Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'hospital'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Celiac Disease: Diagnosis, Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Gluten-Free and Celiac Disease Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease - Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Celiac Disease - Post Diagnosis, Recovery/Treatment(s)
    • Celiac Disease - Related Disorders & Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Intolerance and Behavior
  • Celiac Disease Support & Help
    • Celiac Disease - Coping With
    • Celiac Disease - Parents of Kids or Babies With Celiac Disease
    • Gab/Chat Room - To Discuss Anything BUT Celiac Disease / Gluten-Free Diet
    • Celiac Disease - Doctors
    • Celiac Disease - Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Celiac Disease - Pregnancy
    • Celiac Disease - Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Celiac Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease - Sleep
    • Celiac Disease - Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes - Baking & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Gluten-Free Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Celiac Disease - Publications & Publicity
    • Gluten-Free Travel
    • Gluten-Free Diet & Weight Issues
    • Gluten-Free International Room (Outside USA)
    • Gluten-Free Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Other Food Intolerance and Leaky Gut Issues
    • Super Sensitive Celiacs & Gluten Sensitive
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
    • Lists of Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Addison's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Anemia and Celiac Disease
    • Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Celiac Disease
    • Arthritis and Celiac Disease
    • Asthma and Celiac Disease
    • Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease
    • Attention Deficit Disorder and Celiac Disease
    • Autism and Celiac Disease
    • Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease
    • Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease
    • Candida Albicans and Celiac Disease
    • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) & Celiac Disease
    • Casein / Cows Milk Intolerance and Celiac Disease
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
    • Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Depression and Celiac Disease
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Diabetes and Celiac Disease
    • Down Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Dyspepsia, Acid Reflux and Celiac Disease
    • Epilepsy and Celiac Disease
    • Eye Problems, Cataract and Celiac Disease
    • Fertility, Pregnancy, Miscarriage and Celiac Disease
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Flatulence (Gas) and Celiac Disease
    • Gall Bladder Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Celiac Disease
    • Geographic Tongue (Glossitis) and Celiac Disease
    • Growth Hormone Deficiency and Celiac Disease
    • Heart Failure and Celiac Disease
    • Infertility, Impotency and Celiac Disease
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Intestinal Permeability and Celiac Disease
    • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Kidney Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Liver Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Lupus and Celiac Disease
    • Malnutrition, Body Mass Index and Celiac Disease
    • Migraine Headaches and Celiac Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis Celiac Disease
    • Obesity, Overweight & Celiac Disease
    • Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Bone Density and Celiac Disease
    • Psoriasis and Celiac Disease
    • Refractory Celiac Disease & Collagenous Sprue
    • Sarcoidosis and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma and Celiac Disease
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sepsis and Celiac Disease
    • Sjogrens Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Skin Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sleep Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Celiac Disease
    • Thyroid & Pancreatic Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Tuberculosis and Celiac Disease
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2011 Issue
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
    • United States of America: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Organizations
    • Outside the USA: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Contacts
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com
    • History of Celiac.com Updates Through October 2007
    • Your E-mail in Support of Celiac.com 1996 to 2006

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 8 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/09/2018 - In a seemingly innocuous case of gluten-contamination, an Australian woman was hospitalized with serious health issues after mistakenly eating a waffle she thought was gluten-free. The incident began when Williams and her husband Scott dined at a local Perth restaurant where they had eaten before. This time, though, after eating a meal of chicken and what she took to be gluten-free waffles, she became ill. The mistake caused her to lose consciousness several times, and resulted in mild kidney failure. Diagnosed as celiac at 12 months of age, the 27-year old Williams is a CrossFit fanatic, a fact she believes helped her to survive. “If I was already sick or if I was an elderly person and I had this sort of reaction, I could have died,” Ms Williams said. Williams wants to help spread the word that, for some people, celiac disease is a