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Found 34 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/30/2017 - Dear attending physician: If you are reading this it is because your patient either expects you to refuse or you have refused to test them for celiac disease. You may believe, in keeping with prior training, that this patient does not display the signs or symptoms associated with celiac disease. However, the symptom complex of celiac disease has recently undergone dramatic changes, beginning with the understanding that celiac disease is a systemic, rather than an intestinal ailment. World renowned researchers have weighed in on this issue, with peer reviewed reports that repeatedly establish the protean manifestations of celiac disease. They defy prior algorithms for symptom assessment toward diagnosing celiac disease. In the past, undiagnosed celiac patients were often identified as asymptomatic because their symptoms were simply not diarrhea, abdominal bloating, and muscle wasting. However, the Celiac Disease Center at the University of Chicago lists more than 300 presenting symptoms of celiac disease (1). The same group also offers a list of symptoms that demonstrate the wide range of apparently unrelated symptoms that can indicate celiac disease, only the first two of which represent these classical symptoms (2). Recurring abdominal bloating and pain Chronic or recurrent diarrhea Constipation Nausea or emesis Liver and biliary tract disorders (increased serum transaminases, primary sclerosing cholangitis) Weight loss Pale, foul-smelling stool Iron-deficiency anemia unresponsive to iron therapy Fatigue Failure to thrive or short stature Delayed puberty Arthralgia Tingling numbness in the legs Pale sores inside the mouth Dermatitis herpetiformis Abnormal dentition (tooth discoloration, loss of enamel) Unexplained infertility or recurrent miscarriage Osteopenia or osteoporosis Peripheral neuropathy Psychiatric disorders (anxiety or depression) Please remember that any one or more of the above symptoms and/or ailments may indicate untreated celiac disease, so testing for celiac disease is an important, inexpensive step toward assisting a patient to resolve these troubling, sometimes debilitating, symptoms. Overweight and obesity may also indicate underlying celiac disease. Today's affluence and accompanying food surpluses permit people who are not absorbing nutrients efficiently to eat enough to more than compensate for otherwise calorically deficient diets. Thus, only a minority of celiac disease cases present with classical symptoms in most of the first world. In fact, some reports indicate that overweight patients with celiac disease are as common as those who are underweight ( 3, 4, 5). This is why researchers have long employed the iceberg metaphor to describe the mass of people with celiac disease. The vast majority these people with celiac disease remain undiagnosed (6). Until sensitive and specific serological screening tools became available, very few cases were diagnosed and celiac disease was erroneously considered rare. In addition to alleviating quite a lot of human suffering, early detection offers some rather large economies for the health care system, as many of the more serious ailments that often befall those with untreated celiac disease may be averted through these inexpensive serological tests and subsequent prescription of a strict gluten free diet. Prior to the therapeutic use of a gluten free diet, mortality was reported at 36% among 73 children with celiac disease (7). Admittedly, it is likely that these were the more serious cases and perhaps some cases of misdiagnosis. However, even as recently as 1989, adult celiac patients experienced almost double the early mortality rate seen in the general population (8), so an early diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease is not just helpful in mitigating current symptoms, it is a powerful form of preventive medicine that is coincidental to the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease. Let me expand on that last comment a little further. Chronic depression (9), ADHD (10), neurological (11) and neuromuscular disorders(12) treatment-resistant iron deficiency (13, 14), impaired lung function (15, 16) a variety of lymphomas including B cell and T cell (17, 18, 19) and adenocarcinomas (20, 21) dental enamel defects (22, 23) autoimmune thyroid disease (24, 25 ) autoimmunity in general (26) type 1 diabetes (27, 28) kidney disease (29) liver disease (30, 31) skin disease (32, 33) seizure disorders (34) gait disorders (35) obesity (36) fatigue (37) anxiety (38) infertility (39) osteoporosis (40) learning disorders (41, 42) aphasia (43) and many more such sequels to untreated celiac disease (44) impose an enormous economic burden on our health system and education system. This burden weighs on most levels of government, private insurance companies, families, and individuals. Much of this unnecessary cost is ultimately passed along to taxpayers and/or are incorporated into insurance premiums. We all pay. And the human costs are even greater. Attention deficits and learning disabilities impose life-long inhibitions on success and are corrosive to self esteem. Depression robs us of individual, economic and social achievements, as well as denying us the day-to-day pleasures of life. Similarly, anxiety and infertility are socially isolating and heartbreaking, each in their own ways. Neurological and seizure disorders, including gait disorders, can inhibit our mobility and/or our safe function in this increasingly complex and fast-paced society. Impaired lung function can prohibit or interfere with normal, desirable activities ranging from pleasant walks, sports, and even having sex. Lymphomas and adenocarcinomas can have rapidly fatal consequences. The individual and familial consequences are often devastating. Type 1 diabetes tethers us to insulin injections and requires that we maintain a careful balance between carbohydrate intake and insulin injections. The challenges of this diet dwarfs the inconvenience of a gluten free diet, and a late celiac diagnosis may require that some people comply with both sets of dietary constraints. Skin disease can also exact an enormous social toll, and this is ignores the discomfort and embarrassment of constant itching and scratching, as well as the pain associated with the most common skin diseases connected to celiac disease. Similarly, obesity is not only socially excluding, it poses its own sets of health hazards and life shortening penalties. As osteoporosis becomes more and more common, we can see that society's increasing nutritional dependence on gluten grains may well have set the stage for this degenerative condition, often requiring painful and expensive joint replacement surgeries as our bones gradually crumble and shrink. The dramatic loss of our ability to produce intelligible speech, called aphasia, is by no means the least of this list. The horrific nightmare of being unable to speak to others and have them understand us has been the lived experience of at least one individual. His speech slowly returned after his celiac diagnosis and some time on a gluten free diet. Too many of us are not so lucky. Many of us see ourselves, and our symptoms, in the many posts, blog comments, listservs and websites that discuss celiac disease. Yet outdated medial training can create barriers to patients seeking testing. However, given the above, peer reviewed data and expert opinions, it is difficult to imagine any reasonable argument for refusing to test a patient who requests serological testing for celiac disease. The cost is minimal and the potential benefits to those who are diagnosed, and our society, are enormous. Current data suggest a prevalence of celiac disease in the general population at somewhere around 1%, based on serological testing for selective antibodies. However, newly emerging data suggest that a portion of the population that is at least six or seven times the size of the group with celiac disease mounts an innate immune response to gluten grains. The careful characterization of one pathway for activating intestinal inflammation by non-gluten components of these grains, leaves open the possibility of "gliadin-dependent signaling pathways that still remain to be characterized" (45). Other forms of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, as signaled by IgG class antibodies against gliadin, are seen in 10% to 12% of the general population. Whether these segments of the population with non-celiac gluten sensitivity overlap or are distinct has yet to be determined, so it remains unclear whether they form 10% of our population, or as much as 19% of our culture. Finally, based on a new book by the world renowned pediatric gastroenterologist and allergist, Dr. Rodney Ford, titled Gluten: Zero Global, there is considerable evidence to suggest that, with their many other anti-nutrient, addictive, allergenic, and blood-glucose altering features, gluten grains are a questionable macronutrient food source for humans (46). Thus, testing for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, may offer many of the benefits that testing for celiac disease offers. Your patient and I are asking that you heed the above data from your professional literature and the first dictum of your profession, by 'first doing no harm', and ordering testing for celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Sincerely, Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed. D. Sources: 1. http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/CDCFactSheets10_SymptomList.pdf 2. http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/medical-professionals/guide/symptoms 3. Dickey W, Kearney N. Overweight in celiac disease: prevalence, clinical characteristics, and effect of a gluten-free diet. Am J Gastroenterol. 2006 Oct;101(10):2356-9 4. Tucker E, Rostami K, Prabhakaran S, Al Dulaimi D. Patients with coeliac disease are increasingly overweight or obese on presentation. J Gastrointestin Liver Dis. 2012 Mar;21(1):11-5 5. Cheng J, Brar PS, Lee AR, Green PH. Body mass index in celiac disease: beneficial effect of a gluten-free diet. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2010 Apr;44(4):267-71. 6. Katz KD, Rashtak S, Lahr BD, Melton LJ 3rd, Krause PK, Maggi K, Talley NJ, Murray JA. Screening for celiac disease in a North American population: sequential serology and gastrointestinal symptoms. Am J Gastroenterol. 2011 Jul;106(7):1333-9. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2011.21. Epub 2011 Mar 1. 7. Hardwick C. 1989, as described in Holmes GKT. Non-malignant complications of coeliac disease. Acta Paediatr Suppl. 412: 68-75. 1996. 8. Logan RF, Rifkind EA, Turner ID, Ferguson A. Mortality in celiac disease. Gastroenterology. 1989 Aug;97(2):265-71. 9. Zipser RD, Farid M, Baisch D, Patel B, Patel D. Physician awareness of celiac disease: a need for further education. J Gen Intern Med. 2005 Jul;20(7):644-6. 10. ADHD (10),Niederhofer H. Association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and celiac disease: a brief report. Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2011;13(3). 11. neurological and neuromuscular disorders (11, 12,) Currie S, Hadjivassiliou M, Clark MJ, Sanders DS, 12. Wilkinson ID, Griffiths PD, Hoggard N. Should we be 'nervous' about coeliac disease? Brain abnormalities in patients with coeliac disease referred for neurological opinion. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;83(12):1216-1221. 13. Hadjivassiliou M, Chattopadhyay AK, Davies-Jones GA, Gibson A, Grünewald RA, Lobo AJ. Neuromuscular disorder as a presenting feature of coeliac disease. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1997 Dec;63(6):770-5. 14. Fayed SB, Aref MI, Fathy HM, Abd El Dayem SM, Emara NA, Maklof A, Shafik A. Prevalence of celiac disease, Helicobacter pylori and gastroesophageal reflux in patients with refractory iron deficiency anemia. J Trop Pediatr. 2008 Feb;54(1):43-53. 15. Cekın AH, Cekın Y, Sezer C. Celiac disease prevalence in patients with iron deficiency anemia. Turk J Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct;23(5):490-5. 16. Robertson DA, Taylor N, Sidhu H, Britten A, Smith CL, Holdstock G. Pulmonary permeability in coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Digestion. 1989;42(2):98-103. 17. Edwards C, Williams A, Asquith P. Bronchopulmonary disease in coeliac patients. J Clin Pathol. 1985 Apr;38(4):361-7. 18. Bautista-Quach MA, Ake celiac disease, Chen M, Wang J. Gastrointestinal lymphomas: Morphology, immunophenotype and molecular features. J Gastrointest Oncol. 2012 Sep;3(3):209-25. 19. Leslie LA, Lebwohl B, Neugut AI, Gregory Mears J, Bhagat G, Green PH. Incidence of lymphoproliferative disorders in patients with celiac disease. Am J Hematol. 2012 Aug;87(8):754-9. 20. Elfström P, Granath F, Ekström Smedby K, Montgomery SM, Askling J, Ekbom A, Ludvigsson JF. Risk of lymphoproliferative malignancy in relation to small intestinal histopathology among patients with celiac disease. J Natl Cancer Inst.2011 Mar 2;103(5):436-44. 21. Benhammane H, El M'rabet FZ, Idrissi Serhouchni K, El Yousfi M, Charif I, Toughray I, Mellas N, Riffi Amarti A, Maazaz K, Ibrahimi SA, El Mesbahi O. Small bowel adenocarcinoma complicating coeliac disease: a report of three cases and the literature review. Case Rep Oncol Med. 2012;2012:935183. 22. Vecchio R, Marchese S, Gangemi P, Alongi G, Ferla F, Spataro C, Intagliata E. Laparoscopic treatment of mucinous adenocarcinoma of jejunum associated with celiac disease. Case report. G Chir. 2012 Apr;33(4):126-8. 23. El-Hodhod MA, El-Agouza IA, Abdel-Al H, Kabil NS, Bayomi KA. Screening for celiac disease in children with dental enamel defects. ISRN Pediatr. 2012;2012:763783. 24. Erriu M, Sanna S, Nucaro A, Orrù G, Garau V, Montaldo C. HLA-DQB1 Haplotypes and their Relation to Oral Signs Linked to Celiac Disease Diagnosis. Open Dent J. 2011;5:174-8. 25. Cats EA, Bertens AS, Veldink JH, van den Berg LH, van der Pol WL. Associated autoimmune diseases in patients with multifocal motor neuropathy and their family members. J Neurol. 2012 Jun;259(6):1137-41. 26. Bardella MT, Elli L, De Matteis S, Floriani I, Torri V, Piodi L. Autoimmune disorders in patients affected by celiac sprue and inflammatory bowel disease. Ann Med. 2009;41(2):139-43 27. Nass FR, Kotze LM, Nisihara RM, de Messias-Reason IT, Utiyama SR. Autoantibodies in relatives of celiac disease patients: a follow-up of 6-10 years. Arq Gastroenterol. 2012 Jul-Sep;49(3):199-203. 28. Saadah OI, Al-Agha AE, Al Nahdi HM, Bokhary RY, Bin Talib YY, Al-Mughales JA, Al Bokhari SM. Prevalence of celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus screened by anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody from Western Saudi Arabia. Saudi Med J. 2012 May;33(5):541-6. 29. Van den Driessche A, Eenkhoorn V, Van Gaal L, De Block C. Type 1 diabetes and autoimmune polyglandular syndrome: a clinical review. Neth J Med. 2009 Dec;67(11):376-87. 30. Welander A, Prütz KG, Fored M, Ludvigsson JF. Increased risk of end-stage renal disease in individuals with coeliac disease. Gut. 2012 Jan;61(1):64-8. 31. Drastich P, Honsová E, Lodererová A, Jarešová M, Pekáriková A, Hoffmanová I, TuÄková L, Tlaskalová-Hogenová H, SpiÄák J, Sánchez D. Celiac disease markers in patients with liver diseases: A single center large scale screening study. World J Gastroenterol. 2012 Nov 21;18(43):6255-62. 