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Found 5 results

  1. If anyone could clear this up for me it would be really helpful. My primary care doctor wasn’t able to get me in for months and my insurance isn’t very good so I found a lab online to do blood work. i only did the gluten allergy IGg blood test. I got my results online today and I don’t understand them fully. From what it says I’m ‘in range’ but my range is exactly what the range number is. Therefor is it higher than average just not high enough to be out of range? This is the results I have. In range <2.0 Reference range <2.0 mcg/mL so technically I’m not over the range but there’s nothing to reference, as in do most people that aren’t gluten sensitive have a 0? Because I feel awful most days with serious brain fog, anxiety and depression and massive headaches that never go away and stomach cramps and I can’t see what else could be causing this. I already had an ultrasound from my gynecologist and I don’t have anything visably wrong on the ultra sound causing the stomach cramping. Any insight would be helpful since I can’t get a doctor to fully interpret this. Thank you!!
  2. Celiac.com 02/13/2018 - It is perhaps unsurprising that processed gluten-free foods are less nutritious than their gluten-containing counterparts. We've had data showing gluten-free foods to be high in sugar. We've had studies that show us they contain more salt. And now, for the trifecta, we have a recent study that shows us they contain more fat, sugar and salt. A study by the University of Hertfordshire surveyed more than 1,700 products from five UK supermarket chains and found that gluten-free foods have more fat, salt and sugar than their gluten-including counterparts, despite consumer perception that they "healthier" options. Except for crackers, every gluten-free food in the survey had more saturated fat, sugar and salt than non-gluten-free counterparts. On average for gluten-free brown bread and white bread had more than double the fat of regular breads. Gluten-free products also had significantly lower protein content than their gluten-containing equivalents, and were generally lower in ï¬ber and protein. Gluten-free products were also more likely to break the budget. On average, gluten-free products were also more than 1½ times more expensive than their counterparts, while gluten-free brown and white bread and gluten-free white and wholegrain flour sold at more than four times the price of comparable regular breads, on average. Overall, gluten-free foods are likely to be less nutritious and more expensive than their non-gluten-free counterparts. Basically, people on a gluten-free diet need to be extra careful about getting nutritious food. Simply substituting gluten-free versions of a a standard non-gluten-free diet likely means more fat, sugar and salt in your diet, along with less fiber. If you don't have a medically diagnosed reason for avoiding gluten, then be mindful about four food choices.
  3. Celiac.com 08/29/2017 - The popularity of gluten-free products has soared, despite little evidence that gluten-free products are beneficial for people who do not have celiac disease. The number and range of gluten-free products continue to grow at a rapid pace, and manufacturers are adding more all the time. The proliferation of gluten-free products is inviting the scrutiny of nutritionists, some of whom are arraigning the alarm about questionable nutrition of many gluten-free foods and snacks. Recent products tests show that the vast majority of gluten-free snacks tested are far saltier than their non-gluten-free alternatives, say researchers. Just how much saltier? Researchers surveyed a total of 106 products, and found that many gluten-free snacks have up to five times more salt than non-gluten-free counterparts. And only a third of these products have proper warnings on their labels, according to a separate study by health campaigners. The team also compared salt content for each product in a particular category to the salt content (per 100g) of a randomly chosen gluten-containing equivalent product of that category. Notable differences in salt content include: Schar Gluten Free Pretzels (3.0/100g), twice the salt of Sainsbury's Salted Pretzels (1.5g/100g) Mrs Crimble's Original Cheese Crackers (3.5/100g), 2.5 times the salt of Ritz Original Crackers (1.38/100g) The Snack Organisation Sweet Chilli Rice Crackers (2.6/100g), 3 times as salty as Aldi's The Foodie Market Crunchy Chilli Rice Snacks (0.84/100g) These revelations invite questions about whether health-conscious shoppers are being misled. Nutritionists are urging shoppers to look past clever packaging, and to not automatically assume that "gluten-free" foods are healthy. Full Survey Data: Actiononsalt.org
