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Found 85 results

  1. Sorry for the long post, I've been dealing with this forever and want to figure it out! Hi, I just got tested for celiac (blood test at a family practice (USA)) without knowing that I had to have been eating gluten regularly for it to show anything. I read forums here that said so, so I called the doctor's office before my test to ask if that was true, and they put me on with a nurse that said "I've never heard of that, but let me check the test we have....Oh, yep, it says to eat gluten. So just eat some bread before you come today." Seemed doubtful. I ended up NOT eating any gluten, and I've been actively avoiding wheat for at least 3 years (I noticed a gluten intolerance when I started college, my dad and uncle and 2 cousins can't eat it either). I was accidentally glutened with the tiniest bit of fajita seasoning from a restaurant 3 weeks prior to my blood test, but that's it. I didn't want to make myself sick with bread after reading that the blood test really only works if you've been eating it for weeks/months, so I went and got tested with basically non gluten in my system at all. The test itself said "negative." But I've attached a screenshot of my levels. After talking with the nurses on the phone twice, I'm convinced they know nothing about it. My antibodies were low/normal, probably because I haven't eaten gluten in years. (I sometimes drink beer made with barley instead of wheat because it doesn't give me horrible stomach cramps, but I hadn't had any in probably a month). The one thing that seemed "high" to me for someone who hasn't eaten wheat in years was the tTG IGA (I have no idea what that means). Mine said 7.2 U/mL (again, whatever that means). This family practice test says that a normal level is under 15 U/mL, but all my other levels are less than 1. After some research, I came across what "normal" levels should look like and Mayo Clinic suggested under 4.0 U/mL is negative for celiac (Source) [4.0-10 is a "weak positive"]. Like I said, I'm not very trusting that the practice I went to knows anything about celiac. I know if I want a diagnosis I should go to some specialist. But I really don't want to get put under just to be told "yep, do exactly what you've doing for years, avoiding gluten." So, I decided to sort of "self-diagnose" myself with celiac JUST to make myself be extra careful, you know, just in case my intestines are damaged whenever I get cross-contaminated food. My question is: does anyone else think it's possible I have celiac? Or am I being nuts? Recap & Symptoms: In 2014 I could barely eat anything in my house because I would be sick with horrible stomach cramps and constipation that would make me cry and have to stay home the next day. I lost weight then. Someone suggested going gluten-free, and I knew my dad was doing that because he had a couple passing-out episodes and similar gut pain. My uncle (dad's brother) also has a sever intolerance to gluten, like it gets him hospitalized because of malnutrition and cramping (I'm pretty sure he has celiac, but he's too stubborn to get tested). I tried avoiding gluten for a week and felt way better. Now I've been gluten free for years. Like I said before, though, I am not careful with barley and rye. Malt hurts me a lot, and when I take one bite of, say, a donut thinking it'll be worth it (I miss donuts..) it NEVER is. I'm out for two days after that. If I get glutened, I experience: fatigue, horrible cramps, gas (that won't pass), constipation (for days), foggy head, itchy skin, irritability, and my appetite fluctuates like crazy-- one minute I'm so full I can't think of food, another I'm starving.
  2. Hello! My name is Jamie, I'm 31 years old and live in Norway. Since 2011, I left Vancouver after a year of study and have been in and out of hospitals in Norway, but nobody can give me the proper tests to find the problem with my body. I can't work, I can barely eat and I am laying completely flat in periods. The list of symptoms is extensive, but I will keep this message on the short side. I’m underweight, but have been extremely underweight in periods (49kg / 180cm). It doesn’t matter if I eat 2200 calories or not, the body isn’t absorbing nutrients properly, and it makes me feel awful and at times completely strange. My stomach has 0 beneficial bacteria, probably have leaky gut, and got inflammation (from what it feels like). Is there anyone I could talk to about my problems? I am looking for competent doctors, researches or places where I can possible get checked up in a more fast paced manner, as each visit to a hospital here includes a 6 month waiting period. Not sure how much more my body can handle as I’ve been ill for over 10 years and severely ill multiple times. Ps. I will travel the world to the right facility to get some proper help, because I am not living anymore. Thank you so much in advance. SIncerely, Jamie
  3. A week ago Johnny Rockets mistakenly served us regular gluten buns, not thinking of the miscoloring, I ate it. I had EXTREME gas pain, bowel movements and blood the night after and have been suffering through tons of blood when having a bowel movement ever since. Tonight though.. I had the weirdest looking poop like seperated in weird ways and I don’t know if it should be a concern? I’m sorry for any graphic images but I need to know asap!
  4. Hey, I was wondering if any of you knew - when you eat gluten when you have Celiac, do you take in the calories from the food? Before I was diagnosed, I was extremely malnourished because my body wasn't absorbing vitamins, but does the body absorb the calories? If so, how is so much weight loss possible?
  5. Hey guys so I have had this rash going on for a few months and my doctor just looked at it and said she didn't know what it was and to just use a steroid cream. The cream only works sometimes and generally just stops itching and the blisters from getting bad but never clears it up. I have questioned gluten sensitivity in the past because every time I eat it I immediately get hiccups. Anyhow my rash is on the sides of my ring and middle finger about 2 inches long. It starts as little clear water pockets under the skin and is incredibly itchy. Then it turns to red scaly and peeling and the blisters become raised. Does this sound like something anyone is experienced? Any suggestions for how to get my dr. To look into it more? I'm just nervous because last visit she charged me 800$ to tell me she didn't know what it was and send my home with a prescription that doesn't even work really. Thanks so much in advance!
