Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'holiday'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • Recipes by Continent / Country
    • Biscuits, Rolls & Buns (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Noodles & Dumplings (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Dessert Recipes: Gluten-Free Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Bread Recipes (Gluten-Free)
    • Flour Mixes (Gluten-Free)
    • Kids Recipes (Gluten-Free)
    • Snacks & Appetizers (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Muffins (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Pancakes (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Pizzas & Pizza Crusts (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Cooking Tips
    • Scones (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Waffles (Gluten-Free Recipes)
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
  • Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location


First Name


Last Name


City


State


Country


How did you hear about us?

Found 24 results

  1. Celiac.com 11/19/2008 - Day Four: After a ride on a local public bus, which hugged the narrow road's teetering edge and rounded hairpin curves with an alarming sense of speed, we felt grateful for the solid earth beneath our feet in Positano. Our first order of business was to check into the Hotel Villa Rosa and find a nearby trattoria to fill our grumbling stomachs! One of the staff, Stefania, recommended Caffè Positano on the Fornillo side of the town and arranged for a courtesy taxi to deposit us at its doorstep. Without a doubt, its chief allure was the alfresco terrace facing the sea. Situated across the road from the main restaurant and kitchen, the terrace held a dozen or so umbrella-topped tables and beckoned foreigners with unforgettable views. Jill: We decided to share an enormous plate of salty prosciutto and cold sweet melon as an appetizer. Jeff ordered pesce spada griglia (grilled swordfish) and I chose petto di pollo aceto (grilled chicken with a balsamic vinaigrette, parmesan and arugula). We nibbled at each other's dishes and savored every bite of that culinary welcoming, so much so that we'd find ourselves back for more during our stay. Days later, upon seeing zuppa di verdura (minestrone soup) on the menu, Jeff asked how it was prepared. Our server confirmed it did not contain any noodles/macaroni or gluten, and Jeff was pleased to have his fill of the strictly vegetable-based soup, which we learned is how minestrone is typically prepared in the region. Experimental cook that he is, Jeff was eager already to replicate the recipe when we returned home to San Francisco. Jeff: The Villa Rosa provided an ample gluten-free breakfast. Each morning my tray included a gluten-free chocolate croissant and gluten-free toast with butter and jam, along with our usual assortment of coffee, tea and yogurt. After we finished a late breakfast, lounging at the beach was one of our favorite things to do. Like many beach areas, lunch fare leaned toward sandwiches, pizzas and the like. The few restaurants tended to be overpriced, but we found a reliable alternative in the salumeria, the Italian version of the delicatessen which means "cured meat shop." It had a variety of cheeses, meats and salads priced by the kilo. In addition to fresh pasta and pasta salads, the place usually had salads that were pasta-free and gluten-free. Also, once I discovered that French fries were readily accessible (yes, in Italy) and the minestrone was, in my experience, always gluten-free, I knew I had a reliable fallback. This reinforced my confidence and led us to make an exception of avoiding sit-down lunches near the beach. We tried La Cambusa, where the waiter called us by our city of origin: Mr. and Mrs. San Francisco. I had my staple fallback meal, and Jill snacked on a tasty ham and cheese omelet that she washed down with a glass of prosecco. Jill: While most of our experiences were positive, we had a few missteps along the way. During our first evening at a beach snack shop, Jeff ordered saltimbocca, a dish generally prepared with rolled veal, prosciutto or ham and cooked in a wine and butter sauce. However, what he ended up with was a sandwich version, pressed between thick slabs of bread, that I stuck in our fridge for my lunch the following day. Another time for dinner, we visited Donna Rosa, a family-run trattoria perched high in the hills of nearby Montepertuso, where the locals know to go to eat well and on the cheap. For an appetizer we chose scallops which, to our consternation, were lightly dusted with a bread-crumb gratin that wasn't described on the menu. These surprises could have been averted, though, if we hadn't let down our guard and relied too heavily on the menu. Ultimately, these experiences nudged us to remember to ask questions upfront and not get too comfortable. Day Nine: When we arrived in the more isolated fishing village of Praiano, a veritable country cousin to cosmopolite Positano, Jeff plopped down in the pastel-hued restaurant of the Hotel Margherita mere minutes after dropping his bags. He was famished and awaited a sumptuous plate of spaghetti posillipo, made with the hotel's gluten-free spaghetti and mushrooms. In fact, Jeff was so enamored with the heaping dish of gluten-free goodness that he borrowed my digital camera to snap a photo and in a flurry of excitement accidentally erased all of our other pictures! Well, at least we've got the memories... The Hotel Margherita proprietor Suela and her husband Andrea were also attentive to Jeff's breakfast needs. In addition to the standard buffet that had a generous gluten-free assortment of eggs, deli meat, cheeses, yogurt, coffee and tea, they purchased extras for Jeff, including a sweet, gluten-free lemon muffin and gluten-free toast. Jeff: On the Vettica side of Praiano, the Trattoria San Gennaro was a brisk fifteen-minute walk from the hotel and sat above the main piazza and church. The view from the terrace was both panoramic and quaint, with the Mediterranean offsetting glittering Positano at night and the piazza coming alive with families sitting about while their children played soccer. The place had been recommended by a kind gentleman named Nicola who works at the Villa Rosa in Positano and lives in Praiano. The restaurant served the best bowl of gluten-free minestrone yet! It was so big I have described it as a “tankard” of soup, loaded with fresh vegetables. Though, you do need to ask the kitchen to hold off on the freshly toasted bread garnish. I’ve rarely been so completely well- fed as when I ordered the fries, minestrone and local fish specialty for dinner on our first night. We lingered well into the night, sipping the local wine and taking in the smell of the sea. Day Twelve: Perched on the cliffs, Ravello is often heralded for its gardens, Villa Rufulo and Villa Cimbrone, and has played host to departing Crusaders, famous authors and numerous other visitors throughout history. The town's stone walls, quaint walkways and tight, cobblestone streets exude the charm of antiquity. Gluten-free dining proved to be equally simple here. We arrived at the Hotel Graal early afternoon and were starving after two long cramped bus rides from Praiano. We headed to the restaurant, where the maître d' guided us to a shaded table on the terrace. Soon we lunched on gluten-free mushroom penne pasta and salad and took in stunning views of the ocean and the nearby seaside village of Minori. Jill: Perusing our guidebook, we found a trattoria tucked away beyond the main piazza called Cumpa' Cosimo and decided to give it a try for dinner. Thankfully we'd made a reservation, as the medieval-inspired place that was dotted with pictures of celebrities and run by Italian nonna (grandmother) Netta Bottone filled up fast. Everything on the menu looked enticing. The roasted rabbit caught Jeff's eye, along with more minestrone soup. He couldn't seem to get enough of the stuff! Craving comfort food, I bypassed the local specialties for a four-cheese pizza and glass of beer. After trying a bit of Jeff's entrée, though, I had a serious case of rabbit envy! We were pushing our last-bite limits when Netta paraded over to our table with a complimentary dessert, something like a cross between cheesecake and tiramisù, which Jeff picked at in order to avoid the crust (Celiac.com does not recommend doing this), and I couldn't resist polishing off. When Jeff mentioned that he was a writer as we paid our tab, Netta darted back to the kitchen and returned with a plate of figs and grapes. From her garden, she said, and insisted we put them in our pockets for later. Day Fourteen: Rome may be the Eternal City, but we had all of a day and a half there to explore, with the half starting after our nine-hour transit by private car, Amtrak train and then a female Formula One taxi driver at Termini Station. Since the next day was Sunday and we had no desire to fight the faithful who would attend mass, we opted for a quick visit to St. Peter's and from there trotted over to the Trastevere district for dinner. The Trastevere, a bohemian counterpart to New York's East Village, is one of my favorite places and it won over Jill, who hadn't quite been captured by the Roman magic. Even in August when the area was thick with tourists, street vendors and buskers, it seemed like a breath of fresh air in a city that can be every bit as overbearing as New York or London. We eyeballed a few menus and sniffed out a crowded place that seemed to move food at a good clip. It was elbow-to-elbow seating at our cramped alleyway table, with throngs of tourists shuffling past, but soon we dined under a blue Roman sky at dusk. We enjoyed a flavorful gluten-free meal of fresh salads, veal marsala, mushroom risotto and handmade local sausages. Despite being stuffed already, we couldn't resist some stracciatella (chocolate chip) and nocciola (hazelnut) gelato near the Piazza Santa Maria, where a polished quartet of young classical musicians serenaded the crowd. In general, we noticed an abundance of gluten-free salads, soups, roasted meats and risottos in Rome and in all four towns we passed through along the Amalfi Coast. We found reliable delis and easy access to fresh fruit. When we asked, places that did not have gluten-free pasta showed a willingness to prepare any that you provided. So, with a quick trip to the local pharmacy for some gluten-free pasta, you could dine with confidence! Contrary to our fears before the trip, eating gluten-free while traveling in Italy proved easy to do. With a bit of planning, a call to the airline to line up a gluten-free meal, an Italian/English explanation of your dietary needs and the standard caution nearly all people with gluten intolerance bring to eating out, anyone can look forward to an enjoyable, gluten-free holiday in Italy. Co-written by Jefferson Adams
  2. Celiac.com 12/21/2016 - Here's an easy, tasty recipe for those sugar-glazed holiday nuts that everyone's always going so crazy about. Ingredients: 2 egg whites 2 tablespoon water 1 pound pecan halves ½ pound cashews ½ pound almonds 2 cups white sugar 1½ teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, to taste Directions: Heat oven to 250 degrees F (120 degrees C). Grease one baking sheet. In a mixing bowl, whip together the egg whites and water until frothy. In a separate bowl, mix together sugar, salt, and cinnamon. Add nuts to egg whites, stir to coat the nuts evenly. Remove the nuts, and toss them in the sugar mixture until coated. Spread the nuts out on the prepared baking sheet. Bake at 250 degrees F (120 degrees C) for 1 hour. Stir every 15 minutes. Remove and place onto a wax paper, or paper towel-covered pan or plate. Allow to cool sufficiently before serving.