32. Massironi S, Rossi RE, Fraquelli M, Bardella MT, Elli L, Maggioni M, Della Valle S, Spampatti MP, Colombo M, Conte D. Transient elastography in patients with celiac disease: a noninvasive method to detect liver involvement associated with celiac disease. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Jun;47(6):640-8 33. Caproni M, Bonciolini V, D'Errico A, Antiga E, Fabbri P. Celiac disease and dermatologic manifestations: many skin clue to unfold gluten-sensitive enteropathy. Gastroenterol Res Pract. 2012;2012:952753. 34. Criado PR, Criado RF, Aoki V, Belda W Jr, Halpern I, Landman G, Vasconcellos C. Dermatitis herpetiformis: relevance of the physical examination to diagnosis suspicion. Can Fam Physician. 2012 Aug;58(8):843-7. 35. Maniar VP, Yadav SS, Gokhale YA. Intractable seizures and metabolic bone disease secondary to celiac disease. J Assoc Physicians India. 2010 Aug;58:512-5. 36. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald R, Sharrack B, Sanders D, Lobo A, Williamson C, Woodroofe N, Wood N, Davies-Jones A. Gluten ataxia in perspective: epidemiology, genetic susceptibility and clinical characteristics. Brain. 2003 Mar;126(Pt3):685-91. 37. Balamtekin N, Demir H, Baysoy G, Uslu N, Yüce A. Obesity in adolescents with celiac disease: two adolescents and two different presentations. Turk J Pediatr. 2011 May-Jun;53(3):314-6. 38. Greenfield JR, Samaras K. Evaluation of pituitary function in the fatigued patient: a review of 59 cases. Eur J Endocrinol. 2006 Jan;154(1):147-57 39. Smith DF, Gerdes LU. Meta-analysis on anxiety and depression in adult celiac disease. Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Mar;125(3):189-93. 40. Choi JM, Lebwohl B, Wang J, Lee SK, Murray JA, Sauer MV, Green PH. Increased prevalence of celiac disease in patients with unexplained infertility in the United States. J Reprod Med. 2011 May-Jun;56(5-6):199-203. 41. Rastogi A, Bhadada SK, Bhansali A, Kochhar R, Santosh R. Celiac disease: A missed cause of metabolic bone disease. Indian J Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Sep;16(5):780-5 42. Knivsberg AM. Urine patterns, peptide levels and IgA/IgG antibodies to food proteins in children with dyslexia. Pediatr Rehabil. 1997 Jan-Mar;1(1):25-33. 43. Zelnik N, Pacht A, Obeid R, Lerner A. Range of neurologic disorders in patients with celiac disease. Pediatrics. 2004 Jun;113(6):1672-6. 44. Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Weekly clinicopathological exercises. Case 43-1988. A 52-year-old man with persistent watery diarrhea and aphasia. N Engl J Med. 1988 Oct 27;319(17):1139-48. 45. Norström F, Sandström O, Lindholm L, Ivarsson A. A gluten-free diet effectively reduces symptoms and health care consumption in a Swedish celiac disease population. BMC Gastroenterol. 2012 Sep 17;12:125 46. Junker Y, Zeissig S, Kim SJ, Barisani D, Wieser H, Leffler DA, Zevallos V, Libermann TA, Dillon S, Freitag TL, Kelly CP, Schuppan D. Wheat amylase trypsin inhibitors drive intestinal inflammation via activation of toll-like receptor 4. J Exp Med. 2012 Dec 17;209(13):2395-408 47. Ford R. Gluten: Zero Global. YfoodX Ltd. Christchurch, New Zealand. 2012.
  2. Celiac and a bodybuilder. Need gluten-free BCAAs/aminos and preworkout. Certified gluten-free. Anyone have suggestions?
  3. Celiac.com 02/22/2017 - Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease (celiac disease) are autoimmune diseases that share similar genetic patterns. T1DM treatment is based on diet, physical activity and insulin therapy, whereas celiac disease treatment is based on a gluten-free diet. A research team recently set out to evaluate the quality of life (QoL) of individuals with the association of T1DM and celiac disease, to characterize their nutritional status and to compare it with those with only one disease and to healthier control subjects. The research team included JG Nunes-Silva, VS Nunes, RP Schwartz, S1 Mlss Trecco, D Evazian, ML Correa-Giannella, M Nery, and MS Queiroz. The are variously affiliated with the Nutrition and Dietetics Division, Central Institute of Clinics Hospital, the Lipids Laboratory (LIM-10), Endocrinology and Metabolism Division of Hospital das Clinicas, Faculty of Medical Sciences, the Radiology Institute of Clinics Hospital, the Cellular and Molecular Endocrinology Laboratory (LIM-18), and the Endocrinology Division, Internal Medicine Department, all at the University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil. The researchers evaluated sixty patients controlled by sex, age and body mass index (BMI). Patients were further divided into the following groups based on previous diagnosis: DMCD group (T1DM and celiac disease); DM group (T1DM); celiac disease group (celiac disease); or HC (healthy control subjects). They used the SF-36 questionnaire to assess psychological well-being, and compared the results with glycemic control, presence of complications related to diabetes, and adhesion to gluten-free diet (GFD). Using BMI, waist circumference, bio-impedance, general laboratory tests and whole-body densitometry, they determined nutritional status and body mass composition. Both the DMCD and DM groups had similar times of diagnosis, but the duration of celiac disease was significantly higher in the celiac disease group compared with DMCD. The SF-36 analysis revealed statistically significant differences between DM and HC groups in two domains: general health (P=0.042) and energy/vitality (P=0.012). QoL was also correlated with compliance to a GFD, and scores were similar in both groups: DMCD and celiac disease. Forty percent of individuals in the celiac disease group had visceral fat area above 100 cm2, compared with just 20% in the other groups. So, are people with both Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease automatically doomed to worse health? It seems not. To be sure, they are generally less healthy than control subjects, but the study found that the DMCD group had similar scores to DM, celiac disease and HC on QoL, as well as on their nutritional status and bone metabolism. The researchers conclude from this that the association of T1DM and celiac disease did not deteriorate the health status of the individuals with both Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. So, it seems that having both Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease dose not automatically mean having worse health, nutrition and well-being. Source: Nutr Diabetes. 2017 Jan 9;7(1):e239. doi: 10.1038/nutd.2016.43.
  4. Celiac.com 10/20/2016 - Whether you are an adult or a child, you could have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism or even Asperger's Syndrome. If you do not have enough symptom improvements with the traditional treatments, then why not consider an alternative therapy? What about a gluten-free diet? There are so many statistics that show the connection between these mental conditions and celiac disease. Now, in order to help the symptoms, eating a gluten-free and casein-free (Gluten-free Casein-free) diet might actually help. There is evidence of a correlation between ADHD and celiac disease. It is actually fairly strong. Children and adults with undiagnosed celiac disease, seem to have a higher risk than the general population. Once they started a gluten-free diet, the patients or their parents, reported significant improvements in overall behavior and functioning. As for individuals with autism, they might have a food allergy or high sensitivity to foods containing gluten or casein. Eating a Gluten-free Casein-free diet, might help to reduce symptoms and improve speech, social and cognitive behaviors. Children with autism, according to theory, process peptides and proteins in food items that contain casein and gluten differently. The difference within processing, may exacerbate autistic symptoms. Lastly, children with Asperger's Syndrome, can actually have leaky gut syndrome as well. Treating with a gluten free diet could help ease certain symptoms, such as nonsense talk, obsessions, poor coordination, staring off into space and even social difficulties. Then, consider even going one step further and trying an elimination diet. This is an easy method of figuring out what foods your child is truly reacting to. So, as you can see, these three conditions might actually have more improvements with just simple dietary changes. Having less challenges and being able to focus and interact with less difficulty won't be just a dream, but could be a real possibility for your child. References: https://www.verywell.com/depression-behavior-issues-in-celiac-teens-563017 http://www.thesavvyceliac.com/2011/03/12/research-is-food-the-culprit-in-adhd/ http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/gluten-free-casein-free-diets-for-autism#1 http://www.myaspergerschild.com/2011/11/misbehavior-or-food-allergy.html
  5. Celiac.com 04/14/2016 - Driven partly by a perception among consumers that gluten-free foods are healthier than their non-gluten-free counterparts, the global gluten-free packaged food market is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of approximately 6% between 2015 and 2019, according to a recent market report from Technavio. In addition to health and wellness, Technavio identifies demand from millennials and increased marketing activities as prime emerging trends driving the gluten-free market. Once seen as medical products for gluten intolerant people gluten-free products have evolved into "a lifestyle choice across all customer segments," says Brijesh Kumar Choubey, a lead food industry analyst at Technavio. Many consumers associate gluten-free foods with better energy energy levels, and with weight loss. Technavio cites a 2013 market survey conducted by Monash University that revealed nearly 80% people buying gluten-free products report perceived health benefits as the main reason. Just five to ten years ago, buyers of gluten-free foods were likely to be older. Today, younger consumers, specifically 32% of millennials, and 38% of Generation Z, said they would pay higher prices for gluten-free products. Bakery products, cookies and snacks are the top gluten-free foods among this consumer group, said Technavio. Driven by growing demand, and by new product development, the bakery segment leads the gluten-free packaged food market with 64% market share in 2014. Technavio predicts the segment will outpace the rest of the market through the end of 2019, growing at a rate of about 7%. Increased marketing activities from big and small manufacturers alike is the last key driver Technavio cites as a driver for gluten-free packaged food demand. An example is Heinz, which in 2014 launched a social media campaign for its gluten-free pasta and sauces, Technavio said. Source: Foodbusinessnews.net
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    The GFAF Expos are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the US. Started in 2007, the events are professionally managed and have expanded from one to seven cities throughout the United States. In addition to meeting the needs of the Celiac community, the Expo welcomes those with gluten sensitivities, auto-immune/inflammatory diseases and autism. What do you get with your Expo Ticket? Entry into the 100+ booth vendor fair Valuable coupons at the vendor booths Samples from the vendors Discounted products available for purchase Informative classes related to the gluten and allergen-free lifestyle Free reusable bag to carry your goodies The chance to meet your favorite vendors, authors and bloggers For more information, visit www.gfafexpo.com
  7. Let me introduce myself. You can call me MK. I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes about 6 years ago. I found the complete life change to be a major challenge, as would anyone. I admit, I never really fully was able to, leading to many health issues and many stays in the hospital with diabetic ketoacidosis. Then, to make matters even worse, about a year and a half ago, I was tested and it was confirmed that I have Celiac’s Disease. I have yet to eliminate gluten from my diet. I have made many attempts to do it, but I fall off the band wagon every time. Now to top things off. I lost my job over the summer and found myself living out of my car. I managed to find a part time job, but that barely pays for the car itself. I have to buy food on the fly, since there is nowhere to store food and nowhere to even cook it. This, as you can imagine, limits my options to the point where I don’t even know what to do. I eat anything I can, whenever it is possible. If I eat over another person’s house, I take what I can get. It is wreaking havoc on my intestines and my digestive tract. It has become a nightmare. Recently, my mother has been letting me stay on her couch, which opens up some possibilities for me to finally start getting myself straight. Although she buys a lot of bread and gluten full products, I have been talking to her about trying to work with me and buy some better options for me. That can get expensive and neither she nor I can truly afford to do it. Everything I have seen for sale that is gluten free, such as bread, pasta, etc., is way out of our very limited budget. I need to fix this, though. I need to get healthy or I am afraid I will die. Not even exaggerating. I need some support and didn’t know where else to look. I found this place and was hoping I could maybe find some help and advice. Or even just an ear (or a set of eyes?) to turn to. Thanks in advance. MK
