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Found 15 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/29/2018 - Fatigue is the most common symptom plaguing a majority of patients. Trouble sleeping, weight issues, PMS, headaches, fertility or libido issues, and achy joints are also very common and can all be affected by hormonal imbalance that continues after gluten has been removed from the diet. The trouble with trying to resolve such symptoms is that the root cause can vary. If every patient with fatigue had a thyroid problem, it would be easy to correct because we would know exactly where to look. If you're gluten intolerant you may have suffered from some of the complaints listed above prior to discovering your celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. But perhaps now, despite your gluten-free diet, some of these same symptoms continue to plague you. If so, read on. Let's review the list of symptoms and add a few more: Fatigue Trouble sleeping Weight trouble PMS Migraines Infertility or miscarriage Achy joints or muscles Allergies Light headedness Frequent illness Asthma While the list is long, believe it or not, there is a common cause to all of them. I'm not saying it's the only cause, but what I do wish to discuss is the reason why someone can be found gluten intolerant, successfully institute a gluten-free diet, yet continue to suffer from many of the above symptoms. There are two glands in your body called the adrenal glands. They sit atop each of your kidneys and they are the masters of multi-tasking! If I asked you if one part of your body was responsible for: Giving you energy, maintaining your weight, keeping your immune system strong, maintaining stable mood, anti-aging, controlling sleep quality, assisting with hormonal balance, keeping allergies at bay and more…what would you say? You might think to yourself that if there was one type of body part responsible for all those things then you had better start treating it well! You'd be very right in your analysis. As you've probably guessed the aforementioned adrenal glands are responsible for that very long list and, unfortunately, those very same adrenal glands tend to be quite stressed in the gluten intolerant individual. Why? Because adrenal glands are sensitive to, and get very stressed with, unstable blood sugar. Stable blood sugar comes from eating healthy food that your body finds nourishing. As you well know if you're gluten intolerant, gluten, for you, is a poison. Therefore years of eating gluten created unstable blood sugar and thereby put a tremendous strain on your adrenal glands. Because of the many, many jobs that the adrenal glands do, simply removing gluten as a stressor is typically insufficient to restore them to normal function. They need to be 're-set' with a nutritional and dietary program, to restore their good health. This explains why many who are gluten intolerant continue to suffer with the symptoms mentioned above. Therefore, even if your gluten intolerance has been diagnosed and you've instituted a strict gluten-free diet, if you haven't also found a clinician who understands and specializes in restoring health and function to the adrenal glands, you may very well continue to suffer with symptoms associated with adrenal stress. The good news is that the treatment to normalize adrenal function is not at all difficult. It is a completely natural program, when done correctly, involving no dangerous drugs or surgery. There are lab tests to determine the level of adrenal malfunction occurring but these are functional specialized lab tests rather than traditional ones. I mention this because I want to ensure that there is no confusion created when I mention adrenal function lab testing. The adrenal glands can become diseased but the disease isn't common. If you ask your traditional doctor to test for adrenal malfunction he or she will test for adrenal disease – once again a rare occurrence – and will likely pronounce your adrenal glands 'fine'. What I am discussing is malfunction vs. disease, two very different conditions. While adrenal gland disease is rare, adrenal gland malfunction is extremely common. It is this latter condition that we are discussing here. This is an important distinction because I want to make sure that if you are suffering from adrenal fatigue that you aren't given a 'clean bill of health' incorrectly. Unfortunately this happens often. If it took you a while to receive a diagnosis of gluten intolerance then you will understand this phenomenon. Sadly this area of health is fraught with misunderstanding and it is the patient who suffers, often unnecessarily. If you need any help finding a clinician to help you, feel free to contact me. Normalizing adrenal function is one of our areas of expertise and patients visit us for treatment, at our destination clinic, from across the country, as well as internationally. If we cannot find a clinician close to you that specializes in this then we are more than happy to see you here. The good news is that the treatment is natural and inexpensive. I look forward to hearing from you.
