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Found 19 results

  1. Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N

    Keeping Your Infant Healthy Could Prevent Celiac Disease

    Celiac.com 05/25/2017 - No parent likes to see their child ill. This is most especially true of a newborn. The baby feels sick, perhaps has a fever, and often all they do is cry, look miserable and no one gets any sleep. So while we can all agree that it's no fun, could keeping your baby healthy actually prevent a lifetime of celiac disease? The answer is quite possibly 'yes' based on a recent study published in BioMed Central Pediatrics. The title of the study is: "Early infections are associated with increased risk for celiac disease: an incident case-referent study". [A case referent study is simply one where people with the disease to be studied are identified and compared to people in a control group who do not have that disease but are similar in other respects.] Specifically, the authors concentrated on the 'epidemic' of celiac disease present in Swedish children under two. Their goal was to discover any potential risk or protectant factors that could influence the expression of celiac disease. Nine hundred and forty five children participated in this study, 373 of whom had celiac disease, with the remainder making up the control group. All of those with the disease were diagnosed with it prior to their second birthday. The scientists discovered that if a child had 3 or more infections, regardless of type, during the first 6 months of life, their risk for contracting celiac disease was significantly increased. This risk remained stable after adjusting for variances in infants' feeding and socioeconomic status. Additionally, the risk of celiac disease was further increased if, in addition to the infections, the infants were introduced to gluten in large amounts, compared to small or medium amounts, after breastfeeding was discontinued. The authors concluded that there was actually a synergistic effect between early infections and daily gluten intake. That effect was more pronounced when the infants who were ingesting gluten, did so after breastfeeding was discontinued. So what is our take-away from this study? As a parent of a newborn, one certainly can control whether the infant is breastfed, and the benefits of doing so compared to any available formula seem irrefutable. Therefore, even if a mother is having some trouble nursing or with her milk production, it is well worth the effort to overcome whatever obstacles are present so her infant receives the benefits of nursing for at least 6 months. Personally I encourage a year, but 6 months would be the absolute minimum. Controlling whether or not your child becomes ill is certainly more difficult than ensuring he or she is breastfed, but I would like to share an interesting correlation that we see here at the clinic. Breastfed babies seem, on the whole, to be much healthier than formula fed babies. There is certainly considerable support in the research to support our clinical experience. You may have more control than you would imagine, simply by ensuring that your infant is nursed for as long as possible. The only further dietary recommendation I would suggest is that the infant's mother get checked for gluten intolerance during pregnancy or as soon as possible, and if she has any genetic markers for either celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, she should avoid all gluten (and dairy products) during the nursing months – both have been shown to lower the immune system. Finally, from a lifestyle viewpoint, it would perhaps be prudent to make the first 6 months or so of life as stress-free as possible. I know that some infants gain a passport and international travel experience well before their first birthday due to relatives in foreign lands or from out of state. While all families are excited to greet a new infant into the family, consider having the infant stay at home while others make the journey to meet him or her. This might very well prove to have long-term benefits for the child's health. I hope that you found this helpful. Unfortunately, celiac disease, much like so many other autoimmune diseases we are trying to avoid, continues to increase in frequency. Anything we can do to reduce the numbers of people suffering is well worth it. If you have any questions, comments, or would like to improve your health. Please contact me – call 408-733-0400. We are here to help! Reference: BioMed Central Pediatrics. 2012 Dec 19;12(1):194. Early infections are associated with increased risk for celiac disease: an incident case-referent study. Myléus A, et al.