serious and potentially life-threatening medical condition. The owner of the restaurant seems to be taking the incident seriously, and has said she would be investigating what went wrong that day. “I’m trying to find out what happened because we’ve never had an issue with this,” she said, and that she “would never want to hurt anyone at all.” While the Perth restaurant’s menu did carry a disclaimer that gluten-free items may contain traces of gluten. The owner said the gluten-free options were not recommended for people who are “coeliac or really gluten intolerant.” The restaurant has offered Ms Williams a $40 refund with a confidentiality clause, which she intends to decline so she can speak out and educate others about the risks of dining out. Coeliac Australia’s Cathy Di Bella said restaurants can’t use a “may contain traces of” disclaimer to offset a claim that food is gluten-free. Any restaurant that advertises gluten-free food should take necessary measures to ensure that their gluten-free items are if fact free of gluten. This is an important point, as this incident comes amid recent news reports that indicate nearly one out of ten meals sold as gluten-free at cafes and restaurants across Melbourne were contaminated with gluten. For Ms Williams’ part, she said she has “lost faith in going out for dinner and it’s going to take me a long time to be able to go out and do that without fear of this happening.” Do you or a loved one have a gluten-free horror story to tell? Share it in our comments below. Read more at: Thewest.com.au
  2. I have been a diagnosed Celiac for 6 years now. The moment I was diagnosed I have lead a strict gluten free life, I wasn't taking any chances and wanted to feel better. Over the past 6 years I have never intentionally eaten gluten, but there have been times that I have had cross contamination, especially eating out. Yesterday was quite an experience and I've learned from it and upon trying to research it I found nothing....I'm hoping I'm not the only one, although I wouldn't wish this on anyone. About a year ago I found a Chinese restaurant that had an owner who's claim to fame was she had found ways to make just about everything on the menu gluten free. Gluten free Chinese food? Yes please!! I ate there 4 times with no reaction....ahh, life is complete!....until yesterday. I ordered the gluten free potstickers and sweet and sour prawns. About 2 hours later I started feeling really nauseous. The first thing I thought was maybe I got cross contaminated. Then within the hour I told my friend that I needed to go to the emergency room. I had SEVERE middle back pain and upper stomach pain. I was dizzy, extremely nauseous and my lips were burning and tingling. By the time we pulled up to the emergency room I couldn't stop throwing up....it was bad. And the pain was so intense I was told I was whimpering. They got me in right away and started me on an iv and gave me toradol for the pain and zofran for the vomiting. The doctor wanted to do blood work and an ultrasound because he was concerned it was my gallbladder. Well, everything was fine and it was the gluten, although they couldn't test or confirm it. It is day 2 and my lips are still tingly and I still have quite a bit of pain and nausea. I'm extremely tired and weak. I was looking online for people that have had the same or similar reaction and found nothing....am I the only one? Some things I know have helped me and hopefully they can help others....if you've been cross contaminated or "glutenized" as I call it....chew a handful of vitamin c chewables, it helps. Drink LOTS of water. Stick to a bland diet and NO caffeine for a few days to let your stomach heal. Heating pads help and get lots of rest. And there is an amazing product called GI Response, you can buy it on Amazon. It's expensive but you will thank me later. I don't know how long it will take to feel back to "normal", but I have sworn off eating out....I'd swear off eating if I could. Being gluten free sucks. But that's what we've been dealt and so we must deal with it the best we can. I hope that I've helped at least one person.....and if you are unfortunate enough to have the same reaction to gluten as me....know that you aren't alone.
  3. Celiac.com 09/29/2017 - What is it about the Internet that seems to bring out the worst in some people? In this case, internet trolls making nasty comments about reality star and popular UK country singer Megan McKenna. The body-shaming began almost immediately after McKenna posted two photos of herself on Instagram this summer. According to BuzzFeed, comments calling her things like "boney" and a "skinny rat," flooded in. McKenna recently explained that, at the time the photos were taken, she was in the hospital dealing with the the effects of a medical condition. McKenna has been open about having celiac disease, even speaking about her digestive struggles on Celebrity Big Brother. "Everyone knows I'm a celiac, and I've just been diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome," she told The Sun. Before filming her new show, There's Something About Megan McKenna, she was "in and out of the hospital and no one knew what was wrong with me, so yes I was thin as I was unwell," she said. As is often the case, the nastiness of the commenters was simply out of touch with the reality that McKenna was struggling with an illness, and thus likely did not need to be told how horrible and thin she looked. McKenna is likely having the last laugh in all of this. Now that she has a diagnosis, and can get treatment, her symptoms should improve, and her health should improve with it. In the meantime, she is currently outselling Taylor Swift on iTunes. Read more at: refinery29.com.