  6. Summary:History of gluten intolerance, symptoms have returned despite no change in diet after 5 years of the same gluten sensitivity, I now seemingly react to the smallest cross-contamination and am not getting symptom relief. Do I need to worry about refractory sprue? I posted this on the celiac sub-reddit about two weeks ago but now I thought I could get more input here. A little background. When I was 14 years old, I started having strange joint pains in my wrists, persistent neuropathies and tingling in my hands, and other strange symptoms. Pains were seemingly inflammation of the tendons, made worse by exercise, and the inflammation responded well to NSAIDs. Went to a ton of doctors, tested for RA, MS, and anything else under the sun, but everything came back negative. "We don't know." My digestive health wasn't too bad or too good: I got constipated and got diarrhea from time to time, but not too often. I didn't really experience severe abdominal pains on a consistent basis so I didn't think anything of my digestive symptoms. As a result, no one checked anything digestive. The inflammation went away with NSAIDS. The only lasting effect after was that I absolutely couldn't exercise without developing terrible tendonitis and Joint pain within a few days, which caused a lot of depression. The disease remained stable in nature for a while until when I turned 21 or so. The chronic tendinitis spread to my ankles in addition to my wrists. The inflammation began to happen without any exercise, just from me existing. I also began having some more severe digestive problems, loose stools, poorly-formed stools, stomach pains, and felt like I was in a fog all the time. I tested negative for everything rheumatological. During a late-night research session, I googled a bunch of my symptoms and found out that a lot of people with gluten intolerance experience these same symptoms. I immediately went gluten-free. Over the course of the next two weeks, my digestive health was completely restored, and my joint pains were decreased by about 80% after about 1-2 months. I had an enormous amount of energy. I felt like a new person. I went to the doctor and got tested for Celiac, but the antibody test came up negative. I was already on a gluten-free diet, so I know that probably meant little. I know that my symptoms are not reflective of traditional Celiac and I apologize for self-diagnosing (no positive test). All I know is that going gluten-free absolutely changed my life and restored my health. Over the past five years, I've had absolutely no baseline changes in my gluten sensitivity. I cook most of my food, and eat at places like Chipotle and occasionally eat at restaurants and make sure not to order anything with wheat, rye, or barley. I get "gluten-fee" pizza at pizza places knowing that it's cooked in the same ovens with bread and do fine. I avoid beer and am careful with my alcohol selection, but basically, I was always able to tolerate cross-contamination. On the one occasion when I did eat bread, I had diarrhea for a week or two and then was back to normal. I was still tremendously prone to repetitive strain injuries and inflammation, but not to the same degree I had been before and ONLY after exercise. I was living my life. ... Fast forward to about 2-3 months ago. I have been going through a very stressful period in my life, and I think the stress triggered something. Simultaneously, I have a "glutening:" for a period of a couple of weeks, on 3 or 4 occasions, I eat sushi with imitation crab meat and rice binder that has wheat in it. I start having the pains in my ankles again. X-rays have shown that my ankles are swollen, and I haven't done anything but stayed on my feet and walked. Start developing tendonitis in my wrists again. The loose stools and indigestion are back and I feel like my brain is in a fog. I only get a little bit of symptom improvement if I eat the food I cook for myself. . I now respond to foods I wasn't responding to before. Eating at the same cafeteria I was eating at 5 months ago without a problem now causes a reaction. I have seemingly become very sensitive to ANY cross-contamination whereas just half-a year ago I could tolerate it without a problem. This is after five years of absolutely no change in my baseline reactivity. What the hell is going on? I've HAD glutenings before years back, and they never caused my symptoms to return and persist as they have now! And they NEVER changed my baseline sensitivity to gluten. All of my rheumatological tests have come up negative. I finally spoke to gastroenterolist yesterday and he agreed that this could be Celiac's disease, but had no answer for me on whether my baseline sensitivity would improve. I'm not willing to gluten myself for 6 weeks to get a positive blood test. The symptoms are too much to bare and I am trying to finish graduate school. My question is... if I do have Celiac... Has it suddenly gotten worse? Is it normal to have a sudden worsening of this condition, after 5 years at steady-state? I feel like I'm losing my mind, and have no idea what to do. I'm in constant pain and it's miserable. Whatever this is, it has taken such a huge toll on my life now.
  7. I honestly don't know what's going on with me. I've had health issues going on around 7 years now. I am 21 years old and it has ruined my life so far. My dad is celiac so i thought it was autoimmune i could have. I got the blood test done for that and it came back negative. I've been doing intermittent fasting for the last two weeks and it seems to have been helping but earlier i hit rock bottom. I hadn't eaten anything from around 8pm last night and i broke the fast at around 1:30pm with a big bowl of brown rice and carrot and ever since then i've been feeling really bad. I got fatigued, irritable, sinus issues, face got puffy, eyes puffy, redness on skin. I don't know why this happens to me it's happened many times before too after i eat stuff. Anyways here's a list of my symptoms: My symptoms aren't all there at the same time, they fluctuate. My symptom list is as follows: stingy eyes puffy eyes dark circles under eyes anxiety heart palpitations bloating belly fat (slight) (i'm skinny for my height but i have excess fat in certain places) breast fat (slight) Sometimes when my health gets really bad my face starts getting rosacea-like symptoms puffy face sinus issues brain fog bad short term memory paleness (especially in hands) cold hands and feet loss of collagen in skin oily skin/hair bloodshot eyes flaky skin between eyebrows fatigue irritability lack of sex drive insomnia i think my vision is worse when my health is down too, i have bad eyesight anyways so it's hard to tell flatulence blackheads/whiteheads on nose stiff joints
  8. Hello everyone! I am new here. I went to urgent care for nerve pain last week (hands and feet going numb, tingling, burning etc) My doctor did not want to see me and told me to go to urgent care. I thought the pain was caused from my back because I have a ton of back problems. Anyway, at urgent care the doctor asked if I have celiac disease. I said "No but my grandma does." she straight up said "you have it." no tests nothing, but she has it and said my symptoms reflect the disease. Anyways it makes sense to me and I think I might have it. I have a lot of symptoms and I would like others input. Here is a list: I am a 24 year old female. I am average weight and height. Migranes every day since I was 14. I had to get a cat scan after I fainted in class. They found nothing and put me on meds that didn't work. When I was 15 I had anemia. At 16 I was vitamin D deficient. I got blood work done a few months ago and no longer have anemia After that I had terrible anxiety and depression. Put me on meds that didn't work. Back problems for no reason (started when I was 18) herniated disk, multiple bulging disks, my disks are loosing fluid, scoliosis, Stomach problems, 2 years ago I started to feel nauseous every day, worse in the morning, I'd dry heave every morning or puke. Some days I'd puke up bile. This is still going on. They ran tests on my liver (high liver enzymes and fatty liver) and a gallbladder test, came back normal. I go poop 5-10 times a day. The stool is always loose. Once in awhile it is solid. Sometimes I go so much, when I wipe I start to bleed and it is painful. I have 3 breaks at work, I go before my break and right before it ends. Its embarrassing. So some days I go number two at work 6 times in one day! I always feel like I am on my period, I have skinny days where I can wear a size 9 but somedays for no reason I swell up and my size 11 pants are tight and hurt because my pelvic area is tender. I had an ultrasound, they found one cyst. A few months back I lost 15 pounds in two weeks, I could barely eat I felt so sick all the time. Then a few months later I gained 20 pounds in two weeks. I till wasn't eating. I went up multiple sizes and it just hurt. I never have an appetite. I started to get a random rash, my scalp itched, my knees and my elbows. It went away it was just weird. It lasted about a month and my doc said it was ecsema. Now I can't loose the weight. I am vegetarian, tried working out but can't loose anything. (by working out I mean walking. I literally don't have energy to do anything else) I get puffy eyes. Bad allergies, and sinus pressure every day of my life. On allergy meds that kinda help. I noticed a lot of these symptoms get worse after I eat gluten. I just started keeping track after the doctor mentioned this. I also have just been getting nerve pain, my arms and legs cramp up, my feet cramp up and get stuck, my hands and feet go numb, tingle, and BURN. I am tired all day every day even if I sleep 10 plus hours. Everyday I feel like I lifted weights and did full body work outs and everyday I feel hungover even though I did not drink any alcohol. I get tired from folding laundry and can barely function. All I want to do is lay in bed. Some days I drink 5 cups of coffee and an energy drink and I'm still tired. I also have brain fog and bad memory problems lately. I am messing up at work with the way I feel. I literally feel like my body is telling me something wrong. Sometimes my body aches so much I think I have fibro or (cancer) thats really how bad I feel. One day after my legs were cramping all day I had weird red patches all over my legs. I was freaked out. Any input would be great. Of course having celiac would suck but I feel so bad every day an answer to my problems would be amazing. I can't keep living like this. I noticed after I eat gluten, about an hour after, I feel depressed for no reason. Sometimes I cramp up and my stomach is tender. I don't know what to do.