  8. Celiac.com 11/24/2015 - Polyphenols are a group of compounds produced by plants, highly variable in strucure, physical, chemical and biological properties. Currently science knows of several thousand natural phenolic compounds. A common feature of polyphenols is their ability to enable redox reactions. With their ability to transport protons and electrons, phenolic compounds not only readily get oxidized, but also, through the compounds called quinones that result from their oxidation, may mediate oxidation of other compounds that do not directly react with oxygen. Anthocyanins Anthocyanins are a large group of plant dyes that are soluble in water and are found in flowers, fruits, leaves and stems. In the cell they are located in the vacuoles, in the form of granules of various sizes, however, the cell walls of the pulp and tissues do not contain anthocyanins. Anthocyanins give fruits and vegetables different colors like orange, red, pink, purple and dark blue. Anthocyanins belong to the polyphenol organic compounds. The name “anthocyanin” was first used in 1835 by Marquart to refer to the blue dye of the cornflower. The structure of anthocyanins can be very complex and diverse. Acid hydrolysis of anthocyanins leads to decay into sugars and anthocyanidins, called aglycones. The anthocyanins are natural products usually in the form of mono-, di- or tri-glycosides. Hundreds of natural anthocyanins are known, and over 100 could be produced synthetically. These dyes can be extracted from plants and are used as food additives to impart or reinforce the color of drinks, juices, candies and jellies. Anthocyanins determine the hue and color stability, for example, in strawberries the dominant dye is pelargonidin 3-glucoside. Anthocyanin synthesis is a photochemical process because the fruit which is directly irradiated by solar radiation has a more full coloration compared to fruit picked early and ripened in storage. Health Aspects The healing properties of anthocyanins have long been known in folk medicine, and now they are increasingly being used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Anthocyanin’s name was derived from the Latin name of the plant from which the particular compound was extracted: cyanine flowers or cornflower (Centaurea cyanus L.). Anthocyanins are unstable compounds and reside in an aqueous environment and depend on pH levels that trigger changes in the color of products from which they were isolated. In acidic conditions they have a red color, in nutral conditions violet, and in alkaline they are blue. The structure of anthocyanin molecules has a significant impact on the hue, intensity and color stability. Irreversible changes of anthocyanin pigments are mainly due to oxidative polymerization processes and cause changes in natural red color of fruits to red-brown which is characteristic of long storage. The rate of these changes depends mainly on the presence of factors in the raw material, temperature and time. Chokeberry - Aronia The addition of these compounds to food does not raise concerns of consumers, and they are accepted. An example of a source of anthocyanins is the chokeberry, which contains a lot of polyphenol (above 20 mg/g), including anthocyanins. With a considerable amount of polyphenols, the chokeberry has a significant level of antioxidant activity. Its distinctive tart flavor comes from the high content of tannins which reduces the possibility of direct consumption of the fruit and its products. Generally it is used in combination with other fruits, or in a diluted form. Chokeberry fruit is used for the manufacture of nectars, drinks, wines, jams, as well as food dyes and bioactive compounds. Anthocyanins isolated from chokeberry have antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activity, and chokeberry juice has antioxidant properties. Chokeberry juice is more and more relevant in the food industry as a source of natural red color for products that are poor in stable color. Products made from chokeberries are mainly aronia juice that is mixed with other fruit juices. Other applications include food coloring additives teas and syrups. In Russia, aronia and apple juices are combined and fermented to produce red wine. In Lithuania, dessert wines are produced with the use of chokeberry or chokeberry juice, which is mixed with other fruit juices. Commercial juices are produced by pressing ripe berries, then fining and filtering the juice. To reduce the tannin content gelatin may be added prior to filtration. Tannins sometimes form complexes, which cause clouding of clear juice. Reducing the level of tannins also makes juice have a less tart taste. Clear juice can then be bottled and pasteurized or concentrated and used as a food ingredient. The whole fruit can be used for the production of a puree that is a highly colored product of uniform consistency once the seeds and skins are removed. The product can be frozen and used as a food ingredient in sauces. Antioxidant Effect In the scientific literature, we can find a number of studies on the antioxidant properties of chokeberry, chokeberry extracts or phenolic components. Fresh chokeberry fruits have the highest antioxidant capacity of the fruit measured by ORAC method. Literature reports that chokeberry juice has the highest antioxidant capacity of beverages rich in polyphenols—four times higher than other berry juice, cranberry juice, or red wine. Anthocyanidins and procyanidins containing o-dihydroxyphenyl group are excellent metal chelators and form complexes with, for example iron (III) and copper (II). The presence of free iron and copper in biological systems catalyzed free radical reactions, such as the Fenton reaction. The ability of the phenolic components to bind divalent metal effectively reduces the concentration of these cations, and therefore their oxidative properties. It should be noted that the in vitro data does not say a lot about the role they can play in in vivo systems for prevention of oxidative stress. The literature also describes the antioxidant effects in animals, where chokeberry anthocyanins reduce lipid peroxidation and increase the activity of enzymes that are involved in the antioxidant defense system. It was also observed that the fraction of the red dye from chokeberry, both in vitro and in vivo. is able to prevent damage to the gastric mucosa. Antioxidant effects observed in humans, with chokeberry juice supplementation reduces oxidative damage to red blood cells produced during exercise.
  9. Celiac.com 08/07/2015 - Actor Michael Douglass is making gluten-free celebrity news with his recent disclosure to ITV's Lorraine Kelly that he is eating gluten-free, and that he views the diet is an important part of his post-cancer health regimen. The 70-year old Oscar-winning actor says he feels "great," and credits the gluten-free diet with boosting his memory and transforming his health five years after cancer battle. Douglass recommends the diet and says it has helped him recover and maintain his weight after dropping over 40 pounds in his battle with throat cancer. The American actor, who stars in the superhero film Ant-Man, set for release this week, also spoke with Kelly about his past battles with alcohol and his marriage to Welsh actress Catherine Zeta-Jones. Douglass revealed that he views a gluten-free diet as a key factor in his improved health and well-being. The gluten-free diet has proven popular among celebrities and athletes, including Gwyneth Paltrow, 42, and this year's Wimbledon champion Novak Djokovic, 28. Read more at DailyMail.com
  10. Celiac.com 10/09/2013 - This article originally appeared in the Spring 2013 issue of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. Ron: Where do celiac disease and non celiac gluten sensitivity come from? Dr. Fine: We're talking about the dietary staple of Western Civilization, right? This is not the staple of the Asian diet or the African diet or the diet for the Americas. Not even all European populations have been eating it as long as those earliest farmers in the Middle East. We have altered the wheat so much, through hybridization and seed selection, to have more gluten and to be more favorable for farming practices, that we have to look at what gluten is ...... a highly antigenic food. It always has been. The coeliac affection was first described in 100 AD. So if we've been eating wheat, or grains, for 10, 000 years, then 8,000 years into this, gluten induced disease was written about, it was probably present long before that. The bottom line is that this is a 10,000 year old food with a 2000 year old description, so this is not a new syndrome. What could be new is that because we have hospitals and tests the resulting diseases can now be identified earlier. Before you had to be near death before anyone knew there was anything wrong with you. But we are certainly able to identify celiac disease before you are dying from it. I really think we are seeing more of an epidemic of non-celiac GS because, I believe, our immune systems are much more reactive than ever before. All autoimmune and immune diseases are on the rise. That's a fact from the NIH. The NIH has even acknowledged that there is probably an environmental component to that increase, and I agree with them. The wheat we grow now is more immune stimulating. The way I see wheat today is that it has become the poison ivy of the western diet. Poison Ivy is a plant that is highly immune stimulating but not everyone reacts to it. Not everyone gets a rash. Even if some do not react, for instance, if they rub poison ivy on their skin, you could probably biopsy the skin and see that it was stimulating an immune reaction but there may never be a rash and the person may never itch. That would be an asymptomatic immune reaction. Then, there are symptomatic people. And then, there are people who truly don't react. It is similar with eating grains. This is the food that brought us to where we are and without grains we couldn't have gotten civilization, we couldn't store food, and we couldn't have gotten all the other things that helped us become civilized. But it went awry. If you look at the Old Testament (The Torah), it says we should never mix two seeds of grain in the same field. I look at this as a warning to keep the seeds away from each other so they don't hybridize. Because when they hybridize, they also change their genetics. Wheat does not stay the same. If you cross this wheat with that wheat, instead of being haploid it becomes tetraploid and hexaploid, so modern wheat is hexaploid. Ancient wheat was haploid, with two chromosomes. So now, we've got to look at this like a public food issue. If the same food that gave us civilization is now causing disease, it's either something we've done or something that's been there all along, plus something we've done to the wheat. And, our environment is stimulating our immune systems so much now that we are reacting more to wheat. In other words, to try to say something like we've got to do something to be able to eat wheat is almost like saying 'we've got to do something so when we walk through a patch of poison ivy, we won't react.' I just don't think it makes sense to say let's find a way to eat a substance that we know is causing mental and brain problems, obesity, immune problems, gut problems, etc. They're really just empty calories anyway. There's no vital nutrients in grains. I think it's valid to ask, why are we so addicted to, or in love with, grains? Why can't we just go on from here without them? Why can't we move forward instead of trying to do everything to figure out how to stay in this current food paradigm? Ron: Maybe that is part of why the gluten free diet has become so popular lately. Dr. Fine: An interesting phenomenon we have seen is that since gluten free food and the whole gluten sensitive thing has become popular talk show material, it has been a little bit de-medicalized. That can actually pose some problems because more people are seeing it as a diet like the fifteen other diets they heard about last week. Instead of "I've got a serious problem and I need an answer, and how do I find out what's wrong with me?" That used to be what it was. People have forgotten that this is a serious medical issue. This isn't just a diet de jour. It is a diet that should be followed consistently and strictly. So maybe we should be trying to communicate where we are in this revolution. The popularizing of the gluten free diet may be harmful to some people because they will think that they have tried the diet and gotten little benefit from it, when really, they have just dabbled in the diet and have not really given it a chance to help. They may never learn that gluten really is causing their health problems because they will think that they have tried it and it didn't work for them. And they are less likely to seek objective tests for gluten sensitivity and other possible causes of their problems. It has been a kind of a mixed blessing that the gluten free diet has become so popular. At least we don't have to fight to get the truth out, but what I don't like is the idea that what used to be a highly objective, credible, medical issue ie: celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity is kind of becoming like the Atkin's diet. You know, "I'm on it. I'm off it. I'm going to go on it next week. Oh, I'm going to a birthday party so I'm going to have some cake, etc." That approach, we all know, is the absolute wrong thing to do. And I think that the people who were almost crippled by gluten, and then got better, are probably upset when somebody looks at the gluten free diet like it's the diet of the week. Ron: I know that you operate a testing laboratory but you also organize academic conferences. Dr. Fine: Yes, I've got two organizations. One is a purely educational, non-profit public organization, called the Intestinal Health Institute. My lecturing, for about 12 years now, is aimed at trying to bring about greater awareness of the health problems caused by gluten and other foods, plus intestinal and overall health. Several years ago when talking about gluten sensitivity, it was almost like getting people to see that the emperor didn't have clothes on. That has improved lately, because public and medical beliefs are changing. As a gastroenterologist in the 1980s, I saw a similar revolution in thinking take place. Somebody came out and said "Ulcer disease is not purely from too much acid. It is a disease caused by this bacterium called Helicobacter pylori." That was unbelievable within the existing paradigm. It started out with people saying: "Did you read that paper? It is absurd!" Then more information came out. Then it became controversial. When an idea becomes controversial, it is threatening something. Someone on one side is trying to protect what is, and someone on the other side has a new idea that may displace the side being protected. What I saw was a process where that idea went from being laughable, to possible. Then, fifteen years later, it became the most popular topic in gastroenterology. It went from 1985 to 2000 when Helicobacter pylori had become "the" topic. And, by the way, research goes pop too. Once a topic begins to be accepted, researchers dive in. I saw that happen at the end of the 1990's too. People with microscopic colitis, which my mentor Dr. John Fordtran had originally discovered and defined, and I researched clinically, pathologically and histopathologically. I found it to be very similar, and epidemiologically, almost identical to celiac disease. But these patients didn't have celiac disease nor did they have the markers of gliadin reactivity in their serum. Then I had this idea one day that maybe the antibodies are inside the intestine because I had heard about a researcher, Anne Ferguson, who had done some very interesting work where they had either sampled the fluid inside the intestine or flushed all the intestinal fluid out and measured antibodies, even though they weren't present in the blood. To me that made perfect sense because that's where your food is and if your immune system is ever going to secrete antibodies, as a first line of defense, it had better get those antibodies inside the intestine because that's where the bacteria are going to be invading. You can't use serum antibody testing when we know that the intestine is, indeed, the site where the problem originates. Dr. Anne Ferguson is the one who found that you can find intra-intestinal antibodies when they weren't present in the blood, so blood is an indirect measure of the presence of celiac disease. Those antibodies mainly get in blood when you have intestinal damage but if you don't, they cannot leak into the blood, it seems. It's apples and oranges. A blood test and a stool test are not the same test. IgA is a secretory antibody. It is made to be secreted into the intestinal tract, the respiratory tract, and anywhere there is a mucosa that interfaces with the world or food or a foreign antigen. That's where you see seceretory IgA and that is what we looked for. When we had the idea and played it out - and let me just say now that other people who have tried to study this, who have usually been studying it with the hypothesis that it is no good, and of course, whatever your bias in research is, you are usually going to wind up finding evidence to support that bias. Nevertheless, when we first did it, we adapted a serum method for stools, and we didn't find it either. You have to go a few steps further. But if you give up on your first try, you always miss it, and so did I. And those with a bias against it will never look any further. Anyway, so we developed a method and it was much more sensitive than finding serum positivity for anti-gliadin antibodies. You've got anti-gliadin antibodies in illnesses other than celiac disease, like irritable bowel syndrome, autoimmune diseases like microscopic colitis, chronic fatigue, and so on. So we were looking at numbers like 60% and 75% positive Vs 11% in the blood. We also found fecal gliadin antibodies in 25% of people with no symptoms at all. Still, 75% is a lot higher than 25%. So I knew that I had discovered a new paradigm. And I saw (by the way, that 25%.... at first it was 29% but it eventually averaged out to 25%) a quarter of asymptomatic people reacted positive with stool antibodies. But if you take everybody, because so many people have other diseases, like 15% of the population have irritable bowel syndrome, and nearly 15% have autoimmune disease....... when you add it all up it could be about 50% of people who are reactive to gliadin, as determined by looking for antibodies inside their intestines. Ron: How did you get started on your own? Dr. Fine: I made the transition in 2000, so our anniversary is April 1st, 2000. This is our 13th year. If you've hung around 13 years, I think, that also makes a statement. EnteroLab.com was born because I knew that what I had discovered was, well, what we're really talking about is an epidemic. At that time, I didn't know anything about the "why" or even the "what". I just knew it was a massive problem I had discovered. Maybe I could call myself the Paul Revere of gluten sensitivity. I had to be the one to get on the horse and say "gluten sensitivity is coming". I converted my academic career, which was stellar at the time.... it was very traditional.... 