  3. Celiac.com 11/09/2016 - I don't know about you, but I am totally getting into the holiday spirit! It has been getting a little chilly at night and the night seems to come sooner and sooner. That definitely means it's holiday season! These Hidden Fiber Holiday Spice Cupcakes won't make you gain the traditional 10 pounds of "Santa weight" though and they have the added benefit of helping to keep you regular. A lot of people associate the holidays with all sorts of sweets and treats. I am all for my sweets and treats but I don't like feeling like crap afterwards. That is why I find it so important to come up with healthier alternatives that handle my cravings and make my whole body happy. I hope you enjoy these as much as I do and I hope they help you veer away from the dessert table at your work holiday parties! Ingredients: 1¼ cup almond flour 1 tablespoon coconut flour ¼ cup tapioca flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 tablespoon ground chia seeds 1 teaspoon organic vanilla powder ¼ teaspoon ground cloves, or more to taste 4 eggs 1 tablespoon honey 1 teaspoon liquid Madagascar vanilla 2 tablespoons coconut oil (or ghee) 1 tablespoon almond milk 2 tablespoons Sweet Spreads Cinnamon Roll Coconutter ½ cup plus 4 tablespoons applesauce ½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar Coconut oil for greasing pans 2 TOPPING OPTIONS: My Maple Fluff Frostingor 4 tablespoons Sweet Spreads Vanilla Cupcake Coconutter ½ cup heavy whipping cream ¼ tsp vanilla 1 tablespoons cacao powder for dusting only Instructions: Preheat oven to 350F degrees. Grease mini-muffin pans with coconut oil. Combine all three flours, baking soda, baking powder, ground chia seeds, vanilla powder and cloves in a bowl. Mix well, sifting two times. In another bowl mix the eggs, honey, vanilla, coconut oil, almond milk and Sweet Spreads Coconutter or nut butter of choice. Whip on medium then on high with a hand mixer. Add in applesauce. Mix in apple cider vinegar. Scoop halfway full into well-greased muffin pans. Bake for 12-16 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a rack. Top with my Maple Fluff Frosting or whipped Sweet Spreads Vanilla Cupcake Coconutter. Sweet Spreads Vanilla Cupcake Coconutter Whipped Topping DIRECTIONS: Place cold whipped cream in a cold bowl and whip until very firm. Slowly drizzle the vanilla and Sweet Spreads Vanilla Cupcake Coconutter. It will drop a bit. Top your cupcakes with the frosting. Lightly dust with cacao powder. Enjoy!
  4. With the holidays approaching, I feel some sadness about being deprived of the holiday foods I used to enjoy. Then I remember Sammy (not his real name). He was a four-year old patient of mine when I was working as a pediatric hospital pharmacist. Sammy used to visit me every day in my 3rd floor pharmacy satellite. He would come strolling by with his IV pole and his nurse. They would stand in my doorway and dance to the music I played in my satellite. His nurse told me it made his day. I know it made mine. I so looked forward to seeing Sammy. He was in the hospital a lot. Sammy never ate any food. Never. All his nutrition came from IV admixtures. He never smelled, or tasted, or enjoyed any food. Not any Halloween candy, no Thanksgiving pie, no Christmas cookies, no Birthday cake. Ever. Sammy almost made it to adolescence. Now when I feel deprived, I remember Sammy and my sadness or even anger turns to gratitude for all the pleasures I do enjoy. Maybe it can do the same for you.
  5. Celiac.com 12/17/2014 - Along with turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, stuffing is the foundation of any great holiday feast. To my way of thinking, if there’s no stuffing, it’s just another meal. This year, Celiac.com offers up our favorite recipe for classic holiday stuffing, along with nine more gluten-free stuffing recipes that are guaranteed to help you deliver a delicious gluten-free holiday meal. Classic Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Ingredients: 5-6 cups white, gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled (I use Udi’s or Rudi’s) 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups celery, chopped 2 shallots, minced 1 large or 2 medium yellow onions, chopped 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, minced 1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced 1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced 1-1½ cups gluten-free chicken broth ½ cup white wine 1 egg yolk 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper Add bits of cooked sausage or bacon, diced chestnut, pecan, apple, cranberry, currant, or raisin, as desired, but make sure any sausage is gluten-free! Preparation: Sauté shallots, onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until translucent. Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook another one or two minutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Add wine and continue cooking over medium heat until liquid is reduced by half. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Note: If cooking stuffing inside turkey, add just 1 cup of chicken broth. Place the egg yolk in a large bowl and carefully spoon two or three ounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whisking the mixture. Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. Make sure to blend a small amount of stock into the egg first to prevent scrambled eggs. Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and egg mixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly. Add the salt and pepper and mix. Place the stuffing mixture into a greased casserole dish and cook in 400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, until done. Note: The stuffing is done when you can insert a toothpick into the stuffing and it comes out clean. Make sure you bake stuffing until the toothpick comes out clean. Serves about six to eight people. Scale recipe according to amount of stuffing required. PLUS: Here are Nine More Recipes for Great Gluten-free Stuffing: Brown and Wild Rice Savory Mushroom Stuffing Rice Stuffing with Apples, Herbs, and Bacon Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe Chestnut, Wild Rice, and Pistachio Dressing Gluten-free Bread Stuffing with Herbs Gluten Free Holiday Stuffing Whole Foods Market Classic Gluten-free Stuffing Food Network Classic Gluten-free Stuffing Rudi’s Bakery Gluten-free Stuffing Mix
  6. Celiac.com 12/02/2014 - Say what you want about turkey and stuffing being the cornerstone of any great holiday feast. For many folks, that’s all just window dressing for the real cornerstone of the meal: Dessert. This year, we’re going beyond the standard dessert fare to include the recipe for our home-run Gluten-free Pecan-Streusel Apple Pie with Almond Meal Crust, along with links to ten more top-ranked gluten-free desserts. Gluten-free Pecan-Streusel Apple Pie with Almond Meal Crust Almond Meal Crust Ingredients: ¾ cup finely crushed almonds ¾ cup almond meal 2 tablespoons granulated sugar 2-3 tablespoons butter, room temperature Apple Pie Filling Ingredients: 6 cups thinly sliced, peeled tart apples (6 medium) ¾ cup sugar 2 tablespoons King Arthur Gluten-Free Multipurpose Flour 1½ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon lemon juice Pecan Streusel Topping Ingredients: 1 cup chopped pecans ¾ cup King Arthur Gluten-Free Multipurpose Flour ¼ cup sugar 6 tablespoons cold butter Almond Meal Crust Directions: Heat oven to 325°F. Place all nut crust ingredients in a mixing bowl and mix well. Lightly coat the bottom and sides of a 9-inch pie pan with oil. Pour the nut crust mixture into the pan. Use the bottom of a measuring cup or glass to press the crumbs down into the bottom and up the sides of the pan. Place crust in oven and bake about 5-10 minutes, or until the crust is slightly browned. Remove and cool. Apple Pie Filling Directions: Heat oven to 325°F. In a large bowl, toss apples with lemon juice and vanilla. In a second bowl, combine sugars, cinnamon and gluten-free flour. Add to apple mixture and toss well to coat. Spoon apple filling mixture into the nut crust. Drizzle lightly with butter. Topping and Cooking Directions: In a small bowl, combine the flour, pecans and sugar. Cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle over filling. Bake at 325° for about 1 hour or until filling is bubbly and topping is browned (Check at 45-50 minutes). Cool on a wire rack. TIP: Cover crust with aluminum foil if it starts to get too done. Ten More Great Gluten-free Holiday Desserts: Gluten-free Holiday Pumpkin Pie Gluten-free Chocolate Cream Pie Pumpkin Cheesecake with Almond Meal Crust Pumpkin Cheesecake with Butter Pecan Crust Traditional Gluten-free Apple Pie Low-Fat Pumpkin Flan Gluten-free Apple Crisp Gluten-free Gingerbread Gluten-free Orange Walnut Bread Candied Orange Peels
  7. Celiac.com 12/24/2012 - Like many people, I associate the holidays with delicious desserts and yummy baked goods. As a child, holidays meant ovens warming the house, delicious smells filling the rooms, counter tops brimming with wonderful treats. Homemade desserts and baked goods bring these things and more to the holidays. They bring smiles to the faces of friends and guests and family. They bring joy to the heart. However, for people with gluten-sensitivity or celiac disease, making tasty desserts and baked goods comes with extra challenges. Not only do they need to avoid wheat and flour, they need to find recipes that match the taste and texture and goodness of favorites that are now off-limits. In fact, these challenges have inspired us to include links to some of our best loved and most delicious gluten-free holiday recipes. To help you bring delicious desserts and baked goods to your holiday table, here is a recipe for a delicious gluten-free apple pie, followed by links to some of our best loved gluten-free desserts and baked goods. This pie crust recipe comes from King Arthur Flour Great Gluten-free Apple Pie Gluten-free Pie Crust Ingredients (Makes 1 crust): 1¼ cups King Arthur Gluten-Free Multipurpose Flour 1 tablespoon sugar ½ teaspoon xanthan gum ½ teaspoon salt 6 tablespoons cold butter 1 large egg 2 teaspoons lemon juice or vinegar Apple Pie Filling Ingredients: 6 cups thinly sliced, peeled apples (6 medium) ¾ cup sugar 2 tablespoons King Arthur Gluten-Free Multipurpose Flour ¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon lemon juice Directions: Heat oven to 425F. Be sure to double crust ingredients for a 2 crust pie. Cut the cold butter into pats. Then, in a large mixing bowl, work the pats into the flour mixture till it's crumbly, with some larger, pea-sized chunks of butter remaining. Whisk the egg and vinegar or lemon juice together till very foamy. Mix egg and vinegar mixture into the dry ingredients. Stir until the mixture holds together, adding 1 to 3 additional tablespoons cold water if necessary. Shape into a ball and chill for an hour, or up to overnight. Allow the dough to rest at room temperature for 10 to 15 minutes before rolling. Roll out on a cutting board clean table that is heavily sprinkled with gluten-free flour. Invert the crust into the un-greased 9-inch glass pie plate. Press firmly against side and bottom. Tip: The egg yolk makes this crust vulnerable to burned edges, so always shield the edges of the crust, with aluminum foil or a pie shield, to protect them while baking. Tips for Better Baking: Baking on high heat at the beginning will help prevent sogginess on the bottom of the crust. For best results, use a metal pie pan. Aluminum works best. Bake at 425°F on the bottom rack of your oven for 20 minutes, then reduce the heat to 350°F, move your pie to the middle rack, and continue to bake until the crust is golden and the filling is bubbly (40-45 minutes total baking time). Brushing the crust lightly with milk and sprinkling it with sugar will help the crust to brown better, and will also give a nice sparkle and sweet crunch to your finished pie. Here are links to some of our best loved gluten-free desserts and baked goods (Note: King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour will work well in place of regular wheat flour most of these recipes, so feel free to substitute as you like): Holiday Pumpkin Bread (Gluten-Free) Orange Walnut Bread (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Pie Banana Nut Bread #3 (Gluten-Free) Gingerbread #2 (Gluten-Free) Decadent Gluten-Free Triple Chocolate Chunk Cookies Quick Cranberry Coconut Cookies (Gluten-Free) Molasses Spice Cookies (Gluten-Free) Snickerdoodles (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies (Gluten-Free) Soft Sugar Cookies (Gluten-Free) Frosted Pumpkin Bars (Gluten-Free) Sugar & Spice Madeleines (Gluten-Free) Lebkuchen (German Ginger Cookies - Gluten-Free) Three Ingredient Gluten-Free Pie Crust Danish (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Cheesecake with Butter Pecan Crust (Gluten-Free) Apple Crisp #2 (Gluten-Free) Tasty Apple Crisp (Gluten-Free)