  2. Celiac.com 12/23/2009 - One of the main and largely unrecognized health problems facing the Western world and people on diets of highly refined, processed and starchy foods, which are often low in or devoid of dietary fiber, is that of constipation. This is a particular issue with Celiacs where the gluten-free flours they use are largely starch based and often low in protein and dietary fiber. Unfortunately, we live in a world where it is often considered normal and acceptable to empty the bowels perhaps 2 -3 times a week, rather than the more desirable 2 – 3 times per day. What are the difficulties in this you may ask? Firstly the lymphatic system drains through the bowels and if the bowels are clogged and constipated the lymph system, which is a major part of the human body’s excretory system, does not function properly. This means that instead of continuously draining, as it should, the lymph system becomes a long term storage system for the body’s waste matter when confronted with a constipated digestive system, which provides a home and breeding ground for bacteria and perhaps becoming a precursor for infection and many chronic health problems including cancer. Constipation also leads to dry and hard stools which are difficult to pass and may contribute to the development of hemorrhoids or “piles”, as they are commonly known, and possibly longer term issues leading to colon and rectal cancers. Constipation also leads to greatly increased and undesirable residence time for waste matter in the body which solidifies and putrifies in the process possibly contributing to various forms of gastric and bowel cancer. Other parts of the body’s excretory systems including the sinuses; the lungs and the skin, the body’s largest excretory organ, can also become overloaded if the bowels and lymph system are not functioning correctly. Sinus overload can be reflected in having heavy mucus discharge via a cold or the flu, glandular fever and in nasal, eye and ear infections, from infected, stored mucus. Lung overload may be reflected by mucus discharges associated with a cold or influenza, pleurisy, pneumonia and various other forms of mucus containing fluid which may also become infected by hostile germs and bacteria. Skin overload can be reflected in rashes, eczema, psoriasis, measles, hives, shingles, chicken pox and the like: all symptoms of an acidic body condition and an overloaded elimination or excretory system. If the body cannot dispose of its waste matter by other means, it often resorts to throwing the waste matter out through the skin. Chronic fatigue syndrome is possibly another manifestation of this same issue. Sadly, the vast majority of the human race, end their lives with all of their excretory organs, lungs and blood circulatory systems overloaded with stored waste matter with significantly shortened life expectancy and diminished quality of life as a result. None of the latter problems have anything to do with or need to be part of the aging process. For example, I have a very spry, mentally alert 90 year old father, A blood group type, who still works on a daily basis, drives a car, is totally medication free, has no prostrate, heart or cancer problems and has a good head of hair; clear skin, eyes, arteries and lungs. He should be the model of normality. Sadly, he is not typical. How and why? A fairly spartan diet based mainly upon fruit and vegetables with very sparing consumption of meat, dairy products, fried foods, salt, sugar, animal fats, cakes, lollies, convenience foods and alcohol. He has never smoked. He drinks mainly water and fresh juice with fresh citrus juice first thing every morning. He eats slowly and chews his food thoroughly. He never overeats. He remains curious, physically active and engaged with the world. My paternal grandmother, Daisy, was still walking around without the aid of a stick at age 106 – 107 with all her faculties and complaining about all the other “old chooks” in the nursing home on their walking frames etc: many of them 40 years her junior. Adequate sleep and minimizing stress is also critical to maintaining good health. Most of the chronic health problems facing our community are mainly unnecessary consequences of over indulgence and the accumulations of a lifetime’s bad habits and, in most instances, with a little care these habits are largely avoidable. Fevers and colds are natural processes. They are part of the body’s armoury of natural defense mechanisms for dealing with a cleansing crisis. All too often these and other natural processes are medically suppressed rather than being allowed to run their natural course. They are one of the body’s ways of saying it is overloaded with waste matter and that it needs a chance to deal with this problem. Antibiotics, taken orally, also tend to indiscriminately kill both good and bad gut bacteria often inadvertently disrupting the long term performance of the digestive system to the long term detriment of the patient’s health especially when no restorative probiotics are prescribed as part of the process: which is mainly the case. How do we avoid these problems? By a host of small, simple and easily implemented strategies over a lifetime: by a little self discipline and the formulation of good eating and nutritional habits which enable our bodies to function effectively, naturally, healthily and sustainably for a lifetime, as they are intended to. Ill health is not our natural state but one we impose upon ourselves, or otherwise, through our dietary and lifestyle choices, both individually and collectively.
  3. Hi guys. So I've been trying to adjust to my new diet but I've also been trying to watch my weight. I noticed lately that I'm having a lot of fresh fruits and veggies which is great but I notice my sugar intake is really high (98% which are natural sugars). I find it hard to know what types of snacks to have and meals that don't have a lot of sugar. Even if it's natural sugar I seem to be over doing it. I like to make smoothies with no sugar added so I do about half fruit and half veggies but I'm still getting in way too much sugar for the day. Any tips would be helpful!