40 publications by the time I was 35 and I worked with what would arguably be one of the most successful researchers in the world, Dr. John Fordtran. And I went out on a limb and put my entire professional reputation and career in jeopardy because I knew this had to be brought to the world. I knew there would be a controversy. The idea, which had been in the medical literature for years..... non-celiac gluten sensitivity can be traced back to at least 1980, so we were already 20 years into that. And I thought if I bring the idea directly to the public, then, because it's a dietary treatment, they can proceed in getting better while we wait 15 to 20 years for the doctors to catch on. What I didn't know at the time is that there's a whole subset of practitioners, like chiropractors, nutritionists, and nurse practitioners, who don't seem to feel so threatened by some major new idea. They caught on quickly. They're the early adopters. Ron: You have traveled a long way since 2000 Dr. Fine: Here's the way I'm looking at what's going on now versus where we started. My observation is that every new idea, every revolutionary finding, seems to happen in two places on opposite sides of the globe. Having happened in Christchurch, New Zealand and in Dallas, Texas would qualify for that. I think Dr. Rodney Ford and I got on the track at about the same time. What I had previously been finding and, I think, what he has found was that these positive anti-gliadin antibodies in the serum, which everyone was casting off as false positives, didn't make sense. How could a quality lab test have a 10% or 12% false positive rate? That's like saying that we can't diagnose anemia without including 10% or more people who don't have it. That would be a bad test. So it didn't seem true that if anti-gliadin antibodies were part of the reaction of celiac disease, why would 10% to 12% of the population have anti-gliadin antibodies in their blood? Well, that's because they are reacting to gliadin. It is the most immunogenic food. They don't have celiac disease, either because they don't have the genes to get it, or they haven't got it yet. Fecal gliadin antibodies were this kind of intermediate thing. Ron: Are you saying that the fecal antibody does not identify a leaky gut, whereas the serum antibody does? Dr. Fine: No, it might imply that, but I wouldn't say that it says that. In fact, in a study that I did, where I looked at serum antibodies, we did permeability studies and fecal fat measurements and biopsies, and some treatment. We found abnormal permeability, as measured by a surcrose permeability test, performed by the authority on that test at the time, Dr. Jon Meddings. He found about half of those with leaky gut had the serum antibodies, not all. Ron: Is there more mainstream research that supports your findings? Dr. Fine: Well, I found a rate of about 11% serum IgG or IgA among people at a shopping center in Dallas. Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou found IgG antibodies in about 12% of the population, and Dr. Rodney Ford tells me that he has found a rate of about 10% who are gluten sensitive. These are all congruent findings. Fecal Antibodies at 25% of asymptomatic and 60 to 75% of symptomatic people, depending on what disease or symptom you're talking about and then, because those problems are so common, the overall average, from my calculations is 50% overall...... mostly adults. Theoretically, it might be less frequent in children, but I don't have enough children's data to know. Ron: Is your testing similar to Dr. Marsh's rectal challenge testing for celiac disease? Dr. Fine: Yes. I identify one of his references in my manuscript where even siblings without DQ2 or DQ8 can be positive for a rectal challenge, even though they don't have celiac genes or get celiac disease. That's another proof that you don't have to be celiac to be gluten reactive. He did studies on that, a sibling study which was really interesting. What is your vision for future testing & treatment of celiac disease and non celiac gluten sensitivity? Dr. Fine: My lab and myself are just about finding the facts and then helping people to understand those facts. Frankly, to use a metaphor, your vision is only as good as your eyes and your glasses. If your eyes aren't good, good glasses can make your vision perfect. But if you are using the wrong glasses, ie: the wrong test, or the wrong paradigm, then you might be seeing farther than you used to see, but you are not really seeing the truth yet. Ron: Would you care to comment on the whole oats controversy? Dr. Fine: I've got a feel on oats that is a departure from the general view. We have a new test for oat protein sensitivity and it is really showing to be very helpful. We launched a more extensive food sensitivity test panel, 2 years ago, and oats is one of the antigens we included, along with rice and corn and a few meats and nuts and potatoes. What we are seeing sometimes, is people who don't have a reaction to any foods and their oats are through the roof and they are gluten sensitive. I don't know why. Just like it was all or none with celiac.... you could have something in the middle, right? Oats is the same way. It's not all or nothing. Some people are sensitive, and some people are not. We know it's the least stimulating of the four grains. That makes sense because of the biochemistry of the prolamine and glutamine residues, and a lot of antigenic glutens. However, logically, you cannot do a study of tolerating oats in anyone who doesn't tolerate oats. So anyone doing a study where the subject has to consume oats for long periods of time, that could never include someone who is sensitive to oats. The truth about studies that make this claim is that there is a very large withdrawal rate and a large component that can't qualify for the study because it made them vomit or sick in other ways. So the only thing you can conclude is that among the people who can symptomatically tolerate oats, over long periods of time, oats don't seem to cause the villous atrophy of celiac disease, which isn't the best measure anyway, to my thinking. But that does not mean that anybody with celiac disease can tolerate oats and that seems to be the message that has come down to us. We're talking about wheat, barley, and rye, and, we used to think, oats. Now we are saying oats are okay and that is just plain wrong. In fact my own gluten sensitivity became known after increasing my consumption of oats. And if you ever go into a room of gluten sensitive people and give a talk, just ask them "How many people here know that they can't eat oats?" They either get pain, gas, vomiting, or whatever. It's about 20% to 30% who will always raise their hands. To use an analogy, if people had a fear of round light fixtures, and there happened to be big, large round light fixture on the ceiling, how many people could I expect in this room right now to not be afraid of big round light fixtures? None! Those who are afraid of round light fixtures wouldn't come in the room. So nobody who can't eat oats or is afraid to eat oats is going to volunteer or succeed at staying in a study where they have to eat oats for 2 to 5 years. The only people who are going to stay in that study are the ones who want to find out they can eat oats. The researchers certainly have some reason to want to find out they can eat them. So that bias is automatically built into those studies, so the fact is that it has not been proven and people are being misled and frankly, in my opinion, everybody should wait until they get over their symptoms and then maybe do our test or try re-introducing oats. A person who doesn't eat gluten-free cannot know what an insider knows. And, they have a different agenda. They're clearly exclusively a professional. It's kind of like somebody making policy on health food who eats a horribly unhealthy diet. So I see these jaws drop in my lectures when people find out that you can't just automatically assume that you can tolerate oats. You might be able to, but you might not, and there's no way someone can Ron: Will your oats test work after years on a gluten-free diet? Dr. Fine: I don't know. That's a good question. The good thing about the stool test is that the antibodies last a lot longer. You can be gluten-free for one or two years and still we can find antibodies to the wheat gliadin in the stool. I guess that it would be the same for oats. I definitely abhor the idea of a gluten challenge for celiac disease.... especially the biopsy. I mean, the biopsy may not become abnormal for 5 years and they could still be sick. Ron: You mentioned that you follow a gluten-free diet. Can you tell me why? Dr. Fine: I've had spondyloarthropathy since I was about 14. I manage it without drugs and I have no pain. I control it just with diet. Ron: Does your lab do genetic testing? Dr. Fine: Yes, and the gene test that EnteroLab.com offers actually types the gene at the HLA locus, which means our reports indicate "this is the gene you have at the HLA-DQB1 locus".; we don't just say "yes you have the celiac gene", or "no you don't". There is data in the literature, including research I have published that identifies HLA-DQB1*0301, 0303, which are the DQ7 and DQ9 genes, respectively, and DQ1, and we know from Dr. Hadjivassiliou's research that DQ1 (including 05xx and 06xx subtypes) reacts with gluten and represent gluten sensitive genes. Of course, DQ2 and DQ8 are the main celiac HLA-DQB1 genes. The interesting thing is that, in America, it's very rare not to have one of these. Almost everybody does, actually. It just comes down to how many do you have? Which one/ones do you have? Do you have one that seems to be a more reactive one or a less reactive one? And, do you have a celiac gene or two celiac genes? Which is going to mean, if you have two celiac genes or two gluten-sensitive genes, or a celiac gene and a gluten-sensitive gene that every child you have will have at least one of them. So, we prefer our gene test over that of others that merely answers the question “ Do I or do I not have a celiac gene.” Not only is it inexpensive, at about half the price of the other lab that does it, we give you more data. I was doing genetic studies in the 90s, to figure all this information out. For instance, I met Dr. Hadjivassiliou at the International Conference on Celiac Disease at the University of Maryland in August of 2000. Dr. Fasano hosted it. I spoke before Dr. Hadjivassiliou and I showed this association with DQ1,7, or I called it 1,3 with 7 being a subtype primarily but also 9, and so he came to me and said "Well, I've seen associations with my neurologic disease with DQ1, so I'm glad someone else is finding this." So, again, it's not just the antibodies, and it's not just non-celiac gluten sensitive genes, and as far as I know, no other lab is dealing with that except us. The abnormal permeability, in my opinion, is an effect of the immune arrays going on and the primary reaction is the immune response to gluten. You could possibly say that you get altered permeability first and then you get the gluten reaction, but I don't think so. I used to study permeability in humans in vivo. You can look at my CV or go to PubMed.com and put Fine KD and you'll see some early studies about permeability where we used to measure permeability in live human subjects and it was just a given, to me, that abnormal permeability in inflammatory disorders is primarily due to the inflammation and the disruption of tissue, architecture, and the like. I think that the permeability follows the inflammation. Ron: I have dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) and I find that my skin reacts more to oats than other grains. If I eat something that is labeled “gluten-free” but contains oats, I soon find that my DH flares up. I know others with celiac disease and DH who say the same thing. I mention this oats connection in the hope that you might someday do some research to explore that connection. Dr. Fine: We are just about to launch our oat sensitivity fecal IgA test as part of a gluten sensitivity panel because it is playing a little bit different role than testing for other non-gluten foods. It's like when a sophomore seems to be stellar on a football team, they pull him up to the varsity team. So we're pulling the oat test out of the sophomore squad and putting it on the varsity because it was showing up a lot more often and I think it's in the same paradigm as the wheat gliadin separate from other foods. Even though we like to look at it as "other grains". We are seeing a lot of rice sensitivity, some corn sensitivity. Many seem to react to other grains, as I do personally. The news is that we'd like to use April 1st, 2013 as the launch date for our new gluten sensitivity panel because it is an anniversary date for us. We hope to have that new panel available about April 1st, along with a tTG test, and an anti- gliadin fecal IgA test, and maybe even another test for another dietary food antigen, which is an ASCA (anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies). It's been associated with Crohn's disease. It's like the diagnostic screening blood test for Crohn's, but more sensitive. We and some other people have looked at it in the stool, so that's just another test that we might put in the panel to make it affordable to get all 4. Ron: Thank you for taking the time to provide our readers with such a comprehensive discussion of your work and the exciting new tests that will soon be available at your lab. Dr. Fine: You are very welcome. It was nice chatting with you. And thank you for the pioneering work that you have done as well!