  8. Celiac.com 12/11/2013 - The most wondrous season is upon us. The family gathers to create memories and cherish each moment of the holidays. Wait…wait…what?? With family?@#$?! We often emerge from these gatherings planning the next appointment with our therapist. No need to guess how it'll go this year: Mom locked herself in the bedroom with a bottle of wine again. Grandma has no reservations pointing out that you're still single. Your cousin whom suffers from chronic ‘one up syndrome' is compelled to interject conversations failing to encompass their exceeding significance. There are circumstances and people we cannot change. Your family may not exemplify the magical fuzziness of a Thomas Kinkade painting but so what. What we can take control over is our well-being and attitude. Despite being thrust into drama comparable to a Kardashian marriage, let's focus on our diet. Managing celiac disease is exhausting enough without the added stress from the holidays. With the influx of food, there are more chances that forbidden goodies will bombard their way to the dinner plate. But don't sweat it. Consider the following tips to ease you celiac disease concerns and have one less thing to worry about this season. You'll need the energy for breaking up temper-mantrums over fantasy football scores and equipping the fire extinguisher for the first turkey fry attempt. Eat before you arrive: Never walk into an occasion hungry. There are few worse mood killers than discovering carrot sticks are the only gluten-free item in the room. The hunger will also hinder your inhibitions, tempting to eat something you normally wouldn't. Otherwise, you must wait to eat once the night is over. As nice as you look scowling over the abandoned vegetable tray and dragging your date out of door, I'm certain there are more enticing activities to engage in. Bring your own dish: Coordinate with the host beforehand to avoid confusion about portions. Consider bringing enough for others to try as well. Take the opportunity to share with family and loved ones. After all, you've spent the past year meticulously creating and photographing Pinterest worthy meals. Show them what those eight albums dedicated to food are all about. Help with cooking: Cooking a gluten-free meal may seem easy enough to the uninformed individual. Although the cook has good intentions, their lack in experience with intricate details of the diet may lead to contamination. Insist upon helping even if your offer is declined. This way you can ensure the safety of the meal. Surely, any helping hand with cooking and cleaning duties will be appreciated. Label your food: It only takes one serving spoon dipped into the crunchy green bean casserole to contaminate your food. Set aside a table for a buffet clearly labeled "do not contaminate" and "gluten-free," etc., on the dishes. Better yet, don't put them out with everything else. There's a chance your food will mistakenly be eaten or contaminated within the vicinity of hungry mouths and gluten-filled goodies. Don't be afraid to say NO: Your peachy little grandma, the one who spends the remainder of the year shuffling to the living room for afternoon soap operas has impeccably presented a homemade turkey dinner with all the fixins. Wow grandma, we didn't know you had it in you… Desserts, sides, more desserts, all made from scratch from her mother's, mother's, mother's recipes (she will then spend the next half hour monopolizing conversation regarding how easy we kids have it). None of which are gluten-free since, regardless of your various efforts, Grandma doesn't know what gluten means. The moral of the story: despite it being the super bowl of family dinners in your grandma's world, you must decline the meal. Politely of course but don't be afraid of assertion. Many people do not understand reasoning behind diet restrictions and some will never accept them. There are other ways to show Grandma she is loved and appreciated besides eating her food. When in doubt go without: It's always better to pass on a dish when the ingredients remain unclear. If you must ask yourself, "I don't know if I should eat this" and there's no way to confirm its safety, the answer is do not eat it. This is particularly difficult but worth avoiding the undoing of your well-being. You'll beat yourself up while gripping the toilet at your significant other's childhood home as their newly acquainted relative repeatedly knocks behind the door asking if you're ok. Avoid over indulging: "Well, since it's the holidays I guess it's alright to have this cupcake, a piece of pie, and chocolate cake." Special occasions are used as justification for eating things we normally wouldn't. We tend to overeat at these gatherings because food sits in front of us, not because we're hungry. Remember, 20 parts per million of gluten are permitted in gluten-free certified products. Eating multiple items compile trace amounts of gluten, posing for a likely reaction. Consider sticking to only one gluten-free product with your meal. The gluten-free biscuits, stuffing, corn bread, and apple pie all look delicious but choose one of those. Otherwise, the spandex pants of shame are ready to waddle through your food hangover tomorrow. Communicate with the host and guests: Simply informing the host and cook beforehand may prevent unwanted mishaps. There will be guests who show excitement in trying new dishes and wish to hear your sentiments regarding diet. Share your honest thoughts and opinions without coming across critical of their personal choices. Other guests may not be so willing to converse topics concerning diet or health but don't take offense. Remember, the diet is not simply a fad that you're following. Your life, health, and well-being depend on it and people need to know that. Limit your alcohol: Most parties mean food and booze. Since party food is rarely gluten-free, it's tempting to keep the wine and alcohol pouring in. Grab a glass of soda water and lime as your security blanket. You'll be surprised how efficiently this wards off needless drinks. It's easy to have one glass of wine here, one glass there, but then you're on glass number four. With little food in your stomach you will not be feeling too hot. Not to mention, the company Christmas party may not be the place for that extra glass. Your naughty elf impression may seem very original and hilarious at the time, but come Monday morning…not so much. Mentally prepare yourself: Get your mind right. First, relax. Don't you just hate it when someone tells you to relax during a stressful situation? Truly though, getting worked up will exhaust you before the events even take place. Secondly, be prepared. There will be many tempting foods and opportunities to sabotage your diet. Be mindful and expectant of this beforehand. Lastly, think with a positive attitude. Bring the expectations down a notch and take it easy on yourself and others. Take on too much and be bothered by things outside of your control or choose to have a great holiday. (I'd go with the last choice- you deserve it).
  9. Celiac.com 11/20/2013 - Every holiday season, I field questions about the best way to map mashed potatoes. Which method is best? Which recipe? This is the simplest, easiest recipe for excellent mashed potatoes, for the holidays or any time. Ingredients: 3 pounds Yukon gold potatoes 2 teaspoons salt, divided ⅓ cup butter ⅓ cup cream 2-3 ounces Greek-style yogurt ½ teaspoon coarsely ground pepper Directions: Peel potatoes, and cut into 1-inch pieces. Bring potatoes, 1 tsp. salt, and cold water to cover to a boil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low, and cook 15 to 20 minutes until fork-tender; drain. Return potatoes to pot. Cook on medium until water evaporates. Add butter, next 3 ingredients, and remaining 1 tsp. salt. Cook 1 to 2 minutes until butter melts and the liquid boils. Mix and mash until smooth. Remove from heat. Mix as needed to achieve desired smoothness. Serve immediately.
  10. Stuffing is standard fare at just about every Thanksgiving or holiday meal that involves a bird. This recipe will help those with gluten-sensitivities to keep the stuffing right there on the plate next to the turkey. Served with mashed potatoes, gluten-free gravy, and maybe a little cranberry sauce, and you've got the makings of a great gluten-free holiday! Ingredients: 5-6 cups white, gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups celery, chopped 2 shallots, minced 1 large or 2 medium yellow onions, chopped 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, minced 1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced 1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced 1-1½ cups gluten-free chicken broth ½ cup white wine 1 egg yolk 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper Bits of cooked sausage or bacon, diced chestnut, pecan, apple, cranberry, currant, or raisin (optional) *Make sure any sausage is gluten-free! Preparation: Sauté shallots, onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until translucent. Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook another one or two minutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Add wine and continue cooking over medium heat until liquid is reduced by half. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Note: If cooking stuffing inside turkey, add just 1 cup of chicken broth. Place the egg yolk in a large bowl and carefully spoon two or three ounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whisking the mixture. Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. Make sure to blend a small amount of stock into the egg first to prevent scrambled eggs. Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and egg mixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly. Add the salt and pepper and mix. Place the stuffing mixture into a greased casserole dish and cook in 400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, until done. Note: The stuffing is done when you can insert a toothpick into the stuffing and it comes out clean. Make sure you bake stuffing until the toothpick comes out clean. Serves about six to eight people. Scale recipe according to amount of stuffing required. Suggestion: Add finely diced cooked sausage or bacon bits to the sautéed vegetables, or toss in bits of diced chestnut, pecan, apple, cranberry, currant, or raisins.