  2. Pinkdaisygirl

    Confused and frustrated

    Hi all! I've been reading stuff on this forum for about three years now and I have to say thank you! This is an amazing site and has answered so many questions. I was diagnosed by a chiropractic physician a few years ago with celiac disease so I have no official celiac doctor and am extremely frustrated. I have read a few other posts about this too. I seem to be getting more and more sensitive as the days go on. I have celiac disease and also dairy allergy and seem to be allergic to tapioca and Shea as well. But I'm not sure what else. This year I have developed a rash that appears to be dh? It's itchy but when i scratch or even touch it it feels like it's on fire! But it acts and looks different depending on where it is on my body. Started in the middle of my chest - yep super uncomfortable and then spread to my upper back. Both of those areas cleared up but it had also spread up the back of my neck and even into my hairline somewhat. Seems like every time it starts to go away then it suddenly gets worse. I have changed my shamooo, my conditioner, my soap I use in the shower, no more hair products everything. I'm so frustrated. I can't figure out what it may be that makes it not want to go away. I use wintergreen rubbing alcohol on it a lot bc that seems to help it dry up faster. Also I do use essential oils a lot instead of medicine. They are pure and natural oils and shouldn't contain any gluten as nothing is added to these particular oils. I'm wondering if maybe the oils are irritating it? Or is there anything else that you all may know of that could be keeping this rash active? I use All Free and Clear laundry soap, I switched to Naturelle brand shampoo - no conditioner right now (very dry frizzy hair ATM) no hair products. I was using plain glycerine soap - yuck! And am going to try kirk's Castile soap tonight. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Anything to help the rash go away, stay away, feel even a tiny bit better, anything. Thanks.
  3. I've been struggling with a lot of symptoms for over 7 years now. I've gone on many wild goose chases to get a diagnoses, but I always seem to wind up with negative test results, or an answer that doesn't account for most of my symptoms. Most of my symptoms first started when I was in my sophomore year of high school (I am 23 years old now). I started to experience disassociation, brain fog, and fatigue first, shortly followed by visual snow. I developed tinnitus in both ears around this time also. Since then, none of these symptoms have alleviated; my visual snow and tinnitus have become a constant for me, though they are thankfully relatively easy to ignore. I've experienced headaches commonly throughout my life, but for years now they have become much more frequent. I used to rarely (if ever) experience tension headaches, but now I have tension headaches much more frequently than vascular ones. I also experience (thankfully rare) ocular migraines where I lose portions of my vision for 30 minutes to an hour in both eyes. I've become extremely sensitive to light and stimuli (especially visual and auditory). I've always been sensitive to loud noises and bright colours, but now I can hardly walk through a colourful, fluorescent-lit store without walking out feeling fatigued and in a fog. The enamel on my front teeth has been shot since I was a child, and I've always been prone to canker sores. I have very stubborn dark circles under my eyes, and rough, bumpy skin on my upper arms. My joints feel too stiff and sore for my age, and I have very painful periods (that may skip a month occasionally). My memory is poor, and I struggle with OCD, tourettes, anxiety, and depression. What lead me to look into celiac, however, was the development of gastrointestinal issues. I can't remember when these issues first started-- I think they've been slowly working into my system for years-- but they became much more pronounced over the last year or two. I feel bloated nearly all the time, and frequently have either diarrhea or constipation. I also have acid reflux, as well as frequent abdominal pain and discomfort. My diet is very heavy in foods that contain gluten, and I've noticed my gastrointestinal symptoms definitely worsen when I increase my intake of these foods. Just a couple of days ago, a pb&j sandwich and poptart were all that I ate in the evening; I went to sleep with abdominal discomfort, and woke up with much worse discomfort and diarrhea. Each flareup seems to be similarly marked by consuming gluten. I've had a CT scan of my head, several in-depth eye exams, tests for diabetes, iron and vitamin deficiencies, and high blood pressure. I've had an x-ray of my neck and spine, an