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Found 7 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/11/2014 - A pampered a Jack Russell terrier is being hailed as Britain’s oldest dog after reaching the ripe old age of 25 years, and gluten-free fish fingers are among the foods that keep her happy and healthy. The dog, called Meg, eats whatever she likes theses days, says owner David Abrahams, of Stoke St Michael, Somerset, and that includes roast dinners, gluten-free fish fingers and Peppa Pig-shaped spaghetti in tomato sauce. Of course, the pasta includes gluten, so Meg’s diet is not gluten-free, but Abrahams says, the “fish fingers and the Peppa Pig pasta have helped her along the way.” Read the whole story at The Daily Mail. Does your dog get gluten-free food or treats as part of its diet? How about your cat? Share your gluten-free pet stories below.
  2. I know this is a TMI, but I have had chronic constipation and slow movement my whole life or diarrhea so I am excited to share and I know you all understand! I have actually had a whole week where I pooped everyday!!!!! Never happened to me before in my life. All normal, not too soft, not too hard, still a rainbow but hey, I pooped every day. Just had to share my excitement with people who understand. Thanks for reading lol
  3. Celiac.com 07/18/2011 - People with celiac disease are relatively lucky; a simple change in diet, without any drugs, can completely reverse all symptoms in most patients and causes no side effects. But maintaining a gluten free diet is, of course, far from simple. A number of treatment options are in varying stages of development, but no one has asked celiac patients what kind of treatment they would prefer to a gluten free diet, or if they would even prefer one at all. A recent study in the UK did just that. It found that over 40% of celiac patients are dissatisfied with the gluten free diet. Aziz et al. gave a questionnaire to 310 celiac patients and 477 controls. The first section measured their satisfaction with the gluten free diet; the second measured their use of complementary or alternative medicine by asking if they took popular oral supplements (multivitamins, kava, Echinacea, etc.); and the third assessed their views of novel therapies being developed to treat celiac disease. These include a vaccine that would be injected and would allow the consumption of unlimited gluten; peptidases or zonulin antagonists that would enzymatically degrade gluten or inhibit intestinal permeability, respectively, and would be taken orally in case of accidental or periodic ingestion of gluten; and genetic modification of wheat to reduce its toxicity. Although more than 40% of celiac patients were unhappy with the gluten free diet, they did not use complementary or alternative medicines with more frequently than controls. This suggests that they do not view these as viable alternative treatments to a gluten free diet. Most celiac patients - 42% - said that they would be interested in a vaccine that would allow them to eat unlimited gluten, while 35% said they would prefer anti-zonulin and 23% said they would like peptidases. Both of these latter therapies would not necessarily allow for healing of the small bowel mucosa like a gluten free diet does, but either could be taken as an adjuvant or to protect against minor or occasional ingestion of gluten. Of the potential novel treatments, all patients ranked genetic modification of wheat as their lowest preference. Adherence to dietary advice is among the lowest of all kinds of guidance given by doctors. Among celiac, strict adherence to a gluten free diet varies from 96% all the way down to 36% among different populations. As these British researchers demonstrated and noted in their conclusions, "patients with coeliac [sic] disease are keen to consider novel therapies." Source: Aziz I, Evans KE, Papageorgiou V, Sanders DS. Are patients with coeliac disease seeking alternative therapies to a gluten-free diet? J Gastrointestin Liver Dis 2011; 20(1) 27-31.
