and you will need to do your own research and consult with your doctor for more detailed information on a gluten-free diet. It is also a great idea to get involved in local support groups. Support groups will have members that understand what you are going through and they can help direct you to beneficial resources: Celiac Disease Support Groups, Organizations & Contacts Create New Habits To begin, if you are accustomed to doing things your own way, you will have to throw out many of your old habits. To avoid gluten poisoning you must keep all gluten away from your mouth. You will need to evaluate everything you ingest very carefully. Gluten can come in a variety of unexpected ways, including a kiss from a loved one, and any gluten that comes into contact with your mouth is a potential source of contamination. Cross-contamination can occur when a meal is prepared on cooking equipment shared with gluten-containing foods. It can also come from touching anything that has come into contact with gluten. It is therefore important to gluten-proof your house and to keep everything you eat separate from gluten and gluten residue. If you eat at restaurants, it is important to only eat at places that you know are safe. To help you avoid accidental gluten ingestion, please follow your instincts and use the following guidelines and avoid potential health hazards. Please remember that these are only guidelines--if you still have questions, please consult with a medical professional. What does "Gluten-Free" Actually Mean? Since gluten is found in wheat, rye and barley, it is obvious that you will need to avoid these grains. Less obvious however, are the myriad of products that contain gluten as a hidden ingredient. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently regulated the use of "gluten-free" on a food label, and there was already an FDA regulation that requires manufacturers to declare wheat if it is used as an ingredient in a product. Products that don't use "gluten-free" on their label unfortunately don't have to disclose ingredients that are made from barley or rye, which requires you to learn to read and understand ingredient labels. Many additives, natural or artificial, can contain gluten. Sometimes companies label products as "gluten-free" or the ingredients are naturally gluten-free, but the product may have be contaminated if it was manufactured on shared equipment. You will have to decide if you want to include such products in your diet. It is also important to remember, for reasons just mentioned, that “wheat-free” does not mean “gluten-free.” Batch Testing: According to current FDA proposals, products testing at less than 20 parts per million (PPM) for gluten will likely be allowed to be labeled "gluten-free," and, according to them, are considered safe for people with gluten-intolerance or celiac disease. There are several organizations that offer gluten-free certification for companies who follow their guidelines and batch test their products. Check out the link below for more information on gluten-free certification and labeling. Gluten-Free Food Certification Program by the Gluten Intolerance Group Gluten-Free Shopping Shopping will likely take much longer for you than it used to. Don't rush. It is important to read all ingredients carefully. If you are in a hurry, you run the risk of overlooking a key ingredient that might contain gluten. I find it helpful to plan my meals in advance. There is nothing worse than coming home from work hungry and realizing that you have nothing to eat (and it isn't like you can go to the first drive-thru you find). So planning my meals on the weekend and doing my shopping in advance, cuts my stress level down considerably and keeps me from going hungry. Check your products against your gluten-free guidebooks, and contact the manufacturer if you are unsure about something. The following links will help you take the guess work out of shopping for gluten-free products: Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) As mentioned, there are also many products that are naturally gluten-free that are not labeled "gluten-free," and there are some very helpful books that can help you find these foods when you are shopping. A Gluten-Free Kitchen A gluten-free kitchen is very important. If you can have an entirely gluten-free kitchen, that is ideal, but it may not be an option for many households. Therefore it is especially important to keep your house clean and free of gluten contaminates. It is also important to dedicate special kitchen supplies for gluten-free cooking. I bought a new cutting board that is dedicated only to gluten-free cooking. You may also want to have separate kitchen utensils such as sponges, toasters (a dedicated gluten-free toaster is highly recommended), sifters, bread machines, etc. This is especially important if you use utensils that are made of wood, plastic, or other porous materials that could harbor gluten and possibly contaminate your gluten-free food. If possible use an electric dishwasher to clean your