MRI of my jaw (for TMJD), an EEG-- all came back negative, except for one that determined I have hypothyroidism and the MRI that showed a deformity in the right side of my jaw, neither of which account for most of my symptoms. I also had one single test for celiac (I believe it was the tTG test), which also came back negative. The negative test result I had for celiac has not convinced me that gluten isn't to blame for my issues, however. I feel that too many of my symptoms line up with celiac disease to not at least treat it as a high possibility. I've also read about the possibility of the test I had showing false negatives, which gives me some hope that my negative test result for celiac wasn't just another dead end. I'm not sure where to move from here, however. I truly feel that I have reasonable cause to suspect celiac, but I've also felt that way with many other tests that provided no answers. I wonder, though, if I should pursue more testing for celiac, or just try a gluten-free diet for a few months and see if it improves my symptoms. I am not interested in having an endoscopy; I feel that a positive blood test, or positive results from a gluten-free diet are all I want for answers (plus, sedatives and anesthesia give me wicked anxiety). I guess I'm making this forum for two reasons-- 1. I would like to know if people here that have been formally diagnosed with celiac feel that I have reason to suspect celiac based on my symptoms; 2. I would also like an opinion on trying the diet vs getting a diagnosis prior I'd also love a full list of tests that I should look into if the primary one came back negative Thank you to anyone that reads and/or replies to this, and sorry for how wordy this is ahhh
  4. If I eat wheat bread or even whole wheat goldfish, a headache will flare up, my allergies will worsen, and I'll get some nausea. Is this characteristic to a specific type of gluten/wheat intolerance? I still get moderate symptoms with regular enriched flour products, but they're not as extreme or fast. Maybe it has sometime to do with eating poor breakfasts... I usually just avoid whole wheat because it makes me feel so sick. I read that white flour products have more gluten, so I'm kind of unsure what it is my body's reacting to. Also: we suspect I have PCOS (two of my aunts have it, so it's a high possibility considering my symptoms), so any relevant thoughts are appreciated. Thanks!
  5. Celiac.com 05/28/2015 - A number of studies have shown than many people with celiac disease, including women and children, have issues with headaches, especially migraines. This also true for people with inflammatory bowel disease. People with celiac disease who follow a gluten-free diet report having having fewer headaches, and recent research supports a relationship between a gluten-free diet (GFD) and a reduction in headaches—especially migraines—in people with celiac disease. Gluten's connection to neurologic problems in people with celiac disease is well known, but its connection with headaches and the gluten-free diet is controversial. Recently, Ameghino LucÍa, of the Neurology Department at FLENI in Buenos Aires, Argentina and his colleagues conducted a survey of patients. They reported the results at the 2015 annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology in Washington, DC. A total of 866 people who completed the questionnaire met the criteria. Of those, 24% reported headaches as their main symptom after a celiac disease diagnoses. The team used the "chi square test" or "Mann-Whitney test" to analyze the survey. The subjects reported different types of head pain, including tension-type headaches (TH), reported by just over half, migraine with aura (MWA), reported by 15.4%, and migraine without aura (MWOA), by 32.5%. Upon further examination the researchers revealed that neurological symptoms were more often found in MWA patients than TH. They found that patients with severe headaches generally had better gluten-free diet compliance, at 77% overall, compared to 66% for those with milder manifestations. Furthermore, the study revealed that those with the best gluten-free diet compliance experienced less severe and frequent headaches. For example patients MWA showed nearly a 50% reduction in headache frequency when they followed the diet. These results suggest that the strict adhesion to a gluten-free diet could benefit celiac patients who experience headaches. However, they say more studies are needed to determine whether a gluten-free is beneficial for migraine in general. Source: Hcplive.com
