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Found 6 results

  1. When I first started this journey, roughly 11 yrs ago with symptoms, I had no clue. Eventually, having no luck with doctors (hypochondriac or psychosomatic), I googled my symptoms over and over looking for something... ANYTHING... that would give me a clue. Among other issues, my insides would not move, I was turning gray, felt like death, and had a persistent cough. I can't remember who but someone had posted on the forum and I found some of my symptoms. Eureka, I immediately began a gluten-free diet to see if it made any difference. Of course that was a journey, not realizing what products contained gluten. Long story shorter – first I went gluten-free, symptoms began to reappear, then it was soy (first organic was okay, then not), symptoms reappeared, took out corn, symptoms reappeared, then it was all grains. So the last couple of years I have been grain-free plus no sulphates. Actually, truth be told, my Celiac pharmacist gave me the recipe for health. I asked her if she liked a certain product. She answered, “I don't know, I have never tried it.” I asked her what she did use. She replied, “Nothing out of a box, a bag, or a bottle.” And that has pretty much been my life for the last couple of years. There is the odd product I try but it always has an after effect and I have to way the consequences against the enjoyment of it. I am one of those who react to 1 crumb in the butter, flour dust in the air, sulphates in anything, sometimes things that don't even seem like they would be a problem, like avocados and blueberries when I am contaminated. January 2016 I began this recitation. It is now May 5th, 2016 - Here I am 4 months later and I feel like screaming to anyone who will listen, “Things are improving!! My gut is healing!!” So what happened?? Someone suggested digestive enzymes. My insides were so compromised that I couldn't eat much besides fruit, veggies, and meat; all plain, all without being touched by people other than me. I could barely stand salt at times when I was compromised. Haven't been to a restaurant in years since I am not in a city that would have one to cater or understand this much of a problem. I started digestive enzymes but I read the label wrong and started with 5 first thing in the morning. Whatever... I began to notice improvements in what I could eat. Not anything different but just that I could eat without feeling ill or having my gut shut down. I stayed on those for a month and a half.. then I picked up a parasite from someone living in a very unclean apartment and visiting there and helping to clean. Well, that was a huge battle. I had to eat to discourage parasites. But in the process my insides began to heal dramatically. I was eating blackberries, drinking garlic keefir (which I couldn't have done 5 mths ago and gave me the first clue my insides had improved substantially), drinking oil of oregano or peppermint oil drops in a glasses of water, eating cabbage and green roughage. Drinking water with apple cider vinegar in it and Aloe Vera juice. After a couple of weeks my insides were a whole different story. I had a feeling of wellness that I hadn't had for years! I FELT like trying to eat something different. So I decided to try Gluten-free Rice Chex. Haven't had them in years.... and I am so happy! I can eat them!! (Not to say they are healthy, cause they are processed crap) but I didn't get sick and that was the amazing part. So now I am beginning to try a few things that would have set me back previously, I have made my own crème brulee because I have always been able to eat eggs. But the sugar was causing problems, but now it's okay. The issue I have now is that I want to try things too fast so I am having to exercise restraint. So here is it – parasites are very common, everyone has them however whether they cause problems depends on your immune system. Does it not makes sense that they would cause leaky gut? An over abundance in the gut would destroy gut tissue and take nutrients from a person and possibly put holes in the gut leading to food reactions? Digestive enzymes help to destroy the protective coating around parasites. Foods that discourage them or kill them are blackberries, garlic, cabbage, oil of oregano, peppermint oil, aloe vera juice, Braggs apple cider vinegar and more (google to find). I found medication didn't do anything so I turned to all the other. So this is how it is today. I don't suggest it is the answer to anyone else's problems but when I found this site, hidden in the posts was the beginning of the answers for me. I may still be gluten, soy, corn intolerant but I am feeling so good now and I just thought I would tell someone. I just wanted to share. Thanks for reading.
