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Found 13 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/07/2019 - Researchers don’t have much good data on the distribution of the related alleles in the type 1 diabetes Iranian population. In an effort to generate better data, a team of researchers recently set out to assess the frequency of HLA DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes in patients with type 1 diabetes, with and without celiac disease, and to compare them to the healthy population. The research team included Ali Moheb-Alian, Flora Forouzesh, Amir Sadeghia, Kamran Rostami, Elham Aghamohammadi, Mohammad Rostami-Nejad, Mostafa Rezaei-Tavirani, and Mohammad Reza Zali. The team looked at 70 type 1 diabetes patients who did not have celiac disease, 60 type 1 diabetes cases with celiac disease, and compared them with 150 healthy individuals. They collected ten milliliter Gheparinized blood samples, extracted genomic DNA, and genotyped alleles in Real-time PCR using SYBR Green as a low-resolution method. They found HLA-DQ2 genotypes in 51% of type 1 diabetes patients without celiac disease, and HLA-DQ8 in 23% of such patients. Just over twenty percent of those patients carried both alleles, while 5% carried neither allele. More than 70% of type 1 diabetes patients with celiac disease had DQ2, while nearly 12% carried DQ8. Compared to diabetes patients without celiac disease and the control group, 14% carry both alleles, and 3% carrying neither allele. The frequencies of DQ2 and DQ8 alleles in Iranian healthy population were 19 and 5% respectively. The similarities in genetic background for celiac disease and type 1 diabetes show that HLA-typing can be serve as a helpful tool for spotting celiac disease in people with type one diabetes. Read more in the Journal of Diabetes and its Complicationshttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2018.10.001 The researchers are variously affiliated with the Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases Research Center, Research Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; the Department of Genetics, Tehran Medical Sciences Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran; the Department of Gastroenterology MidCentral District Health Board, Palmerston North Hospital, New Zealand; the Basic and Molecular Epidemiology of Gastrointestinal Disorders Research Center, Research Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; and the Proteomics Research Center, Faculty of Paramedical Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  2. I was wondering if anyone is familiar with genetic test results. I was tested through Prometheus over a year ago due to many celiac symptoms. My test came back positive DQ2.2 and DQ2.5, putting me in their "very high" risk category. Because of these results, my doctor also ordered a genetics screening for my daughter, 10 at the time. Her results ended up being processed through Quest instead and had a very different type of report. It showed the following: HLA-DQ2 Negative HLA-DQ8 Negative HLA-DQA1* 02 HLA-DQA1* 02 HLA-DQB1* 0202 HLA-DQB1* 0202 According to the notations on the test results, she "did not have the HLA-DQ variants associated with celiac disease." I left it at that thinking she could not develop celiac. Fast forward a year and she began developing symptoms - stomach aches that became more and more frequent and reflux after meals with throat clearing and coughing. I looked at these results again, and this is when I noticed the variations that showed positive. I wish I understood genetics more, but I did some research and discovered that these haplotypes form the DQ2.2 gene. Is this correct? If so, I've read studies indicating that being homozygous for DQ2.2 puts you at a moderate risk for celiac - not "no risk." I've also ran her raw DNA through several sites which show she carries genes that put her at risk for celiac. I'm trying to piece all of this together. Am I missing something here? It should be noted that I've since had to go gluten-free, and my husband later did. We've both had dramatic health improvements since. We are seeing her functional MD for this, and also have an appointment with a pediatric GI. Her one doctor reordered tests for both genetics and antibodies and told me I could go through Prometheus with it. It's my understanding that Prometheus offers a more comprehensive genetics screening.
  3. Beginning a few months ago, I thought I was just gluten intolerant. Then I started to really question what was wrong with me. Since I was a baby, I had intolerance to dairy. They would make us drink milk at school, and they (the government, basically) told us it was essential to our health. Yet, I was always in the health room after lunch in pain. Everyone thought I was faking it because I didn't like being at school. It wasn't until I entered high school that I diagnosed myself as lactose intolerant. I never had those stomach aches, gas, etc. again as long as I didn't consume dairy. Since I was 20, I lost a lot of weight. My BMI is 19.0, but it was 18.2 when it first happened. To maintain my weight, I don't exercise, and I overeat. This is not how things are supposed to be! I miss working out! I don't like worrying about eating when I don't want to. I'm pale, I'm cold, I can't sleep because I get a pins-and-needles feeling all over my body, sometimes I'll lose feeling in a toe, I've been told I look unhealthy, or like a ghost, I have no energy anymore, my anxiety, anger, and other mood issues are through the roof. I developed borderline personality disorder (ironically, probably, and partially stems from the emotional neglect of my parents about my physical and mental health for all those years. Saying it's all in my head, etc. I actually cried 3 times today, first time in months. My mom doesn't believe anythings wrong with me. I stayed up all night interpreting my DNA results to try getting her to believe me. We've been fighting all day. She always tries to minimize my problems and calls me a bypochondriac). My hair is becoming finer and possibly even thinning. I was diagnosed with ADD, bipolar, and psychosis. At about 17, I developed acid reflux - lots of throat-related issues like clearing it a lot, and post-nasal drop. All of this happened at the same time, basically. About 1 year ago. I had a genetic test done. There are two haplogroups related to celiac, I have the HLA DQA1 version (the most common). There are 13 (I believe) SNPs related to celiac disease. I have 12. My cousin had a similar issue and did NRT. And she's never felt better. They didn't give her diagnoses but told her to watch her dairy intake. What are your thoughts? Is it safe to assume I have the disease? I want to be myself again, but I don't know how to do that unless I know what's causing the problem. And please please please don't tell me to see a doctor, because some of us can't afford it, nor can we afford putting another medical issue on our profile. Thank you!
  4. I was wondering if anyone has ancestors from the present-day region of Alsace, France, or near there, who had celiac disease on that side of the family? This condition and related ones (diabetes) are common in my family on this side. I have traced it up the family tree and am wondering for research purposes.
  5. I am in Pittsburgh and have been to multiple doctors for stomach issues. I had an endoscopy that showed "villous atrophy indicative of celiac sprue". I had IgG and IgA testing- both came back negative. I had genetic testing and the doctor says it is also negative, but the results say I am positive for: DQB1*03 DQB1*06 DQA1*01 DQA1*03 I have googled and googled with no luck. I guess I have a few questions. Can everything be negative and I still have Celiac disease? Or what else could cause the damage to my intestines? Does anyone know enough about genetics to interpret these positives? I know I shouldn't be seeking medical advice on a forum, but my doctors have been useless. Any advice is appreciated. Should I keep up the hunt for a doctor or is this a true negative? Thanks!
  6. Can you help me understand these results? Question 1: Do I have Celiac? Question 2: If not, what are chances of developing in future? Question 3: Should I have another test performed? Piotr --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- HLA-DQ2 -- Positive HLA-DQ8 -- Negative HLA-DQA1* -- 01 HLA-DQA1* -- 05 HLA-DQB1* -- 0201 HLA-DQB1* -- 0502 TISSUE TRANSGLUTAM AB IGA -- 1 (Range: No Antibody Detected <4) IMMUNOGLOBULIN A -- 193 (Range: 81-463 mg/dL) Also, I have low vitamins deficiencies of B12 and D3
  7. I would like some help in understanding my results from the 23andme test. I am being told that I have 2 copies of a genetic variant that was tested. The variants were detected in the HLA-DQA1 gene. "We detected two copies of a variant linked to the HLA-DQ2.5 haplotype." Do do these results mean? In the HLA-DQ2.5 - HLA-DQa1 - rs2187668 - there are two TT. Is this bad? Is this what is mean by having homozygous hla dqa2.5? I am new to all of this and am just looking for some answers. I am concerned about being at risk for celiac disease. Thanks!
  8. Celiac.com 03/16/2017 - When screening arthritis patients for celiac disease, should HLA be done before serology? During the past decades, an accumulating evidence shows a dramatic rise in the frequency of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and gastrointestinal conditions, such as celiac disease. HLA genes have been shown to be strongly associated with numerous autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and celiac disease. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the performance of celiac disease associated serology in face of a rheumatologic patient, when gluten enteropaty is suspected. The research team included Hakim Rahmoune, Nada Boutrid, Mounira Amrane, and Belkacem Bioud. They are variously affiliated with the Pediatrics Department and the Biochemistry Department of Setif University Hospital at Setif-1 University in Algeria. The main question they sought to answer was: Should HLA be done prior to the serology? Could unnecessary serial serological celiac disease screening in such rheumatology patient be avoided by performing an HLA typing, as a long-life marker of genetically celiac disease-susceptible patients? Serogenetic screening without the requirement for follow-up small bowel biopsies provides a flexible, cost-effective methodology that could be widely applied to obtain accurate estimates of the prevalence of celiac disease in large group studies. Source: International Journal of Celiac Disease, 2017, Vol. 5, No. 1, xx. DOI:10.12691/ijceliac disease-5-1-2
  9. Hello, everyone, this is my first time posting in the forums, but I have found so much useful information on celiac.com that I feel confident in asking for help. I have been a long time sufferer of IBS-D, but my GI doctor wanted to test for celiac because I have so many symptoms of the disease, and my flare ups are almost completely under control when I'm on a gluten-free diet. I had a celiac genetics test done through Quest, which was sent out to UCLA, and the results are a bit confusing: Locus DNA Typing Result NMDP Code Comments Allele Allele DQB1* 03 06 03:ACBGS 06:ABXCF High risk antigen HLA-DQ2 ABSENT High risk antigen HLA-DQ8 ABSENT DQA1* 01 02:01 01:ARSW 02:01 I can see that I was negative for DQ2 & DQ8, which most likely means it's not celiac, but I am interested to know if I might have any of the other antigens that may indicate gluten sensitivity (DQ1, etc.) I did have a blood test done prior to this, which was negative, but also showed I was IGA deficient so my doctor said it was no good. For that test I had to do a gluten challenge for 6 weeks because I had been on a gluten-free diet. I went back on the gluten-free diet after the blood test so there is really nothing else that can be done at this point. I am fine not being diagnosed with celiac or gluten sensitivity. I know how luten makes me feel, and after 30+ years of suffering I am so relieved to find a simple solution that works for me! I do have children with GI issues, though, so having any information to help them would be fantastic. If anyone can make sense of the alleles in this lab result, I really appreciate it. Thanks!
  10. Hello everyone!! Still on my journey to figure out what's going on with me! I've had a positive gliadin IgG test, negative gliadin IgG, Negative tissue transglutaminase IgG/IgA... Negative biopsy, it showed inflammation and lymphocytes infiltrating the epithilium but no issues with the villi... After I went gluten free for a month and felt great... Reintroduced and all my aches pains and respiratory issues came back I didn't think I had any GI issues but when I reintroduced I realized it made me constipated.... Now I had the genetic testing done and my HLA-DQB1*02 and HLA-DQB1*03:02 were negative but HLA-DQA1*05 is positive. Report says this is rarely observed in individuals with celiac and that it is only mildly supportive of a clinical diagnosis of celiac disease..... I know I should just go gluten free cause it makes me feel better... But I would have really loved a yes you have this or a no you don't
  11. I posted in the babies/kids section, but I thought this could go here because genetics don't change with age! My son is six and we think he has multiple Celiac symptoms. His ttIG was low, so his GI wanted to drop the Celiac idea. We persisted and he decided to check him for the gene. I also looked at all of his old blood work and found a ttIG from Feb. Gene results are as follows: HLA Class II, Locus DQB*, Allele 1 02:01 Results: Positive for HLA-DQA*05 and HLA-DQB*02 alleles HLA Class II, Locus DQB*, Allele 2 05:01 Patient has the HLA-DQ2 antigen, but does not have the HLA-DQB antigen HLA_DQB Genotyping Interpretation If less than 2 alleles are reported for a locus , the patient is likely homozygous. I am wondering if he has copies of the gene from both of us based on his results. I don't really understand the Allele 2 part of it. I also found out his overall IgA had gone from 71 to 59 since Feb. and his ttIG went from .8 to 2.6. I thought his overall IgA should be going up since he is growing! I feel like I am really going to have to work on his GI for a diagnosis and need all the back up info I can get. Thanks in advance. This site is amazing! Jess
  12. Hi, I am new here. My 5 yr old son was negative for all celiac disease bloodwork in 2010 and July 2012. He used to have mild GI symptoms that improved drastically after determining he is lactose intolerant, but he still had some ongoing, occassional issues until I realized that he also has an issue with fructose. I'm happy to report that since I started limiting his fructose intake in August, all of his symptoms have completely resolved and he is doing well, gaining weight, and growing I should mention that he was borderline anemic in July (10.8hgb) that has gone up to 12.2 with a low dose iron supplement. Likewise, since I started limiting his fructose, his appetite has increased tenfold (he never was hungry before!) and he is the happiest I've ever seen him. All of this has really made me believe in the fructose malabsorption diagnosis. We have seen 2 GIs (NJ/NYC) and both were not concerned with celiac disease any longer; they felt we had ruled that out. Both agreed that if I saw complete resolution of symptoms with the new low fructose diet, that is it. However, my pediatrician decided to throw a wrench in the works and said, "Why don't we do the DNA testing for celiac disease? It will show us for certain that he doesn't have the gene and you can forget about it." Well, now I get these results. And of course, the pediatrican doesn't know how to interpret them other than to read the paper to me and tell me that not everyone with the gene will get celiac disease. I'd also like to know what these results may mean for my other 2 children (healthy). Please help! I'm waiting to hear from the specialist. Thank you so much in advance. Lab Corp results: Celiac HLA-DQ Result DQ Alpha 1 01, 03 DQ Beta 1 03:02, 05 Interpretation: These genes are permissive for celiac disease. The absence of HLA celiac permissive genes would make the presence of celiac disease unlikely. However, these genes can also be present in the normal population.
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