dishes. If everyone in your household is going gluten-free it is important to clean out and empty all of the gluten products from your kitchen. If you share a kitchen with gluten eating family members, it is a good idea to store their food products separately from your gluten-free products, and to clean off all surfaces before you prepare your gluten-free food. Dedicating gluten-free cupboards and refrigerator shelves is a great way to start. Here are some important links that will help you cook gluten-free meals with ease: Gluten-Free Cooking Gluten-Free Recipes Kitchen Checklist - Possible Sources of Contamination: Bread-machine Toaster Sponges & cleaning pads All kitchen supplies & utensils Colanders Cutting boards Door handles Soaps For more information on maintaining a safe kitchen environment, click the link below: What You Need If You Can't Have A Gluten-Free Kitchen Dining Out Gluten-Free Dining out presents a challenge for most people on a gluten-free diet. Depending on your level of sensitivities, you may have difficulty eating out at all. Even if the restaurant offers a gluten-free menu, it is always important to find out what safety precautions the restaurant uses to avoid cross-contamination, and to make sure all the ingredients in your food are gluten-free. This may require you to modify your order, and also may mean talking with the chef about their kitchen practices. You may also benefit from utilizing a guide to safe restaurants. Here is an additional article that may be helpful to your situation: Take Charge of Your Meal When Eating Out A Gluten-Free Bathroom Believe it or not, your bathroom is another place where you might be getting sick from gluten contamination, and not even know it. There are many products in your bathroom to watch out for as many body products contain wheat and/or hidden gluten ingredients. Most celiacs can use body products without a negative reaction, though some people experience rashes and other unsavory reactions from gluten body products. However, if you are using face or body products that contain gluten, it is very important not to ingest them. I find it difficult to avoid getting shampoo or makeup near my mouth, so I don't take any chances. I use gluten-free soap, shampoo, conditioner, face-cleaner, toner, make-up, toothpaste; basically nothing goes onto my body that contains gluten. Using gluten-free body products allows me the freedom to worry less about accidental contamination, and gives me more time to enjoy my life. Many gluten-free body products are not labeled gluten-free, so it is important to read ingredient labels carefully and check with the manufacturer if necessary. Bathroom Checklist: Toothpaste Shampoo/conditioner Make-up Lip-stick, lip-liner, lip-gloss, cosmetics, etc. Lotion Sunscreen Gluten-Free Medications (Prescriptions and Supplements) Most people with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance also suffer from malabsorption and sometimes malnutrition. Your doctor may prescribe pain, anti-inflammatory, digestive or other medications or supplements to help assist with your recovery. It is very important to note that some medications and supplements can contain gluten. Do not assume that just because your doctor knows you have celiac disease or gluten intolerance that the medications or supplements they may prescribe for you are gluten-free. Be your own advocate and read the ingredients and contact your pharmacist and/or the manufacturer and find out if your prescriptions, vitamins and supplements are gluten-free. Gluten-Free Medications List Additional Concerns Children with Celiac Disease Raising children with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance is no easy feat. Your kids will have to deal with immense peer pressure and there will be a great deal of temptation for them to eat gluten-containing foods. Talk to the staff at their school and help them to understand your child's special needs. The more support you have, the better off your child will be. There are many support groups that advocate for children with celiac disease, and it is important to get involved and learn everything you can to help support your child. Raising our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K) Support Group Pets Your pets present another source of potential contamination, especially if you have pets like mine that love to smother you with unexpected kisses, sometimes on the mouth. What your pet eats can affect you too. Handling your pet's food, cleaning your pet's dishes and having young celiac children in a house where they may eat dog or cat food are all legitimate concerns. I decided to switch my pets to gluten-free pet food. Most pet food is not labeled gluten-free, so it is important to read ingredients carefully. I found grain-free, all natural pet food to be a great alternative to gluten-containing pet foods, that way I don't have to worry about accidental contamination or getting kisses from my pets--and it's healthier for them too! It is also important to check all other pet