  9. Tabbmarie

    THINK I'm celiac

    So I havent been diagnosed. But was experiencing some pretty terrible stomach pains, And started paying attention to what i was eating. And that's when I realized that wheat and bread really do not agree with me. So it's only been a few days of trying to eat gluten free, And it's so terrible. This sounds so dumb, but I feel like life is over because i won't be able to eat some of my favorite things. And the idea of being infertile from this absolutely terrifies me. I'm only 23. And I keep googling things about celiac and making it worse for myself and freaking myself out. This sucks so bad. Even trying to be gluten free, it's just so hard. Everything has gluten. I'm just having a rough time coping with the idea of this already. Any tips on how to get better at This? And how long it takes to feel better? And if you have any amazing recipes, please do share.
  10. Hi, I am 16 years old and have been gluten free for about 4 months now however I was just officially diagnosed with celiac a month ago. I was completely gluten free for the first week however now I cannot seem to cope with the idea of not eating gluten. And yes I know how damaging it is to my body and it makes me so sick for so long however, I can't seem to stop eating it. I keep putting on a ton of weight and my stomach is so bloated it looks as if Im pregnant (which let me make very clear, I am not). I just don't know what to do. I have suffered from an eating disorder before my diagnosis and am worried that I am going to develop it again. My gluten eating binges usually end with me so sick I can't move or focus and me crying in a bathroom. My entire house is gluten free because my parents are so so supportive of me. I just really need help because as I am typing this I just ate a panini and a croissant. I really need help I can't keep living like this and I thought that someone on here would be able to offer me some much needed advice. Please Please Please help me. ps... I should also mention that I suffer from many other food sensitivities, mainly dairy, soy and coconut.
  11. Teresa811

    Sore nose

    Hi been diagnosed as celiac over 2 years ago have a bad episode at present with tongue and swollen sore nose looks like little blisters has anyone else had these symptoms and if so what made it stop please any advise would be fab
  12. I made this account to ask this question and i dont know if this is the right place but please help Someone I know was diagnosed about 1 year ago and she’s getting worse I think. Everything she eats she vomits whether it’s glutened or not. I’m really worried!! Always feeling pukey which she says is normal but this pukey!!? she cant even take pills please please PLEASE someone help!! edit: she’s taking b12, d3, and a few others that aren’t for main things just like side affects. - sa
  13. Celiac.com 11/23/2017 - Many theories have been fielded about autism. Some research careers have been made by investigating autism, while other careers have been seriously damaged when that research threatened some sacred cows of allopathic medicine. Yet despite all of this active research exploring the world of autism, we continue to experience exponential increases in rates at which autism is diagnosed. And debate continues unabated regarding the causes and appropriate treatments. Part of this increasing trend is, doubtless, because we have gotten better at recognizing the various manifestations of this debilitating condition. However, the evidence indicates that there is a dramatic increase in the absolute incidence of autism. Although frightening, this trend may offer some insight into several of the factors that contribute to this condition. That is the crux of my argument here. Since most prior theories have been tested in isolation, as is the norm in medical investigations, measurement of changes induced by individual contributing factors may either be so mild as to escape notice, or may not have been sufficient to induce symptom mitigation. Similarly, if preconceived notions shape resistance to some of these hypotheses, we may miss the most salient characteristics of autism. I have therefore chosen to combine several findings to form a testable hypothesis. I'll let posterity and the reader be the judges of whether this speculation is worthy of further investigation. We begin with Dr. Kalle Reichelt, who sought to understand autism and other psychiatric illnesses through the prism suggested by Dr. Curtis Dohan's work investigating schizophrenic patients. While Dohan et al reported positive results among schizophrenics from a gluten free, dairy free diet, Reichelt and his colleagues identified unique peptides in the urinary excretions from patients on the autistic spectrum and explored their possible connections with gluten and dairy proteins(1). A leaky gut appeared to be a precondition for autism. In 1996, D'Eufemia and others reported increased intestinal permeability in almost half of their autistic patients, using synthetic sugars that can be measured in the urine (2). Gardner has reported disturbed gastrointestinal function in autism. Reichelt and Knivsberg have also published reports of improved social interaction and communication among some children with autism following institution of a gluten-free, casein-free diet (4). However, their investigations reveal that the diet must be consistent, strict, and long-lasting to allow the gradual dissipation of the psychoactive peptides from these foods. Others have reported that this dissipation process can take up to 12 months (5). It is important to note that, while the work indicating that the symptoms of autism can often be mitigated by the strict, long-term avoidance of gluten and dairy, none of these investigators claimed that this diet can cure autism or even eliminates all of its symptoms. The diet simply helped children improve to the point where they could function better in school and society by mitigating their most severe and limiting symptoms (4). Many of these researchers postulate that improved integrity of the intestinal barrier and reduced ingestion of psychoactive peptides in the diet are a likely root of these improvements. Against this backdrop of widespread recognition of gastrointestinal dysfunction, excessive intestinal permeability, and symptom mitigation through dietary restriction in many autistic children, Dr. Andrew Wakefield, along with 12 other researchers, published their discovery of a pattern of intestinal inflammation and compromised barrier function in 11 of 12 subjects with pervasive developmental disorders, including 9 children with autism. Based on histories provided by parents, health visitors, and general practitioners, a pattern of behavioral/autistic symptom onset was seen within 14 days of combined vaccination for measles, mumps, and