  4. This gluten-free, mung bean crepe recipe is time consuming, but if you love crepes as much as I do, you will not care. These mung bean crepes are so versatile, they can be eaten for breakfast, lunch or dinner. They are naturally gluten-free and dairy-free, but they can be made corn-free, and meat free also. Vietnamese Happy Crepes (Gluten-Free) Crepes Ingredients: ½ cup dried mung beans 1 cup unsweetened coconut milk from a can - stirred first 2 cups white rice flour 1 cup cornstarch 4 cups water 2 scallions, thinly sliced 1 ½ teaspoons turmeric ¾ teaspoon salt To Make Crepes: Soak the dried mung beans in warm water for about 30 minutes. Drain and put them in a food processor. Add coconut mil, rice flour, cornstarch, water, scallions and turmeric. Let the crepe batter rest for about 20 minutes or even overnight to loosen the starches. Filling Ingredients: 1 to 1 ½ pounds of boneless chicken or pork or tofu, cut into ¼ inch pieces sprinkled with gluten-free fish sauce and a little sugar. 1 small onion sliced very thin 1 cup thinly sliced button mushrooms 3 cups beansprouts Nuoc Cham Sauce Ingredients: ¼ cup gluten-free fish sauce ¼ cup lime juice ½ cup hot water ¼ cup or more light brown sugar ½ -1 Thai or Serrano Chili sliced into little rings-to taste 1 large clove garlic-minced To Make Nuoc Cham Sauce Mix sugar into hot water and stir to dissolve. Add in lime juice, fish sauce, chili and garlic. Taste for desired sweetness and let cool. Pour into separate small serving bowls. To Cook: Heat oven to 200 F degrees and put a large baking sheet in oven to heat it. Using a nonstick 8" skillet, add one teaspoon of oil and heat. Add a few pieces of pork or chicken or tofu, mushrooms and a few slivers of onion and saute until pork loses its' pinkness. Pour in ½ cup of crepe batter, tilting and swirling the pan until crepe coats the bottom of the pan thinly and rises up the side of the pan. Let it cook for a moment until the edges become drier, then add the beansprouts. Cover and let steam cook for about 2 minutes or until the bottom is golden brown. Fold in half and put onto baking sheet to keep warm while making remaining crepes. Garnish Ingredients: 1 head of Red Leaf Lettuce - leavesseparated, washed and dried Handful of Mint leaves, Cilantro andThai Basil To Serve: Place crepe onto plate and garnish with several lettuce leaves, a small amount of Mint leaves, Cilantro and Thai basil. Give each person a small bowl of Nuoc Cham to dip. To eat, tear crepe into pieces along with herbs and wrap in lettuce leaves. Dip into Nuoc Cham sauce and enjoy!
  5. TiffersAnn

    Changes

    Wow, so I was just re-reading my old entries... boy have I changed. I no longer give a crap if people around me eat pizza because I don't want to feel bad anymore. If I do have these cravings for certain foods, I have learned to make them myself. Even my husband loves my gluten-free pizza! My changed attitude over the years is attributed to learning as many different recipes and varieties of food I possibly can. Before discovering I was Celiac I had never tried Thai food... now, I LOVE Thai food. The best part is that most Thai food is gluten-free.
  6. Celiac.com 01/07/2009 - To help you make 2009 the happiest and healthiest year ever, the staff at Celiac.com has come up with 10 simple tips that we hope will help you stay gluten-free all year long. Toss Out any Unsafe Foods The beginning of the year is a great time to go through your cupboards to make sure that any gluten-containing food that might have snuck into the house over the holidays is banished forever. Still have that fruitcake from your well-meaning aunt who forgot about your gluten-free diet? Toss it…or, maybe better, re-gift it to one of your gluten-eating friends (or enemies depending on the quality of the fruitcake!). Restock your Kitchen Plan to include a gluten-free shopping list in that first grocery purchase to help you replace any depleted favorite gluten-free ingredients. The start of the year is a great time to re-stock your kitchen with your favorite gluten-free foods and ingredients. Take Advantage of Sales/Specials to Stock up on Gluten-free Favorites Numerous online companies are eager to make way for 2009, and offer great deals on your gluten-free favorites. Whether it’s breads, pizzas, pizza crusts and mixes by companies like Chebe, Dad’s, Schar, Foods By George, or ‘Cause Your Special, now is a perfect time to stock up and save big. Source Products from Reliable Makers and Vendors The ‘gluten-free’ label is becoming a hot commodity, with the market for gluten-free products growing at double-digit rates, and consumer demand higher than ever. However, until the U.S. government implements official standards, there is no official definition as to what