  4. Hi So at Christmas lots of family and friends got the cake mug shots you can buy now. My aunt can eat the gluten free ones you can buy but I can't. I can't eat gluten, dairy, potatoes, rice and tend to ignore grains as a whole. I stuck with healthy wholefoods, clean eating to get my health back. Recipe 1 : my favourite 2 mashed up bananas and 1 egg or for vegan option swap egg for a couple of table spoons of almond flour (add fillings: you can mix cocoa powder into mixture, add ginger, spices, chocolate chunks, Coconut , fruit etc). Mix into mug, heat in microwave for 2 minutes or until done. Super easy and delicious. Or Recipe 2 2 eggs and about 1/2-3/4 mug full of almond flour (Add fillings) pop in mug, heat in microwave for around 1 minute until done. ( also: you can make banana fritters by smothering the bananas in a mixture of almond flour and egg, fry in oil, coconut oil is good, serve with melted chocolate they are ace!) I was so happy, when I made this discovery in my own kitchen. Tend to experiment alot. Almond mug shot idea from me, had always found it difficult to find quick treats. Had always made almond flour for cakes which many people have done for years in general, then I thought to myself pop it in a mug. Cook's alot quicker than putting in an oven didn't want to feel left out from the cake mug trend. I hope people who find it difficult to find treats, find this a great idea to enjoy just as much as I do. Katie x
  5. Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD

    Vitamin K2 for Healthy Bones and Arteries

    Celiac.com 10/18/2016 - Vitamin K was discovered in 1929 and named for the German word koagulation with Herrick Dam and Edward A. Doisy receiving the Nobel Prize for their research in 1943. But Vitamin K is a multi-functional nutrient. Vitamin K1 or phyloquinone is found in green leafy vegetables like spinach and used by the liver for blood coagulation within 10 hours. Vitamin K2 or menaquinone (referred to as MK-4 through MK-10) comes from natto (fermented soybeans), organ meats, egg yolks, and raw milk cheeses. It circulates throughout the body over a 24 hour period and is synthesized in the human gut by microbiota according to the Annual Review of Nutrition 2009. Aging and antibiotic use weakens the body's ability to produce K2 so supplementation needs to be considered. The Rotterdam Study in the Journal of Nutrition 2004 brought into focus the role of K2 as an inhibitor of calcification in the arteries and the major contributor to bone rebuilding osteocalcin- NOT calcium supplementation that many health professionals had recommend. The study reports K2 resulted in 50 percent reduction in arterial calcification, 50 percent reduction in cardiovascular deaths, and 25 percent reduction in all cause mortality. K1 had no effect on cardiovascular health. Dennis Goodman, M.D. in Vitamin K2- The Missing Nutrient for Heart and Bone Disease describes why most western diets are deficient in K2. Dietary awareness of Vitamin K has focused on anti-clotting since warfarin was approved as a medicine (in 1948 it was launched by the Germans as rat poisoning) and President Eisenhower was administered warfarin following his heart attack. Little attention was paid to any other nutritional importance this essential fat-soluble vitamin could provide. Menaquinones (K2 or MK) are rapidly depleted without dietary intake of natto or animal sources needed for repletion which results in bone health issues, especially in menopause. Without it, the body does not use calcium and Vitamin D3 to activate osteoblasts to rebuild bone. Menaquinones cause cells to produce a protein called osteocalcin which incorporates the calcium into the bone. Without it, calcium moves into the artery wall and soft tissues of the body leading to hardening of the arteries and osteoporosis. The benefit of K2 is not new research. In 1997 Shearer presented the roles of vitamins D and K in bone health and osteoporosis prevention in the Proceedings of Nutrition Society. The Osteoporosis International meeting in New Zealand 2013 re-emphasized this nutrient's importance proclaiming the best treatment for osteoporosis is achieving a strong peak bone mass before 30 years old and increasing Vitamin K2 food sources in the diet throughout life. The richest food source of K2 is the Japanese fermented soybean natto, which is produced with Bacillus natto, a bacterium that converts K1 to MK-7. Fermented cheeses like Swiss and Jarlsberg contain Mk-8 and Mk-9 which can be converted to K2 at a 20 to 40 percent lower rate than from natto, but more appealing to the western taste buds. Grass-fed beef and egg yolks are the most common source of K2 in the American diet. For those who have not acquired a taste for fermented soybeans or natto, my nutrition mentor, Adelle Davis, had it right when she recommended eating liver once a week. Celiacs need to be sure that their diets include ample red meats, eggs and fermented cheeses or yogurt or else dietary supplementation with Vitamin K2 (MK-4) is recommended. Without it, bones can become soft tissues and arteries "turn to stone" or calcified. A Chart of Vitamin K levels in Foods can provide insight into food choices for menaquinone compared to Vitamin K1. It was adapted from Schurgers et al. Nutritional intake of vitamins K1 (phylloquinone) and K2 (menaquinone) in the Netherlands. J Nutr. Environ. Med. 1999. Food K1 MK-4 MK-7,8,9 Meats 0.5-5 1-30 0.1-2 Fish 0.1-1 0.1-2 Green Vegetables 100-750 Natto 20-40 900-1200 Cheese 0.5-10 0.5-10 40-80 Eggs (yolk) 0.5-2.5 10-25 The American Heart Association and many medical professionals who advocated no organ meats or red meat and egg yolks, deprived Americans of primary sources of Vitamin K2 which is essential for bone and cardiovascular health.