rubella. The average time to symptom onset was about 6 days. In the same report, Wakefield et al state "We did not prove an association between measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine and the syndrome described." Later on the same page, they state "If there is a causal link between measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine and this syndrome, a rising incidence might be anticipated after the introduction of this vaccine in the UK, in 1988." [my emphasis] Wakefield et al identify several reports connecting vaccine-strain measles virus with Crohn's disease and autoimmune hepatitis. They also hearken to earlier work that implicates inflamed or dysfunctional intestines in the behavior changes seen in some children. They point to other factors that suggest a genetic predisposition may also be a precondition of developing autism, along with markers of vitamin B12 deficiency (which many readers will recognize as a common finding in celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity). Clearly this group was not attacking the MMR vaccine or its importance to public health. Nonetheless, in the same issue of The Lancet, no less than six letters, written by a combined total of 21 authors, attacked Wakefield et al because of the impact that their findings might have on public health. Over the ensuing months and years, Wakefield's methods were criticized and denigrated. One of the more emotional attacks alleged academic fraud on Wakefield's part (7). He has been vilified in the public and professional media as a brigand. Yet he and his research group were careful to avoid making any claims beyond having found a form of bowel disease (lymphoid hyperplasia) in 9 of their subjects, and non-specific colitis in 11 of their subjects, along with reporting the close temporal association of onset of behavioral symptoms and MMR vaccines as reported by parents, health visitors, and general practitioners. They would have been remiss had they failed to report this association. Further, there were 12 other researchers who put their names to this research. Surely we cannot suspect that all 13 of these professionals would risk their careers to perpetrate a fraud! Meanwhile, as these attacks were ginning up, a research group at the University of Maryland reported that, in genetically susceptible individuals, a protein they dubbed "zonulin" can, when gluten is ingested, induce changes to intestinal permeability (8, 9). Does the gluten free, dairy free diet reduce excessive intestinal permeability? We know it does in people with celiac disease (8), but what impact would or could it have on children with the lymphoid hyperplasia and/or non-specific colitis identified by Wakefield et al? And does reduced zonulin production due to restriction of these foods explain the benefit experienced by many children with autism? Perhaps these questions are also relevant to another area of autism research reflected by identification of specific strains of clostridium infection in autism, first postulated by Bolte (10). Dr. S. Finegold and his colleagues demonstrated that 8 of 10 children with late onset autism showed transient reductions of symptoms of autism in response to oral vancomycin which returned when vancomycin was withdrawn (11). This is an antibiotic that is usually used in cases of antibiotic-resistant infections. Because this group identified an unusually large number and variety of strains of clostridium in their autistic subjects, as compared with controls, and because many clostridium variants excrete neurotoxic substances, their use of vancomycin was given to target clostridium. However, elements of Finegold's work and Wakefield's work may be taken to suggest some overlap. For instance, could the added clostridium load in autistic children contribute to the intestinal inflammation and permeability seen in Wakefield's report? Or could the MMR vaccinations produce conditions that are more hospitable to antibiotic resistant, neurotoxic strains of clostridia? Or could symptoms induced by MMR lead to administration of antibiotics that provide favorable conditions in the gut for proliferation of clostridium? To further complicate this issue, Dr. Stephanie Seneff has identified vitamin D deficiency, and popular use of statin drugs, in combination with reduced dietary consumption of cholesterol and fats as possible factors in autism. She implicates these deficiencies as arising either in utero or in infancy and she specifically cites work demonstrating that cholesterol, fats, and vitamin D are important components of healthy immune function (14). Putting it all together The hypothesis embodied herein asserts that at some stage the autistic child has: some predisposition to autism; a multi-dimensionally compromised immune system; been exposed to multiple and uncommon strains of clostridium which lead to the colonization of the gut by these antibiotic-resistant bacteria; are suffering from some degree of vitamin D deficiency and are eating a diet that is deficient in fats and cholesterol. Further, as the child develops one or more of the symptoms or sequelae of clostridium colonization or other infection, antibiotics are administered to provide relief from these or other symptoms of infection, sometimes including chronic ear infections. Thus, the competing gut bacteria that might otherwise keep these strains of clostridia in check are wiped out, permitting broader proliferation of multiple strains of clostridia. Similarly, the MMR vaccine, which, by design, engages and taxes the immune system. In the immune system's weakened state resulting from vaccination and dietary opioids (13), increased numbers of unusual strains of clostridium, abnormal gut biome, cholesterol deficiency, vitamin D deficiency, and perhaps, other nutrient deficiencies, also reduces systemic surveillance for, and antibody combat with, the clostridia and/or remnants of MMR vaccine. The neurotoxic excreta from clostridia and MMR are released into the intestinal lumen and by zonulin's action to widen the junctions between epithelial cells, these toxins are thus given access to the bloodstream. By the same pathway, opioids, other psychoactive peptides from gluten and dairy, along with other undigested and partly digested proteins, which may be harmful, also reach the bloodstream. From there, they travel to the BBB where zonulin again opens gaps in this barrier and allows the clostridium-derived toxins, opioids, and other impurities access to the brain where they alter blood-flow patterns, damage neurological tissues, and perhaps do other damage that has not yet been recognized. Ultimately, this damage and dynamics lead to impeded social performance, intellectual performance, and sometimes, induce startlingly abnormal behaviors. Although this picture appears bleak, and much of it simply