products that you come into contact with for hidden gluten ingredients, like shampoos and soaps. It is of course always important to talk to your veterinarian before making any dietary changes for your pet. Other Food Sensitivities Most people who begin a gluten-free diet experience almost immediate relief from their symptoms. However, many people experience gluten-like reactions to other foods, and often suspect that their food was contaminated by gluten. As it turns out, many people who experience such reactions may in fact have additional food sensitivities. Some of the most common food sensitivities include, dairy/casein, soy, corn, sugar, nuts, shell-fish and processed or fatty foods. While many people report that they are able to add these foods back into their diet after they have established a gluten-free diet for many months, and after their intestines have had time to heal, it is up to you and your doctor or nutritionist to determine which foods may be causing you trouble. The 'elimination diet' is often recommended for determining what additional food sensitivities you may have. Ask your doctor if the elimination diet is right for you. Food Diary It is important to keep a food diary, especially when first initiating a gluten-free diet. Making notes of the foods you eat and the reactions you have to the foods you eat, and how you feel that day, can give you more insight as to which foods are hurting you and which foods your body can easily digest. Final Thoughts Be Picky Having a gluten intolerance means taking pride in your body, but not being too proud to say, "no, thank you." Don't worry about appearing too picky to others, you simply can't take care of yourself and worry what others think of you at the same time. You have the right to eat what you want; if something doesn't look, smell or taste right to you, or if you just don't feel right about eating something, don't eat it! It is better to come across as too finicky, than to spend the night in the bathroom or worse yet, the emergency room. Everyone has a different level of gluten sensitivity and you will have to find out through trial and error what works best for you. Be Prepared As a former Boy-Scout, my high-school teacher used to always say, "Be prepared". I cannot emphasize enough the importance of this statement. It is important to be prepared and think ahead. Keep gluten-free snacks on hand at all times, because you never know when you are going to get hungry somewhere that doesn't offer gluten-free food. Keep shelf-stable snacks in your car, office, purse, and anywhere you spend time. It is better to have gluten-free snacks on hand, then to get hungry and make a bad decision to eat something you might later regret. Gluten-Free Quick-Check: Read all labels carefully Call the manufacturer whenever necessary Avoid cross-contamination at all times Keep your hands clean Check personal-care products for hidden gluten Check all vitamins, supplements and RX prescriptions for hidden gluten Make sure your pets are gluten-free Maintain a food diary Get involved-join a support group Rule of thumb-if you think it's possibly contaminated, don't take any chances. It's better to go hungry than to suffer later. Above all, trust your body Additional Resources: Gluten-Free Forum Celiac Disease Support Groups Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  2. Hi all, I was diagnosed with both Celiac and Microscopic Colitis (Callogenous) last year, and while I'm feeling largely better, I've never been able to find a succinct and ready-to-go guide for people with MC and Celiac, and am having an especially hard time finding one that is friendly for vegetarians. Any advice, links, or reads that anyone might have would be greatly appreciated!
  3. Hi all, Forgive the presumption. I don't have anything near the experience or knowledge base of others here, however I wonder if there's a need for an Intro post for the pre diagnostic board that could serve a similar purpose to this one: The same questions come up again and again, so this could save some time for users helping new members as long as they agree with the 'stock' answers. I have some time on my hands and want to put something back here having been the recipient of your collective support, so I thought I'd have a go at a draft. If you think the forum is better off without such a post (perhaps with a simple stickied redirect to a bona fide medical site) instead then by all means say so. If however it's a good idea in your opinion. feel free to tear it apart and correct as you see fit. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Welcome to the forum. If you're in this section, or have been directed here, you've yet to be diagnosed but may suspect that Celiac or gluten could be an issue for you. Please note that we are not medical professionals and although happy to share our experience and support you should at all times seek medical advice rather than relying on internet based sources. That said, we'll do our best to answer any question you have, just start a topic, but before you post please take a look at the following answers and links to see if they help answer your questions. I have symptoms X,Y and Z could I have Celiac or Gluten sensitivity? We don't know! No-one here can diagnose you via an online post, however detailed or however much your symptoms suggest a connection. Diagnosis is something for you to explore with your Doctor. What we can tell you is that as Celiac affects the auto immune system it can present in a lot of different ways or none, here's a short summary: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/symptoms/ and here's a much longer list of associated conditions: https://glutenfreeworks.com/gluten-disorders/symptom-guide/ I don't feel well, should I give up gluten to see if that's the problem? Giving up gluten shouldn't be your first port of call, that would be your doctor! Even if you're right to suspect gluten, an accurate diagnosis of Celiac requires the patient to be consuming gluten. If you remove it beforehand you may have a much harder time finding out if gluten really is a problem for you. Also, the Gluten Free diet can be tricky to follow and it may be that you don't need to be quite so restrictive. There is evidence to suggest that other foods may be to blame for symptoms: http://bottomlineinc.com/before-you-give-up-gluten-try-a-low-fodmap-diet/ but you won't find out if you remove gluten first. I've already excluded gluten and feel better on the gluten-free diet, should I still get tested? This is something you will have to decide for yourself, preferably after a discussion with your doctor. The benefits of testing may include recognition and additional ongoing support from the medical community, further testing for malabsorption, monitoring of intestinal damage and recovery, access to dietician advice and automatic testing for close relatives who may have undiagnosed celiac. The validation of a positive test may also be helpful in maintaining the gluten-free diet for life without exceptions. Why do I need to eat gluten to get tested? Celiac involves an immune system reaction to gluten. The blood tests measure levels of antibodies in the blood. If gluten isn't present prior to testing those antibody levels could be affected and the test may result in a false negative. Most doctors recommend at least 8 weeks of gluten exposure prior to blood testing and at least 2 weeks for biopsy. How much gluten do I need to eat for the test to work? There doesn't appear to be a consensus on the level of gluten required, so you're best bet is to discuss with your doctor. Further information on a gluten challenge is available here: https://www.verywell.com/whats-involved-in-a-gluten-challenge-562708 What tests should I request? Tests differ with some labs not offering all the available tests. Ask your doctor or gastro enterologist to outline which tests they use. These are the current markers which should be tested: Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgA Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgG Anti-Endomysial (EMA) IgA Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) IgA Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) IgA and IgG Total Serum IgA I went through testing and got a negative result, should I forget about gluten? If you've exhausted the diagnostic process and have a negative result for celiac you may still want to try diet changes to see if they help with symptoms. Estimates suggest between 0.5% and 6% of the population may suffer from non celiac gluten intolerance: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820047/ You may not have to give up gluten however: http://bottomlineinc.com/before-you-give-up-gluten-try-a-low-fodmap-diet/ If you've finally decided to give up gluten keep a food diary to help track any intolerances and see the celiac newbie thread for help with the gluten-free diet: Other resources: https://www.coeliac.org.uk/coeliac-disease/coeliac-disease-faqs/ - a collection of questions and answers from a UK based Celiac organisation https://www.coeliac.org.uk/coeliac-disease/getting-diagnosed/ - a guide to the diagnostic process from a UK perspective. http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/ - Advice from the University of Chicago's Celiac Disease Centre https://health.ucsd.edu/specialties/gastro/areas-expertise/Pages/celiac-disease-clinic.aspx - Advice from University of California, San Diego Celiac centre http://www.celiac.ca/?page_id=128 FAQ from Canadian Celiac Society https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/diagnosing-celiac-disease/screening/ - screening info from celiac.org http://www.beyondceliac.org/celiac-disease/get-tested/ - Testing info from Beyond Celiac