  6. Celiac.com 10/23/2015 - Just as I finished writing about the failure of current commercial enzymes to effectively degrade gluten, an interesting study on another enzyme suggests that there may be help on the horizon, at least for people without celiac disease. According to the latest press release, in lab conditions, aspergillus niger prolyl endoprotease (AN-PEP) efficiently degrades gluten molecules into non-immunogenic peptides. But so what? If AN-PEP is to be effective in people with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity, which would seem to be the whole point of an anti-gluten enzyme, it must effectively digest gluten in "non-healthy" subjects. A team of researchers recently set out to assess AN-PEP on gluten degradation in a low and high calorie meal in healthy subjects. The research team included B.N. Salden, V. Monserrat, F.J. Troost, M.J. Bruins, L. Edens, R. Bartholomé, G.R. Haenen, B. Winkens, F. Koning, A.A. Masclee. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology-Hepatology in the Department of Internal Medicine at NUTRIM, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion at Leiden University Medical Centre in Leiden, the DSM Biotechnology Centre, Delft, the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, CARIM, at Maastricht University in Maastricht, and with the Department of Methodology and Statistics, CAPHRI, Maastricht University Medical Center in Maastricht, all in The Netherlands. The team conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study in which 12 healthy volunteers attended to four test days. Each volunteer received a liquid low or high calorie meal (4 g gluten) with AN-PEP or placebo administered into the stomach. Using a triple-lumen catheter the team was able to sample gastric and duodenal aspirates, as polyethylene glycol (PEG)-3350 was continuously infused. Acetaminophen in the meals tracked gastric emptying time. The team used gastric and duodenal samples to calculate 240-min area under the curve (AUC0-240 min ) of α-gliadin concentrations. The team calculated absolute α-gliadin AUC0-240 min using duodenal PEG-3350 concentrations. The teams data showed that AN-PEP lowered α-gliadin concentration AUC0-240 min, compared to placebo, from low and high calorie meals in stomach (low: 35 vs. 389 μg × min/mL; high: 53 vs. 386 μg × min/mL; P < 0.001) and duodenum (low: 7 vs. 168 μg × min/mL; high: 4 vs. 32 μg × min/mL; P < 0.001) and absolute α-gliadin AUC0-240 min in the duodenum from low (2813 vs. 31 952 μg × min; P < 0.001) and high (2553 vs. 13 095 μg × min; P = 0.013) calorie meals. In the placebo group, the high compared to low calorie meal slowed gastric emptying and lowered the duodenal α-gliadin concentration AUC0-240 min (32 vs. 168 μg × min/mL; P = 0.001). These results confirm that AN-PEP significantly enhanced gluten digestion in the stomach of healthy volunteers, while increasing caloric density prolonged gastric residence time of the meal. According to the authors, these results suggest that AN-PEP shows promise as an anti-gluten digestive enzyme for people with celiac disease, but further study is clearly needed. Still, the fact that AN-PEP can effectively break down gluten in the stomach of healthy volunteers is a good start, but it means little if AN-PEP can’t do the same in people with celiac disease, which remains to be seen. Stay tuned for more developments. Source: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2015 Aug;42(3):273-85. doi: 10.1111/apt.13266. Epub 2015 Jun 4.
  7. Celiac.com 08/04/2015 - Both health nuts and nacho lovers will cheer these three-cheese nachos! They are the perfect game day snack, or a great addition to any barbecue! They are easy to make, and come together in a single skillet for easy prep, serving and clean-up. Ingredients: Tortilla chips, enough to fill your skillet 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese 1 cup shredded pepper jack cheese 1 cup pinto beans from can, rinsed and drained ½ cup Queso Fresco or Cotija cheese, or a blend Optional toppings: Green onion, chopped Sweet onion, chopped Tomatoes, diced Black olives, sliced Avocado, chopped Cilantro, chopped Jalapeño, sliced Sour cream Salsa of choice Directions: Heat oven to 400 degrees F. Spread half of the tortilla chips into a cast iron skillet. Layer half of the cheddar and pepper jack cheese over the chips. Top with half of the beans. Add the remaining chips, cheddar cheese, jack cheese, and beans in that order. Finish with a layer of cheese. Place skillet in oven and Bake at 400 degrees F for 8-10 minutes, or until cheese is melted. Remove from oven and top with crumbled Queso Fresco. Serve warm, and top with choice of diced tomatoes, black olives, avocado, cilantro, jalapeño, green onion, sweet onion, and sour cream.
  8. Celiac.com 12/11/2014 - A pampered a Jack Russell terrier is being hailed as Britain’s oldest dog after reaching the ripe old age of 25 years, and gluten-free fish fingers are among the foods that keep her happy and healthy. The dog, called Meg, eats whatever she likes theses days, says owner David Abrahams, of Stoke St Michael, Somerset, and that includes roast dinners, gluten-free fish fingers and Peppa Pig-shaped spaghetti in tomato sauce. Of course, the pasta includes gluten, so Meg’s diet is not gluten-free, but Abrahams says, the “fish fingers and the Peppa Pig pasta have helped her along the way.” Read the whole story at The Daily Mail. Does your dog get gluten-free food or treats as part of its diet? How about your cat? Share your gluten-free pet stories below.