  11. Please help me out. Hello, I am a 17 year old boy in CA. I have recently been made aware that i 90% have celiac. And after research, it is almost certain that I have the disease. I am scheduled for an endoscopy within the next 2 months or so. I am fairly healthy with eating and exercise as I started this lifestyle over a year ago. I lift weights 6/7 days a week. And do some form of cardio 6/7 as well. I have become overly obsessed with exercise as I get anxiety and depression if I miss a workout. I have lost 60 pounds over the course of a year, (whether or not celiac helped.) Although over the past few months I have been feeling fatigued and brain foggy, I am tired, and the only relief is through vigorous exercise. I work so hard and see little to no results so far. And over the course of a few months I have been getting worse at my physical activity. I went from doing 30+ pull ups to struggling to do 10. People tell me to take more rest days, even a week of to repair my muscles, but whenever I do, I lose all muscle tone and feel terrible. I get severely depressed. I am a little underweight and want to get bigger. So I eat more and rest more to rebuild and repair my muscles. And when I do, I feel bloated, sick, and I only gain dead weight to my stomach and lose muscle. It's terrible. I want to start gluten free now because of the wonderful stories of getting stronger and feeling clearer but I need to wait for the endoscopy. I hear problems of people who needed to stop working out for their body to heal (the villi, neuro, and muscular systems), and they eventually lose their motivation to work out. The twisted part in me is that I want to sort of keep this terrible feeling so I stay motivated to work out. Because my motivation is everything. I am severely lost, and depressed. My goal in life was to join the military, yet celiac shuts the door on those who want to join the armed forces. So my question is.. What do you suppose will change for me after the gluten-free diet? Will I feel better? Will I get stronger? Will my performance be affected? Will the depression stop? What do I do if my endoscopy result come back negative? Thank you, this is a huge problem for me.
  12. Celiac.com 04/09/2014 - The human gastrointestinal tract contains approximately 1014 bacterial cells that form a unique, diverse and very dynamic microbial ecosystem also known as gut microbiota. The genomes of all intestinal microbes form the “microbiome”, representing more than 100 times the human genome. The composition of gut microbiota is crucial for human health. Normal gut microbiota enhances digestive processes, produces certain vitamins and nutrients, facilitates absorptive processes, participates in development and maturation of the immune system and limits colonization of the gut by pathogenic microorganisms. It has been demonstrated that the following predominant microorganisms constitute for the normal gut microbiota: Bacteroides, Clostridium, Eubacterium, Veillonella, Ruminococcus, Bifidobacterium, Fusobacterium, Lactobacillus, Peptostreptococcus and Peptococcus. Diet is a major environmental factor influencing gut microbiota diversity and functionality. Abnormalities in the composition of normal gut microbiota, also known as dysbiosis, frequently result in the development of chronic inflammatory, autoimmune and atopic processes not only within the gut but also in the distant body compartments such as skin, exocrine glands, the brain, muscles and joints. It is well recognized that people affected by poorly controlled celiac disease have detectable dysbiosis. Compared to healthy individuals, people with active celiac disease are characterized by higher numbers of Gram-negative bacteria, known to activate pro-inflammatory processes, and lower numbers of Gram-positive bacteria benefiting the gastrointestinal tract and anti-inflammatory responses. Furthermore, recent studies of children with celiac disease showed that even a strict compliance with a gluten-free diet does not completely restore the normal gut microbiota. Di Cagno and colleagues analyzed the composition of gut microbiota in children with celiac disease on a strict gluten-free diet as compared to a group of matched, non-celiac controls. The study showed that the levels of Lactobacillus, Enterococcus and Bifidobacteria were significantly higher in fecal samples from healthy children rather than from celiac children. On the contrary, cell counts of potentially pathogenic microorganisms such as Bacteroides, Staphylococcus, Salmonella, Shighella and Klebsiella were significantly higher in celiac children compared to healthy children. Based on the aforementioned data, it is obvious to propose that probiotics, defined as viable microorganisms benefiting gastrointestinal health, may serve as a valuable addition to the maintenance protocols for those with celiac disease. Well established probiotic effects include: Beneficial effects on dysbiosis including control of yeast (Candida albicans) overgrowth Facilitation of pathogenic bacteria elimination (for example, Clostridium difficile and Helicobacter pylori) Reduction of local and systemic inflammatory responses Prevention of autoimmune and allergic reactions Prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea Normalization of intestinal contractions and stool consistency Reduction of the concentration of cancer-promoting enzymes and metabolites in the gut Prevention of upper respiratory and urogenital infections Cholesterol-lowering activity Experimental data indicate that probiotics can benefit celiac disease. Lindfors K. and colleagues showed that live probiotic, Bifidobacterium lactis, bacteria inhibit the toxic effects induced by wheat gliadin in intestinal epithelial cell culture. Papista C. et al. demonstrated (in a mouse model) that probiotics can prevent intestinal damage of celiac disease. The published data on the beneficial effects of probiotics in celiac patients is limited. Our clinical experience (Institute for Specialized Medicine – www.ifsmed.com) indicates that appropriately selected probiotics significantly reduce diarrhea and bloating in patients with gluten intolerance and celiac disease. Furthermore, we see positive reduction of gluten-associated joint and muscle pain, fatigue and brain fog as well as on gut colonization with yeast. Probiotics also normalize markers of inflammation (for example, C-reactive protein) and markers of mucosal immune responses (for example, fecal secretory immunoglobulin A – sIgA). Typically, the benefits of probiotics administration cannot be seen instantly. It takes at least 4-6 months to see measurable benefits. The choice of probiotics is another difficult issue for an inexperienced consumer. The following probiotic strains may benefit those with celiac disease and gluten intolerance: a. Lactobacillus acidophilus is a species of Lactobacilli which occurs naturally in the human and animal gastrointestinal tract and in many dairy products. The L. acidophilus strain DDS-1 is one of the best characterized probiotic strains in the world. The medicinal properties of L. acidophilus DDS-1 include: production of lactic acid supporting good bacteria in the gut, production of B and K vitamins, prevention of colon cancer, prevention of ‘traveler’s diarrhea’, inhibition of gastric/duodenal ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori, reduction of symptoms of eczema and atopic dermatitis, reduction of serum cholesterol level, fermentation of lactose and reduction of symptoms of lactose intolerance, and reduction of intestinal pain. b. Lactobacillus plantarum is a Gram-positive bacterium naturally found in many fermented food products including sauerkraut, pickles, brined olives, Korean kimchi, sourdough, and other fermented plant material, and also some cheeses, fermented sausages, and stockfish. The medicinal properties of L. plantarum include: production of D- and L-isomers of lactic acid feeding beneficial gut bacteria, production of hydrogen peroxide killing pathogenic bacteria, production of enzymes (proteases) degrading soy protein and helping people with soy intolerance, synthesis of amino-acid L-lysine that promotes absorption of calcium and the building of muscle tissue, production of enzymes (proteases) digesting animal proteins such as gelatin and helping people with pancreatic insufficiency. c. Lactobacillus casei is a species of Lactobacilli found in the human intestine and mouth. The medicinal properties of L. casei include: production of lactic acid assisting propagation of desirable bacteria in the gut, fermentation of lactose and helping people with lactose intolerance, fermentation of beans causing flatulence upon digestion. d. Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a species of Lactobacilli found in yogurt and other dairy products. The medicinal properties of L. rhamnosus include: production of lactic acid supporting good bacteria in the gut, production of bacteriocins and hydrogen peroxide killing pathogenic bacteria, prevention of diarrhea of various nature, prevention of upper respiratory infections, reduction of symptoms of eczema and atopic dermatitis, affecting GABA neurotransmitting pathway and reducing symptoms of anxiety. e. Lactobacillus salivarius is a species of Lactobacilli isolated from saliva. The medicinal properties of L. salivarius include: production of lactic acid supporting good bacteria in the gut, reduction of inflammatory processes causing colitis and inflammatory arthritis, prevention of colon cancer. f. Bifidobacterium bifidus is a Gram-positive bacterium which is a ubiquitous inhabitant of the human gastrointestinal tract. B. bifidus are capable of fermenting various polysaccharides of animal and plant origin. The medicinal properties of B. bifidus include: production of hydrogen peroxide killing pathogenic bacteria, modulation of local immune responses, production of vitamins B, K and folic acid, prevention of colon cancer, bioconversion of a number of dietary compounds into bioactive molecules. g. Bifidobacterium lactis is a Gram-positive bacterium which is found in the large intestines of humans. The medicinal properties of B. lactis include: production of hydrogen peroxide killing pathogenic bacteria, modulation of local immune responses, production of vitamins B, K and folic acid, prevention of colon cancer. h. Lactococcus lactis is a Gram-positive bacterium used in the production of buttermilk and cheese. The medicinal properties of L. lactis include: production of lactic acid supporting good bacteria in the gut, prevention of colon cancer, fermentation of lactose and reduction of symptoms of lactose intolerance. i. Saccharomyces boulardii is a probiotic strain of yeast first isolated from lychee and mangosteen fruit. Upon consumption, S. boulardii remains within the gastrointestinal lumen, and maintains and restores the natural flora in the large and small intestine. There are numerous randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled studies showing the efficacy of S. boulardii in the treatment and prevention of various gastrointestinal disorders. Potential indications for use of Saccharomyces boulardii in humans include: 1) diarrhea/traveler’s diarrhea/antibiotic-associated diarrhea, 2) infection with Clostridium difficile/pseudomembranous colitis, 3) irritable bowel syndrome, 4) ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, 5) partial IgA deficiency, 6)peptic-ulcer disease due to Helicobacter pylori. Published data also indicate that enzymes produced by S. boulardii can digest alpha-gliadin and related molecules. j. Bacillus coagulans, also known as Lactobacillus sporogenes, is a gram-positive, spore-forming probiotic which is characterized by the increased survival in acidic gastric environment and in bile-acid-associated duodenal environment as compared to the commonly used probiotic microorganisms. Bacillus coagulans do not adhere to the human intestinal epithelium and is completely eliminated in four to five days unless chronic administration is maintained. Once in the intestines, Bacillus coagulans is activated and releases anti-inflammatory molecules or acts indirectly to eradicate organisms in the gut responsible for the inflammatory immune response. Activated Bacillus coagulans produces bacteriocins and lowers local pH by producing L(+) lactic acid that, along with competition for sites of mucosal adherence, works to dislodge and eliminate any antagonizing microbes that may be contributing to an inflammatory response. Bacillus coagulans also produces short-chain fatty acids such as butyric acid, a compound known to support the health and healing of cells in the small and large intestines and to contribute to modulation of the mucosal immune system. To achieve therapeutic responses, the daily dose of the probiotics should be at least 25 billion CFUs (colony-forming units) and above. We recommend taking probiotics on an empty stomach either 20-30 minutes before breakfast or one-two hours after dinner with plenty of fluids. In those taking antibiotics, the time of the probiotic administration needs to be spaced out from that of antibiotics for at least several hours. References: Papista C, Gerakopoulos V, Kourelis A, Sounidaki M, Kontana A, Berthelot L, Moura IC, Monteiro RC, Yiangou M. Gluten induces coeliac-like disease in sensitised mice involving IgA, CD71 and transglutaminase 2 interactions that are prevented by probiotics. Lab Invest. 2012 Feb 13. doi: 10.1038/labinvest.2012.13. Sanz Y, De Pama G, Laparra M. Unraveling the ties between celiac disease and intestinal microbiota. Int Rev Immunol. 2011 Aug;30(4):207-18. de Vrese M, Schrezenmeir J. Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics. Adv Biochem Eng Biotechnol. 2008;111:1-66. Lindfors K, Blomqvist T, Juuti-Uusitalo K, Stenman S, Venäläinen J, Mäki M, Kaukinen K. Live probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis bacteria inhibit the toxic effects induced by wheat gliadin in epithelial cell culture. Clin Exp Immunol. 2008 Jun;152(3):552-8. Raffaella Di Cagno, Maria De Angelis, Ilaria De Pasquale, Maurice Ndagijimana, Pamela Vernocchi, Patrizia Ricciuti, Francesca Gagliardi, Luca Laghi, Carmine Crecchio, Maria Elisabetta Guerzoni, Marco Gobbetti, Ruggiero Francavilla. Duodenal and faecal microbiota of celiac children: molecular, phenotype and metabolome characterization. BMC Microbiology 2011, 11:219.