reflects the several dietary miscues of the last and our current century, there are corrective steps that can sometimes improve these children's lives. Vitamin D, vitamin B12, and other supplements can be administered to address deficiencies. Because of the associated gut problems, sub-lingual vitamins, and exposure to sunlight without sun screen may both be good starting points. A strict, long-term gluten free, dairy free diet should also be on the menu, even if the whole family has to follow it to ensure that the autistic child does not rebel due to feeling deprived. High levels of cholesterol, saturated and mono-unsaturated fats should also comprise a large part of the diet. One or more courses of vancomycin may also be worth trying. In isolation, the benefits of antibiotics alone will likely be short-lived, as reported by Finegold, but in combination with these other strategies, may extend the benefits of this drug. New developments in antibiotics research may lead to isolation of protective substances from hens' egg shells that may provide more appropriate antibiotic relief and therefore benefit these children even more (15). Most of the research, to date, has focused on one of these factors in isolation. However, if an immune system is compromised by any or all of cholesterol deficiency, vitamin D deficiency, vitamin B12 deficiency, dietary shortages of cholesterol and fats, lingering, chronic sequelae of MMR vaccination, opioids from gluten and/or dairy, and an unusual and wide variety of clostridia, then it seems unreasonable to expect to reverse this condition through implementing only one of the interventions suggested by the above. Each and all of these other components should be addressed when attempting to remediate autism. In the context of these dietary and lifestyle changes, appropriate antibiotics may lead to more permanent improvements for the autistic child. This would be the greatest gift that a physician, parent, or caretaker could give to these children. One may hope. References: Reichelt KL, Hole K, Hamberger A, Saelid G, Edminson PD, Braestrup CB, Lingjaerde O, Ledaal P, Orbeck H. Biologically active peptide-containing fractions in schizophrenia and childhood autism. Adv Biochem Psychopharmacol. 1981;28:627-43. D'Eufemia P, Celli M, Finocchiaro R, Pacifico L, Viozzi L, Zaccagnini M, Cardi E, Giardini O. Abnormal intestinal permeability in children with autism. Acta Paediatr. 1996 Sep;85(9):1076-9. Gardner MLG (1994) in Physiology of the gastrointestinal tract (Johnson LR : edit) Rave Press, NY pp 1795-1820 Knivsberg AM, Reichelt KL, Høien T, Nødland M. A randomised, controlled study of dietary intervention in autistic syndromes. Nutr Neurosci. 2002 Sep;5(4):251-61. Paul, K., Henker, J., Todt, A., Eysold, R. (1985) Zoeliaki- Kranken Kindern in Abhaengigkeit von der Ernaehrung Seitschrift der Klinische Medizin 40; 707-709. as reported in Reichelt K (1990). The Effect of Gluten-Free Diet on Urinary Peptide Excretion and Clinical State in Schizophrenia. Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine. 5(4): 223-239. Wakefield AJ, Murch SH, Anthony A, Linnell J, Casson DM, Malik M, Berelowitz M, Dhillon AP, Thomson MA, Harvey P, Valentine A, Davies SE, Walker-Smith JA. Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children. Lancet. 2004 Mar 6;363(9411):750. Flaherty DK. The vaccine-autism connection: a public health crisis caused by unethical medical practices and fraudulent science. Ann Pharmacother. 2011 Oct;45(10):1302-4. Epub 2011 Sep 13. Fasano A, Not T, Wang W, Uzzau S, Berti I, Tommasini A, Goldblum SE. Zonulin, a newly discovered modulator of intestinal permeability, and its expression in coeliac disease. Lancet. 2000 Apr 29;355(9214):1518-9. Clemente MG, De Virgiliis S, Kang JS, Macatagney R, Musu MP, Di Pierro MR, Drago S, Congia M, Fasano A. Early effects of gliadin on enterocyte intracellular signalling involved in intestinal barrier function. Gut. 2003 Feb;52(2):218-23. Bolte ER. Autism and Clostridium tetani. Med Hypotheses. 1998 Aug;51(2):133-44. Finegold SM, Molitoris D, Song Y, Liu C, Vaisanen ML, Bolte E, McTeague M, Sandler R, Wexler H, Marlowe EM, Collins MD, Lawson PA, Summanen P, Baysallar M, Tomzynski TJ, Read E, Johnson E, Rolfe R, Nasir P, Shah H, Haake DA, Manning P, Kaul A. Gastrointestinal microflora studies in late-onset autism. Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Sep 1;35(Suppl 1):S6-S16. http://stephanie-on-health.blogspot.ca/2008/11/sunscreen-and-low-fat-diet-recipe-for.html Hoggan R. Considering wheat, rye, and barley proteins as aids to carcinogens. Med Hypotheses. 1997 Sep;49(3):285-8 Seneff S, Davidson R, Mascitelli L. Might cholesterol sulfate deficiency contribute to the development of autistic spectrum disorder? Med Hypotheses. 2012 Feb;78(2):213-7. Epub 2011 Nov 17. Wellman-Labadie O, Lakshminarayanan R, Hinckeemail MT Antimicrobial properties of avian eggshell-specific C-type lectin-like proteins. FEBS Letters Volume 582, Issue 5 , Pages 699-704, 5 March 2008
  14. Hello, I am a 22 year old female - normal weight and height. When I was 20 years old I started waking up with a swollen lip, or swollen face - to the point where I was no longer recognizable. Sometimes both lips swell and I literally look like plastic surgery or injections gone wrong. Doctors couldn't find anything and allergist came up with nothing. I went to the naturopath and they tested my sensitivities and told me to cut out a long list of foods including gluten. I cut out all foods and started bringing them back in except for gluten. I went gluten free for about a year and I had only swelled up once while I was gluten-free. (before this diet I was swelling up 2-3 times a month). I am a student and when the reactions happened I couldn't leave the house, but I am beginning a job in January and I cannot be taking off work for these random episodes Sometimes I have swelling in the ball of my foot and it gets VERY ITCHY and hot. A few times I had swelling in my wrist and the next day when the swelling went away, my wrist was still very sore. Other nights I wake up and my throat feels like it is swelling and I have a hard time breathing. I started eating gluten again here and there. A beer here and there, a burrito from time to time, and I have had no swelling - but today for the first time I had real pizza and my foot is swelling and I feel my face about to swell. NOTHING helps the swelling go down other than just time. No allergy pills help. My doctor told me to take allergy pills every night for the rest of my life basically. I don't have any digestion issues or other pain so I am not sure what I have or what is going on. My doctor also doesn't want to test for celiac, as too many times it comes back as a false positive....... Has anyone else had these symptoms or heard of them?? Any advice will help! Thanks!
  15. I recently took a blood test and went over the results with my GI doctor who will be performing and endoscopy and colonoscopy on me soon. I can't remember exactly what she said, but I believe she was talking about my IGA-TTG levels. She said the normal range was under 10 but mine was 639. I think she was talking about IGA-TTG but I'm not sure. For people who have done this test what were your high levels? Thanks! Female, 16
  16. Hi everyone. looking for some more advice. My 9 yr old has been sick for about 8 weeks now with various symptoms but not enough for the Drs to pinpoint anything. He's had 2 "low" positive coeliac screens and just had a scope on Friday. The Drs seem to be very reluctant to diagnose with anything, just saying it's a bug (he did pick one up in the middle of all this but multiple tests show this is not the cause of all his symptoms), its psychological and sometimes kids are just sick. I took him to a nutritionist who has said coeliac or not she would advise gluten free and lactose free based on his history and test results. I'm happy to do this because it can't hurt and so far the Drs are kind of if we can't diagnose anything there's nothing wrong and just deal with it. Dr rang today with biopsy results which show minor abnormalities but still not clear on what it is and won't diagnose but said to keep eating gluten and will recheck bloods and possibly do a second biopsy in 6-12 months. I just don't understand why it's so hard. If they really don't think it's coeliac that's ok, but why the insistence of staying on gluten. They did do bloods again but he hadn't got those results yet. If they're ruling out coeliac but not looking at anything else but telling us to keep eating gluten why? Sorry I am just so confused and upset and had a plan to get my little boy off gluten and hopefully feeling better whatever the biopsy said and now I don't know what to do. He has shown some improvement but still sick and out of sorts. It seems that at the moment he is breaking down. A nose infection and inflamed ear is the latest after hives, mouth ulcers and vomiting with severe stomach pain for the last 8 weeks. Not to mention being tired and lethargic and complaining of joint pain. And his eczema is making s comeback. What would you do?
  17. Hi, I was diagnosed as celiac around a year ago and since that time I've steadily put on weight. I decided to look up various gluten free diets to see if there were any changes I could make just to try and get a little healthier. The problem is all the diets I'm finding seem to use other things that I'm also allergic to as nearly every meal either contains avocado or banana as their base ingredients. (I have a latex allergy so have a problem with the proteins that are found in these and other foods like them) Does anyone have any ideas on what I could use in their place or have encountered a diet that doesn't centre around avocado? I'm really at a loss and I don't want to pay for an appointment with a dietitian unless I absolutely have to. Thank you for any help that you can give on this, Linz
  18. I was diagnosed with Celiac in Sept 2016. I have been gluten-free for 7 months. Pre-diagnosis: hair thinning, dry skin, head aches, awful bloating, etc. Symptoms have steadily improve with bloating here and there. Now, the past month, my hair has taken a dramatic turn for the worse with loss and thinning of hair again - but worse!! Why is this? I need help!
  19. Celiac.com 08/10/2017 - Gluten ataxia is defined as sporadic ataxia with positive antigliadin antibodies without an alternative cause. Gluten ataxia patients often receive MRS at baseline and again after a period on a gluten-free diet. A research team recently set out to evaluate the effect of gluten free diet on magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the cerebellum in patients with gluten ataxia. The research team included M Hadjivassiliou, RA Grünewald, DS Sanders, P Shanmugarajah, N Hoggard. They are with the Academic Departments of Neurosciences (M.H., R.A.G., P.S.), Gastroenterology (D.S.S.), and Neuroradiology (N.H.), Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, UK. The team included 117 consecutive patients with gluten ataxia in their report. Sixty-three followed a strict a gluten-free diet with elimination of antigliadin antibodies, 35 ate a gluten-free diet, but still tested positive for antigliadin antibodies, while 19 patients were not following a gluten-free diet. The N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) area ratio from the cerebellar vermis increased in 62 out of 63 (98%) patients on strict a gluten-free diet, in 9 of 35 (26%) patients on a gluten-free diet, but positive antibodies, and in only 1 of 19 (5%) patients not on a gluten-free diet. The NAA/Cr ratio decreased in all 14 ataxia control patients (cerebellar variant of multisystem atrophy), while the researchers saw no differences in the MRS results between patients with celiac disease and those without. Better NAA/Cr ratios seen on follow-up scans supports previous findings that gluten ataxia patients see clinical improvement a gluten-free diet Such improvements can occur regardless of existing enteropathy, so patients with positive serology and negative duodenal biopsy should still maintain a strict a gluten-free diet. Source: Neurology. 2017 Jul 19. pii: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000004237.doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000004237.
  20. Celiac.com 08/03/2017 - Some evidence indicates that feeding in the first months of life might have an impact on the risk of later celiac disease. Numerous patients with celiac disease or type 1 diabetes show high levels of antibodies against cow milk proteins. For infants with genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes, avoiding of cow’s milk-based formula can lower the levels of diabetes-associated autoantibodies. Could the same be true for celiac disease? To find out if weaning to an extensively hydrolyzed formula lowered the risk of celiac disease of celiac disease autoimmunity, a research team performed a randomized controlled trial. The research team included Mila Hyytinen, Erkki Savilahti, Suvi M. Virtanen, Taina Härkönen, Jorma Ilonen, Kristiina Luopajärvi, Raivo Uibo, Outi Vaarala, Hans K. Åkerblom, and Mikael Knip for the Finnish TRIGR Pilot Study Group. For their double-blind controlled trial, they enrolled 230 infants with HLA-defined predisposition to type 1 diabetes and at least 1 family member with type 1 diabetes. The infants were randomly assigned to groups, with 113 fed a casein hydrolysate formula, and 117 receiving a conventional formula whenever breastmilk was not available during the first 6–8 months of life. The team collected serum samples over an average of 10 years, and screened for antibodies to tissue transglutaminase (anti-TG2A) using a radiobinding assay, to endomysium using an immunofluorescence assay, and antibodies to a deamidated gliadine peptide using an immunofluorometry assay. In patients with anti-TG2A levels over 20 relative units, the team conducted duodenal biopsy. They measured cow’s milk antibodies during the first 2 years of life. Their results showed that about 13% of the 189 participants they analyzed for antiTG2A 25 tested positive. Just ten of the 230 study participants were diagnosed with celiac disease. The team found no significant differences in total cases of anti-TG2A positivity (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95 % CI, 0.51–2.54) or celiac disease (hazard ratio, 4.13; 95% CI, 0.81–21.02) between the casein hydrolysate and cow's milk group. Interestingly, children who developed celiac disease did show higher levels of cow's milk antibodies before the appearance of anti-TG2A or celiac disease. This study of infants with genetic risk factors for celiac disease showed evidence that weaning to a diet of extensively hydrolyzed formula compared with cow’s milk-based formula would lower the risk for celiac disease later in life. Elevated levels of cow's milk antibody before anti-TG2A and celiac disease indicates that many people may experience increased intestinal permeability before they develop celiac disease. Source: GASTROENTEROLOGY
  21. Celiac.com 07/12/2017 - Humans rely on powerful canine noses to do so many things, including sniffing for drugs, bombs and even cancer. Now, some dogs are being trained to serve their masters by sniffing out gluten. Trained to help some of the 3 million Americans who have celiac disease, gluten sniffing dogs can be a tremendous boon to their owners, especially those who are highly sensitive. One such person is Evelyn Lapadat, a 13-year-old Indiana girl with celiac disease that leaves her with joint pain, stiffness and fatigue when she eats even tiny amounts of gluten. Now, thanks to Zeus, her Australian shepherd, Evelyn rarely has an issue with gluten. That's because Zeus has been trained to sniff out even tiny amounts of gluten in food. Zeus stays by Evelyn's side throughout the day at school, checking her hands and sniffing her food. Zeus has learned to raise his paw if he smells gluten. If the food is safe, then Zeus turns his head. “I haven't gotten sick in a really long time and it's like a really big relief,” Evelyn said. Maybe one day dogs like Zeus will be much more common. See more at NBCNews.com
  22. ok today is officially one week i've been gluten free and i haven't made any noticeable differences in feeling better. my first question is: how long should i wait to expect changes to occur? am i not giving it enough time? prior to going gluten free one of my issues was constipstion, as well as other health issues usually involving an upset stomach, nausea or an uneasy feeling in my stomach. but since going gluten free i have had a bowel movement different from usual. and today it was more loose and diarrhea like and it is very rarely like that. oh and about half way through the week i got a random rash pop up on one ankle???? advice or suggestions??
  23. Hi everyone, I'm new to this forum (and diet) & have been having a lot of trouble trying to find foods I can eat based on the results I recently received after a food intolerance blood test. Google isn't helping me answer all my questions, and my naturopath is on vacation for the next 2 weeks, so I was hoping some of you informed folk could help? My main intolerances include: Dairy (cow, sheep, goat, casein) Barley & wheat - (I am OK to eat gluten, durum, wheat bran, buckwheat, millet, rye, oats...) Pea Corn Potato Rice Cashew nut & pistachio Yeast (brewer's) - baker's is fine Bean (Red Kidney & White Haricot) Egg white - (egg yolk is OK, and baked eggs are fine) Orange Cabbage (Savoy/White) Mustard Seed The odd thing is, I am okay to eat gluten (gliadin) itself, but eliminating wheat from my diet puts me on a gluten-free diet. Does anyone know what kinds of flours are appropriate substitutions given my intolerances? (ie, sorghum, quinoa, semolina, spelt, etc.). Most places use rice, potato or corn as substitutions, all of which I think are safe to say I cannot have. My list of questions of what I CAN eat, if anyone can help answer their groupings or categories: Baking powder corn syrup, rice vinegar, sweet potatoes/squash lima, black, pinto, mung beans & chickpeas quinoa & farro It's been difficult trying to create a diet and figure out places I can safely dine out without having to worry. Thanks so much for your help. Cheers! A
  24. Howdy, y'all. Greetings from hot as hades Texas. I want to start by saying thank you to everyone who has posted on here. I'm glad I found this site because I'm feeling very confused, a little bit scared, and I see many of you started your journeys with celiac disease in much the same way. Anyway, long story long... I'm a 45-year-old female who has been seeing a slew of specialists my whole life and have been seeing the same PCP for over 20 years. I always felt like I was getting good care. However, there have been a few instances where I felt that the communication between them was lacking, and many of them seemed to pooh-pooh anything that wasn't traditional (i.e., Western). So a few weeks ago I went to an integrative medicine MD with chief complaints being hot flashes and what I figured (and had previously been told) was IBS. As I was going through my history with the NP at the new practice, she noted all my "itis"es and said I might have an issue with gluten. She recommended a gluten-free diet and to get rid of added sugar. Fair enough. She sent me for basic blood work at the lab covered by insurance, and a food sensitivity test with an independent lab. She scheduled me for a follow up in two weeks. I went and had the lab work that same day. A week later, a nurse called and said that the NP wanted me to get additional blood work done. She mentioned a celiac panel. I asked what prompted that request and she said the results hadn't been finalized by the NP so she couldn't be sure. So naturally, I started Googling "celiac" and as I read about it, it seemed like maybe I was finally getting to the bottom of a host of ailments that have plagued me my entire life. My history follows: HISTORY: -Dx at infancy with "milk allergy" to formula and had to have soy-based formula. -Dx at 18-months-old with Systemic JRA and a bit later, Iritis. Mom noticed symptoms at 9 months (right about when I started eating more than formula) but symptoms were only a slight limp that she attributed to me being a toddler figuring out how to walk. After another 9 months of the run-around from the pediatrician, then an orthopedist, we finally ended up at a rheumatologist. Apparently my rheumatoid factor was always negative but the rheumatologist said that didn't preclude the JRA diagnosis. Rash, fever, stiffness, joint inflammation...all were present and indicative of systemic JRA. Went through flare-ups and remissions throughout my childhood until about my early 20s. I learned how to get around it by not doing any sort of high-impact exercise. It's been pretty calm since then with persistent stiffness in a few joints and very rarely, swelling. No more rash or fever. - Dx at 22 y.o. with IBS. Blood in my stool and severe stomach cramping that my PCP at the time attributed to being over-prescribed antibiotics (that he'd prescribed). Symptoms improved somewhat (no more blood) but occasional diarrhea remained. Had a sigmoidoscopy, which was normal. Being 22 and in college , I began to make a connection between beer and my occasional D. - Dx at 25 by PCP with Graves' Disease. My eyes were bugging out of my head. (Had to have a crazy surgery to fix that.) He prescribed antithyroid meds which normalized my levels. Began seeing an endocrinologist to manage the Graves. - Had my sweet baby boy via C-section at 30, unable to breastfeed, found out then that I had become hypothyroid out of nowhere, after years of being normal. Went back to the endocrinologist and was prescribed Synthroid and, voila! I had milk! - Endometriosis with laparoscopic removal over and over from 31-42ish. Tried to conceive again but fertility meds made the Endo worse, then had a total hysterectomy at 42. Was prescribed estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. - Around 40, had a wicked thrombosed hemorrhoid. Went to a GI who did a colonoscopy, referred me to a colorectal surgeon who removed a bunch of internal and the one external