  9. They say in mathematical sciences a negative and a negative make something positive. Well lets see if I can try and apply this to my current situations in life. At work I am in an mentorship progarm for computer programming as I want to move from a current job I hold to being a programer. Some of the things I need to learn is databases and maybe with having to track my food even more carefully than I was ,I can use this as a swift kick in the rear to finally learn how to build and maintain databases. Has anyone here had experience doing such? I am currently working on my front end of the project to where I enter food, carbs, fats and calories and effect of eating said food item, if there is one that needs recorded. I tend to only make notes in my paper copy if I feel sick afterwards. Any ideas from anyone who has tried such a project would be a great benefit to helping me learn something I need to as well as taking better care of myself. A side note on my vegan blues fest issue. While Dr.'s have stated with current going on's being vegan is not a good idea dietary wise. There are other ways I guess I can do to help with that. While the diet needs to change, I can continue to not use leather bags or products that have been tested or contain animal by products. I know it isn't the same but it does have an impact minorly.
  10. shimallalex

    Just The Beginning

    Hi, my name is Alex and I'm a college freshman. At only 18, I’ve been gluten-free for ten years (pretty much my entire life). My mom, my two siblings, and I were diagnosed when I was only eight years old. I’ve had the experience of being ill every night and not knowing the cause. Of spending the majority of my childhood indoors because I was too tired to play outside. Of struggling to pay attention in class because it was too hard to focus. Starting out was a challenge. When we began, there were no options for being gluten-free and the food was definitely not as appetizing. Our whole world was turned on its head. Today, there are so many grocery stores filled with food, restaurants that cater to gluten-free needs, and the online options are endless. I created healthyfoodhealthyyou.weebly.com in an effort to help people making the transition to a gluten-free lifestyle. Celiac disease is not a diet or fad for so many people. It’s scary and daunting, and the reality of their lives from now on. However, you will survive, just like so many others. In addition to being gluten-free, my family maintains a very healthy lifestyle. I have recently adopted a vegetarian outlook (for health reasons). Through my website, I offer gluten-free and vegetarian recipes, but also advice. Your world will be forever changed when you are diagnosed, whether medically or self-diagnosis. Either way, remember that this is a change for the better. Just because it’s called Celiac disease doesn’t mean it’s a curse.
  11. Celiac.com 05/13/2013 - Intestinal absorption capacity is currently regarded as the best way to assess overall digestive intestinal function. Earlier reference values for intestinal function in healthy Dutch adults were based on a study that was conducted in an inpatient metabolic unit setting in a relatively small series. A team of researchers recently used bomb calorimetry to measure normative values of intestinal absorption in healthy ambulant adults. The research team included N. J. Wierdsma, J. H. C. Peters, M. A. E. van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, C. J. J. Mulder, I. Metgod & A. A. van Bodegraven They are variously affiliated with the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Department of Gastroenterology, Small Bowel Unit, and the Department of Clinical Chemical Laboratory at VU University Medical Centre in Amsterdam, and the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology of Red Cross Hospital in Beverwijk, The Netherlands. The present study aimed to readdress and describe the intestinal absorption capacity of healthy adults, who were consuming their usual (Western European) food and beverage diet, in a standard ambulatory setting. The researchers evaluated twenty-three healthy subjects, ranging form 22–60 years old, using a 4-day nutritional diary to determine levels of nutritional intake (energy and macronutrients). They then collected fecal samples over three days to measure mean fecal losses of energy (by bomb calorimetry), fat, protein and carbohydrate. Finally, they calculated intestinal absorption capacity by determining the differences between intake and losses. They found that average (SD) daily feces production was 141 grams, of which, 49 grams (29%) was dry weight, Overall, the samples contained 891 (276) kJ [10.7 (1.3) kJ g1 wet feces; 22.6 (2.5) kJ g1 dry feces], 5.2 (2.2) g fat, 10.0 (3.8) g protein and 29.7 (11.7) g carbohydrates. Mean (SD) intestinal absorption capacity of healthy subjects was 89.4% (3.8%) for energy, 92.5% (3.7%) for fat, 86.9% (6.4%) for protein and 87.3% (6.6%) for carbohydrates. They found that average intestinal energy absorption was approximately 90%. These data serve as normative values for both stool nutrient composition and intestinal energy and macronutrient absorption in healthy adults on a regular Dutch diet in an ambulatory setting. Source: J Hum Nutr Diet. doi:10.1111/jhn.12113
  12. Celiac.com 05/02/2013 - Even though gluten-free baked goods are getting slowly better than in the past, many gluten-free baked goods on the market today taste worse than their traditional counterparts made with wheat flour, and may also lead to nutritional deficiencies of vitamins, minerals and fiber. Thus, the production of high-quality gluten-free products has become a very important issue. Microbial fermentation using lactic acid bacteria and yeast is one of the most ecological sensitive and economically sound methods of producing and preserving food. A team of researchers recently set out to determine how microbial fermentation with lactic acid bacteria might be used to make better gluten-free products. The research team included E. Zannini, E. Pontonio, D.M. Waters, and E.K.Arendt of the School of Food and Nutritional Sciences at the University College Cork in Western Road, in Cork, Ireland. Their recent article in Applied Microbiology and Microtechnology reviews the role of sourdough fermentation in creating better quality gluten-free baked goods, and for developing a new concept of gluten-free products with therapeutic and health-promoting characteristics. Source: Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2012 Jan;93(2):473-85. doi: 10.1007/s00253-011-3707-3.