  13. CaliSparrow

    Cultivating Health During Crisis

    I enjoyed this article from Mark's Daily Apple. It's good advice for those of us dealing with our health during a time of crisis: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/cultivating-health-during-crisis/#axzz2yDxYRwlB
  14. I tried an Acai Berry Chia Bar today that is made by Health Warrior, and was pleasantly surprised. This chia bar is 100% natural and has a nice chewy texture that is also crunchy at the same time, which makes for an interesting combination. The bar is packed with chia seeds to the point where it contains 1,000mg of Omega-3's, four grams of fiber, and three grams of protein...and yet contains only 100 calories and 15g of carbs! For those of you who like to have a quick, healthy snack on hand, this bar is an excellent choice. For more info visit their site.
  15. Ok for those of you who do not know me I travel a lot. So from time to time I accidentally ingest gluten in one form or another. For instance I found out today that Sodium Starch Glycolate is technically gluten and can cause a full reaction in someone who is as sensitive to it as I am. Thanks to #glutenfreeinsc post I now know what I was getting in my diet that was causing a reaction. So I've decided to start trying different things that can help me either get better faster once I ingest gluten or reduce the reaction if taken daily. Keep in mind that I am a little bit eccentric at times. Tral 1: zGlutn by systemic formulas I decided to eat a slice of bread and take 4 pills at the same time. I know this is insane but I wanted to know if it worked. So I ate the bread during lunch and told my boss that If i didn't make it into work the next day I was probably dead... The next two hours: a little cloudy feeling but not very severe. And no GI issues. That evening: Kept working and didn't feel very cloudy but had to pace myself. I was a little tired but still no severe reaction Went home and went to bed after a light dinner. My stomach was growling a bit but no pain and no noticeable diarrhea or nausea. This was a surprise to me since I always feel very sick, get stuck in the bathroom and can't think straight after I get gluten. I also get a rash around my mouth. I know that's gross but you understand my plight. Next Morning: a little bit of a hot feeling in my stomach but nothing too bad. I felt a little bit cloudy but still functional. Worked through the day no problem except for a two trips to the lavatory. Conclusion: helped a ton. Wouldn't recommend trying this at home because it wasn't a cure but if you get gluten by accident it can reduce your symptoms dramatically. I've been taking it every day and it seems to be helping. Has anyone else tried this product? I got it from a nutritionist. Iang if anyone has a product that works for them as vitamin I want to try it. apparently ciliact is terrible. I'll keep trying supplements and diets and keep you guys updated.
  16. Celiac.com 01/23/2013 - Can going gluten-free bring about a major improvement in mental health for some children? This question is addressed in recent article by Mary Lochner. In the article, Lochner talks about the challenges she faced in trying to raise her daughter who, for the first couple of years, seemed to become more and more emotionally volatile and unstable, even while her daughter's twin brother seemed just fine. Lochner details her trips to multiple pediatricians and behavioral therapists in an effort to get an answer for her daughter's behavior. Initially, the behavioral therapists pretty much dismissed her concerns and, when Lochner asked what she could do to calm her daughter down, told her to “Try distracting her…Give her a toy that makes noise. Or sit her down in front of the T.V. for a while.” Unimpressed with the advice, Lochner says she knew, as a mother often does, that something was, in fact, wrong with her child. In the mean time, her daughter's temper was becoming progressively more volatile. She began having behavioral episodes during the night, as well as during the day. The first time it happened, she woke up screaming hysterically at 2 a.m. Lochner found a new pediatrician for her daughter, one who took her concerns seriously. He ran Mary Jean through a test or screening for everything from iron deficiency to autism. At the same time, she continued to do her own research, and began to wonder if the problem might be Sensory Processing Disorder. It was during this time that Lochman stumbled onto the writings of nutritionist, Kelly Dorfman, who had co-authored an article in the Huffington Post which claimed that gluten intolerance sometimes manifests with “neurological symptoms.” The basic thrust of the article was that, for some people, gluten-sensitivity can cause neurological symptoms. While she was investigating that possibility, s came across an article from the March 2012 Huffington Post called “Is Sensory Processing Disorder the New Black?” The article described the case of a child whose extreme behavioral symptoms disappeared after her mother put her on a gluten-free diet after consulting a nutritionist. For Lochman, the article hit close to home, and led her to read Kelly Dorfman’s book concerning nutritional origins of childhood illnesses: What’s Eating Your Child? Initially, Lochman says she was skeptical of claims of major behavioral improvement in children who had gone gluten-free, and regarded much of what she'd heard about gluten-free diets with some doubt. However, she did bring up the book with her pediatrician, and, rather than dismissing her, the doctor confirmed that gluten can cause behavioral problems in some gluten-sensitive children. He suggested that her daughter go gluten-free for a month, then back on gluten for a month, then gluten-free a second month, and that she keep a journal of her daughter's behavior. By doing the gluten-free trial twice, she and the doctor would be able to confidently confirm that any improvement in my daughter’s behavior was due to the removal of gluten, and not to coincidence. During the first month on a gluten-free diet, her daughter’s episodes decreased sharply, but Lochman was still skeptical. However, when she went back to eating gluten during the second month, the emotional outbursts and episodes came back in less than a week. By the end of that second month, she found herself looking forward to returning her daughter to the gluten-free diet for month three of the trial. In the third month, her daughter’s episodes rapidly decreased during the first two weeks. By the end of the month, they were down to only two or three times a week. This is when Lochman really knew something was up. She says that she thought that her daughter was seeing a major shift, if not a miracle cure. She quick to tell people how she was wrong to think that. That's because, Lochmans says that taking gluten out of her daughter's life was, in fact, a miracle cure. She says that after just six weeks on the gluten-free diet, "her daughter's 'awful screaming and flailing episodes, the ones that would last for hours and come out of nowhere, were gone. Vanished. A thing of the past. It was like she was a completely new, and different, person." Lochman describes a daughter who now only gets upset with good reason, and who is highly responsive…a daughter who now looks her in the eyes again, who easily relaxes to snuggle, and who is ebullient, curious, affectionate, and "so thoroughly level-headed you would be hard pressed to connect her to her former self." For her part, Kelly Dorfman notes that non-celiac gluten-sensitivity has only recently been identified as a distinct medical condition, one that resists conventional tests for diagnosing celiac disease. She says that she commonly sees patients in her practice for whom behavior and mood issues are the only symptoms of gluten intolerance. Dorman's new book is due to be re-released in April under a new title, Cure Your Child With Food, and includes a new chapter with more on information on 'bizarre' gluten-related effects on behavior and more. Read Mary Lochner's full article in the Anchorage Press.
