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Found 3 results

  1. Celiac.com 02/08/2012 - Having finally being diagnosed with celiac disease myself, I enjoy writing about this autoimmune disease in my gluten-free advocacy work with my mom, Tina Turbin. However, there is a whole other segment of the population who, rather than having celiac disease, have a food sensitivity to gluten. In fact, according to The Food Intolerance Consumer, gluten-sensitive people make up 15% of Americans, whereas celiac disease is currently estimated to exist in 1% of the population. Clearly, in view of its prevalence in the U.S., gluten sensitivity needs to be addressed, but as it turns out, research is showing that an early diagnosis of gluten sensitivity is particularly crucial in preventing celiac disease and other serious health conditions from developing among the gluten-sensitive population. According to the website of the ALCAT Food and Chemical Sensitivity/Intolerance Test, food sensitivity "induces chronic activation of the innate immune system and gives rise to inflammatory process," and this inflammation "has been linked to countless chronic conditions, including: digestive disorders, migraines, obesity, chronic fatigue, ADD, aching joints, skin disorders, arthritis and many more.' Perhaps you're wondering how a food sensitivity is different from a food allergy. According to ALCAT, food allergies encompass reactions to food that activate the immune system to produce large amounts of histamine, which leads anaphylaxis, a condition that can be deadly, causing swelling in the throat and esophagus so that one can't access air from the lungs or other reactions such as hives and rashes. According to Kenneth Fine, MD, in a transcript of a talk he gave to the Greater Louisville Celiac Sprue Support Group, as published by Celiac.com, the immune system reaction that gluten sensitivity causes starts in the intestine because this is where gluten is found after being digested in foods. When this reaction causes damage to the absorptive finger-like projections that line the small intestine called villi, known as villous atrophy, celiac disease is said to exist. However, says Dr. Fine, "Although the small intestine is always the portal of the immune response to dietary gluten, it is not always affected in a way that results in villous atrophy." In fact, he says that most gluten-sensitive people don't have this symptom of celiac disease and are therefore not celiac. Despite this fact, the testing that has been commonly administered in order to diagnose gluten sensitivity have yielded positive results only when damage to the villi was noted, a fact which can have devastating health consequences for gluten-sensitive people without such damage, who are likely to continue ingesting gluten. According to Dr. Fine, "This can result in significant immune and nutritional consequences, many of which are irreversible even after treatment with a gluten-free diet." The list of disorders and health conditions that can manifest is long, including, Dr. Fine says, "loss of hormone secretion by glands (hypothyroidism, diabetes, pancreatic insufficiency, etc), osteoporosis, short stature, cognitive impairment, and other inflammatory bowel, liver, and skin diseases, among others." That's why he stresses early diagnosis for gluten sensitivity. Dr. Fine seeks to change current testing methods and clear up misconceptions that prevent early diagnosis from being made. One of the misconceptions he discusses is the reliability of specific blood testing for not only antigliadin antibodies but also autoimmune antiendomysial or anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. He says that "a negative test does not mean you do not have the problem. This is the biggest pitfall of all because the only thing a very specific test, like blood testing for celiac disease, can do is 'rule in' the disease; it cannot 'rule it out.'" This means that people with advanced or long-term celiac disease will show positive results. In fact, when the villi were only partly damaged, only 30% of celiac individuals being tested had positive results. Detecting gluten sensitivity early in individuals can have major health benefits, preventing not only the development of celiac disease (that is, villous atrophy, according to Dr. Fine), but a wide array of autoimmune diseases and conditions such as osteoporosis, malnutrition, infertility, certain mental disorders, and even some forms of cancer. I myself was diagnosed in my early 20's after being in and out of hospitals and incorrect diagnoses. Additionally, the treatment for gluten-sensitive individuals diagnosed early would be simple-a gluten-free diet-which should result in improvement in symptoms. With the medical community enlightened by Dr. Fine's research, we can look forward to better testing and earlier diagnosis of the gluten-sensitivity community and their resultant health benefits. Resources: TheGlutenSyndrome.net The Food Intolerance Consumer: Gluten Intolerance and Celiac Disease Gluten Free Help ALCAT: What is Food Sensitivity? Early Diagnosis of Gluten Sensitivity: Before the Villi are Gone by By Kenneth Fine, M.D.