  4. Hey everyone! Hope this is the right board to post to. I have an upcoming surgery (partial thyroidectomy) at the Celeveland Clinic (Marymount). Has anyone stayed there? Or have any overnight hospital experience since being diagnosed? Aside from gluten-free I will also need a dairy free diet. Should I plan to pack my own food, or are they pretty good about this stuff and offering a decent selection? ... And will they allow me to eat a packed lunch if I bring one (providing I'm not on liquids)?
  5. Celiac.com 09/13/2016 - A 10-year-old girl allegedly fell ill after eating pizza that was supposed to be gluten-free, but which turned out to be standard pizza. The girl, Sydney Bayle, became violently ill, and ended up in the local emergency room. The attorney for Grotto Pizza says the company has admitted making a "mistake." Now the parents, Samuel and Victoria Bayle, of Edinboro, Erie County, are seeking monetary damages against both Grotto Pizza and Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center in Plains Township, including doctors and nurses. After becoming ill and checking in at the Medical Center's Emergency Room, the parents claim that medical center staff made the Sydney wait for nearly three hours, where she continued to be ill enough to vomit blood. Sydney has suffered from celiac disease from birth, according to the complaint. Read more at: Timesleader.com
  6. Celiac.com 08/23/2010 - People following a gluten-free diet due to celiac-disease or other conditions, who are facing a hospital stay, might want to cheek with their hospital dietitian and staff to make sure that the 'gluten-free' meal they receive is, in fact, gluten-free. That's because, even hospitals can make mistakes. Let's face it, if they can occasionally amputate the wrong limb, remove the wrong organ, or give the wrong drugs, they can accidentally slip an item containing gluten into a gluten-free meal. That's exactly what happened to Don MacMillan, a 68-year old Canadian man whose recovery from gall-bladder surgery was marked by a hospital mix-up that sent him a standard meal instead of the gluten-free meal he required and requested. Still weak, three days after surgery, and hungry from three days of intravenous and liquid nutrition, MacMillan was looking forward to eating his first solid food. Still, he didn’t want to take any chances. He was suspicious of the hospital's lunch of chicken à la king and a cookie. Fortunately for MacMillan, he was both suspicious and vocal. ‘You sure what I’m being fed is gluten free?’ he asked the assistant. She answered that it was, but MacMillan asked her to please double-check. After checking in with the kitchen, she admitted that they had made an error: the meal was not, in fact, gluten-free. “She told me it was OK, but I just didn’t trust her ... so I asked her to verify," MacMillan added. Quintin Wight, spokesman for the Ottawa chapter of the Canadian Celiac Association, said what happened to MacMillan occurs more frequently in hospitals and nursing homes than is reported. “I sympathize with him greatly because this is a situation that we’ve heard about on and off over many years,” said Wight. “I’m not sure how it arises in the hospitals because the dietitians certainly know what gluten-free food is, but it doesn’t seem to get to the kitchen staff. These are organizations that should know better," he added. No one needs extra dietary or immune challenges when recovering from surgery. People who plan a hospital stay, and who require and request a gluten-free meal due to celiac disease or other conditions, can do themselves a big favor by taking steps to confirm the gluten-free status before eating the meal provided. Rule of thumb: Just because the meal is labelled gluten-free, doesn't mean it is gluten-free. When it comes to special meals in the hospital, trust, but verify. Source: Ottawa Citizen
  7. Celiac.com 03/05/2009 - Nurse Cynthia Kupper, RD, celiac disease, and the good folks over at Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) recently circulated a helpful checklist to help you and your loved ones ensure a successful gluten-free hospital visit. Here's a summary of their recommendations: Be sure to make a copy of this checklist, distribute it to your family members, and keep it with you during your hospital visit. Keep this checklist with your chart of current medications, along with the names and addresses of each of your health care providers. Present a copy of this checklist to the managing nurse of the ward where you will be staying. It's also a good idea to make sure a copy goes to the pre-admission staff to ensure the information is placed at the front of your chart or documented in your computerized medical record. Be sure to ask that it be made easily visible to anyone inspecting your chart. Arrange for a written note from a doctor mandating a gluten-free diet. Be sure that the note clearly labels your condition as an allergy, so that there is no confusion among the staff about your dietary needs. If your visit requires you to be admitted, then, prior to your admission, arrange to meet with