  11. During the holidays I find myself missing certain holiday foods terribly. The one that really gets me is pumpkin pie. No matter what anyone says, it’s just not possible to make a gluten-dairy-sugar-free pumpkin pie and call it a pie... So, this holiday, in the quest for something pumpkin-y I came up with a simple recipe for pumpkin bread that I can eat with abandon, that tastes great, and that doesn’t contain any gluten, dairy, or table sugar (sucrose). Ingredients 1 package (8 oz.) Fearn Brown Rice Baking Mix. The box contains 2 packages of mix – 8oz each. 1 - 15 oz. can pumpkin ½ to 1 tsp. cinnamon ½ to 1 tsp. pumpkin pie spice 2 eggs ½ cup olive oil ½ cup unsweetened applesauce Directions Preheat oven to 350F. Place a small amount of olive oil in the bottoms of 4 mini-loaf pans. (I use ceramic pans purchased from Michaels for a whopping 99c each). In a large mixing bowl, mix eggs and pumpkin until well blended. Add oil and applesauce and mix well. In a separate bowl, combine one package of Fearn Brown Rice Baking Mix with the cinnamon and pumpkin pie spice. (I vary my amounts of spice depending on the mood of the day but usually use between ½ - 1 tsp of each.) Mix the dry ingredients into the pumpkin mixture until all ingredients are well blended. The mixture will be quite thick. Spoon into 4 prepared mini-loaf pans. Bake at 350F for 35-45 minutes or until the tops are brown. Test for "doneness" with a toothpick. I enjoy my pumpkin bread served warm with Organic Smart Balance butter spread. My children (who can thankfully eat mostly anything) eat it with a dollop of Redi Whip. If I eat it for dessert, I heat up a slice and then add Silk Soy Vanilla Yogurt on the side. This quite satisfies my dessert-with-cream longing. Happy gluten-free eating!
  12. Celiac.com 11/16/2012 - Many of the increasing number of folks who suffer from celiac disease and/or gluten-intolerance also happen to love beer. So, what to do? For those who are loathe to give up on one of their favorite beverages, there are a number of delicious, gluten-free alternatives that will help to keep the smiles coming. For those who prefer cider over beer, we've also included a list of some mighty tasty, gluten-free ciders to warm you on the dark nights ahead. Here is a partial list of gluten-free beers and ciders that will take even the most discerning gluten-free beer drinker through the holiday season and beyond: Gluten-free Beers Harvester Brewing Dark Ale Harvester Brewing is a dedicated gluten-free brewery founded by James Neumeister in 2011, after his wife was diagnosed with celiac disease. Harvester's website says that every beer that they make is gluten-free, and "made in our brewery where no gluten containing items are allowed through the door." In place of wheat and/or barley, Neumeister uses chestnuts, which he roasts and brews specifically for each product Harvester makes. Harvester's Dark Ale uses a very dark, near espresso-like, roasted chestnuts, which yields a brew that has hints of chocolate, coffee, dark fruits, and a rich chestnut finish. Brunehaut Bio Amber Brunehaut's hefty, certified-organic amber ale uses de-glutenized barley to produce a rich, copper colored brew with a beige head, and notes of caramel and fresh bread with hoppy accents of pine and citrus, along with hints of vanilla, toffee, butterscotch and ripe fruit. Alcohol is 6.5% by volume. Estrella Damm Daura In 2011, Estrella Damm's gluten-free Daura fended off entries from all over the globe to win Gold Medals at the World Beer Championships and the International Beer Challenge, and won the World’s Best Gluten-free Lager Award at the World Beer Awards. Gluten-free beer drinkers consistently report that Daura is one of the best beers they have tasted. The beer has limited distribution in the US, and, for many gluten-free beer drinkers, finding it can be like finding the Holy Chalice. Here's a handy link to help you find Estrella Damm Daura in your area. Green’s Quest Gluten Free Tripel Blonde Ale For those who prefer Trappist style ales, but can't have the traditional malted barley, the folks at Green's use millet, sorghum, buckwheat, and rice, to brew a refermented tripel blonde ale that offers an herby, yeasty aroma, with hints of pear and apple, spice, and flavors of candied fruit. Alcohol is 8.5% by volume. Green's Endeavour Dubbel Ale Green's Endeavour is brewed in the classic dubbel fashion. The result is a brew that offers hints of dark-sugar and toffee flavor with a traditional Belgian yeast bouquet. Alcohol is 7.0% by volume. Green’s Discovery Amber Ale Green’s Discovery is a medium-bodied amber ale with subtle caramel and nut flavors, and a refined, herbal hop bouquet and finish. Alcohol is 6.0% by volume. Since 2004, Green's beers have been brewed in Lochristi, Belgium at the highly-regarded DeProef Brewery. Inspired by tasty, full-bodied European beers and developed to a closely guarded secret recipe, these strong beers offer a crisp taste and a refreshing flavor, while eliminating allergens. Because they are bottle-conditioned with genuine Belgian yeast, all of Green's Beers have a full five-year shelf life. According to Green's website, the characteristic tastes and aromas of their beers result from the specially selected de-glutenised barley malt and hop varieties and are brewed to age old recipes. New Planet Tread Lightly Ale For their gluten-free Tread Lightly Ale, New Planet uses sorghum, corn extract, orange peel, hops, and yeast to brew a refreshing, light bodied beer without the aftertaste of many sorghum-based beers. New Planet Off Grid Pale Ale For their Gluten-free Off Grid Pale Ale, New Planet uses sorghum and brown rice extract, molasses, tapioca maltodextrin, caramel color, hops, and yeast to produce a classically styled pale ale with a distinctly deep amber color and great character and body. Three varieties of hops impart a delightful citrus aroma and a spicy hop flavor. Omission Gluten-Free Lager, Omission uses aromatic hops to brew a refreshing and crisp beer in the traditional lager style. Alcohol is 4.6% by volume. Omission Gluten-Free Pale AleBold and hoppy, Omission Pale Ale is a hop-forward American Pale Ale, brewed to showcase the Cascade hop profile. Amber in color, Omission Pale Ale’s floral aroma is complimented by caramel malt body. Alcohol is 5.8% by volume. Their website states that, before shipping, Omission tests gluten levels in every batch both at the brewery, and at an independent lab, using the R5 Competitive ELISA gluten test, to ensure that the beers measure well below the Codex gluten-free standard of 20 ppm or less. Sprecher Shakparo Ale Sprecher's gluten free Shakparo Ale is a West African Shakparo-style beer brewed from sorghum and millet. An unfiltered, light, crisp ale with a cider or fruit highlights and a dry aftertaste. For the more adventurous, Sprecher also brews Mbege Ale, which is an unfiltered ale brewed with bananas, yes, bananas, in the African style. Light hints of banana remain present in the aroma and flavor of this unique offering. Steadfast Sorghum Pale Ale Steadfast brewery uses Cascade-and Columbus hops and White sorghum syrup and molasses to brew their golden amber, Indian/American-style Steadfast Sorghum Pale Ale. Alcohol is 6.8% by volume. Gluten-free Ciders Crispin Browns Lane Browns Lane by Crispin is a lightly sparking, crisply effervescent cider made with traditional English bittersweet cider apples sourced in the Malvern Hills of Worcestershire. The result is a rich cider with a dark straw color, and an aroma that evokes an almost traditional farmhouse cider bouquet. Soft, subtle natural apple sweetness up front, with a slightly dry, woody, lingering finish. Crispin Original Cider Crispin Super Premium Hard Apple Cider is naturally fermented using fresh pressed apple-juice, not apple-juice concentrate, from a premium blend of US West Coast apples, with no added malt, grape-wine, or spirit alcohol. The crisp flavor of Crispin is polished with pure apple juice, with no added sugar, colorants or sorbate or benzoate preservatives and cold filtered for crisp refreshment. Strongbow Cider Strongbow uses a traditional English recipe to brew a crisp, refreshing premium cider. Magners Cider Magners uses 17 varieties of apples and ferments their cider up to two years to deliver a full-bodied, well-rounded traditional cider.
  13. Celiac.com 11/11/2010 - The holidays are upon us, once again, and that means it's time toremind folks that a little planning and preparation will help anyonewith celiac disease or gluten intolerance to enjoy a safe, deliciousgluten-free Thanksgiving and holiday season without worrying aboutinadvertently eating wheat or gluten. For folks cooking a gluten-free turkey dinner at home, here are some helpful tips to make things easier: First, make sure the turkey you plan to serve for your gluten-freeholiday dinner is, in fact, a gluten-free turkey. This is notautomatically true. Many brands of turkey are processed with addedgluten—so, don't assume, and make sure to check the ingredients list.Celiac.com offers a pretty comprehensive list of safe gluten-free foods and ingredients, along with gluten-free shopping guides to make yourgluten-free shopping easier. Second, make sure that any stuffing you serve is gluten-free! Accept nosubstitute. There's no need to risk putting gluten-based stuffing inyour turkey. You can astound and delight all your guests withceliac.com's delicious Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe (below). Third, prepare a simple, delicious gluten-free gravy using Celiac.com'sThanksgiving Holiday Gluten-Free Turkey Gravy recipe, or your favorite gluten-freegravy mix. Note: Be careful, many bouillon cubes contain wheat or gluten, so make sure to use only gluten-free bouillon cubes. Tip: Thicken homemade gravy with either corn starch or arrowroot flour. Prepare easy, tasty gluten-free side dishes by browsing Celiac.com'sextensive listing of gluten-free recipes, where you will find sidedishes to impress even the snootiest gourmet. Order gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items likeprepared gluten-free pies ahead of time for convenience—this will allowyou to spend more time with friends and family rather than spending allof your time in the kitchen! Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can now be ordered anddelivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall, and your purchases there actually directly support Celiac.com. Here are some helpful holiday tips and information for anyone planning to dine out, or at a friend or relative's house: Ali Demeritte's blog entry: The Dinner Party Drama—Two Guidelines to Assure a Pleasant Gluten-Free Experience. Danna Korn's article: Venturing Out of the House: Restaurant Realities. Aimee Eiguren's blog entry: Eating Out Gluten-Free and Without Fear. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free at Restaurants. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free Meals at Small or Moving Restaurants. Celiac.com's Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe Ingredients: 5-6 cups white, gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups celery, chopped 2 shallots, minced 1 large or 2 medium yellow onions, chopped 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, minced 1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced 1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced 1-1½ cups gluten-free chicken broth ½ cup white wine 1 egg yolk 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper Bits of cooked sausage or bacon, diced chestnut, pecan, apple,cranberry, currant, or raisin (optional) *Make sure any sausage isgluten-free! Preparation: Sauté shallots, onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until translucent. Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook another one or twominutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Add wine andcontinue cooking over medium heat until liquid is reduced by half.Remove from heat and allow to cool. Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Note: If cooking stuffing inside turkey, add just 1 cup of chicken broth. Place the egg yolk in a large bowl and carefully spoon two or threeounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whiskingthe mixture. Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. Make sure toblend a small amount of stock into the egg first to prevent scrambledeggs. Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and eggmixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly.Add the salt and pepper and mix. Place the stuffing mixture into a greased casserole dish and cook in400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, untildone. Note: The stuffing is done when you can insert a toothpick into thestuffing and it comes out clean. Make sure you bake stuffing until thetoothpick comes out clean. Serves about six to eight people. Suggestion: Add finely diced cooked sausage or bacon bits to thesautéed vegetables, or toss in bits of diced chestnut, pecan, apple,cranberry, currant, or raisin. *Make sure any sausage is gluten-free! Gluten-free Classics: Holiday Pumpkin Pie Ingredients: ¾ cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon ground ginger ¼ teaspoon ground clove 2 large eggs (Duck eggs work great!) 1 can (15 oz.) Libby's 100% Pure Pumpkin (Yes, it's gluten-free!) 1 can (12 fl. oz.) Evaporated Milk (Delicious with evaporated goat's milk!) 1 unbaked 9-inch (4-cup volume) gluten-free pie shell Whipped cream (optional) Directions: Mix sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggsin large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stirin evaporated milk. Pour into gluten-free pie shell. Bake in preheated 425° F oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to350° F; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near centercomes out clean. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours. Serve immediately orrefrigerate. Top with whipped cream before serving. *Adapted from Libby's Original Pumpkin Pie Recipe
  14. Celiac.com 08/07/2008 - We'd begun practicing basic Italian⎯buon giorno! We'd practically memorized the Frommer's travel guide. We'd scoured multitudes of online travel sites and finally made all the arrangements for our once-in-a-lifetime romantic getaway to the sun-kissed shores of the Amalfi Coast. As the date of our departure approached, we grew more excited to spend our first major vacation together, tucked away in cliffside hotels, taking in sweeping views of the Mediterranean from our seaside balconies. We had some lingering doubts, though. Jeff follows a gluten-free diet, and I was concerned about how well he'd be able to eat in Italy, the land of pizza, pasta and bread. I know how difficult it can be to dine out, even in our neighborhood in San Francisco. What could he possibly find that would be gluten-free in Italy? And, with the language barrier, how would we be able to easily communicate his needs? Jeff: I know a little Italian, but solo un po’ (only a little), as the Italians say. So I, too, was a bit worried. At home, I keep tight control over what I buy, prepare most of my own meals and eat out only at select places that I know are safe. I was worried that consuming every meal at a hotel or restaurant for two weeks straight would present challenges. Like so many people with celiac disease, I've lost more than a few days to gluten contamination. That's the last thing I wanted to happen on such a special trip. One of the first things we did was to e-mail the hotels several weeks in advance to see what gluten-free options they might offer. We crafted a short inquiry in English, and just in case the staff only spoke Italian, put it through a free online translation service called Babel Fish. We included both versions in our messages. All four hotels responded within a day or two, most in English. Three confirmed gluten-free options in the hotel and/or its restaurant. One pledged a solution upon arrival, suggesting that Jeff could communicate a preference for breakfast, and the hotel would meet his needs. Jill: I was especially impressed with Casa Astarita, a bed and breakfast along the first leg of our trip in Sorrento. The staff at Casa Astarita noted that we could request food without wheat or barley, recommended a restaurant in the square and pledged to help us during our stay in Sorrento. In addition, the Hotel Margherita in Praiano, a charming seaside town off the beaten path, assured us of gluten-free pasta and biscuits (probably what we would call crackers) in the hotel. Another step we took about two weeks before our flight was to contact the airline about gluten-free meal options. We wondered if Jeff would be able to eat gluten-free on both legs of the trip⎯from San Francisco to Chicago, and more importantly, the nine-hour haul from Chicago to Rome. Either way, we planned to pack plenty of gluten-free snacks to have on hand as a precautionary measure. Jill: The American Airlines customer service representative told me the airline did not offer gluten-free meals on the short flight from Chicago to San Francisco, and we'd need to bring our own food. However, on the longer flight from Chicago to Rome, they could accommodate gluten-free needs. The representative confirmed a special meals code for the gluten-free food request (GFML is the code) that was entered into the reservation. American Airlines also pointed us to its Web site, which lists sample menu options that may vary month to month: Brunch/hot breakfast - Mushroom cheddar omelet with sweet potato hash, yogurt, seasonal fruit Cold breakfast - Yogurt, seasonal fruit, breakfast cookie Lunch/dinner - Sweet chili salmon, green beans, white rice, salad, fresh fruit Snack - Penne pasta with artichokes, fresh fruit The quick and positive responses from the hotels and airline immediately put us at ease. A little online research into gluten-free travel in Italy promised a smooth experience.Jeff: It turns out that the Italians are actually at the forefront of celiac disease awareness and treatment. In fact, all Italians are screened for celiac disease before they are six years old. [1,2] Those with celiac disease receive excellent support, including monthly payments from the government for gluten-free food, as well as more vacation to offset extra time used to shop for and prepare gluten-free food. Italians are also on the vanguard of the gluten-free food movement. The country's robust celiac association, called the Associazione Italiana Celiachia (AIC), the Italian government and several large Italian companies that make and distribute gluten-free foods have joined together to promote awareness and understanding of celiac disease. This makes for knowledgeable restaurant owners, managers, chefs and waiters. [3] Italians are among the most expert crafters of gluten-free pastas and baked goods. Italian companies like Beretta and BioLand make delicious gluten-free rice pasta and a variety of other gluten-free food products, while others produce numerous gluten-free specialty items for import, such as chestnut flour. AIC has a helpful Web site and convenient 24/7 telephone hotline. Both offer celiac information and support in English and Italian, along with tips on gluten-free food and dining in every region of Italy. [4] So, all of the useful information we turned up in our search made us hopeful that our first vacation together just might be a gluten-free gastronomic delight. Tune in next month to find out how things turned out on the ground. Until then, happy gluten-free travels and, as the Italians say, Mangia bene! Eat well! http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1009402816.html http://celiac-disease.emedtv.com/celiac-disease/ celiac-disease-screening.html http://www.prlog.org/10063446-at-last-the-gluten-free-guide-to-italy-guide-to-the-gluten-free-land-of-pasta.html http://www.celiachia.it/default.asp Co-written by Jefferson Adams
  15. Cooking with booze is one of the great culinary rites of the holiday season. Apples sauteed with butter, sugar, and cinnamon and polished off with a splash of bourbon, rum, or liqueur are one of the easiest, tastiest gluten-free holidays deserts to make. Start by finding yourself some good, crisp, tart apples. I prefer Granny Smiths, Braeburns, Galas, or Pippins, as their tartness combines well with the sweetness of the sauce. But, I've had success with Golden Delicious and Jonathans, as well. Remember, the alcohol boils off during cooking, so this desert treat is safe for kids. I recommend serving these delicious treats with a big helping of vanilla ice cream. This particular recipe makes enough apples to serve about a dozen people. Ingredients: 1/2 stick of salted butter 12 granny smith apples, peeled, cored, and cut into wedges 1 1/2 cups white sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg (optional) 1 tablespoon vanilla 1/2 cup bourbon, dark rum, or liqueur such as Amaretto, Frangelico, or Grand Marnier Preparation: Wash, core and peel apples. Slice apples into 1/2 to 1/4-inch wedges Soak apples in booze for 30 minutes. Pour off booze, reserving 1/2 cup. In a medium bowl, mix sugar, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg, if desired. Melt butter in a frying pan over medium heat. Add apples and cook slowly, allowing them to brown slightly. When apples have softened and browned, add sugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg and mix well. Pour in vanilla and just enough booze to coat the apples, up to 1/2 cup. Stir well and heat until apple mixture is juicy and the juice boils. Reduce heat to low and simmer about 10-20 minutes until apples are tender, and most of the liquid evaporates. Stir as needed to avoid sticking and burning. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream.