  4. Celiac.com 03/20/2017 - Researchers really do not have really good data on rates of celiac disease in the general population of children in the United States. A team of researchers recently set out to estimate the cumulative incidence of celiac disease in adolescents born in the Denver metropolitan area. The research team included Edwin Liu, Fran Dong, MS, Anna E. Barón, PhD, Iman Taki, BS, Jill M. Norris, MPH, PhD, Brigitte I. Frohnert, MD, PhD, Edward J. Hoffenberg, MD, and Marian Rewers, MD, PhD. Their team collected data on HLA-DR, DQ genotypes of 31,766 infants, born from 1993 through 2004 at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Denver, from the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young. For up to 20 years, the researchers followed subjects with susceptibility genotypes for celiac disease and type 1 diabetes for development of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). The team was looking for patients who developed either celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA) or celiac disease, and they defined CDA as persistence of tTGA for at least 3 months or development of celiac disease. Marsh 2 or greater lesions in biopsies or persistent high levels of tTGA, indicated celiac disease. For each genotype, the team assessed cumulative incidence of CDA and celiac disease. To estimate the cumulative incidence in the Denver general population, they weighted outcomes by each genotype, based on the frequency of each of these genotypes in the general population. They found that, of 1.339 patients they studied, 66 developed CDA and met criteria for celiac disease, while 46 developed only CDA. Seropositivity for tTGA resolved spontaneously, without treatment, in 21 of the 46 patients with only CDA (46%). The team estimated the total incidence for CDA in the Denver general population at 5, 10, and 15 years of age was 2.4%, 4.3%, and 5.1% respectively; incidence values for celiac disease were 1.6%, 2.8%, and 3.1%, respectively. This 20-year prospective study of 1.339 children with genetic risk factors for celiac disease showed the total incidence of CDA and celiac disease to be high within the first 10 years. Although more than 5% of children may experience a period of CDA, that is, persistently high celiac autoantibodies, not all of them develop celiac disease or require gluten-free diets. Sources: Gastroenterology.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2017.02.002 gastrojournal.org
  5. Celiac.com 12/07/2016 - Refractory celiac disease (RCD) is a form of celiac disease that does not respond to treatment with gluten-free diet, and often involves greater risk of complications. The guts of many RCD patients over-produce effector cytokines, which are supposed to amplify the tissue-destructive immune response. However, it remains unclear if the RCD-associated mucosal inflammation is sustained by defects in counter-regulatory mechanisms. A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether RCD-related inflammation is marked by high Smad7, an intracellular inhibitor of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 activity. The research team included S Sedda, V De Simone, I Marafini, G Bevivino, R Izzo, OA Paoluzi, A Colantoni, A Ortenzi, P Giuffrida, GR Corazza, A Vanoli, A Di Sabatino, F Pallone, and G Monteleone. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Systems Medicine at the University of Rome "Tor Vergata," the First Department of Internal Medicine at the Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo of the University of Pavia, and with the Department of Molecular Medicine at San Matteo Hospital at the University of Pavia in Pavia, Italy. The team evaluated Smad7 in duodenal biopsy samples of patients with RCD, patients with active celiac, patients with inactive celiac disease and healthy controls by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and real time-PCR. In the same samples, they used ELISA and immunohistochemistry to assess TGF-β1 and phosphorylated (p)-Smad2/3, respectively. They evaluated pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in RCD samples cultured with Smad7 sense or antisense oligonucleotide. Smad7 protein, but not RNA, expression was increased in RCD, as compared to active and inactive celiac patients and healthy controls. This increased expression was associated with defective TGF-β1 signaling, as marked by diminished p-Smad2/3 expression. TGF-β1 protein content did not differ among groups. Knockdown of Smad7 in RCD biopsy samples reduced IL-6 and TNFα expression. These results show that, in RCD, high Smad7 associates with defective TGF-β1 signaling, and sustains inflammatory cytokine production. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which amplifies mucosal cytokine response in RCD, and suggest that treatments targeting Smad7 might be helpful in RCD. Source: Immunology. 2016 Nov 14. doi: 10.1111/imm.12690.
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