constitutes a gluten-free product, so it’s buyer beware! So it’s best to buy your gluten-free products from trusted companies and sources. Look for companies that have a long history and are vigilant about protecting their customers. One of our favorites is the The Gluten-Free Mall, which has provided on-line shopping for such products since 1998. Stay Informed Follow the latest Gluten-Free developments. From clinical trials of a vaccine for celiac disease, to the pending U.S. adoption of the Codex Alimentarius standards for gluten-free labeling, to major developments in diagnosis, treatment, associated conditions, etc., there’s plenty happening in the gluten-free world, so be sure to follow any news that might have a positive affect on your health and gluten-free lifestyle. You can follow your favorite authors and news on Celiac.com by setting up our Celiac.com RSS feed in your Google or Yahoo! account. Or even better still, subscribe to a celiac disease or gluten-free newsletter such as Celiac.com’s paper newsletter, and help support us at the same time. Double-Check Safe and Unsafe Gluten-Free Food Lists You can find free updated lists at Celiac.com. Another good option is to purchase a commercial gluten-free shopping guide, which can help you find items at a regular grocery store that are safe. Take Part in Food Planning for 2009 Events From post-New Year’s parties to the Super Bowl and beyond, now is a good time to look at the year ahead with an eye toward any events you’ll likely be attending and to make a mental note to chime in ahead of time with hosts to arrange for any gluten-free adjustments. This includes arranging to bring gluten-free versions of any favorite or ‘must-have’ dishes. Think Ahead: Plan and Try Gluten-free Dishes in Advance Think back to the few disappointments you may have suffered at one of last year’s parties or picnics. Maybe it was the company get-together, maybe it was your cousin’s Superbowl party or Memorial Day BBQ, where there just wasn’t enough gluten-free snacks to nourish you properly. Don’t get caught short again. Now is a perfect time to look ahead and mark your calendar for the events you know will be coming. Then mark your calendar again for a date far enough in advance of those events for you to prepare and try out the gluten-free offerings that will help to make those events a gluten-free success! Try new Gluten-free Products! With the market for gluten-free foods projected to grow at double-digits through foreseeable future, the number of gluten-free products hitting the market is also swelling. Since 2004, food retailers have added nearly 2,500 new gluten-free products to their shelves. In 2008 alone, retailers added nearly 750 new gluten-free products. Trying new gluten-free products is a great way to discover new products, and new manufacturers, and to enjoy eating gluten-free. Spread the Word Generally speaking, a gluten-free diet is a healthy diet. On the whole, people who eat gluten-free automatically avoid a huge number of foods containing enriched wheat flour that pervades our food chain, and is often found in combination with other questionable ingredients like hydrogenated oils, high-fructose corn syrup, preservatives, etc. Eating gluten-free generally means paying closer attention to ingredients, eating foods made with a variety of whole grains, like quinoa, rice, corn, and millet, along with more fruits, and vegetables. A gluten-free diet is an invitation to a healthier lifestyle. Spread the word!
  7. A must-read survival guide for parents, friends, teachers, and caretakers. Kids with Celiac Disease is a practical survival guide for families of children and teenagers with this lifelong digestive disorder. While it sounds as though it is only applicable to children with the condition, Kids with Celiac Disease is loaded with valuable information for people of any age - as well as for people on the gluten-free diet for reasons other than celiac disease. Written by the mother of a celiac child diagnosed in 1991, Kids with Celiac Disease is a compilation of 10 years of experience and research. Danna founded R.O.C.K. (Raising Our Celiac Kids) in 1991, and incorporated much of what she has learned from other parents into this book. Kids with Celiac Disease includes: Practical suggestions for dealing with school, sitters, birthdays, holidays and other unique challenges Menu and snack ideas Emotional and psychological implications How to talk with friends and family Eating out at restaurants Travel tips Up-to-date scientific, medical and nutritional information A resource guide listing contact information for hundreds of resources that are valuable to anyone on a gluten-free diet. Click here to order!
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