  16. Celiac.com 11/17/2008 - One of the great pleasures of the holidays is having a wide assortment of goodies around to enjoy with family and friends. Don’t get left out of the fun just because you’re gluten-intolerant. Organize an old-fashioned cookie exchange with a gluten-free twist. Here’s how to do it... Pick a date and invite people to participate: The easy route: just get your family and friends together for the event at your house. Whether or not they are gluten-intolerant, these recipes will make everyone happy. They really won’t miss the gluten. Or, if you belong to a celiac support group, this is a natural activity to suggest. Alternatively, you can do a more public event. There are probably more gluten-free people in your local area than you think there are. Put a notice in your local paper offering to organize and host a gluten-free cookie exchange and see how many responses you get. Your biggest problem may be limiting the numbers. Fifteen people is probably the upper limit for a civilized cookie exchange…unless you have some ambitious organizers to help you. If you do decide to take all comers, try dividing the participants into smaller subgroups to exchange cookies among themselves. That could also allow people with other common sensitivities (e.g., dairy or nuts) to exchange recipes among themselves, with the appropriate common denominators. Arrange a venue – a local college culinary arts program kitchen, a community hall, the hall of a place of worship, or the home-base of a civic organization. It is often possible to find a space with a large kitchen at little or no expense for such purposes and it will give you a chance to demonstrate gluten-free cooking techniques and increase community awareness of gluten-intolerance. If there is a cost, you can ask participants to contribute (or look for community sponsorship). Set and distribute the ground rules: Use gluten-free ingredients only. Follow recipes carefully. Prevent cross-contamination with gluten during preparation, baking and handling. Scrupulously clean all utensils and surfaces before you begin. Unless baking pans/cookie sheets have ONLY been used for gluten-free baking, line them with parchment paper or aluminum foil (some recipes call for this step anyway, to prevent sticking). Tip: use some gluten-free baking spray on the pan before you line it with parchment paper. The spray will keep the paper from curling up and slipping around while you work. Participants should make copies of the recipe/s they bake and bring them to the exchange. This allows others to check ingredients as well as to expand their cookie repertories. Distribute recipes: If each participant makes one or two recipes, with no duplication, everyone will get a maximum variety of sweets to take home. You could manage this by just assigning each person a recipe or two, or you can ask participants to call or e-mail you with their preferences, so that you can prevent duplication. You’ll also need to decide how many cookies each person should make (do the math: how much variety do you want? how many of each type of cookie will people want to bring home?). Most of these recipes make 2-3 dozen. Recipes can be doubled, if you wish to end up with more of each type. Extras are also fair game for tasting at the exchange….I have included a number of recipes here (followed by a listing of sources), but you may want to add your favorite gluten-free cookie recipes. Be sure to give recipes for flour mixes to participants, as needed. Surf the web for gluten free cookie recipes (Celiac.com is a good source, but there are others, as well) of use your favorite cookbooks. If you can’t find a gluten-free version of your favorite holiday cookie recipe, try substituting the same amount of basic gluten-free flour mix for the all-purpose wheat flour in your original recipe. It usually works. Have a party: The exchange itself is a good excuse for a party. Serve tea, coffee, hot spiced cider or eggnog and enjoy sampling the extra cookies while you all count out your “shares.” Some of these cookies can be decorated. You may wish to do that as a group. If so, have confectioners icing, colored sugar crystals, cinnamon, food colorings, etc. available. Have paper platters on hand or ask people to bring their own platters or tins to pack their shares home. You might want to pretty them up with ribbons or other decorations. Flours and flour mixes: It is not difficult to mix your own gluten-free flours and they will be superior to pre-made mixes in flavor and quality of results. They will also cost you less over time. If you really get into making your own flour mixes, you may use different blends for different types of baked goods. I grind my own brown rice, which really makes for a superior flavor and complete control over texture. But following are fine multi-purpose blends that you can mix up from store bought ingredients. Gluten-free Flour Mixes called for in the following recipes: Multi-Blend Gluten-Free Flour (source: Celiac.com) 2 ¼ cups finely ground brown rice flour (or mix white and brown rice flours, if preferred) ¼ cup potato starch flour (potato starch or potato starch flour is not to be confused with potato flour) 2/3 cup tapioca starch (also called tapioca flour) ¾ cup sweet rice flour (Mochiko brand can typically be found in Asian section of stores) 1/3 cup cornstarch 2 teaspoons xanthan gum (or guar gum) Featherlight Mix (source: Betty Hagman) 1 cup each of rice flour, tapioca flour and cornstarch 1 tablespoon of potato flour (NOT potato starch) Simple Gluten-Free Flour Mix (aka Food Philosopher Brown Rice Flour Mix from Annalise Roberts; Basic Gluten-free Mix from Rebecca Reilly) 2 cups finely ground brown rice flour 2/3 cup potato starch 1/3 cup tapioca starch COOKIE RECIPES Hazelnut Cookies (16-18 cookies) 1 ¾ cups hazelnut flour ¼ cup tapioca starch ¼ teaspoon xanthan gum ¼ teaspoon gluten-free baking powder 1 stick unsalted butter 1 cup sugar ¾ teaspoon gluten-free vanilla 1 egg yolk Mix together the hazelnut flour, tapioca starch, xanthan gum, baking powder, and salt. Cream the butter until white. Add the sugar and beat until fluffy, abt. 5 min. Add the vanilla and egg yolk. Blend. Stir in the dry ingredients. Refrigerate at least 1 hour. Preheat oven to 350. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Lightly spray the paper with cooking spray. Make 1 ½ inch balls and place them on the cookie sheet, leaving 2 inches between. Bake 15-20 min. The bottoms will have a slight golden brown color. Cool slightly before transferring to a cooling rack VARIATIONS: Use pecan or almond flour in place of hazelnut. Walnut Orange Biscotti (makes abt 3 doz) 1 ½ cups Basic Gluten-Free Mix ¼ cup sweet rice flour 1 teaspoon xanthan gum ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon gluten-free baking powder 1/8 teaspoon salt 1 stick unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 cup sugar 2 eggs 2 teaspoons grated orange zest 1 teaspoon gluten-free vanilla 1 ½ cups chopped, lightly toasted walnuts Mix together gluten-free flour mix, sweet rice flour, xanthan gum, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. Cream butter until white. Add sugar and beat until fluffy, abt 5 min. Blend in the eggs, one at a time. Add orange zest and vanilla, then stir in the nuts. Slowly incorporate the dry ingredients to form a soft dough. Refrigerate the dough for at least 1 hour. The dough bakes better if refrigerated overnight. Preheat the oven to 375. Lightly grease 2 cookie sheets and line with parchment paper. Divide the dough into 3 equal pieces. Roll each piece into a log 1 ½ -2 inches thick. Place 2 logs on one cookie sheet, leaving enough space betweent hem for the dough to spread while baking. Place the third log on the other cookie sheet. Bake the logs for 20 mins. Remove the cookie sheet from the oven and let sit for 5-10 min. Slice the logs on a slight diagonal about ¾ inch thick. Place the slices, cut side down, on the cookie sheets. Lower the oven temperature to 350 and bake the slices for 10-12 min. Cool on a cooling rack. Store in an airtight container. Old-Fashioned Molasses Cookies (2 dozen) 2 ½ cups Basic gluten-free Mix 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon ginger ½ teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon xanthan gum ¼ teaspoon cloves 1/8 teaspoon salt 1 stick unsalted butter ½ cup packed brown sugar ½ cup molasses 1 egg ½ cup buttermilk Mix together gluten-free mix, baking soda, ginger, cinnamon, xanthan gum, cloves, and salt. Cream the butter until white. Add sugar and beat until fluffy, abt. 5 min. Slowly pour in the molasses. Beat until creamy. Add the egg. Alternately add the buttermilk and dry ingredients in 3 additions. Refrigerate the dough for at least 1 hour. Preheat the oven to 350. Lightly grease a cookie sheet and line it with parchment paper. Using a medium or small ice cream scoop, place mounds of dough on the cookie sheet, leaving 2 inches between the mounds. Or roll the dough into 1 ½ in balls, place on the cookie sheet, and flatten slightly. Bake for 8-12 min, depending on the size. Let the cookies sit for 5 min on the coolie sheet before transferring to a cooling rack. Scottish Shortbread Cookies (2 dozen) 2 cups brown rice flour ½ cup almond flour ¼ cup sweet rice flour ½ teaspoon xanthan gum 1/8 teaspoon salt 2 sticks unsalted butter, at room temperature ½ cup packed brown sugar 1 teaspoon. gluten-free vanilla 2 tablespoon heavy cream mixed with an egg yolk, for glazing cookies (optional) Preheat oven to 350. Lightly grease a cookie sheet and line it with parchment paper. Mix together the brown rice flour, almond flour, sweet rice flour, xanthan gum and salt. Cream the butter until white. Add sugar and beat until fluffy, about 5 min. Add the vanilla. Stir in the dry ingredients. Keep mixing until you have a soft cookie dough. For traditional shortbread cookies, divide the dough into 3 pieces. Lightly flour the counter with white rice flour. Roll out the dough into a round 1/3 -1/2 in thick. Thicker cookies will be somewhat softer; thinner ones, crisper. For a golden finish, brush the dough with the egg glaze. Using a fork, prick the surface gently. Cut into wedges. Place pieces on the cookie sheet 1 in apart and bake for 12-20 min, depending upon the thickness. Transfer to a cooling rack. Chocolate-Chip Coconut Macaroons (3 dozen) ½ cup sugar 2 extra large eggs 1 ½ cup coconut flour (coconut powder) 1 tablespoon melted butter or margarine 1 teaspoon gluten-free vanilla 3 oz. bittersweet chocolate, chopped Preheat oven to 325. Line a large cookie sheet with aluminum foil. In a medium bowl, beat the sugar and the eggs until pale and thick, at least 5 min. Fold in the coconut powder, melted butter, vanilla, and chocolate. Drop the dough by teaspoonfuls about 1 in apart onto the lined cookie sheet. Bake in the upper part of the preheated oven for 18 min. Transfer to a platter with a metal spatula. Nut-filled Dates (makes 25) 2/3 cup ground, blanched almonds 2 ½ teaspoon sugar Grated zest of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon rum 25 pitted dates 5 oz. melted chocolate In a medium bowl, combine