  17. Wellesse’s Digestive 3-In-1 Health liquid dietary supplement provides prebiotics and soluble fiber, (which are both key to maintaining healthy gut microbiotia) as well as aloe vera to balance stomach acidity. These are all important supplements for maintaining a healthy digestive system and Wellesse brings them all together in a form that the body can easily absorb. Taken with juice, the supplement is very easy to fit into your morning routine (perhaps easier than pills, for those who have trouble swallowing them). After a week or two, I was noticing more digestive regularity, I was feeling full from meals quicker and I had dramatically reduced acid reflux. Overall, my digestive system feels… well, healthier. Wellesse’s Digestive 3-in-1 Health Liquid Dietary Supplement makes a great digestive health ‘cocktail’. Just be sure to take some kind of probiotic supplement as well. Visit their site for more info: www.wellesse.com. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  18. Celiac.com 10/19/2012 - Irish citizens with celiac disease will no longer be reimbursed for the gluten-free products they buy, under to a newly announced cutback to their health benefits. The Irish Pharmacy Union (IPU) says that new cuts to health benefits by the Irish health service (HSE) mean that many gluten-free products will no longer be reimbursed by the government, including products purchased by patients with medical cards, and those receiving long-term illness benefits. Gluten-free products that will no longer be covered include baking powder, breads, cornflakes, flour, muesli, pasta, pizza and porridge. People with celiac disease must eat gluten-free foods to avoid suffering from significant health problems. The IPU says this means that celiac patients, who rely on gluten-free products to maintain their health, will no longer receive financial support to help them cover the cost of these products. The HSE announced the controversial €130 million in cuts last spring, but made no mention that gluten-free products would be removed from the list of free items. The HSE announcement said only that 'certain products including' glucosamine, the obesity drug Orlistat, and Omega-3 Triglycerides to protect against heart disease, would be removed from the list of reimbursable products. In confirming the elimination of reimbursements for gluten-free products, an HSE spokesperson said that the agency was choosing to cut products for which there was 'doubt about their clinical efficacy.' What do you think? Are gluten-free products medically questionable for people with celiac disease? Let us know your thoughts by commenting below. Source: Irish Health
  19. Celiac.com 08/08/2012 - In the UK, people with celiac disease get their gluten-free food subsidized by the government as part of their national health care. This includes items like gluten-free pizzas. This practice works in much the same way that insurance companies in America cover drug prescriptions for their members. Those members with a doctor's prescription pay a reduced cost or no cost at all on certain items. In the UK, everyone is insured by the National Health Service (NHS). There, people with celiac disease and certain other conditions get prescriptions that allow them to obtain gluten-free food at a reduced cost. In a recent story, BBC news claims that, as part of this service, the NHS is spending £17 (about $26) on each gluten-free pizza it supplies. That amount would equal four times the original base price of the pizza, since they originally cost less than £4.50 (about $6) each. According to the BBC, once manufacturing, handling and delivery fees were added, the bill for the NHS had risen to £34 (over fifty bucks) for two pizzas. Without acknowledging the actual cost per pizza, Stuart Lakin, head of medicines management at NHS Rotherham, said that the NHS was making efforts to minimize wholesaler delivery charges on the pizzas by switching patients from brands that attract additional charges. He added that costs for all gluten-free products was down from £274,611 in 2009/10 to just £177,153 in 2011/12. Moreover, he noted, only patients with clinically diagnosed celiac disease are eligible for prescriptions for gluten-free products. Health Secretary Andrew Lansley pointed out that prescriptions encouraged celiac sufferers to more strictly follow gluten-free diets, but admitted that the practice is ‘under ongoing review.' What do you think? Should gluten-free food be treated like medicine for people with celiac disease, and be covered under insurance plans like prescription drugs? Is $26 dollars too much to pay for a gluten-free pizza? Source: BBC News
  20. Celiac.com 04/01/2011 - On March 10th, Chef Damian Cardone boasted on Facebook that he delights in feeding diners who specifically requested gluten-free meals a variety of gluten-filled dishes instead. He states on his Facebook page that he does not believe in gluten intolerance and that it’s “all in their disturbed little heads.” Clearly, chef Cardone did not attend a reputable institution of culinary arts, where classes in food allergies are now standard, and guest lecturers who are specialists in celiac disease and gluten intolerance are frequently invited to speak to students. Hopefully in the future, dining will be safer, gluten-free guests will be accommodated with creativity and courtesy, and uneducated, malicious food workers like Mr. Cardone will be unable to find employment in the food industry. I am also very surprised by Mr. Cardone’s naiveté, in assuming none of the diners who ate at his establishment would take legal action, and that there would be no repercussion. We are a litigious society, and I certainly hope that once word gets out in the gluten-free community, and make no mistake—it will—that legal action will be taken. I must also assume that Mr. Cardone is not aware of the current correctional institutional residence of a certain bread baker in North Carolina, who also knowingly sold gluten-containing items marketed as “gluten-free” to unsuspecting consumers. When these consumers became ill, they reported this to health authorities, who investigated. Their investigation quickly led to charges, and the conviction of the criminal involved. Most criminals are not very intelligent, and that’s why they are eventually caught, so I hope that Mr. Cardone keeps this in mind. If for no other reason than to save his own skin, this Colorado “Chef” should immediately give up any participation in the food preparation industry. His behavior is not intelligent, and he is not worthy of diners’ trust. This brings up another interesting line of thought regarding food service. Does Mr. Cardone break any other rules? Does he wash his hands after using the bathroom, blowing his nose, or touching raw meat? Does he believe in food-borne illnesses such as Salmonella, E. coli outbreaks, or Clostridium? Does he feed soft cheeses to pregnant women, who may suffer miscarriage due to Listeriosis? People can, and do, die from complications related to celiac disease, which now affects an estimated 1 in 100 people in the U.S. Non-celiac gluten intolerance may affect up to 12% of the population. That means that on a night when he plated 100 dinners, not uncommon for a mid-size restaurant, that 12 of those dinners had the potential to cause a negative reaction in the consumer. Mr. Cardone is apparently unaware that most reactions to gluten are not, in fact, gastrointestinal. Neurological reactions to gluten far outnumber gastrointestinal reactions. Neurological reactions can include: contributing to abnormal behaviors in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, foggy or disturbed thinking, ataxia (disturbances in gait and coordination), tremors, exacerbating and triggering MS symptoms, muscle weakness, fatigue, depression, bipolar disorder, and even schizophrenia. I personally know and have helped to treat gluten-intolerant patients with all of these disorders. So, Mr. Cardone was partially right. For many patients, it is “all in their heads”, but that doesn’t mean that the symptoms aren’t real, and that they are not caused by ingesting gluten. In fact, Mr. Cardone’s disturbed behavior may be caused by consuming a diet filled with gluten. Perhaps he deserves our compassion, and he needs a medical checkup—Pronto! I am a foodie—a former prep, pantry, line-cook, and pastry chef. I have spent years working at many of the finer dining establishments in Boulder and Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Does Mr. Cardone think that I would willingly have given up making and eating my own gluten-filled homemade croissants, danish, challah, bagels, black forest cake, salmon-en-croute, beef wellington, spanakopita, and baklava if I didn’t have to? Celiac disease nearly killed me, and it caused me over a decade of severe pain, none of which was located in my gastro-intestinal tract. In my restaurant days, I had what I thought was “a cast-iron stomach”, never once experiencing a bout of diarrhea, bloating, indigestion, heartburn, or gas related to my dietary intake. But, eventually my health deteriorated, and eventually I was diagnosed with celiac disease, and all of my extra-gastrointestinal symptoms have subsided on a 100% gluten-free diet. It scares me to think that anyone would deliberately sabotage my health by substituting foods containing gluten for my specially requested gluten-free meal. I certainly hope there aren’t any copycats out there, who are stupid enough to engage in such risky and criminal behavior. Intentionally inflicting harm on anyone is a crime. When dining out, I call ahead, I speak politely to my waitperson and often ask them to communicate with the chef, I eat what I’m served without complaint, I give verbal thanks, and I tip extraordinarily well when my request for a safe, gluten-free meal is accommodated. But Mr. Cardone does not want guests like me in his restaurant. That is his loss, but it is not and never will be his right, to purposefully inflict pain and suffering on other human beings, people who are paying him money to serve them safe food. He is guilty of so many crimes it’s difficult to fathom, and I certainly hope that his days of freedom to continue poisoning diners will end soon. Luckily, the gluten-free community has many other options, and gluten-free diners will learn to avoid any establishment in which Mr. Cardone has any affiliation. Even though Mr. Cardone does not deserve any compassion, I would never wish for him, or anyone, to be diagnosed with celiac disease. It’s just too painful… Author's Note: Thank you to Chad Hines for spreading the word about this occurrence. Mr. Cardone live in Glenwood Springs, Colorado, where he works as a private chef, and also at the Italian restaurant "Florindo's" in Glenwood Springs, Colorado.
  21. Celiac.com 06/05/2009 - Recently, the British Journal of Nutritionreported that following a gluten-free diet may be detrimental to guthealth, which may also affect immune health, according to a new studyfrom the Spanish National Research Council. The Spanish researchersanalyzed the gut microflora of ten healthy subjects with an average ageof 30 assigned to consume a gluten-free diet for one month. Analysisof the participants’ feces showed that populations of healthy gutbacteria decreased following the gluten-free diet, while populations ofunhealthy bacteria increased. It has been previously documented that gluten can cause leaky gut, evenwithout celiac disease. Chronic gluten exposure has been shown toactivate zonulin resulting in increased intestinal permeability (orleaky gut) even in the absence of celiac disease. Intestinalpermeability with malabsorption has been described in celiac patientsand their relatives who don’t have atrophy of the intestine on biopsybut only increased inflammatory cells. An imbalance of intestinalbacteria has been cited as one of the main causes of leaky gutsyndrome. This study could be the beginning of discovering the missingcomponents of the known link between celiac disease (and foodsensitivities), leaky gut syndrome, inflammation, and immune health. If you have celiac disease and/or other food sensitivities, your riskfor a bacteria imbalance is high. What can you do to protect yourhealth? Know the signs of bacteria imbalance: abdominal pain, asthma, chronic joint pain, chronic muscle pain,confusion, fuzzy or foggy thinking, gas, indigestion, mood swings,nervousness, poor immunity, recurrent vaginal infections, skin rashes,diarrhea, bed-wetting, recurrent bladder infections, poor memory,shortness of breath, constipation, bloating, aggressive behavior,anxiety, fatigue, feeling toxic. Consider dietary changes: Limit foods that feed bad bacteria – all forms of sugar, vinegars, andmoldy foods like mushrooms. Eat foods that promote intestinal healing,including high fiber foods rich in antioxidants (cabbage, cauliflower,beets, and onions) and omega-3 fatty acids found in salmon andflaxseed. Healthy bacteria found in yogurt (read the label to ensurethat it contains live cultures) has also been recommended. Think about chemical exposure: Eliminating or reducing substances that promote intestinalpermeability, such as avoiding antibiotics, nonsteroidalanti-inflammatory drugs, pesticides, herbicides, and meat contaminatedwith hormones. Talk to your doctor: More research needs to be done, but it seems as though probiotics maybe protective against leaky gut and bowel inflammation. Clinicalresearch shows that oral supplementation of probiotics enhances theimmune system's ability to fight foreign organisms. Digestive Enzymescan also help to restore intestinal permeability. Herbs and botanicalswith anti-inflammatory properties, and those that reduce congestionand/or eliminate waste may also be helpful. Sources autoimmunedisease.suite101.com About.com Leaky Gut Syndrome/Intestinal Permeability, Cathy Wong, July 23, 2007 www.Foodnavigator-usa.com Crook, William; Dean, C.; Crook, E (2003). The Yeast Connection and Women’s Health Author's Note: I apologize for the confusion a poorly-worded sentence caused - it has since been removed. Obviously, this study is very flawed - it can barely be called a study. What prompted me to write about it was the very small glimmer of hope it gave me, and many of the people I work with...so many celiacs feel good on the diet for a long time, then don't feel good anymore. Many are told that it's in their heads, or they must be consuming gluten. Come to find out, it's a yeast overgrowth due to bacteria imbalance. The relief that I, and many that I know, have felt from the suggested steps in the article has been incredible. I'm just glad this connection is being looked at! I'm hopeful more in-depth, meaningful research is to come!