a representative from the departments that will be involved in your stay, such as pre-op, surgery, medical/surgery, pharmacy, nutrition services-dietitian, rehabilitation, etc. Ask for a allergy alert wristband, and consider requesting that the following words be printed in BOLDFACE on your chart, near your bed, or on the outside of your door: Celiac Disease: All foods and medications must be verified gluten-free! See if you can bring food and medicines you know to be gluten-free. If permitted, clearly label all food and medicine containers with your full name, date and room number. If your visit is unplanned, then arrange to speak with the hospital's Registered Dietitian as soon as you can. If you're unable, then make sure your family or care-giver knows in advance to make this arrangement. Since some dietary staff members may be unfamiliar with the intricacies of the gluten-free diet (Diet Technicians, Nutrition Assistants, Meal Assistants, etc.), it's good practice to speak directly with the Dietitian. Work with the Dietitian. Find out how the hospital chooses its gluten-free foods, and how those foods are processed in the kitchen. Find out who is in charge of for approving the hospital's gluten-free offerings. Bring some non-perishable gluten-free back-up snacks as rules permit. Gluten-free favorites like cookies, crackers, condiments, and cereal are easy to store. Label all food with your full name and room number. For a scheduled visits, see if you can get the dietary department to order some special gluten-free pasta, muffin mix, cake mix, or bread to make during your stay. Ask if you can supply your own. If a dietary staff offer to make shop for you, remind them not to select food from bulk bins. Source: Gluten Intolerance Group Cynthia Kupper, RD, celiac disease
  8. Celiac.com 09/28/2006 - The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia announces the establishment of the Center for Celiac Disease, a multidisciplinary resource created to diagnose, treat and provide support for patients and families with celiac disease. "A person with celiac disease is unable to digest gluten, a common ingredient found in many foods, including bread, pasta and even condiments," said Ritu Verma, M.D., gastroenterologist and director of the Center for Celiac Disease at Childrens Hospital. "This inability to digest gluten damages the lining of the small intestine and prevents the body from absorbing essential nutrients. The only treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet." One of the challenges of celiac disease is that though it is relatively common, affecting approximately one in 133 people, the warning signs like small stature, fatigue and stomach irritation are relatively vague and may mimic other disorders like inflammatory bowel disease or lactose intolerance, making it difficult to diagnose. In some cases symptoms may be so mild that they are overlooked entirely. If celiac disease is not diagnosed, patients may face problems with osteoporosis, internal organ disorders and internal bleeding. "The average patient lives with celiac disease for 11 years before being properly diagnosed," said Dr. Verma. "The goal of the Center for Celiac Disease at Childrens Hospital is for families to get the answers they need and receive a comprehensive treatment plan and support that will last a lifetime." The Center for Celiac Disease consists of a multidisciplinary team of specialists including physicians, nutritionists, nurses, educators, laboratory technicians and clinical researchers, who provide individualized nutrition counseling and care for each patient. "Celiac disease not only affects the child diagnosed with the disease, but also the entire family because treatment requires a drastic change in lifestyle and diet," said Jennifer Autodore, R.D, LDN, clinical nutritionist at Childrens Hospital. "That is why at Childrens Hospitals Center for Celiac Disease we offer care from highly-trained specialists, in addition to family education sessions and support groups where information about the latest gluten-free restaurants and recipes is shared. The Center also provides comprehensive family screenings and support and direction to advocate for gluten-free menu items in the childrens schools." The Center for Celiac Disease at The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia is one of the largest resources in the Northeast United States, dedicated solely to the care of children with celiac disease. The Center currently treats more than 350 patients from Pennsylvania, Delaware, and New Jersey. For more information on the Center for Celiac Disease please visit http://www.chop.edu or call 215-590-1680 to make an appointment. The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nations first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals and pioneering major research initiatives, Childrens Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country, ranking second in National Institutes of Health funding. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 430-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents.