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Found 10 results

  1. Sandi Star, HHP, CNC, CCMH

    The MTHFR Mutation

    Celiac.com 02/08/2018 - Have you ever considered being tested for a genetic defect called MTHFR? If you have a family history of heart disease or stroke, migraines, trouble getting pregnant or have a child with Autism you might want to consider reading on to learn more. These are just a few of the list of conditions linked to MTHFR mutation. Surprisingly, 60% of our population has this mutation and most do not even know what MTHFR is. I recently came up positive myself for MTHFR A1298C. We will talk more about the two common markers in a bit. This changes everything when it comes to choices and is important to have the knowledge when choosing foods and supplementation. It's also important to monitor your folate levels. More to come. Interestingly, Untreated celiac disease may be associated with hyperhomocysteinemia caused by a combination of vitamin deficiencies and variants in the MTHFR gene. If you are not healing with a gluten free diet this might be a test to consider. [1] So, what is MTHFR? The MTHFR gene (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) is an enzyme that plays an important role in processing amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Now you know why it's an acronym! Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase is important for a chemical reaction involving forms of the vitamin folate (also called vitamin B9). This enzyme converts a molecule called 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate to a molecule called 5-methyltetrahydrofolate. This reaction is required for the multistep process that converts the amino acid homocysteine to another amino acid, methionine. The body uses methionine to make proteins and other important compounds. [2] Although, there are over fifty known MTHFR variants, two are commonly tested C677T and A1298. Some of the key things methylation process is responsible for are: Cellular Repair – DNA repair is a collection of processes by which a cell identifies and corrects damage to the DNA molecules that encode its genome (genetic material of an organism). Detoxification and Neurotransmitter Production – The interconversion of amino acids. Healthy Immune System Function – Formation and maturation of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelet production. What's the Difference Between the Two Most Common Types? The 677T Variant is associated with heart disease and stroke whereas the 1298C is associated with a variety of chronic illness. Either one however can cause general health problems. Homozygous vs Heterozygous An organism can be homozygous dominant, if it carries two copies of the same dominant allele (allele - one of two or more alternative forms of a gene that arise by mutation and are found at the same place on a chromosome.), or homozygous recessive, if it carries two copies of the same recessive allele. Heterozygous means that an organism has two different alleles of a gene. If you are homozygous (2 abnormal copies) your enzyme efficiency drops to 10% - 20% of normal which can be problematic. A more serious combination is 677T/1298C which has both genetic anomalies. If you are having symptoms and can't quite put your finger on it I would suggest getting tested for the MTHFR. That will help your practitioner determine what supplementation best suits your needs. Diet will also be a factor as with MTHFR the body cannot process synthetic folate which is in fortified foods such as cereal, nutritional yeast (can get unfortified), breads, rice, pastas, flour, etc., This explains why I always got a headache after I ate fortified nutritional yeast. I switched to unfortified and I don't have the headaches. As mentioned above, there are many chronic conditions linked to MTHFR. Here are a few: Alzheimer's Autism Autoimmune Disorders Breast cancer Chronic Fatigue Down's Syndrome Fibromyalgia Heart Disease IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) Infertility in both men and women Mental disorders such as bipolar and schizophrenia Migraines Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Sensitivity to chemicals Stroke The Great Detoxifier Glutathione is the body's main antioxidant and detoxifier. What happens with MTHFR mutation is it can make you susceptible to disease by lowering your body's ability to make glutathione. Most people with MTHFR have low glutathione levels. With low glutathione levels, you are more sensitive to toxins and chemicals including heavy metals. The good news is you can supplement glutathione in the correct methyl form and change up your diet. More to come on this. With oxidative stress, we are more likely to have premature aging as well. Another reason to be aware of MTHFR and maintain a healthy high folate diet along with supporting supplementation. Testing If you have any of the symptoms above or have a family history with MTHFR mutations I highly recommend testing for both C677T and A1298. Testing can be done through a practitioner. You can go to 23andme and order the test or work with your health practitioner. It's inexpensive and well worth it. Also, testing your levels of glutathione and folate would be beneficial so your practitioner knows where your levels are before recommending supplementation. Supplementation for MTHFR If you are taking a B vitamin, make sure it's methyl-B12, methyl-folate. Taking synthetic forms (folic acid) can be more harmful than good because the body cannot do the conversion. It's essential to make sure that your method delivers the antioxidant efficiently to your cells. One of the B vitamins I recommend from Pure Genomics is their B Complex available on our marketplace. Glutathione is also important but hard to absorb so a liposome form is recommended or get one with a precursor called NAC (N-acetyl-cysteine). Glutathione is important for detoxification as mentioned. Here are a few to consider – Liposomal Glutathione by Pure Encapsulations as a liposome form With any supplement, you can have adverse effects so make sure you work with a knowledgeable practitioner. Diet and Lifestyle Folic Acid vs. Folate While folic acid and folate may be marketed interchangeably, as mentioned earlier, their metabolic effects can be quite different, especially for those with the MTHFR mutation. Folate is the bioavailable, natural form of vitamin B9 found in a variety of plant and animal foods. Folic acid, on the other hand while readily utilized by the body is synthetic. Folate is found in supplements and fortified foods such as cereals and might I add nutritional yeast. The body is more adept at using folate and regulates healthy levels by discarding excess folate in urine. With MTHFR folic acid can be problematic so make sure you purge the folic acid rich foods and supplements. For those who love the flavor of nutritional yeast and use it in vegan recipes there are a few companies who make unfortified versions you can get off amazon. Daily lifestyle activities such as dry brushing (lymphatic circulation) Epsom salt baths, exercise, sauna's (infrared sauna is amazing) and of course a healthy diet rich in natural forms of folate such as: Beans and lentils Leafy green vegetables including raw spinach Asparagus Romaine Lettuce Broccoli Avocado Bright-colored fruits, such as papaya and orange Here are just a few examples of some folate rich foods. As you can see spinach packs a powerful punch of folate as well as papaya and lentils coming in the highest. [2] Source Spinach Asparagus Papaya Orange Lentils Pinto Beans Sunflower Seeds Serving Size 1 Cup 1 Cup 1 papaya 1 orange 1 Cup 1 Cup ¼ Cup Folate 263 mcg 262 mcg 115 mcg 40 mcg 358 mcg 294 mcg 82 mcg DV % 65% 64% 29% 10% 90% 74% 21% Did you know your liver needs glutathione to produce bile in addition to the detoxification process? Look at addressing health issues such as leaky gut, IBS and Inflammation as these can affect absorption and neurotransmitter levels as well as hormones with MTHFR A1298C mutations. MTHFR mutations are tied to higher mental disorders such as anxiety, depression, bipolar and schizophrenia as well as chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia. It's important to find ways to manage the stressors in addition to healing the gut as symptoms can be heightened with MTHFR. Protect the heart with an anti-inflammatory diet rich in omegas, fiber and plants. Omega 3 and COQ10 supplementation is helpful. A good multi is beneficial as long as you get one with B12 (methyl cobalamin) and Folate (methyl tetrahydrofolate) forms. Drug Interactions to consider You should not use any supplements without first talking to your health care provider. For example, folate should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. Folate is necessary if taking medications for birth control, cholesterol or seizures for example as they may lower folic acid levels in the body. Dosage and timing is important to know. Here are some medications to keep in mind: Antacids, H2 blockers, proton pump inhibitors Bile acid sequestrants Carbamazepine Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) Sulfasalazine Triamterene When taken for long periods of time, these medications, as well as other anti-inflammatory and anti-seizure medicines, can increase the body's need for folic acid. Also consider drugs used for cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis as those also reduce the folic acid in the body. Supplementing folic acid can help reduce symptoms of these disorders however with cancer, folic acid may interfere with methotrexates effects on treatment. Talk with your practitioner if you are taking any medications. [3] Knowing your DNA make up is important as is knowing your numbers (blood pressure, cholesterol, etc.) so you can keep a handle on your health and do your best to control stress. Getting tested for the MTHFR mutation is worth knowing whether it comes up or not. It can make all the difference in aging and detoxing and give you a peace of mind. Sources: https://draxe.com/mthfr-mutation/ http://doccarnahan.blogspot.com/2013/05/mthfr-gene-mutation-whats-big-deal.html https://www.jillcarnahan.com/2014/02/23/health-tips-for-anyone-with-a-mthfr-gene-mutation/
  2. Celiac.com 10/28/2016 - Researchers still don't know why some people develop celiac disease or gluten intolerance, but a number of studies have focused on factors including breast-feeding, dietary habits, the timing of the introduction of gluten and geographical origin. Sweden is a high-risk country for the development of celiac disease in early life, with rates in some areas approaching 2%, nearly double that of most population baseline levels. Carin Andrén Aronsson is a dietician and doctoral student at Sweden's Lund University. Her research, ahead of her public thesis defense, indicates that the amount of gluten matter more than breast-feeding or the timing of introduction of gluten as a trigger for celiac disease. This is one of the findings from several extensive studies of children with an increased genetic risk of celiac disease conducted by researchers at Lund University in Sweden. "Our findings indicate that the amount of gluten triggers the disease," says Aronsson. Her research team has also observed that the dietary habits among the children they studied vary from one country to another, and that "there are reasons to analyze the significance of this variation more closely," she added. All the research in Aronsson's thesis is based on small children born with an increased genetic risk of celiac disease. Some of her most important conclusions are: Swedish children who reported consuming more than 5 grams of gluten per day up to the age of two years had twice the risk of developing celiac disease compared to children who consumed a smaller amount, while children with celiac disease reported eating more gluten druing that period. The risk of developing the autoimmunity which gives rise to celiac disease was highest in Sweden compared to Finland, Germany and USA, which were also studied. There was no apparent connection between the duration of the period of breast-feeding and the risk of developing celiac disease. Further study could help explain why Swedish children develop celiac disease earlier than children in other countries. Source: Lund University
  3. Celiac.com 05/15/2015 - People with celiac disease need to maintain constant vigilance against gluten-exposure. Even those celiacs who avoid gluten need to be on guard against nutritional deficiencies, and to check with their doctor when taking certain drugs. Here are five important things to remember about celiac disease: Tiny Amounts of Gluten Trigger Big Reactions For people with celiac disease, exposure to as little as 30 to 50 mg of gluten (about 1/50th the size of a slice of bread) on any given day can trigger damage to the mucosal lining of the small intestine. Nutritional Deficiencies are Common Many people with celiac disease, even those who avoid gluten, suffer from nutritional deficiencies. Doctors recommend that people with celiac disease be monitored regularly for nutritional deficiencies, especially vitamins A, D, E, and B12, carotene, copper, iron, folic acid, magnesium, selenium, and zinc. Doctors recommend vitamin and mineral supplementation, as needed. Bone Loss and Weakness are Common People with celiac disease should receive regular screening for osteopenia or osteoporosis. If needed, they should receive calcium supplements to ensure that they are getting the recommended dietary allowance for calcium. Nutritional and Drug Malabsorption are Common Gluten reactions cause inflammation in the small-intestine and, over time, damage that decreases absorption of common dietary nutrients, and likely promotes malabsorption of oral drugs or medicines, as well. That’s why it’s important for people with celiac disease to be monitored for proper drug and nutritional levels, and to receive supplements as needed. Celiac Disease Can Impair the Effectiveness of Certain Drugs Based on their molecular properties, drugs currently under investigation for their absorption characteristics in gluten sensitivity include acetaminophen, aspirin, indomethacin, levothyroxine, prednisolone, propranolol, and certain antibiotics. Please check with your doctor before taking any of these drugs.
  4. Celiac.com 07/09/2015 - Children presenting for rheumatology evaluation have undiagnosed celiac disease at double the rates of the general population, says the latest study. However, current clinical guidelines do not consider patients with rheumatic conditions to be at high risk for celiac disease despite numerous reported associations between the two in adults and children. A team of researchers set out to assess the prevalence of celiac disease among kids receiving a rheumatology evaluation. The research team included Yekaterina Sherman, BA, Rose Karanicolas, MD, Brittany DiMarco, BA, Nancy Pan, MD, Alexa B. Adams, MD, Laura V. Barinstein, MD, L. Nandini Moorthy, MD, and Thomas J. A. Lehman, MD. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York; the Division of Rheumatology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Brunswick, New Jersey. The team conducted celiac disease screenings on a total of 2,125 patients presenting for initial evaluation by the Division of Pediatric Rheumatology at the Hospital for Special Surgery between June 2006 and December 201, as a part of the standard initial serologic evaluation. The team then reviewed the charts at the end of this period. From this information, the team diagnosed celiac disease in a total of 36 patients (30 girls, 6 boys, mean age 9.4 ± 4.3 years, range 2–16 years), after serologic testing and evaluation by pediatric gastroenterology. Eight additional patients with known celiac disease diagnoses presented during this time period. The total prevalence of celiac disease over this 6.5-year period was 2.0%. The most commonly reported complaints among patients diagnosed with celiac disease were myalgias, arthralgias, and skin rash. Less frequently, patients reported gastrointestinal complaints including abdominal pain, nausea, and diarrhea. All patients reported improvement or complete resolution of their musculoskeletal symptoms after beginning a gluten-free diet. In this study, the team found 36 new cases of celiac disease among children presenting for rheumatology evaluation, for an overall prevalence rate of 2.0%. The majority of patients who ultimately received a diagnosis of celiac disease presented with extra-intestinal manifestations. These results underscore the importance of celiac disease screening in children receiving a rheumatology evaluation. Source: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2015/06/09/peds.2014-2379.abstract
  5. Hello. I'm making gluten free cookies for my friend's lacrosse team where at least two girls have gluten allergies. I have Stop n Shop brand canola oil which says it may contain wheat. It is related to food product isa and I have to know if it is safe to use. Thank you.