  6. Five months ago I developed symptoms. I felt a tired, low energy, and in the head not feeling all there. A slight sore throat coming on, the feeling you get when you're *about* to get sick. Problem was, I never really got sick (no cough, no runny nose, no fever) and this "almost sickly / tired / foggy feeling continued." For days. Weeks. Months. I went to the doctor. Tests came back normal for things like thyroid checks, vitamin B12, mono, Epstein-Barr, etc. The only thing was my Vitamin D that was insufficient at 23 (30 is normal). I took Vitamin D pills and now my level is 36. The symptoms continue. Some are less and others are more, but the overall feeling is definitely still there. Over the weeks of taking the pills, I'd feel better for a few days, then worse for a few days. Rinse, repeat. The primary symptom during this whole time is what I call brain fog. I see the term thrown around and I don't know if it's the same as what other people say it is but generally I use brain fog because it feels like my experience is clouded in my head. Like having a layer of cloud in your brain fogging things up. Physically it feels almost like a headache, but not quite. It feels almost like being dizzy, but not quite. It feels like tiredness and extreme exhaustion, but that has lessened in recent months and it feels more like a headache. Sleep doesn't change it. There are no noticeable patterns. Even when it's not severe, I feel like it's "always there," my head never feels fully clear. Seems to come in waves. I might go 3-5 days without a severe episode, then it is severe for 3-5 days. Or it might show up in the middle of a day and continue for the rest of that day. Some symptoms came and went: most notably temperature extremes: night sweats, or feeling very cold and shivering. These were quick episodes and stopped after the first month. They happened maybe less than 5 or 8 times. Maybe it's unrelated. The sore throat died down in recent weeks. But I do consistently get cold extremities, which I never used to get. And dry lips, which I also rarely got and only in the winter. And new symptoms appeared in the first month: weakness / feeling of internal 'wobbliness' in my muscles, particularly in my thighs. Not 24/7 but sometimes, kind of like the cycles from before. It wasn't involuntary movement. But I definitely could feel weakness / wobbliness. This has died down in recent weeks. One night I felt tingling on my hands, but that symptom never returned. MRI results are normal. With the exception of something my neurologist described as something about the white matter that is part of normal aging (I'm in my mid-30s), but can appear in people with migraine headaches. I think I will talk with him again to discuss this further because I do not really understand it, but he assured me the MRI was normal. I felt the 'brain fog' prior to and while getting the MRI (symptoms at medium severity). So here I am today, feeling about the same with brain fog / headaches and pretty much always feeling like something's a bit off, like feeling cloudy. I can still do things, exercise, run, go out with friends. But the brain fog / headaches sometimes really kick in sometimes, it seems like in phases. Then I read about gluten sensitivity. I see symptoms like 'brain fog' and headaches and wonder if it might be related. I do think at times after eating heavy meals the fogginess / extreme tiredness came on. But there are days where I eat gluten in cereal and I don't notice an increase in symptoms. Like I said before it comes in waves. 3 days at a time or half a day or 2 days. It's not like after every meal 30 minutes later I feel it then it goes away. But perhaps it's related to *how much* gluten I eat.. My doctor said he does not think it is a gluten issue, but that I can try going gluten free for a few weeks to see if symptoms improve. I'm currently tracking my symptoms and food intake to see if there's a pattern. So I'm just wondering if anyone else here experiences these symptoms and if you think it might be a gluten issue. Thank you for reading.
  7. I have been gluten free for maybe three months now. I had had diarrhea and headaches and stomach pain before. Now I am just getting the headaches. I had gotten them a lot espicially after walks before becoming gluten free. After gluten free it seemed like I didnt get as much and could take walks. Now I have noticed more sometimes after walks. They are mostly minor and go away after a bit. Before celiac they wernt minor. So I am wondering if it is something I am eating. The only things I can think of is Wendy's and a local pizza place which im not sure if it has cross contamination. Should I stop eating at these places and see if I improve? I can't think of anything else. Is there any safe pizza places? Cross contamination is easy at those places. Domino's has good information on their website and seems to be the only place that cares.