  22. Celiac.com 03/04/2009 - Millions of people currently suffer from a potentially deadly condition that can have little or no symptoms, but is easily diagnosed and treated. The condition is called celiac disease, and it is caused by an adverse autoimmune reaction to gliadin (found in wheat gluten), secalin (found in rye gluten), or horedin (found in barley gluten). Because of the broad range of symptoms that celiac disease can present, and the fact that many people will have no symptoms at all, it can often be very difficult for those who do have it to get properly screened for the disease. According to Dr. Alessio Fasano, medical director of the Center forCeliac Research, 2.5 million to 3 million people in the USA have celiac disease—it istwice as common as Crohn’s disease, ulceric colitis and cystic fibrosiscombined—yet, to date, no more than 150,000 of them have beendiagnosed. This means that a full 2.35 to 2.85 million people in the USA have not been diagnosed and treated. The symptoms of the disease can range from no symptoms at all, to mild weakness, bone pain, aphthousstomatitis (canker sores), chronic diarrhea, abdominal bloating, and progressiveweight loss. If people with celiac disease continue to eat gluten, studies show that their risk of gastrointestinal cancer increases by a factor of 40 to 100 times over the general population. Further, gastrointestinal carcinoma or lymphoma develops in up to 15 percent of patients with untreated or refractory celiac disease. It is thus essential that the disease be quickly diagnosed and treated. The last decade has seen an explosion in the understanding and awareness of celiac disease and in higher standards and increased availability of gluten-free foods. To help us better appreciate the dramatic changes and developments that have taken place, Celiac.com has put together a list of historical landmarks in the understanding and treatment of celiac disease. A glance at the time line will show that it really has taken centuries just to recognize and diagnose celiac disease, with the greatest strides being made in the last fifty years, and especially in the last decade. A Celiac Disease / Gluten-Free Diet Historical Timeline: 100 A.D.—The first written account of celiac symptoms in western medicine occurs when the Greek Physician, Aretaeus the Cappadocean, known as Galen, describes the characteristic stool, noting that the disease was more common in women than men and that children can also be affected. 1669—The Dutch physician Vincent Ketelaer publishes a book that contains an account of a diarrheal illness in which he notes feces so voluminous that, "several basins or pots scarcely hold these accumulations." 1737—John Bricknell writes of patients who suffer from what he terms the "white flux.” Both Ketelaer and Bricknell were likely describing celiac disease, though that name would not be attached it for another century and a half. 1887—Dr. Samuel Gee ushers in the modern era of celiac disease, when he drew attention to the disorder in a lecture delivered at the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street, London. 1888—Dr. Gee publishes his classic paper, "On the Coeliac Affection,” in which he describes aspects of the celiac disease with great accuracy and suggests that, "if the patient can be cured at all, it must be by means of diet.” He experimented with various diets and noted that children who were fed a quart of the best Dutch mussels daily, throve splendidly, but relapsed when the season for mussels ended. 1889—R.A. Gibbons, MD., M.R.C.P. publishes The Celiac Affection in Children in the Edinburgh Medical. Journal. 1908—British Physician Christian Herter becomes the first to discover that celiac disease can cause stunted growth, especially among children in their middle years. 1921—British Physician John Howland devises the healthy, three-stage diet for celiac patients known as the milk/protein diet. 1932—Danish physician Thorwald Thaysen provides the first clinical explanation of celiac disease in adults, though he lacks detailed knowledge on intestinal pathology for a full understanding of the disease. 1936—Dutch pediatrician Willem Karel Dicke isolates cereal grains as the factor in aggravating the symptoms of celiac disease, especially in children, and begins treating children with the gluten-free diet. Afterwards his Ph.D. thesis was published and he was laughed out of the NYC gastroenterology meeting in 1950 and vowed not to return to the USA. 1954—Experimenting with surgical biopsy material, Doctor J. W. Paulley makes the first discovery of the intestinal lesions caused by celiac disease in patients. 1955—Margo Shiner invents the tiny biopsy tube that is still used today for confirming the presence of celiac disease in the small intestines. The important celiac disease discoveries of Paulley and Shiner meant that, from the mid 1950s onwards, doctors had a means by which to reliably diagnose the disease. Their discoveries gave rise to an explosion in the understanding of celiac disease that continues to this day. 1965—Dermatologists recognize that people suffering from the itchy skin rash, dermatitis herpetiformis, have an abnormal jejunal biopsy just like those with celiac disease and that the rash usually subsides with the observance of a gluten-free diet. 1970—In the early 1970s, researchers identify genetic markers for celiac disease. Even though the gene or genes that cause celiac disease have not been identified, researchers remain hopeful that they will succeed in doing so, and thereby give rise to a new generation of celiac treatments that do not require a gluten-free diet. 1980s—Fiber optic technology enables doctors to take small bowel biopsies using fiber-optic endoscopes, while the development of reliable screening blood tests greatly increases the number of celiac diagnosis. 1981—The Codex Alimentarius Commission establishes the earliest standards for gluten-free food. Under this original standard, foods labeled “gluten-free” must be made from naturally gluten-free grains, such as corn or rice or from gluten grains (wheat, barley, rye) that had been rendered gluten free through processing. At the time, there was no way to test for the presence of gluten, so tests gauged the levels of gluten by measuring nitrogen levels, an imprecise method. ~1985—It is discovered that gliadin initiate damage to the absorptive epithelium of the small intestine toproduce symptoms of celiac disease in susceptible individuals. 1990s—Early in the decade, doctors thought celiac disease to be rare and affect just 40,000 or so Americans. Over the last decade or so, the number of Americans diagnosed with celiac disease has nearly tripled, to 110,000, but that’s just the start. The National Institutes of Health now estimates that about 1% of the population, or about 3 million people suffer from celiac disease, and that only about 3% of existing cases have been diagnosed. A full 97% of celiac cases remain undiagnosed. That’s about 2.9 million people who remain undiagnosed and in danger. More and more of those who are diagnosed are reporting no symptoms. 1995—In San Francisco, California, Scott Adams launches the Web site that evolves into Celiac.com, the first website on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. The site quickly evolves into one of the most authoritative, informative, and comprehensive sources for celiac disease and gluten-free diet information. The celiac.com forum is one of the most popular places on the web for people with celiac disease to get answers and share information. 1998—Codex Alimentarius revises its standards for foods labeled ‘gluten-free’ to be made from naturally gluten-free ingredients and contain 20 parts gluten per million, or less, while foods processed to be reduce gluten, such as wheat starch, can have no more than 200 parts per million gluten. 1998—The Gluten-Free Mall (www.GlutenFreeMall.com) launches its "Special Diet Superstore!" to provide home delivery of top quality foods and other products that are free of wheat, rye and barley gluten, soy, dairy, eggs, corn, and other common allergens. The Gluten-Free Mall now sells thousands of gluten-free products including breads, cookies, cakes, pizzas, mixes, full meals, frozen foods, cosmetics, gluten-free guides, books, and more. 1997 to 2007, the number of people under-18 diagnosed with food or digestive allergies rises nearly 20%, and nearly 3 million people young people now suffer from food allergies. About 12 million Americans suffer from a food allergy, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, with nearly 90% of all food allergies arising from reactions to just eight foods: Cow’s milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, soy and wheat. Since 2004, food retailers have added nearly 2500 new gluten free products to their shelves. 2000—Scientists at the University of Maryland discover Zonulin, which is a protein that participates in tight junctions between cells of the wall of the digestive tract. 2003—Alessio Fasano, MD, publishes his seminal study in the Archives ofInternal Medicine that indicates that 1 in 133 people in the USA haveceliac disease. 2007—Studies show a high instance of arthritis and osteoporosis in people with celiac disease, and other studies show a high prevalence of celiac disease among people with type-1 diabetes. 2008—A team of researchers works to develop a simple saliva test after concluding that it is possible to accurately measure salivary tTG-Abs; both at initial diagnosis for celiac disease, and also while patients are following a gluten-free diet. 2008—Rates of celiac disease are shown to be 2.5 times higher among elderly people than among the general population. 2009—Canada debuts the home celiac disease test kit as part of its national health care plan. 2009—The company Nexpep is currently preparing for a clinical trial program for a peptide-based therapeutic vaccine, and intends to commence a Phase 1 in the first half of 2009. According to Nexpep, the peptide-based therapeutic vaccine is designed to treat the main problem T-cell epitopes of gluten, and has the potential to treat at about 80% of people with celiac disease and the appropriate genetic background. 2009—Sometime this year the USFDA is expected to adopt long awaited regulations for the use of the term "gluten-free" on USA food labels. The new regulation would require foods with "gluten-free" on their labels to contain less than 20 parts per million of gliadin. Several pharmaceutical companies are currently working on treatments for celiac disease, such as Alvine Pharmaceuticals (enzyme therapy), and Alba Therapeutics is developing a zonulin receptor antagonist called AT-1001, which is currently in phase 2 clinical trials. 2012—All food made in the E.U. with ‘gluten-free’ on its label must contain less than 20 parts per million of gliadin, in accordance with the Codex Alimentarius standards.
  23. I have been taking probiotic supplements for a long time, but nothing has worked as well for me as Shaklee Optiflora Two-Product System with Prebiotic & Probiotic. Every since I started Shaklee's gluten-free prebiotics and probiotics I feel so much different--I feel like I have more energy. This is a high quality system that is designed to provide needed support for our digestive tracts. According to Shaklee the Optiflora Probiotic Complex uses a "patented triple layer encapsulation technology to protect live probiotics and guarantee their delivery into the intestine," which can enhance energy levels and provide excellent support for our bodies. Shaklee Optiflora Probiotic Complex contains bifidus and acidophilus, which support long-term intestinal and colon health. For those with celiac disease or other digestive issues high quality probiotics like these are a must. Shaklee Optiflora Prebiotic Complex is intended to provide a welcome environment for the friendly, beneficial bacteria that live and work in the colon. Due to the positive response my body has had to these products I plan to continue taking them long term. Visit their site for more info: http://insideout.myshaklee.com/us/en/products.php?sku=80638 Note: Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.
  24. Celiac.com 08/16/2010 - There have been a number of studies connecting celiac disease with impairments in women's reproductive health, including such disorders as infertility, delayed puberty, amenorrhea, and early menopause. Associations between celiac disease and oligomenorrhea, hypomenorrhea, metrorrhagia, and dysmenorrhea have also been observed. In 2008, a case-controlled study in Italy was executed to determine the association between female reproductive health and celiac disease. The study evaluated 62 celiac women, and 186 healthy control patients between the ages of 15 and 49. Of the celiac women evaluated, the average age when diagnosed with celiac disease was about 24 years old. Most of the women, 69.3% exhibited a bloated stomach, 61.3% exhibited anemia, 51.6% exhibited weight loss, 40.3% exhibited diarrhea, and 17.7% exhibited vomiting as their main symptom during onset of celiac disease. 40.3% of the women evaluated claimed to have other symptoms at the time they were diagnosed for celiac disease, including menstrual cycle disorders. Of the celiac women evaluated, 47.6% reported that they noticed the onset of their menstrual cycle disorders before they noticed any other classic celiac symptoms, 28.6% noticed the onset of the menstrual symptoms after the other celiac related symptoms presented, and 19% noticed menstrual problems at the same time as other celiac symptoms. 19.4% of celiac women exhibited menstrual disorders. Exactly 50% of the celiac women tested and 50% of the controls tested had been pregnant at least once prior to entering the study. Celiac women reported 63 total pregnancies and 49 of those were brought to full term. The control group reported 203 pregnancies with 179 brought to full term. While only 11.8% of the control groups pregnancies ended in miscarriages, 22.2% of the women with celiac disease had miscarriages. Additionally, the average birth rate of the children born from the celiac mothers was lower than the birth rate of the control group babies. This study confirmed the association between celiac disease and pregnancy disorders. However, there have not been enough studies yet to determine the exact correlation between celiac disease and female related reproductive issues. It has been hypothesized that the connection might be due to the fact that celiac disease can cause malabsorbtion and therefor malnutrition in some individuals, which could possibly play a role in ovarian dysfunction. Although from this study and others, the connection between celiac disease and reproductive disorders has been demonstrated to be significant enough that women exhibiting reproductive issues are recommended to undergo celiac screenings. Source: BMC Gastroenterology 2010, 10:89
  25. For immediate release. Please post. Celiac.com 07/13/2010 - Writer, researcher, and celiac advocate, Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed. D., and long-time celiac advocate Scott Adams, founder and owner of Celiac.com, the largest and longest running website that caters to the gluten-free lifestyle, have joined forces to bring you a new, broad spectrum book about the many facets of gluten-induced illnesses and how to avoid or reverse them. In their new book, Hoggan, Adams, and their 27 co-authors reveal many of the hidden secrets of this widespread, insidious health hazard. This is more than a book about celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. It is a how-to manual for getting a diagnosis, reversing symptoms, improving one’s health, and living well on a gluten-free diet. Cereal Killers: Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free A to Z is a new resource that provides the most diverse exploration of this topic currently available. From the research scientist to the concerned parent, all voices are heard in this novel approach to curing gluten-induced ailments. There is information here for all levels of interest in this burgeoning new area of research and health care. "Hoggan & Adams have brought together a wide range of viewpoints at multiple levels. This book should appeal to a broad spectrum of readers who want a full and enriched perspective." --Robert Machon, July 12, 2010 Newly diagnosed celiac and gluten sensitive patients complain about conflicting information, from the safety of oats to the hazards of older grains. Cereal Killers has the answers to these and many other questions. Even seasoned members of the gluten-free community want a better understanding of their illness and the bounds of a safe diet. These questions are also addressed. Common errors, common misconceptions about the diet, and unusual insights into the dynamics of inflammation, disease, and recovery are all offered by one or more of the many voices that form this unique offering. But the information runs much deeper than that. Cereal Killers explores subtle nuances of immune reactions, often overlooked signs and symptoms of celiac disease, and a host of elements of associated illnesses that miraculously clear up on the diet. Questions about non-celiac gluten sensitivity are addressed in detail, along with explorations of what signs and symptoms should signal testing for gluten sensitivity and how much credence these indicators of disease should be given. In all, readers are offered a rich resource for understanding the importance of dietary compliance along with the cracks in the system through which patients sometimes slip because of current deficiencies in the understanding of gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. Jointly published by CreateSpace, Cereal Killers ISBN: 978-1449918200 is available through Celiac.com, and quality book sellers such as Blackbond Books.
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