  6. For immediate release. Please post. Celiac.com 07/13/2010 - Writer, researcher, and celiac advocate, Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed. D., and long-time celiac advocate Scott Adams, founder and owner of Celiac.com, the largest and longest running website that caters to the gluten-free lifestyle, have joined forces to bring you a new, broad spectrum book about the many facets of gluten-induced illnesses and how to avoid or reverse them. In their new book, Hoggan, Adams, and their 27 co-authors reveal many of the hidden secrets of this widespread, insidious health hazard. This is more than a book about celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. It is a how-to manual for getting a diagnosis, reversing symptoms, improving one’s health, and living well on a gluten-free diet. Cereal Killers: Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free A to Z is a new resource that provides the most diverse exploration of this topic currently available. From the research scientist to the concerned parent, all voices are heard in this novel approach to curing gluten-induced ailments. There is information here for all levels of interest in this burgeoning new area of research and health care. "Hoggan & Adams have brought together a wide range of viewpoints at multiple levels. This book should appeal to a broad spectrum of readers who want a full and enriched perspective." --Robert Machon, July 12, 2010 Newly diagnosed celiac and gluten sensitive patients complain about conflicting information, from the safety of oats to the hazards of older grains. Cereal Killers has the answers to these and many other questions. Even seasoned members of the gluten-free community want a better understanding of their illness and the bounds of a safe diet. These questions are also addressed. Common errors, common misconceptions about the diet, and unusual insights into the dynamics of inflammation, disease, and recovery are all offered by one or more of the many voices that form this unique offering. But the information runs much deeper than that. Cereal Killers explores subtle nuances of immune reactions, often overlooked signs and symptoms of celiac disease, and a host of elements of associated illnesses that miraculously clear up on the diet. Questions about non-celiac gluten sensitivity are addressed in detail, along with explorations of what signs and symptoms should signal testing for gluten sensitivity and how much credence these indicators of disease should be given. In all, readers are offered a rich resource for understanding the importance of dietary compliance along with the cracks in the system through which patients sometimes slip because of current deficiencies in the understanding of gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. Jointly published by CreateSpace, Cereal Killers ISBN: 978-1449918200 is available through Celiac.com, and quality book sellers such as Blackbond Books.
  7. Celiac.com 11/25/2003 - Investigators from the Celiac Sprue Research Foundation, a non-profit public charity, and the Palo Alto Medical Foundation are seeking 20 volunteers who have Celiac Sprue to participate in a study called the "Gluten Detoxification Trial". The Gluten Detoxification Trial will test the effects of consumption of an Orange Juice Mixture that has been modified by the addition of gluten pre-treated with an enzyme (PEP) that is intended to "detoxify" the gluten. If the PEP is successful in detoxifying the gluten, then the stage will be set for development of a PEP therapeutic drug, or pill, that may allow Celiac Sprue patients to consume a regular gluten containing diet. The study involves 2 two-week stages, separated by one month off. The first stage will occur during the first two weeks in December. The second stage will occur during late January 2004. Participants in this study will be randomized to consume an Orange Juice Mixture containing gluten daily for 14 days during one stage, and an Orange Juice Mixture containing gluten pre-treated with the PEP daily for 14 days during the other stage. Participants will record symptoms daily during each stage, and will have laboratory tests measured before and after each stage. Participants will undergo a screening physical exam at the beginning, and brief follow-up exams after each stage at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. Participants in the Gluten Detoxification Trial must meet all of the following criteria: Diagnosed with Celiac Sprue by small intestinal biopsy (participants must be able to provide a copy of the biopsy report). Have had at least one abnormal Celiac antibody test (e.g. transglutaminase (ttg), endomysial (EMA), anti-gliadin) in the past. Be in remission on a gluten-free diet. Be at least 18 years of age. Pre-registration is required to participate in the study. If you can participate, please contact the Celiac Sprue Research Foundation at the above address or e-mail address and request a registration packet/consent. Please call either Dr. Gail Pyle at (408) 655-0384 or Dr. Gary Gray at (650) 327-1144 if you have any questions.