  2. Celiac.com 07/26/2010 - There is very little information currently available regarding the effects of follow up strategies for those celiac patients that follow a gluten-free diet. Therefore, it was the aim of of researchers in Italy to determine the t-transglutaminase antibodies (t-TG) in celiac disease patients while they were enrolled in a community based follow-up program over a 5-year period. Most patients that are diagnosed with celiac disease are told they need to adhere to a gluten-free diet for the remainder of their lives, and then they are usually left to figure it out on their own. However, it is recommended that celiac patients have regularly scheduled follow-ups after diagnosis for early detection of celiac related complications, and to reinforce the importance of adhering strictly to a gluten-free diet. In the year 2000, a community based “celiac disease-Watch” follow-up program was designed by the Local Health Authority of the Brescia Province in Northern Italy. The hope for the celiac disease-Watch program was to increase awareness of celiac disease and to standardize diagnostic criteria for celiac disease among health care professionals. Beginning in January 2003, all celiac patients that reside in the Province of Brescia have been enrolled in an ongoing celiac disease-Watch follow-up program. To encourage celiac patients to enroll in the follow-up program, the Italian government gives patients a bonus to subsidize their gluten-free diets, and all patients are required to contact the Local Health Authority every year to renew their bonuses. Furthermore, the celiac disease-Watch program requires all patients to have their serum tested once a year for detection of t-TG antibodies. Testing for the antibodies begins 12-16 months after a celiac diagnosis. The testing is free of charge to the patients and they can choose any laboratory they like. Results from the t-TG testing is reported to the Local Health Authority, and it is a requirement to continue to receive subsidization, although patients continue to receive subsidization regardless of their t-TG results. Those that test positive for t-TG antibodies during their annual follow up, are referred back to the clinic where they were initially diagnosed. At the clinic they receive a clinical evaluation, and dietary counseling. While those that have a clean bill of health are scheduled for follow up appointments every 3 years. Through this study, researchers found that as a result of the celiac disease-watch program, celiac patients with negative t-TG antibodies advanced from 83% to 93%. Respectively, using mathematical modelling to t-TG conversion rates observed in the study, the projected population of t-TG negative patients increased in population from 90% to 95% over the 5 year period. From this study, researchers were able to determine with confidence that without a follow-up strategy in place, patients with celiac disease will be inconsistent with adhering to a gluten-free diet. It is therefore strongly emphasized that regular serological and clinical follow-ups are a sustainable strategy to promote dedicated compliance to a gluten-free diet. Source: Digestive and Liver Disease doi:10.1016/j.dld.2010.05.009
  3. Celiac.com 07/02/2010 - Serological screening of healthy volunteers from around the world estimates that the prevalence for celiac disease is approximately 0.5%- 1% of the total population. However, a recent meta-analysis denotes that the actual ratio of known or undiagnosed celiac cases is closer to 1 in 7 people. Due to knowledge of celiac, acute clinical suspicion, and increased endoscopy accessibility some areas have reported celiac prevalence as high as 5.2%; suggesting that there is a considerable gap in effectively detecting new cases of celiac disease. Researchers further investigated the statistics on celiac disease prevalence by evaluating the incidence of celiac disease among “adult out-patients biopsied during upper endoscopy with typical and atypical symptoms”. One hundred and fifty out-patients including 94 women and 56 men with a median age of 45, were enrolled for the study between January 2007 and December 2008. There is no current standard classification for endoscopic lesions found from celiac disease. As such, this study used a method of classification where-as patients were labeled as; normal, mild, moderate, or severe. To detect villous atrophy, biopsy's were taken from patients that were only presenting endoscopic appearances, which are indicative of celiac disease. Results which had t-TGA levels greater than 24 U/mL were considered positive for celiac disease. Patients were also positively diagnosed as celiac if they exhibited some degree of histological abnormality. Of the hundred and fifty subjects studied, twelve were diagnosed positively for celiac disease, and nine of them were women. The most commonly exhibited gastrointestinal pathology diagnosed in the study, was gatroduodenitis peptic ulcer. All of the subjects that had biopsy proven t-TGA, had positive antibodies, and the values of t-TGA increased depending on the intensity of the mucosal lesions. Additionally, all subjects were assessed for the existence of gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms. Typical gastrointestinal symptoms of celiac include diarrhea, anemia and weight loss, as evident in 58.32% of the subjects studied, while atypical symptoms were present in 25% of the test subjects. 41.66% of the subjects had iron deficiency anemia(IDA), 8.33% had osteopenia, 16.66% had hypocalcaemiaia and hypomagnesaemia. Additionally, extra-intestinal symptoms associated with gastrointestinal manifestations were found in 16.66% of the subjects that had astenia, and in 41.55% of the subjects with weight loss. Almost every celiac case observed demonstrated symptoms that progressively increased in severity. No differences were observed among patients in the control group, and in the celiac patients with regard to gastrointestinal problems and discomforts. However, IDA was observed most frequently in patients with celiac disease than in the control group. All patients that were diagnosed were recommended to strictly adhere to a gluten-free diet. One person refused to comply with the diet, but the other 90% followed the diet for one year. Of the patients following a gluten-free diet, a total histological response was observed. Severity of mucosal lesions decreased in 70% of the subjects, and all subjects were asymptomatic after one year on a gluten-free diet. The final incidence of celiac disease in the study was 6%. Screening studies such as these, demonstrate that the prevalence of celiac disease is increasing. When duodenal biopsy was preformed in patients during routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, the incidence of celiac disease was observed at rates as high as 12%. Additionally, when clinical presentations of symptoms like diarrhea, anemia, and weight loss are used as screening criteria for celiac, increased rates of celiac disease diagnosis' were evident. Strict adherence to a completely gluten-free diet is still the only cure for celiac disease. Increased doctor and patient awareness of celiac, as well as an increase in celiac screening (especially for patients with typical celiac symptoms or atypical symptoms untreated by standard methods) is still needed to avoid more cases of undiagnosed celiac disease, and to eliminate unnecessary suffering for those misdiagnosed or undiagnosed. Source: Journal of Experimental Medical & Surgical Research, Year XVII · Nr.1/2010 · Pag.23 -27
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