  8. Celiac.com 01/11/2010 - When I first went on a gluten free diet, my migraines disappeared completely.Forfive wonderful years, I only felt the twinges of a migraine (or maybejust a blessedly “normal” headache) during those few times when Iinadvertently consumed gluten.Another thing also happened once I went on a gluten free diet – I got pregnant. But, five yearslater, I learned that there could be more than one trigger for mymigraines and unfortunately, gluten was only one of them.After two cycles of pregnancy and nursing, my hormones eventually normalized into a regular cycle.Now, that, in and of itself, amazed me, that for the first time in my life my body had learned to have a 4-week textbook cycle.But, along with those cycles came the worst migraines I had ever experienced in my life.I realized, sadly, that gluten wasn’t my only migraine trigger.I could avoid gluten, but I couldn’t avoid my cycle.Theirony of it all struck hard– the gluten free diet had made me healthyenough to have a regular cycle – a regular cycle attached with horrificmigraines.Once again, I was going from doctor to doctor,but this time (unlike the years until my celiac diagnosis), I receiveda fast diagnosis – menstrual migraine.The neurologistwho diagnosed me said that they were probably the worst type ofmigraine out there – very resistant to medication, fierce in theirstrength, and often lasting for days.Well, he hasn’t been wrong. Four years of migraines later, I honestly believe I may have tried every migraine treatment known to woman!I have been searching for a solution in the hope that if I could cure mine, anybody’s could be cured.However,along the way, many of the things I have tried that have temporarilyworked, have worked for others too, with more lasting results.Hence this article – why not share what I’ve learned in the hope that others can be helped?Maybe, too, in this process, someone out there will know of a treatment that I have not yet tried. Before I go on, I dowant to say that staying on the gluten-free diet is the only option tohaving a good life at all – even though it allows the cycles that bringthe migraines.Before going gluten-free, I was sick all the time with migraines.Now I am much healthier, but do get terrible cyclical migraines.I obviously choose the latter. This article focuses on migraine prevention.Ido have in my cabinet some very expensive, strong prescription triptans(Amerge works the best for me) and these are a necessity…simply becauseI do not want to land up in my local emergency room with a migrainethat feels like it’s killing me.I think of the prescriptions as my rescue doses, for those times when all the prevention and care in the world fails. I have tried many,many preventative treatments – supplements, herbs, Chinese medicine,bioidentical hormone pills, natural hormone creams, allergy treatments,massage, chiropractic, and even acupuncture.People swearby massage and acupuncture, I tried it some, but did not perceiveenough of a benefit to continue – the expense alone was giving me amigraine. To date, nothing has taken away my migraines, but the following items have definitely helped.And, the good news is that every item listed is affordable and completely doable! Wakeup at the same time every day. My neurologist has a beautifulexplanation as to why this can prevent a migraine, and it surprisinglyhas nothing to do with low blood sugar! I cannot remember his eloquentexplanation. But, many migraine sufferers will find they get amigraine on their day off – the “Saturday Migraine”. Usually, it’sfrom sleeping in and messing up the sensitive sleep/wake cycle. Myalarm has one setting – for week days as well as weekends. If I’mtired later in the day from getting up early after a late night (whichwould usually happen on a weekend), I do my best to take a nap, but Irarely sleep in. B complex. Every migraine guide you read anywhere, always mentions theB vitamins. As I have already posted, and others have commented,celiacs have low absorption of the B vitamins since often the damagedportion of the small intestine is where absorption of B’s shouldoccur. This can be overcome by taking large doses of B’s. I finallyfound a B-complex I can tolerate, and that’s Solgar B50. They have astronger dose, Solgar B100, but the B50 works for me. B2 is oftensingled out for migraine sufferers, and Solgar makes an isolated B2,but this doesn’t work well for me. It may for you, and at under $10,it’s certainly worth a try – in fact, I wish I could give you some ofmy almost-full bottle to try! Magnesium. I’ve taken magnesiumall along, but recently, from a commercial on the celiac website in themigraine section, I read about Dermamag. (My husband joked with methat purchasing a supplement from an online Ad, was akin to finding adate on the internet, but it does look like this has been a goodthing!) The premise behind Dermamag, is that people with migraines arenot absorbing enough magnesium through their digestive systems (soundslike a celiac to me), and that their “patented” formula is the first ofits kind to deliver it through the skin. Well, $29 and a few dayslater, my first bottle arrived, and I must say, I’ve been quitepleased. It does sting my skin a bit, so I apply it to wet skin, butit has definitely stopped a few days from turning into migraine daysthese past few weeks. I’m hoping that after a few months of use, theoverall benefit will increase. It might work just as well to soak in abath of Epsom salts every night, and it would certainly be cheaper, butyou know, that isn’t a “patented” way to increase your magnesiumlevels!!! Lemon Juice. About three years ago I read a littleside article in an educators magazine, of all places, that women intheir mid-thirties often start experiencing terrible cyclicalheadaches. The article blamed this on our western acidic diets andwent on to say that one of the best ways to counteract an acidic dietis to squeeze lemon in your water. Now, that made about as much senseto me as nothing – since lemons are acidic themselves, but lemons arecheap – much cheaper than the dozens of supplements I have tried overthe years. I have since been told that although they are acidic, theirnet effect in the body is basic (?!!) but illogical logic aside, Istarted squeezing lemons into my water that same day and for THREEMONTHS I did not have one migraine. Of course, you have to be carefulnot to overdo it – too much acid cannot be good for a sensitivestomach. Currently, I consume at least one lemon every day – mostpeople go to the store when they run out of milk, I go when I run outof lemons. I honestly think that at this point in my migraine journey,without “lemon-water” I would have a migraine every day. Vitamin D. I actually break open my vitamin D capsule and rub it on myskin every other day. I know the latest articles are pushing 4000 IU’sof vitamin D a day and higher, but if I take that much (orally ortransdermally) I get welts on my skin. I showed the welts to a healthcare practitioner once and he immediately said they were from excessvitamin D. I reduced my dose and find that 2000IU every other dayseems to be optimum for me. Evening Primrose Oil (EPO) fromHemp Oil. I think, I hope, I pray, that this oil is turning into myown personal magic bullet. A few months ago I purchased some ManitobaHarvest Hemp Oil on the advice of a friend and went 5 weeks without amigraine. I had previously tried a great brand of EPO in the capsuleform, but honestly couldn’t afford to take it in the doses I required. The Hemp Oil, however, brings you the EPO in a nature-made n-3:n-6:n-9fatty acid ratio. When I ran out of the Manitoba harvest, I couldn’tfind it locally, so I bought a different brand and my migrainesreturned. Frustrated, I gave up on it, until just two weeks ago, whensomeone I had suggested try it raved on and on how it was helping themwith PMS. I finally found my original brand, and have been back on itfor 10 days. The difference so far has been amazing, I don’t even feellike I could get a migraine at all! Obviously, time will tell, but fornow I’ll continue to be hopeful. I actually take Nordic Arctic FishOil, too, so I mix a little of each and swallow the whole nasty mess. I have friends who mix it in juice or incorporate it in their food, butI don’t want to ruin the food I’m eating, so I just take it straightand get it over with. A word of caution – EPO has been known to causeuterine contractions, so do not take it if you are pregnant! Finally, and I will not belabor this point since I have have mentionedit in another article, I do take Solgar’s prenatal multivitamin simplybecause it’s the only multi that I can tolerate. And, I only take halfa dose. Calcium, magnesium, vitamin D from Solaray. That’smy personal regime. I have come up with it by research, reading,severe trial and error, and much wasting of money. Hopefully one ofthose items can help you in your quest to become migraine free. Asalways, I would never try more than one new thing at a time, our bodiesare too sensitive and there needs to be time for us to gauge our ownreactions. Good luck, God bless, and I would love to hear of anyof your own personal successes against migraines. Maybe, between allof us, we can beat these things, and instead of counting the yearsuntil menopause, we can enjoy the intervening years gluten AND migrainefree!!!
  9. Neurology 2001;56:385-388. Celiac.com 02/15/2001 - According to a new study published in the February issue of Neurology, severe, chronic migraine headaches can be triggered in gluten-sensitive individuals who do not exclude gluten from their diets. The study examined ten patients who had a long history of chronic headaches that had recently worsened, or were resistant to treatment. Some patients had additional symptoms such as lack of balance. Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou, from the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield, UK, and colleagues tested each patient and found that all were sensitive to gluten. . The patients were tested and each was found to be gluten-sensitive. Additionally, MRI scans determined that each had inflammation in their central nervous systems caused by gluten-sensitivity. Results: Nine out of 10 patients went on a gluten-free diet, and seven of them stopped having headaches completely. The patients heightened immune responses, which are triggered by the ingestion of gluten, could be one of the factors causing the headaches. The other two patients who were on a gluten-free diet experienced significant relief, but not complete relief. Conclusion: According to Dr. Hadjivassiliou, removal of the trigger factor by the introduction of a gluten-free diet may be a promising therapeutic intervention for patients with chronic headaches. Further studies are needed to confirm Dr. Hadjivassilious preliminary findings.
  10. Ok, so I found an hot tea, that I liked that stated that it was gluten-free, ( some teas do contain preservatives that contain gluten) but when drinking it today I noted a headache coming on and a mild discomfort in my stomach. The brand is called Revolution and it is a Ginger Peach tea. I checked the ingredients and for gluten-free markings to ensure safety on the box, and both seemed to check out. No other warnings that show it could have been cross contaminated either(as most products I seen at Whole Foods, or The Fresh Market will warn of that possibility). Has anyone ever experienced problems with this brand? edit note: My hubby had also checked that box when buying it and it is certified gluten-free, I myself just double checked and it is certified.
  11. Hello, So based on blood tests and discussing symptoms with a GI, we have both come to the conclusion that I almost certainly have celiac. I am a 17 year old junior in High School. This week and the following are finals weeks. Gluten causes me a great deal of headaches, lack of sleep, lack of focus, as well as irrational depression. ( I do not know if the depression is a separate factor but it sure doesn't help.) But I have a Biopsy scheduled a few days from now. (right before the end of finals week.) And I am having a miserable time trying to study and get homework done now. I have a presentation to make for my english class, and it is way harder than it should be. I normally have an outstanding work ethic in school, but i just simply can't focus on anything. I have terrible short term memory loss as well. I am a very good student and can't afford to fail these finals. I am so damn depressed about all of this. I don't know what to do, I have been trying to tough out the symptoms I'm feeling until the biopsy, but it occurs and an unfavorable time. And I am receiving no support from my parents, just insults like "oh you're glutens making you act all illogical again huh? Deal with it, get your finals done." I have never worked so hard in my life before. I just would like to ask, what do i do? I have absolutely no idea how to cope with this, my most important year in High School is going down the drain because of this unforgiving disease. I almost just want to give up.
  12. Celiac.com 04/10/2013 - People with celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease have higher rates of migraine headaches than their counterparts without those conditions, according to a new study. The research team included Alexandra K. Dimitrova MD, Ryan C. Ungaro MD, Benjamin Lebwohl MD, Suzanne K. Lewis MD, Christina A. Tennyson MD, Mark W. Green MD, Mark W. Babyatsky MD, and Peter H. Green MD. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the rates of migraine headaches in clinic and support group patients with celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and to compare those with a sample group of healthy control subjects. A number of European studies have shown higher rates of migraine headaches in patients with celiac disease and IBD compared with control subjects. For the study, participants all answered a self-administered survey containing clinical, demographic, and dietary data, as well as questions about headache type and frequency. They also used both the ID-Migraine screening tool and the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6). The research team analyzed five hundred and two subjects who met exclusion criteria. Of these, 188 had celiac disease, 111 had IBD, 25 had gluten sensitivity (GS), and 178 healthy subjects served as controls. Thirty percent of celiac patients, 56% of gluten-sensitive patients, 23% of IBD patients, and 14% of control subjects reported chronic headaches (P < .0001). Using multivariate logistic regression, the team found that all subjects with celiac disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.78-8.10), GS (OR 9.53, 95% CI 3.24-28.09), and IBD (OR 2.66, 95%CI 1.08-6.54) had significantly higher rates of migraine headaches than did control subjects. Migraine rates were influenced by female sex (P = .01), depression, and anxiety (P = .0059) were independent predictors of migraine headaches, whereas age >65 was protective (P = .0345). When it came to grading their migraines, seventy-two percent of celiac disease subjects reported having migraine that were severe in impact, compared with 30% of IBD, 60% of GS, and 50% of C subjects (P = .0919). The number of years on gluten-free diet had no influence on the severity of migraines. Migraine headaches were more common in people with celiac disease and IBD patients than in control subjects. The team points out that future studies should screen migraine patients for celiac disease and assess the effects of gluten-free diet on celiac disease patients with migraines. Source: Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain. DOI: 10.1111/j.1526-4610.2012.02260.x
  13. Am J Gastroenterol. 2003;98:625-629 Celiac.com 04/29/2003 – The findings of a recent study published in the March edition of American Journal of Gastroenterology indicate that around 4% of those who suffer from migraine headaches may have celiac disease, and in such cases a gluten-free diet can reduce or eliminate migraine symptoms. According to one of the researchers, Maurizio Gabrielli, MD (Gemelli Hospital in Rome, Italy), if further studies confirm these findings it could alter the current range of migraine treatments to include serological screening for celiac disease and the gluten-free diet for those with positive test results. Maurizio Gabrielli, MD and colleagues studied 90 patients who were diagnosed with idiopathic migraine, and found that 4.4% had celiac disease compared to 0.4% of 23 controls. The four migraine patients found to have celiac disease were treated for six months with a gluten-free diet and their symptoms decreased or were eliminated. The patients also showed an improvement in their cerebral blood flow on a gluten-free diet that was confirmed by using single-photon emission computed tomography scans.
  14. Ok I now have a celiacs child. Her tummy aches are finally gone 6 weeks after egd and diagnosis of celiacs. Gluten free diet did the trick. She now has chronic headaches. These are daily and and last most the day. I thought it may be something that she is lacking in her new gluten free diet but nothing has helped. Does anyone have this problem? Heard of this? Any advice? Thank you New to forum Dave
  15. Hey everyone! Sorry I'm new to everything here so I'm looking for some advice for you more seasoned pros. About 10 months ago I went to the Dominican on a service trip and ended up getting a severe stomach flu or cholera. Since then, I haven't felt normal. Symptoms started with stomach churning and bloating all the time, most often at night or after I ate. It kind of feels like when you drink a lot of water and you can feel it sloshing around-- but it happens to me all the time. It also is SUPER loud. I also was experiencing constipation. So I went to gastroenterology and they did a whole bunch of blood tests (including celiac) and all came back negative and normal. Then I got an endoscopy-- also normal. They told me I had post-infectious IBS, and that I just had to wait it out. So after months of waiting and still feeling sick I went back to the doctor. We did more tests (thyroid, food allergy) and all came back normal. My constipation had gotten worse at this point and I was still experience the churning/bloating all the time. Again they told me to wait. After 10 months I decided to get a second opinion. The doctor mentioned gluten sensitivity but said the topic was very controversial and there was no way to test for it. He also explained that my chronic headaches (since I was 14) and skin eczema (specifically on my scalp) could also be symptoms of gluten sensitivity. Unfortunately he said he didn't know enough about the subject to tell me any more. So after doing my own research I decided to try going gluten free on my own. The first two days I felt pretty good, the churning eased off a bit and my bathroom experiences weren't so bad. Day four however hit me hard. The churning was so bad it made me nauseous and I was so tired I couldn't do anything all day. Day 5 started with significant stomach churning/bloating, more constipation, and a migraine. I'm starting to question my self diagnosis. Am I way off track here? Is it possible I'm not gluten sensitive at all? The day I started to feel sick I had a starbucks raspberry latte and some movie theater popcorn (as well as some stuff I cooked myself). Is it possible that one of those things had gluten in it and it's affecting me this severely? Sorry for the long post, I'm just frustrated and looking for some answers. I'm new to this and I'm worried I'm doing it all wrong or I'm wrong in my diagnosis in the first place. Any similar experiences or help would be very VERY much appreciated. Sheri