  4. Hey everyone, I'm a newly diagnosed celiac and have some social skills issues as well. While I've read other guides for how to order at restaurants, I was wondering if someone could write up specific questions to ask staff that I could use and memorize, as I'm not even sure what questions to be asking or how to phrase them the best (accurately, firmly, yet politely). Without some questions to ask, I tend to fumble my words and my needs don't get met or understood. I'd like to go out to a bar, for example, and I understand what ingredients are and aren't safe but am not sure what questions about cross contamination/shared kitchen use type stuff I should be asking. Would someone be willing to share the script they use for A.) going out to a new restaurant and B.) going to a bar? I would really appreciate the guidance. -G
  5. Celiac.com 11/03/2016 - Refractory celiac disease type II (RCDII) often transforms into an enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL), a serious condition that requires intensive treatment. Current treatment strategies for RCDII include cladribine(2-CdA) and autologous stem cell transplantation (auSCT). A team of researchers recently set out to assess long-term survival in refractory celiac disease type II, and to define clear prognostic criteria for EATL development comparing two treatment strategies. They also wanted to evaluate histological response as prognostic factor. The research team included P Nijeboer, RLJ van Wanrooij, T van Gils, NJ Wierdsma, GJ Tack, BI Witte, HJ Bontkes, O Visser, CJJ Mulder, and G Bouma. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology, the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, the Department of Pathology, and the Department of Haematology at VU University Medical Centre in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. For their study, they retrospectively analyzed 45 patients. All patients received 2-CdA, after which they were either closely monitored (monotherapy, n=30) or received a step-up approach, including auSCT (step-up therapy, n=15). Ten patients (22%) developed EATL, nine of whom had received monotherapy. Absence of histological remission after monotherapy was associated with EATL development (p=0.010). A total of 20 patients (44%) died, with an average survival of 84 months. Overall survival (OS) in the monotherapy group was far better in those with complete histological remission compared to those with without histological remission. The monotherapy patients, who achieved complete histological remission, showed comparable EATL occurrence and OS as compared to the step-up therapy group (p=0.80 and p=0.14 respectively). Histological response is an accurate parameter to evaluate the effect of 2-CdA therapy and this parameter should be leading in the decisions whether or not to perform a step-up treatment approach in RCDII. Source: United European Gastroenterology Journal, April 2016; DOI: 10.1177/2050640616646529
  6. If you are new to celiac disease and a gluten-free diet, the Sterling Silver Food Company's new Gluten Free Guide and Cook Book is a great place to start. The guide section of the book covers all the basics about the gluten-free diet, including how to read food labels and avoid potential contamination, and even how to eat out, travel, and cook gluten-free. The cookbook area includes 56 fabulous gluten-free recipes, including two that I tried: Toasted Almond Zucchini Bread and Chocolate Chip Blondies—both were outstanding! If you are looking for a perfect gift for this holiday season I would highly recommend this versatile gluten-free guide and cookbook. For more info visit: Amazon.com
  7. Celiac.com 11/11/2010 - The holidays are upon us, once again, and that means it's time toremind folks that a little planning and preparation will help anyonewith celiac disease or gluten intolerance to enjoy a safe, deliciousgluten-free Thanksgiving and holiday season without worrying aboutinadvertently eating wheat or gluten. For folks cooking a gluten-free turkey dinner at home, here are some helpful tips to make things easier: First, make sure the turkey you plan to serve for your gluten-freeholiday dinner is, in fact, a gluten-free turkey. This is notautomatically true. Many brands of turkey are processed with addedgluten—so, don't assume, and make sure to check the ingredients list.Celiac.com offers a pretty comprehensive list of safe gluten-free foods and ingredients, along with gluten-free shopping guides to make yourgluten-free shopping easier. Second, make sure that any stuffing you serve is gluten-free! Accept nosubstitute. There's no need to risk putting gluten-based stuffing inyour turkey. You can astound and delight all your guests withceliac.com's delicious Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe (below). Third, prepare a simple, delicious gluten-free gravy using Celiac.com'sThanksgiving Holiday Gluten-Free Turkey Gravy recipe, or your favorite gluten-freegravy mix. Note: Be careful, many bouillon cubes contain wheat or gluten, so make sure to use only gluten-free bouillon cubes. Tip: Thicken homemade gravy with either corn starch or arrowroot flour. Prepare easy, tasty gluten-free side dishes by browsing Celiac.com'sextensive listing of gluten-free recipes, where you will find sidedishes to impress even the snootiest gourmet. Order gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items likeprepared gluten-free pies ahead of time for convenience—this will allowyou to spend more time with friends and family rather than spending allof your time in the kitchen! Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can now be ordered anddelivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall, and your purchases there actually directly support Celiac.com. Here are some helpful holiday tips and information for anyone planning to dine out, or at a friend or relative's house: Ali Demeritte's blog entry: The Dinner Party Drama—Two Guidelines to Assure a Pleasant Gluten-Free Experience. Danna Korn's article: Venturing Out of the House: Restaurant Realities. Aimee Eiguren's blog entry: Eating Out Gluten-Free and Without Fear. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free at Restaurants. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free Meals at Small or Moving Restaurants. Celiac.com's Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe Ingredients: 5-6 cups white, gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups celery, chopped 2 shallots, minced 1 large or 2 medium yellow onions, chopped 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, minced 1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced 1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced 1-1½ cups gluten-free chicken broth ½ cup white wine 1 egg yolk 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper Bits of cooked sausage or bacon, diced chestnut, pecan, apple,cranberry, currant, or raisin (optional) *Make sure any sausage isgluten-free! Preparation: Sauté shallots, onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until translucent. Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook another one or twominutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Add wine andcontinue cooking over medium heat until liquid is reduced by half.Remove from heat and allow to cool. Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Note: If cooking stuffing inside turkey, add just 1 cup of chicken broth. Place the egg yolk in a large bowl and carefully spoon two or threeounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whiskingthe mixture. Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. Make sure toblend a small amount of stock into the egg first to prevent scrambledeggs. Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and eggmixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly.Add the salt and pepper and mix. Place the stuffing mixture into a greased casserole dish and cook in400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, untildone. Note: The stuffing is done when you can insert a toothpick into thestuffing and it comes out clean. Make sure you bake stuffing until thetoothpick comes out clean. Serves about six to eight people. Suggestion: Add finely diced cooked sausage or bacon bits to thesautéed vegetables, or toss in bits of diced chestnut, pecan, apple,cranberry, currant, or raisin. *Make sure any sausage is gluten-free! Gluten-free Classics: Holiday Pumpkin Pie Ingredients: ¾ cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon ground ginger ¼ teaspoon ground clove 2 large eggs (Duck eggs work great!) 1 can (15 oz.) Libby's 100% Pure Pumpkin (Yes, it's gluten-free!) 1 can (12 fl. oz.) Evaporated Milk (Delicious with evaporated goat's milk!) 1 unbaked 9-inch (4-cup volume) gluten-free pie shell Whipped cream (optional) Directions: Mix sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggsin large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stirin evaporated milk. Pour into gluten-free pie shell. Bake in preheated 425° F oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to350° F; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near centercomes out clean. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours. Serve immediately orrefrigerate. Top with whipped cream before serving. *Adapted from Libby's Original Pumpkin Pie Recipe
  8. Celiac.com 11/11/2011 - Once again, Thanksgiving looms, as does the specter of pulling off a smooth, tasty, gluten-free dinner on the big day. To help make that goal an easy reality, celiac.com once again offers up a heaping of gluten-free information and recipes to help make your gluten-free Thanksgiving celebrations a smashing success! For those cooking a gluten-free turkey dinner at home, these helpful tips will make your work easier: First,be certain to start with a 100% gluten-free turkey for your gluten-freeholiday dinner. Gluten? In my turkey? Yes! Many brands use gluten whenprocessing their turkeys. Don't assume your turkey is gluten-free. Besure to check the ingredients list. Celiac.com offers a fairlycomprehensive list of safe gluten-free foods and ingredients, along with gluten-free shopping guides to make gluten-free shopping easier. Next,be certain to serve only gluten-free stuffing! Accept no substitute.Don't risk putting gluten-based stuffing in your turkey. Instead,astonish and satisfy all of your guests by preparing celiac.com'sdelicious Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe. Lastly,prepare a simple, delicious gluten-free gravy using Celiac.com'sThanksgiving Holiday Gluten-Free Turkey Gravy recipe, or your favoritegluten-free gravy mix. Thicken homemade gravy with either corn starch orarrowroot flour. Be careful: Many bouillon cubes contain wheat or gluten, so make sure to use only gluten-free bouillon cubes. Make easy, tasty gluten-free side dishes using Celiac.com's extensive listing of gluten-free recipes.Order gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items like prepared gluten-free pies ahead of time for convenience—this will allow you to spend more time with friends and family rather than spending all of your time in the kitchen! Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can now be ordered and delivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall, and your purchases there actually directly support Celiac.com. Gluten-free Thanksgiving Recipes: Our Great Brined Turkey recipe offers a fabulous way to prepare your gluten-free turkey that will leave your guests quizzing you about your secrets to such a moist, savory bird. Spiced Pumpkin Soup makes a delightful holiday treat for yourself, your family, or your guests. Gluten-free Stuffing is a holiday staple that keeps them coming back for more. Gluten-free Gravy is the perfect topping to your delicious stuffing. If you don't want to prepare your own, be sure to use a gluten-free gravy mix. Meanwhile, our recipe for Red Pepper Pumpkin Seeds is sure to delight, and makes a great addition to the holiday snack bowl. In addition to our ever-popular recipe for Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie, we offer this delicious variation: Ginger Crust Pumpkin Pie: In anticipation of the next two months worth of feasting, I’ve been tinkering with this Thanksgiving classic. The crust is perfectly spiced and also goes well with sweet potato pies. A dollop of fresh whipped cream and you’re good to go. Coconut flakes also make a tasty topping.Ingredients: Crust 1 ½ cups gluten-free gingersnaps ½ cup walnuts 3 tablespoons light brown sugar ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 4 tablespoons melted butter Filling 1 ¼ cup canned pumpkin ½ cup sweetened condensed milk 1 teaspoon each ground ginger, cloves, and cinnamon ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup sugar ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract 2 eggs, lightly beaten Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and lightly butter a 9-inch pie dish. For the crust, combine cookies, walnuts, brown sugar, and nutmeg in a food processor and grind to a powder. Slowly add melted butter and pulse until mixture forms clumps. Spread evenly over the pie dish press down until tightly packed. Set aside. In the bowl of a mixer, combine pumpkin and condensed milk. Add sugar and salt and beat until well-combined. Add eggs, then vanilla and spices. Pour filling into the unbaked pie crust and bake for 40-50 minutes, or until center is set. Cool on a wire rack before serving.
  9. I just received a copy of Living Without’s Gluten-Free Holiday Guide and am very impressed with both the quality and the content of the magazine. This special holiday issue contains cooking tips as well as gluten and casein-free recipes that cover Thanksgiving, Christmas dinner, and New Year’s. It also has a nice section on how to successfully entertain guests over the holidays who might have food allergies or celiac disease, and another that covers allergy-friendly gift ideas. This magazine was a first for those with food allergies or gluten sensitivity, and I am very impressed with how it has evolved over the years into such a comprehensive publication. For more info visit: www.LivingWithout.com. Note: Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.
  10. A must-read survival guide for parents, friends, teachers, and caretakers. Kids with Celiac Disease is a practical survival guide for families of children and teenagers with this lifelong digestive disorder. While it sounds as though it is only applicable to children with the condition, Kids with Celiac Disease is loaded with valuable information for people of any age - as well as for people on the gluten-free diet for reasons other than celiac disease. Written by the mother of a celiac child diagnosed in 1991, Kids with Celiac Disease is a compilation of 10 years of experience and research. Danna founded R.O.C.K. (Raising Our Celiac Kids) in 1991, and incorporated much of what she has learned from other parents into this book. Kids with Celiac Disease includes: Practical suggestions for dealing with school, sitters, birthdays, holidays and other unique challenges Menu and snack ideas Emotional and psychological implications How to talk with friends and family Eating out at restaurants Travel tips Up-to-date scientific, medical and nutritional information A resource guide listing contact information for hundreds of resources that are valuable to anyone on a gluten-free diet. Click here to order!
×