  13. Celiac.com 04/08/2013 - Numerous studies have shown a connection between celiac disease and various types of arthritis. A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the occurrence of lower limb enthesopathy in celiac disease patients without clinical signs of articular involvement. Entheses are the places where collagen fibers of a tendon, ligament or muscle are mineralized and connected into bone tissue. Entheseal abnormalities are abnormalities of these areas, and are often associated with arthritis. The team wanted to use ultrasound to investigate the presence of entheseal abnormalities in patients with celiac disease without clinical signs of articular involvement, and then compare the results with healthy control subjects. The research team included M. Atteno, L. Costa, R. Tortora, A. Cozzolino , A. Del Puente, F. Caso, P. Sfriso, R. Scarpa, and C. Ciacci. They are affiliated with the Rheumatology Research Unit in the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine of the Gastroenterology Research Unit in the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine at University Federico II of Naples, Naples, the Gastroenterology Unit at Santo Ottone Hospital in Ariano Irpino, Avellino, the Rheumatology Research Unit of the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine at the University of Padova in Padova, and the Department of Medicine and Surgery, Gastroenterology, at the University of Salerno in Salerno, Italy. For their study, the team looked at sixty patients with asymptomatic celiac disease who attended the gastroenterology outpatient clinic of the University Federico II of Naples. They then compared the celiac patients with sixty healthy control subjects matched for age and sex. Both groups of patients received clinical and ultrasound examination. The results showed that 24 of the sixty celiac disease patients (40%) showed at least one entheseal abnormality, compared with just six of the sixty (10%) healthy control subjects (P < 0.01). Interestingly, the celiac disease patients more commonly showed abnormalities of the patella (distal and proximal), while nearly all abnormalities in the healthy controls were found in the Achilles tendon. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of ultrasound to detect signs of subclinical entheseal abnormalities, and reveal higher rates of subclinical entheseal abnormalities in people with asymptomatic celiac disease. Source: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2013 Jan 7.
  14. Celiac.com 02/06/2013 - Villous atrophy (VA) in the small intestine is one of the prime features of celiac disease, and has been associated with increased mortality, but it is unknown if mortality is influenced by mucosal recovery. To better understand the relationship between mucosal healing and mortality in celiac disease, a research team set out to determine whether persistent villous atrophy is associated with mortality in celiac disease patients. The research team included B. Lebwohl, F. Granath, A. Ekbom, S.M. Montgomery, J.A. Murray, A. Rubio-Tapia, P.H. Green, and J.F. Ludvigsson. They are variously affiliated with the Celiac Disease Center at the Department of Medicine of Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, NY, the Clinical Epidemiology Unit at the Department of Medicine of Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden. The team used biopsy reports from every pathology department (n = 28) in Sweden to identified 7,648 individuals with celiac disease, which they defined as the presence of villous atrophy, and who had undergone a follow-up biopsy within 5 years of diagnosis. They used Cox regression to assess mortality according to follow-up biopsy. Celiac patients were 28.4 years of age, on average, and 63% were female. The average follow-up after diagnosis was 11.5 years. Overall, patients who underwent follow-up biopsy had lower mortality rates than those who did not undergo follow-up biopsy (Hazard Ratio 0.88, 95% CI: 0.80-0.96). Of the 7648 patients who underwent follow-up biopsy, 3317 (43%) showed persistent villous atrophy. In all, 606 (8%) patients died. However, patients with persistent villous atrophy died at about the same rates as those with mucosal healing (HR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.86-1.19). Also, children with persistent villous atrophy showed no increase in mortality (HR: 1.09 95% CI: 0.37-3.16) or adults (HR 1.00 95% CI: 0.85-1.18), including adults older than age 50 years (HR: 0.96 95% CI: 0.80-1.14). Mortality rates for celiac patients with persistent villous atrophy are about the same as for celiac patients with healthy guts. So, persistent villous atrophy is not tied to higher mortality for celiac disease patients. That means that even though a follow-up biopsy will help doctors to spot refractory disease in symptomatic patients, persistent villous atrophy is not useful in predicting future mortality. Source: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Feb;37(3):332-9. doi: 10.1111/apt.12164.
  15. Celiac.com 11/15/2012 - While nobody can argue with the fact that the gluten-free diet is healthier for the gluten intolerant, some people claim that it has health benefits for everyone. There's no conclusive evidence to suggest that it does, but it's also probably not as 'dangerous' as some skeptics might have you think. As the gluten-free diet grows in popularity, more and more celebrities are coming out to promote its health benefits. Some, like a Jennifer Esposito and Miley Cyrus, suffer from celiac disease or non-celiac gluten intolerance. Others, like Kim Kardashian and Lady Gaga, don't have any kind of wheat intolerance, but still tout the diet's health benefits (often weight loss). The problem is that while Kim Kardashian, et al. may be finding success with the diet, there is little scientific evidence to support any health benefits for cutting gluten if you aren't sensitive to it. Everyone should consider the role wheat plays in their diet, but it is a bit premature to be declaring the gluten-free diet a cure-all. Lately, a growing number of dietitians seem to have noticed this trend, and are advising people to refrain from going off gluten unnecessarily. Dr. Stefanno Guandalini, medical director at the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center says that “for everyone else, embracing this diet makes no sense” while dietitian Susan Watson advises “So what if so-and-so has found all these health benefits – their health concerns are not necessarily the same as the individual that's reading it or seeing it on TV.” In a segment on ABC Nightline, Dr. Peter Green of Columbia University's Celiac Disease Center warned that switching to a gluten-free diet could cause vitamin B and/or calcium deficiencies. The main argument against a gluten-free diet (and in some instances, a valid one) is that gluten-free foods often contain carbohydrate-rich wheat flour alternatives like rice flour or potato starch. Even Dr. William Davis, author of Wheat Belly: Lost the Wheat, Lose the Weight and Find Your Path Back to Health acknowledges that gluten-free alternatives aren't always healthier, reasoning that they can “send your blood sugar and insulin sky-high, even more so than wheat.” However, it is fallacious to conclude that this means the gluten tolerant would gain no health benefits from switching to a gluten-free diet. Yes, junk food should be consumed sparingly, but there is just as much (if not more) wheat-based junk food around, and many people already base their diets around it. Dietitians who are skeptical of the gluten-free diet seem to be giving advice on the 'if it isn't broken, don't fix it' model of thinking, but the average American's diet is broken, as evidenced by our sky-high obesity rates. Dr. Green is correct: people should be worried about vitamin deficiencies, but a wheat- and sugar-centric diet is likely littered with them. Dietitians should be advising people to more closely monitor their diets, whether they are gluten intolerant or not, and consider whether some staples in their diet could be replaced with more nutritious alternatives. Wheat is delicious (which is why we eat so much of it), but nutritionally, it pales in comparison to alternatives like buckwheat, quinoa, breadfruit, amaranth and millet. At the very least, whole wheat is vastly more nutritious than refined wheat. As Susan Watson points out: “if you avoided white bread and white rice, and switched it with whole-grain bread and whole-grain rice, you're getting a way better health benefit than cutting out all wheat.” Dr. Davis disagrees with that last clause though, and advises against consuming any form of wheat. He cites its high glycemic index, as well as the way it is broken down, which yields a morphine-like substance that, according to him, makes people crave more wheat. The bottom line is that dietitians are correct: people should not switch over to a gluten-free diet blindly and assume it will make them healthier. They should, however, consider whether wheat is really necessary as the main staple of their diet when there are many healthy alternatives. Sources: http://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2012/10/02/does-gluten-deserve-to-be-on-the-public-health-enemies-list/2/ http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/gluten_free_diet/should_you_go_gluten_free_if_you_dont_have_celiac_disease?utm_source=HuffingtonPost_Michelle_Hasselbeck_050312 http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2012/10/05/f-anti-wheat-diet.html http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-57381966-10391704/gluten-free-diets-not-always-necessary-study-suggests/ http://celiacdisease.about.com/b/2010/11/05/is-cutting-gluten-from-your-diet-dangerous-if-you-dont-have-celiac.htm
  16. Celiac.com 08/06/2012 - Celiac disease seems to be on the rise in the United States, with recent population-based data suggest a sharp increase in rates over the last several decades. A number of researchers hypothesize that such a rise might be due in part to disease triggers including inter-current illnesses, such as gastroenteritis, surgeries, and trauma. But just how common is celiac disease among the healthy adult population, and what, if any, do prior illnesses have to do with it? To get a better idea of actual rates and connections, a team of researchers recently conducted a study regarding the incidence and risk of celiac disease in healthy U.S. adults. The research team included Mark S. Riddle, Joseph A. Murray and Chad K. Porter. For their study, they turned to data from active duty US military personnel, a largely healthy population with excellent medical diagnostic coding. The data offered a unique opportunity to spot trends in celiac disease and deployment-related risk factors. The team used electronic medical encounter data, from 1999–2008, on active duty US military personnel. In all, they reviewed data for over 13.7 million person-years, to conduct a matched, nested case–control study describing the epidemiology and risk determinants of celiac disease (based on ≥2 ICD-9 medical encounters). Using this data, they were able to estimate incidence and duration of celiac-related medical care, and to employ conditional logistic regression to evaluate celiac disease risk following infectious gastroenteritis (IGE) up to 3 years before celiac diagnosis, while controlling for other risk factors. They found a total of 455 incident cases of celiac disease, which they then age, gender, and time matched to 1,820 control subjects. They found that, from 1999 to 2008, cases of celiac disease increased five-fold from 1.3 per 100,000 to 6.5 per 100,000, with the highest rates of increase among those over 34 years of age. The average annual increase was 0.8 cases per 100,000. They found a total of 172 episodes of IGE, 60.5% of which were viral in nature. Using multivariate models, they found a strong association between IGE and celiac disease was found (Odds ratio (OR): 2.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.43, 2.97). Risk generally increased with temporal proximity to, and non-viral etiology of, exposure. Other notable risk factors for celiac disease in multivariate models were Caucasian race (OR: 3.1, P). Rates of celiac disease in the US military are rising, particularly among those in the fourth and fifth decades of life and the rates seem higher than other population-based estimates. The team noted a connection between prior IGE and risk of celiac disease, but they noted that they could not rule out possible IGE misclassification, and called for further study to better determine any links between pathogen-specific exposure to celiac disease, anti-gluten antibody development or symptom onset. Source: The American Journal of Gastroenterology , (15 May 2012) doi:10.1038/ajg.2012.130
  17. Celiac.com 07/06/2012 - More and more, diners are looking for healthy, local and gluten-free options when deciding where to dine out, analysts say. Diners also want less salt and fat, and more spice in their food, although they are open to bite-sized dessert options. Restaurant owners say business is good these days as more people are choosing to spend any extra dollars on food and beverages. According to the 2012 Restaurant Industry Forecast by the National Restaurant Association, total restaurant industry sales are expected to reach a record $632 billion in 2012, a 3.5 percent increase from 2011. Nearly three out of four people who dine out are looking to maker healthier restaurant choices than they did just two years ago, said the industry forecast. Most restaurants surveyed said customers are in fact ordering the healthier items on the menu. That includes shunning that full slice of cheesecake for a bite-sized version that offers less total fat and sugar. In December, the National Restaurant Association released the results of their "What's Hot in 2012" survey, which revealed that consumers have become more aware of where their meat, fish, fruit, vegetables and even alcoholic beverages are being produced. Nearly three-quarters of those surveyed said they're more likely to visit a restaurant that offers locally produced food items. Source: http://www.upi.com/Business_News/2012/04/29/Consumer-Corner-Healthy-local-and-gluten-free-tops-menu/UPI-95361335691800/
  18. A must-read survival guide for parents, friends, teachers, and caretakers. Kids with Celiac Disease is a practical survival guide for families of children and teenagers with this lifelong digestive disorder. While it sounds as though it is only applicable to children with the condition, Kids with Celiac Disease is loaded with valuable information for people of any age - as well as for people on the gluten-free diet for reasons other than celiac disease. Written by the mother of a celiac child diagnosed in 1991, Kids with Celiac Disease is a compilation of 10 years of experience and research. Danna founded R.O.C.K. (Raising Our Celiac Kids) in 1991, and incorporated much of what she has learned from other parents into this book. Kids with Celiac Disease includes: Practical suggestions for dealing with school, sitters, birthdays, holidays and other unique challenges Menu and snack ideas Emotional and psychological implications How to talk with friends and family Eating out at restaurants Travel tips Up-to-date scientific, medical and nutritional information A resource guide listing contact information for hundreds of resources that are valuable to anyone on a gluten-free diet. Click here to order!
  19. Grodzinsky, et al: High Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Healthy Adults Revealed by anti-gliadin Antibodies ANNALS OF ALLERGY vol.69, July 1992, p. 66-70. This study was done by testing random blood samples from healthy blood donors. Donors with elevated levels were asked to undergo endoscopic examination. Some refused. One in 256 of those who underwent endoscopy were identified as having celiac disease. Everyone in this study thought themselves healthy enough to be donating blood without being asked to do so. Extrapolating from the number who consented to endoscopy, had the ratio remained constant, the proportion would have been One in 187. Again, these were healthy blood donors, not folks in a GI department of a hospital.
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