  8. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2002 Sep;37(9):1054-6. Related Articles, Links Celiac.com 08/27/2004 – The following abstract demonstrates the importance of follow up exams with your doctor, and also the importance of regular colon screenings for those with celiac disease. BACKGROUND: Coeliac disease and colorectal neoplasia are both common, present most often in patients over 40 and cause similar symptoms. Greater awareness and early use of serological tests have improved the diagnosis of coeliac disease, but raise the concern that co-existing colorectal neoplasia may be missed. This study assessed the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia among patients with coeliac disease diagnosed after the age of 40 who presented with altered bowel habit or iron deficiency. METHODS: All patients meeting the above criteria underwent colonoscopy unless this or barium enema had been performed shortly before. RESULTS: Of 69 patients with coeliac disease undergoing colonoscopy, 7 (10%) had colon neoplasia: 5 had tubulovillous polyps, and 2 had carcinoma. The prevalence figures for coeliac patients undergoing colonoscopy with iron deficiency and altered bowel habit alone were 11% (5 of 47) and 10% (2 of 22), respectively None of a further 13 who had undergone previous colon investigation (all by barium enema) had neoplasia, although these were probably a selected population. The seven patients with colorectal neoplasia had not reported rectal bleeding. The prevalence of colorectal neoplasia was not significantly higher than in two series of non-coeliac patients undergoing colonoscopy for investigation of iron deficiency (12%) or altered bowel habit (8%). CONCLUSIONS: There is a high prevalence of colorectal neoplasia among older patients with coeliac disease who present with iron deficiency or altered bowel habit, though this is no higher than for non-coeliac patients with these presentations. The possibility of dual pathology should be considered and excluded by colon investigation.
  9. Vijay Kumar, M.D., Research Associate Professor at the University of Buffalo and President and Director of IMMCO Diagnostics: Absolutely yes. For the test to provide meaningful results, it must be validated using a large number of clinical documented subjects. In addition, the two tests, endomysial and reticulin are immunofluorescent tests where the readings are subjective. Experienced laboratory personnel are needed to read such tests. Karoly Horvath, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Peds GI Nutrition Laboratory; University of Maryland at Baltimore: There are several advantages to use a laboratory experienced with the celiac serological tests: Technically, the test are more reliable, and the internal and external control of tests are better established than in laboratories where the celiac disease serology panel is only one of the routine tests More importantly, laboratories specialized in celiac serological testing have larger numbers of positive and negative samples to validate their tests and they are able to set up more accurately the negative, intermediate and pathologic values A laboratory specialized in these tests generally has a clinical background, and the physicians with experience in celiac disease may help in the interpretation of the results and they are happy to consult with other physicians and they can answer the questions of patients.
  10. Vijay Kumar, M.D., Research Associate Professor at the University of Buffalo and President and Director of IMMCO Diagnostics: It is important for the serum tests to be negative in patients with celiac disease. These tests provide strong indicators that the gluten free diet followed is effective and is free of gluten. Sometimes drugs or other intakes may be contaminated with gluten that may continue sensitization and the disease process which may be subclinically. We and others believe once the diagnosis of celiac disease is confirmed and the patient is on a gluten free diet, repeat tests once in 3-6 months may be sufficient. Karoly Horvath, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Peds GI & Nutrition Laboratory; University of Maryland at Baltimore: If a patient has histologically (endoscopy) and serologically (antibody tests) proved celiac disease, and his/her symptoms disappeared on a gluten-free diet, a repeat biopsy is not necessary. The serological tests are useful tools for estimating the effectiveness of the diet after 3-6 months on a gluten-free diet. The disappearance of antibodies from the blood takes months, if there was not any accidental gluten challenge (dietary mistake).
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