hemorrhoid. - Pulmonary Embolism at 43, Dr in hospital took me off estrogen. Hot flashes ensued. Went to a menopause specialist to see if there was anything that could be done about that (because let me tell you, hot flashes are So Not Fun in hot-as-hell Texas). She prescribed Gabapentin, an anti-convulsant that is prescribed off-label for hot flashes, and it's helped. - For the last 2-3 years or so, I've had chronic diarrhea. I can't remember the last time I had a normal movement. On a good day I go 2-3 times. Bad days 4-6 times. I work from home so I've been able to manage it without too much fuss. But I recently went on vacation with friends and noticed myself saying "I can't eat that, it'll jack up my stomach;" "I can't drink that, it messes up my stomach;" etc., etc. Always having to know where the bathrooms were, and if I knew bathroom access was limited, I had to take an Imodium beforehand. After that experience, I was just sick of it...literally. So as soon as I got back I scheduled with the integrative medicine doc to see if there was anything non-pharmaceutical that I could do about what I thought was IBS and the hot flashes. So a few days ago, I got my lab results back and there were a number of out-of-range results. LAB TESTS [out-of-range results (according to the lab) highlighted in red]: 1. ANA TITER AND PATTERN: Centromere, 1:80 (Expected range <1:40) Speckled, 1:40 (Expected range <1:40) Homogenous, 1:40 (Expected range <1:40) 2. CANDIDA ALBICANS IgA, IgG, IgM IgA, 1.40 (Expected range <=0.89 (EV) IgG, 1.31 (Expected range <=0.89 (EV) IgM, 1.87 (Expected range <=0.89 (EV) 3. HEMOGLOBIN A1c 5.3 (Expected range 4.0-5.6) 4. FEMALE WELLNESS PANEL NAME VALUE REFERENCE RANGE PROTEIN, TOTAL 7.2 6.1-8.3 (G/DL) ALBUMIN 4.6 3.5-5.2 (G/DL) BILIRUBIN, TOTAL 0.5 <=1.2 (MG/DL) BILIRUBIN, DIRECT 0.2 0.0-0.3 (MG/DL) ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE 113 H 30-101 (U/L) AST 213 H 9-40 (U/L) ALT 413 H 5-40 (U/L) WBC 6.5 4.0-11.0 (K/UL) RBC 4.76 3.80-5.10 (M/UL) HEMOGLOBIN 15.6 H 11.5-15.5 (G/DL) HEMATOCRIT 44.5 34.0-45.0 (%) MCV 93.5 80.0-100.0 (fL) MCH 32.8 27.0-34.0 (PG) MCHC 35.1 32.0-35.5 (G/DL) RDW 12.5 11.0-15.0 (%) NEUTROPHILS 57.9 40.0-74.0 (%) LYMPHOCYTES 29.7 19.0-48.0 (%) MONOCYTES 9.8 4.0-13.0 (%) EOSINOPHILS 2.1 0.0-7.0 (%) BASOPHILS 0.5 0.0-2.0 (%) PLATELET COUNT 233 130-400 (K/UL) ESTRADIOL <17.0 Note: Estradiol sensitivity is 17 PG/ML. DHEA SULFATE 92 27-206 (UG/DL) INSULIN 14 H 4-13 (UIU/ML) FREE T3 7.6 H 2.2-4.2 (PG/ML) FREE T4 (THYROXINE) 1.16 0.80-1.90 (NG/DL) TSH 0.011 L 0.400-4.100 (UIU/ML) THYROID PEROXIDASE AB 357 H <9 (IU/ML) THYROGLOBULIN AB 1 <4 (IU/ML) VITAMIN D, 25 OH 23 L Suboptimal NG/ML 20-29) VITAMIN B-12 570 200-950 (PG/ML) TESTOSTERONE 12 <=50 (NG/DL) Note sensitivity is 12 ng/dL SEX HORM BIND GLOBULIN 64.7 24.6-122.0 (NMOL/L) CALC FREE TESTOSTERONE 0.1 <=0.5 (NG/DL) PROGESTERONE 0.26 5. HIGH-SENSITIVITY CRP High-sensitivity CRP, 4.9 (High if >3.0) 6. ANA (ANTI-NUCLEAR AB WITH REFLEX TITER) Anti-Nuclear Antibiodies, Positive (Expected range = Negative) So, since the initial labs, the NP ordered the Celiac Panel, Celiac Genotype, CMP, and a Thyroid Panel. Due to a mix-up between the lab and the doctor's office, only the first two (Celiac Panel and Genotype) are done and I don't have those results yet. I have my follow up in three days when I'm sure all labs will be in and discussed. Based on my research, my autoimmune issues (especially JRA and Graves) make me more susceptible to celiac disease, and a lot of what I see in these labs seem to line up with a celiac disease Dx [elevated AST & ALT, Low Vit-D Low B-12 (before supplementation), Positive ANA, Elevated Alkaline Phosphatase, and Candida]. However, my AST & ALT seem WAY high, higher than what I've seen most people on here post as their elevated levels. Looking into it further it looks like SLE (Lupus) could also be causing some of these results, which is frightening as well. As for family history, no one in my family has been diagnosed with celiac disease or Lupus, but nobody has been tested, either. My grandmother had celiac disease symptoms her whole life, as do both of her children (my mom and aunt) and both of their children (me, my brother, and my two cousins). My mom and son have constipation instead of D. I'm hoping the Celiac Genotype can help rule out celiac disease at least for me, my mom and son, but if it turns out I've got the genes then I'm going to insist all of them get tested as well. Anyway, that was a lot to type. I hope some of the celi-experts on here can help me make sense of these labs in the context of my history and my family's GI issues. The information I've found here has been sooooo helpful, so if anyone has any insight to share, I'd sure appreciate it.
  25. I am really struggling with finding meals I can make that is gluten free, dairy free, chocolate, and soy free. I am struggling to find meals and snacks for on the go and traveling. I have trouble coming up with a variety of different meals for dinner. I am getting sick of rice, potatoes, chicken, and beans as my main dish. I have yet found a good cookie recipe or any kind of dessert that isn't dry. I need so advice on where to look or if you know any good recipes. It would be very helpful if anyone had any quick dinner meals as well. I have been unable to cook more than and 20 minutes due to vertigo and balance issues. thanks