the almonds, sugar, lemon zest, and rum. Using a small spoon, fill each date with the nut mixture. Dip the end of each filled date in the melted chocolate and allow it to harden. Melting Moments ½ cup cornstarch ½ cup confectioners sugar ¾ cup softened unsalted butter Pinch of salt 1 cup gluten-free flour mix Mix dry ingredients together into the softened butter to form a dough. Chill at least one hour. Preheat oven to 375. Roll into ropes. Cut into small, uniform pieces (a bit smaller than a quarter). Roll in sugar that has been placed on wax paper. Dip cookie press in sugar and before pressing each cookie (Tip: if cookie press sticks to the dough, oil it lightly with cooking spray). Bake on greased cookie sheets for 25 min. Gingerbread Cookies (makes a lot…) In a large bowl, beat together: ¾ cup butter ¾ cup sugar ¾ cup molasses 1 teaspoon baking soda 1-2 tablespoons fresh, finely grated ginger (or 1 teaspoon ground ginger) ½ teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon nutmeg Dissolve 2 teaspoons instant coffee in 2 tablespoons hot water (OR use 2 tablespoons very strong brewed coffee) and stir into sugar mixture. Gradually stir in 3 ¼ cups Multi-blend gluten-free flour mix. Cover and chill until firm, at least 3 hours and up to 3 days. Use gluten-free flour mix or sweet rice flour to dust rolling surface. Roll to ¼ in thickness. Cut with cookie cutters, as desired. Use all your dough – just gather scraps together and roll them out again. Bake at 325 for 10-15 minutes. Cool briefly on pan, then transfer to wire racks. When completely cool, decorate as desired with confectioner’s icing and other gluten-free decorations, such as colored sugar crystals, candied fruit, etc. Pecan Butter Cookies (Mexican Wedding Cakes) – makes about 50 1 cup unsalted butter 6 tablespoons confectioners sugar 2 teaspoons gluten-free vanilla 2 cups Brown Rice Flour Mix 1 teaspoon xanthan gum 1 cup pecans, toasted (bake about 5 min in preheated 350F oven) and chopped Confectioners sugar Preheat oven to 350F. Position rack in center of oven. Lightly grease cookie sheet with baking spray. Beat butter and sugar in large bowl of electric mixer until light and creamy. Add vanilla and mix until smooth. Add flour mix and xanthan gum; beat until a smooth dough is formed. Mix in pecans. Use your hands to shape dough into 1 inch balls. Roll balls in confectioners sugar and place on cookie sheets. Bake in center of oven for 12-15 min or until a very light golden color. Test for doneness. Bottom should be light golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack and cool. Store in an airtight container. Dutch Sugar Cookies (makes 3 doz, 2 ½ in cookies) 2 ½ cups Featherlight Mix 1 teaspoon baking powder 2 ½ teaspoons xanthan gum 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup sugar 1 cup butter flavor Crisco 1 egg 2 teaspoons vanilla ¼ cup (or more) potato starch for kneading Preheat oven to 350F. Have on hand 2 un-greased cookie sheets. In a small bowl, whisk together the flour mix, baking powder, xanthan gum, and salt. Set aside. In the bowl of your mixer, cream the sugar and Crisco. Beat in the egg and vanilla. Add the dry ingredients, mixing enough to combine. The dough will be a soft ball. With your hands, knead in enough of the potato starch to make the dough easy to handle and roll out. Using about half at a time, place a piece of plastic wrap over the ball and roll out to about 1/8 in thickness. Cut into desired shapes and place on pan. Decorate with colored sugars before baking or use frosting to decorate after baking. (With this dough, you can use all the scraps. Just scrape them together and roll out again. They will not get tough) Bake for about 13 min. Cool very slightly before removing from pan. Almond-Pignoli Cookies 12 ounces (Solo canned) almond paste ½ cup white sugar 1 cup confectioners' sugar 4 egg whites 1 ½ cups pine nuts Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Line 2 cookie sheets with foil; lightly grease foil. Mix almond paste and granulated sugar in food processor until smooth. Add confectioners' sugar and 2 egg whites; process until smooth. The dough will be easier to handle if you chill it before proceeding to the next step Whisk remaining 2 egg whites in small bowl. Place pine nuts on shallow plate. With lightly floured hands roll dough into 1 inch balls. Coat balls in egg whites, shaking off excess, then roll in pine nuts, pressing lightly to stick. Arrange balls on cookie sheets, and flatten slightly to form a 1 1/2 inch round. Bake 15 to 18 minutes in the preheated oven, or until lightly browned. Let stand on cookie sheet 1 minute. Transfer to wire rack to cool. Gluten-Free Recipe Sources: allrecipes.com (Pignoli Cookies I, reproduced above as Almond-Pignoli Cookies) Hagman, Bette The Gluten-free Gourmet Makes Dessert (Henry Holt, 2002) Dutch Sugar Cookies, p. 175 Reilly, Rebecca, Gluten-Free Baking (Simon & Schuster, 2002) Walnut-Orange Biscotti, p. 83; Hazelnut Cookies, p. 78; Old-Fashioned Molasses Cookies, p. 70; Scottish Shortbread Cookies, p. 75 Roberts, Annalise G., Gluten-Free Baking Classics (Surrey Books, 2006) Pecan Butter Cookies (aka Mexican Wedding Cakes), p.101 Mauksch, Mary Wachtel Fabulous and Flourless: 150 Wheatless and Dairy-free Desserts (MacMillan, 1997) Chocolate Chip Macaroons, p. 139; Nut-filled Dates, p.159 Morrow, Phyllis (old favorites made gluten-free): Gingerbread Men (or Women, or Children, or Bears….) Melting Moments (adapted from the recipe of a dear Danish friend, Clara Foged, who called them “melting moomins”)
  17. Holidays and pumpkin pie go together like Santa and reindeer. This recipe is easily adaptable to various dietary demands. It's easy to prepare, and makes a rich, creamy, delicious pumpkin pie. Find yourself a gluten-free pie shell or five and go to town on the pumpkin pie! Ingredients: ¾ cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon ground ginger ¼ teaspoon ground clove 2 large eggs (Duck eggs work great!) 1 can (15 oz.) Libby's 100% Pure Pumpkin (Yes, it's gluten-free!) 1 can (12 fl. oz.) Evaporated Milk (Delicious with evaporated goat's milk!) 1 unbaked 9-inch (4-cup volume) gluten-free pie shell Whipped cream (optional) Directions: Mix sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggs in large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. Pour into gluten-free pie shell. Bake in preheated 425° F oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to 350° F; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours. Serve immediately or refrigerate. Top with whipped cream before serving. *Adapted from Libby's Original Pumpkin Pie Recipe
  18. Make the best holiday turkey ever with this turkey brine recipe. Any knowledgeable chef will tell you that brining is the key to roasting a moist, flavorful bird. Brining a turkey is easy. With a big clean bucket, a big stock pot, some broth, some herbs and some salt, and you've got the basics for a good brine. Some recipes add fruit juices or other exotic components, but this brine is simple, easy, and guaranteed to produce a tasty, juicy turkey that yields pan drippings that will make a delicious gravy. This brine will work for any type of poultry. This recipe makes two gallons, enough brine for a 12 to 20 pound turkey. Ingredients: 1 gallon vegetable broth 1 cup sea salt 6-7 fresh Juniper berries 1 small bunch fresh rosemary, or 1 tablespoon crushed dried rosemary 1 small bunch of fresh sage or 1 tablespoon dried sage 1 small bunch of fresh thyme or 1 tablespoon dried thyme 1 small bunch fresh savory or 1 tablespoon dried savory 1 gallon ice water Preparation: In a large stock pot, combine the vegetable broth, sea salt, juniper berries, rosemary, sage, thyme, and savory. Bring to a boil, and stir well to dissolve salt. Remove from heat, and let cool to room temperature. When the broth mixture is cool, pour it into a clean 5 gallon bucket. Stir in the ice water. Wash and dry the turkey, and remove the innards. Place the turkey, breast down, into the brine. Make sure to fill the bird's cavity. Place the bucket in the refrigerator overnight. Remove the turkey carefully draining off the excess brine and pat dry. Discard excess brine. Cook the turkey as desired reserving the drippings for gravy. Keep in mind that brined turkeys cook 20 to 30 minutes faster so watch the temperature gauge. The Huffington Post offers an excellent Turkey Preparation Guide with handy turkey Dos and Dont's to help you roast the best possible turkey.
  19. It's just not a holiday meal without gravy. Gravy is the thing that unites the holiday meal. Gravy pulls the meat and the stuffing and the potatoes together. Gravy makes it all good. This recipe makes a rich, savory gravy that will have all your holiday guests smiling! Makes enough gravy to serve about eight to ten people. Ingredients: 1 pound turkey giblets and neck 1½ quarts gluten-free chicken stock (low sodium is fine) 2 carrots, chopped 1 stalk celery, chopped 2 cups water 1½ cups pan drippings from roasted turkey 4 tablespoons of corn starch (approximate) Note: One tablespoon corn starch (1/4 ounce) thickens one cup of liquid 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons cranberry sauce Salt and ground black pepper to taste Preparation: While the turkey is roasting, place the turkey giblets and neck into a large saucepan with the carrots, celery, water, and chicken stock. Bring to a boil over medium heat, skim off any foam that rises to the top, reduce heat to low, and simmer the stock for 3 hours. Skim off the fat, strain the stock, and set aside. There should be about 4 cups of stock. Take carrots and celery and press through a strainer. Spoon strained carrots and celery into the stock and stir. Skim off and discard all but ¼ cup of the fat from the drippings in the roasting pan, and place the roasting pan over medium heat. Whisk in the corn starch, then heat and stir the corn starch mixture until it becomes pale golden brown, about 5 minutes. To avoid lumps, mix the starch with an equal amount of cold liquid until it forms a paste, then whisk it into the liquid you're trying to thicken. Once the thickener is added, cook it briefly to remove any starchy flavor. Don't overcook. Whisk in the stock and tomato paste; bring to a boil, simmer for 5 minutes, then whisk in the cranberry sauce. Simmer for 10 more minutes. Season to taste with salt and black pepper.
  20. I just received a copy of Living Without’s Gluten-Free Holiday Guide and am very impressed with both the quality and the content of the magazine. This special holiday issue contains cooking tips as well as gluten and casein-free recipes that cover Thanksgiving, Christmas dinner, and New Year’s. It also has a nice section on how to successfully entertain guests over the holidays who might have food allergies or celiac disease, and another that covers allergy-friendly gift ideas. This magazine was a first for those with food allergies or gluten sensitivity, and I am very impressed with how it has evolved over the years into such a comprehensive publication. For more info visit: www.LivingWithout.com. Note: Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.
  21. Celiac.com 12/11/2009 - Happy Holidays, gluten-free food lovers! Our readers enjoyed the Thanksgiving edition of Celiac.com's Gluten-free Holiday Guide so much that we've decided to provide even more gluten-free food for thought as the holidays kick into high gear!Once again, the basic message is the same: With a little of planning and a few tips, anyone with celiac disease or gluten intolerance can enjoy safe,delicious gluten-free foods, treats, and baked goods this holiday season without worrying about accidental gluten consumption. Alongwith some of our favorite tips and links for preparing delicious gluten-free meals and treats, we've included a list of great gluten-free gift selections to help you get the most out of your gluten-free holiday season. Once again, for those planning to prepare a gluten-free turkey dinner, here are some helpful tips to help it go smoothly: Start your gluten-free holiday dinner with a gluten-freeturkey. Not all brands of turkey are gluten-free. Some contain glutenin their additives—so, as with everything else, check the ingredientsand use our Gluten-Free Ingredient Lists or our Gluten-Free Shopping Guides to help you shop. Demand gluten-free stuffing! Accept no substitute. Don’t risk putting non-gluten-free stuffing in your turkey. Instead, try Celiac.com's favorite gluten-free stuffing recipe. Top that stuffing with simple, delicious gluten-free gravy from either a gluten-free gravy mix, or a gluten-free gravy recipe. Remember, some bouillon cubes contain gluten, so be sure to use gluten-free bouillon cubes. Tip: Thicken your homemade gravy with either corn starch or arrowroot flour. Prepare easy, tasty gluten-free side dishes by browsing Celiac.com's extensive listing of gluten-free recipes, where you will find side dishes to impress even the snootiest gourmet. Nothing says holidays like the smell of baking. Load up on your gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items like prepared gluten-free pies gluten-free cakes, brownies and baking mixes ahead of time. Keep your loved ones happy and spend more timewith friends and family and less time in thekitchen! Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can now beordered and delivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall.Don't forget those gluten-free cookies and crackers. Nothing anchors out the holiday snack selection like a good cracker. Choosefrom a wide selection of gluten-free crackers for your family andguests. Pair them with your favorite wines, cheeses, and hors d'oeuvresfor a smashing holiday spread. And who can get through the holidays without nibbling on a cookie.Not Santa, that's for sure! Keep plenty of gluten-free cookies andcrackers on hand this holiday season, and remember to leave a gluten-free cookie for Santa! Gluten-free Gift IdeasUpdated Gluten-free Food and Drug Lists are a great way to makesure your gluten-free loved ones are current with the latestgluten-free ingredients and products. For those who like to stay abreast of the latest research on celiac disease and gluten intolerance, may we suggest the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. Books on gluten-free living, diet, recipes and other issues make great holiday gifts. This season, celiac.com suggests Elisabeth Hasselbeck's gluten-free DietRemember, gluten-free personal body care products and gluten-free gift vouchers make great for your gluten-free loved ones. Meantime, for those looking for more great gluten-free holiday food and meal suggestions, including celiac.com's Best Ever Gluten-free Stuffing, and Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie, click on the links. Celiac.com wishes you and your loved ones a safe, healthy, and happy gluten-free holiday season!
  22. Celiac.com 09/11/2008 - After a two-leg flight and multiple trains, Jeff and I finally stepped off the local Circumvesuviana train in sunny Sorrento, our first destination on the fabled Amalfi Coast. It was hot, or as the Italians say, molto caldo. We’d been traveling for nearly 24 hours straight, and as we lugged our bags along the final stretch of cobbled sidewalks toward Casa Astarita, we both felt exhausted, ravenous and more than a bit disoriented. Jill: Any nourishment from our 10-hour flight from Chicago to Rome had long since faded. However, American Airlines had made good on its promise to provide Jeff with decent gluten-free meals. The attendant had confirmed his special meal selection at the beginning of the flight, and at both dinner and breakfast he was among the first to be served (much to the envy of the other hungry passengers!). Jeff: For dinner American served me a gluten-free meal of blackened chicken on a bed of quinoa, with green beans, melon and a gluten-free German chocolate cookie. Now, airline food is never going to win any Michelin stars, but I was grateful that my meal was gluten-free, hot and reasonably palatable. As we checked into Casa Astarita, the helpful receptionist Marella suggested that we try Bar Syrenuse, a nearby ristorante with gluten-free menu options. Marella even gave us a referral card good for a 10 percent discount. After freshening up, we sauntered a couple blocks to the Piazza Tasso, the main square, where we easily found the cheerful and airy establishment. Jill: Bar Syrenuse offered a separate gluten-free menu selection. Many of the items, such as the meats and salads, were regular staples on the menu. Jeff had many options to choose from – including gluten-free pasta. I opted for a club sandwich, stuffed with local ham and cheese, and a caffe alla nocciola (hazelnut coffee). Jeff: The intense heat of the day was just beginning to break, and I wasn’t in a pasta mood at that moment, so I ordered pollo al forno (grilled chicken with balsamic vinegar, parsley and chili flakes) and an insalata verde (green salad). The food was delicious, and sitting on the terrace made for a lovely introduction to Italy. All this for two for under 25 euros. Perfecto! Day Two: Our stay at Casa Astarita included breakfast, and we’d been assured via email of gluten-free options. The staff did not disappoint and even offered to prepare an omelet if Jeff wished. He ultimately chose from the standard offerings of orange/pineapple yogurt, fresh juices, individually brewed coffee, cheese and corn flakes (which for some might best be avoided) before we began our morning walk. Jill: During our meanderings through the town and along the cliffs overlooking the spectacular Bay of Naples, we checked out a few potential lunch spots and perused their menus. We decided on a simple outdoor restaurant, Angelina Lauro, near that train station that offered shaded tables and faced a grassy piazza bearing the same name. Jeff had a vegetable and cheese omelet along with fries, which would frequently become his reliable substitute for bread. I had a scrumptious margherita pizza. It was so big that I was able to save half for lunch the next day. Jeff: After a short nap followed by another evening walk along the Marina Grande, we again headed for Bar Syrenuse – this time, with gluten-free pasta in mind! We decided to share a few dishes and ordered gluten-free penne pasta with tiny tomatoes, grilled seasonal vegetables and an insalata caprese. The pasta was nicely cooked, with a flavorful sauce. Jill commented it tasted so good she’d have never known it was gluten-free. It was then I realized just how good it felt to be in Italy, sitting outside and eating pasta, an almost forgotten favorite, as the sun went down. The manager of Bar Syrenuse is a personable gentleman named Toni. We were able to pull him aside during a pause in his busy dinner rush and ask a few questions about how the restaurant came to offer gluten-free options. Toni explained that there are so many special diets that it is important to offer many choices to attract the fullest clientele, and noted that a wide range of food options is a reflection of good service, which is good for business. Consequently, Bar Syrenuse offers numerous items that cater to a number of specialty diets. Day Three: After a torrid afternoon spent traipsing through the ruins at Pompeii, where we’d consumed just a few snacks – gelato, granita and coconut snack bars – we were ready for a proper meal. The day before, we’d spotted several quaint restaurants tucked away in the alleys near our hotel, and so we headed in that direction. We nestled in at Ristorante Sorrento, a charming establishment with a large awning and phalanx of outdoor tables adorned in crisp white tablecloths. Jeff started with minestrone soup, followed by a main course of fresh local white fish with tomatoes in a white wine sauce and a green salad. I choose lemon risotto with shrimp and an order of pane (bread). Jeff got a little extra protein that night as I quickly passed over the jumbo shrimp to his plate. Their heads, with those little black eyes staring back at me, were more than I could take! During our stroll back to the hotel, we stopped to purchase a few postcards and sip some cappuccino before settling in for a good night’s rest, before moving on to what would be the absolute gem of our trip, picture-perfect Positano. Check back for our next article featuring our gluten-free gastronomical adventures in this serene oasis by the sea!
  23. Celiac.com 10/25/2008 - With a bit of planning and knowledge anyone with celiac disease can enjoy a safe, gluten-free Thanksgiving and holiday season without the concern of accidental gluten ingestion. If you plan to prepare your own gluten-free turkey dinner, here are some ideas that may be helpful: A gluten-free holiday dinner starts with a gluten-free turkey. Believe it or not some brands of turkey do contain additives that are not gluten-free—so, like everything else, read the ingredients and use our Gluten-Free Ingredient Lists or our Gluten-Free Shopping Guides to help you shop. Don’t risk gluten-based stuffing in your turkey. Instead, try my favorite gluten-free stuffing recipe. Gravy is easy: Use a gluten-free gravy mix, or a gluten-free gravy recipe. Remember, bouillon cubes can often be a source of hidden gluten in holiday meals so be sure to use gluten-free bouillon cubes. To thicken your homemade gravy you can use corn starch or arrowroot flour. Gluten-free holiday side dishes are easy: Browse our extensive listing of gluten-free recipes to find side dishes that will impress anyone—celiac disease or not. Order gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items like prepared gluten-free pies ahead of time for convenience—this will allow you to spend more time with friends and family rather than spending all of your time in the kitchen! Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can now be ordered and delivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall. If you plan to eat out, or at a relative’s or friend’s house during the holidays, you might find this information helpful: Ali Demeritte's blog entry: The Dinner Party Drama—Two Guidelines to Assure a Pleasant Gluten-Free Experience. Danna Korn's article: Venturing Out of the House: Restaurant Realities. Aimee Eiguren's blog entry: Eating Out Gluten-Free and Without Fear. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free at Restaurants. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free Meals at Small or Moving Restaurants. The holiday season can stressful enough without having to worry about gluten in your meals. Hopefully the tips in this article will help you eliminate this concern, and allow you to have a safe and relaxed gluten-free holiday!
  24. 2 small boxes of cranberry (Jello Brand) Jello or any red Jello ½ cup sugar 1 bag of fresh cranberries. ½ -1 cup pecans (or nuts of choice) 1 softened package of Philadelphia Light or Regular cream cheese 1 can of crushed pineapple (Dole is the best), drained thoroughly Put cranberries in a pan of water and add sugar. Cook until cranberries begin to pop open. Remove from heat, and while its cooling fold softened cream cheese into cranberries and it will melt. While that is cooling, make Jello only ½ way (use only hot water, do not add the 2nd step of cold water once granules are dissolved.) Refrigerate until softly gelled, then add remaining ingredients and mix. Refrigerate until ready to serve. It is very pretty, colorful and festive!
×
×
  • Create New...