  2. Celiac.com 04/09/2014 - The human gastrointestinal tract contains approximately 1014 bacterial cells that form a unique, diverse and very dynamic microbial ecosystem also known as gut microbiota. The genomes of all intestinal microbes form the “microbiome”, representing more than 100 times the human genome. The composition of gut microbiota is crucial for human health. Normal gut microbiota enhances digestive processes, produces certain vitamins and nutrients, facilitates absorptive processes, participates in development and maturation of the immune system and limits colonization of the gut by pathogenic microorganisms. It has been demonstrated that the following predominant microorganisms constitute for the normal gut microbiota: Bacteroides, Clostridium, Eubacterium, Veillonella, Ruminococcus, Bifidobacterium, Fusobacterium, Lactobacillus, Peptostreptococcus and Peptococcus. Diet is a major environmental factor influencing gut microbiota diversity and functionality. Abnormalities in the composition of normal gut microbiota, also known as dysbiosis, frequently result in the development of chronic inflammatory, autoimmune and atopic processes not only within the gut but also in the distant body compartments such as skin, exocrine glands, the brain, muscles and joints. It is well recognized that people affected by poorly controlled celiac disease have detectable dysbiosis. Compared to healthy individuals, people with active celiac disease are characterized by higher numbers of Gram-negative bacteria, known to activate pro-inflammatory processes, and lower numbers of Gram-positive bacteria benefiting the gastrointestinal tract and anti-inflammatory responses. Furthermore, recent studies of children with celiac disease showed that even a strict compliance with a gluten-free diet does not completely restore the normal gut microbiota. Di Cagno and colleagues analyzed the composition of gut microbiota in children with celiac disease on a strict gluten-free diet as compared to a group of matched, non-celiac controls. The study showed that the levels of Lactobacillus, Enterococcus and Bifidobacteria were significantly higher in fecal samples from healthy children rather than from celiac children. On the contrary, cell counts of potentially pathogenic microorganisms such as Bacteroides, Staphylococcus, Salmonella, Shighella and Klebsiella were significantly higher in celiac children compared to healthy children. Based on the aforementioned data, it is obvious to propose that probiotics, defined as viable microorganisms benefiting gastrointestinal health, may serve as a valuable addition to the maintenance protocols for those with celiac disease. Well established probiotic effects include: Beneficial effects on dysbiosis including control of yeast (Candida albicans) overgrowth Facilitation of pathogenic bacteria elimination (for example, Clostridium difficile and Helicobacter pylori) Reduction of local and systemic inflammatory responses Prevention of autoimmune and allergic reactions Prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea Normalization of intestinal contractions and stool consistency Reduction of the concentration of cancer-promoting enzymes and metabolites in the gut Prevention of upper respiratory and urogenital infections Cholesterol-lowering activity Experimental data indicate that probiotics can benefit celiac disease. Lindfors K. and colleagues showed that live probiotic, Bifidobacterium lactis, bacteria inhibit the toxic effects induced by wheat gliadin in intestinal epithelial cell culture. Papista C. et al. demonstrated (in a mouse model) that probiotics can prevent intestinal damage of celiac disease. The published data on the beneficial effects of probiotics in celiac patients is limited. Our clinical experience (Institute for Specialized Medicine – www.ifsmed.com) indicates that appropriately selected probiotics significantly reduce diarrhea and bloating in patients with gluten intolerance and celiac disease. Furthermore, we see positive reduction of gluten-associated joint and muscle pain, fatigue and brain fog as well as on gut colonization with yeast. Probiotics also normalize markers of inflammation (for example, C-reactive protein) and markers of mucosal immune responses (for example, fecal secretory immunoglobulin A – sIgA). Typically, the benefits of probiotics administration cannot be seen instantly. It takes at least 4-6 months to see measurable benefits. The choice of probiotics is another difficult issue for an inexperienced consumer. The following probiotic strains may benefit those with celiac disease and gluten intolerance: a. Lactobacillus acidophilus is a species of Lactobacilli which occurs naturally in the human and animal gastrointestinal tract and in many dairy products. The L. acidophilus strain DDS-1 is one of the best characterized probiotic strains in the world. The medicinal properties of L. acidophilus DDS-1 include: production of lactic acid supporting good bacteria in the gut, production of B and K vitamins, prevention of colon cancer, prevention of ‘traveler’s diarrhea’, inhibition of gastric/duodenal ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori, reduction of symptoms of eczema and atopic dermatitis, reduction of serum cholesterol level, fermentation of lactose and reduction of symptoms of lactose intolerance, and reduction of intestinal pain. b. Lactobacillus plantarum is a Gram-positive bacterium naturally found in many fermented food products including sauerkraut, pickles, brined olives, Korean kimchi, sourdough, and other fermented plant material, and also some cheeses, fermented sausages, and stockfish. The medicinal properties of L. plantarum include: production of D- and L-isomers of lactic acid feeding beneficial gut bacteria, production of hydrogen peroxide killing pathogenic bacteria, production of enzymes (proteases) degrading soy protein and helping people with soy intolerance, synthesis of amino-acid L-lysine that promotes absorption of calcium and the building of muscle tissue, production of enzymes (proteases) digesting animal proteins such as gelatin and helping people with pancreatic insufficiency. c. Lactobacillus casei is a species of Lactobacilli found in the human intestine and mouth. The medicinal properties of L. casei include: production of lactic acid assisting propagation of desirable bacteria in the gut, fermentation of lactose and helping people with lactose intolerance, fermentation of beans causing flatulence upon digestion. d. Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a species of Lactobacilli found in yogurt and other dairy products. The medicinal properties of L. rhamnosus include: production of lactic acid supporting good bacteria in the gut, production of bacteriocins and hydrogen peroxide killing pathogenic bacteria, prevention of diarrhea of various nature, prevention of upper respiratory infections, reduction of symptoms of eczema and atopic dermatitis, affecting GABA neurotransmitting pathway and reducing symptoms of anxiety. e. Lactobacillus salivarius is a species of Lactobacilli isolated from saliva. The medicinal properties of L. salivarius include: production of lactic acid supporting good bacteria in the gut, reduction of inflammatory processes causing colitis and inflammatory arthritis, prevention of colon cancer. f. Bifidobacterium bifidus is a Gram-positive bacterium which is a ubiquitous inhabitant of the human gastrointestinal tract. B. bifidus are capable of fermenting various polysaccharides of animal and plant origin. The medicinal properties of B. bifidus include: production of hydrogen peroxide killing pathogenic bacteria, modulation of local immune responses, production of vitamins B, K and folic acid, prevention of colon cancer, bioconversion of a number of dietary compounds into bioactive molecules. g. Bifidobacterium lactis is a Gram-positive bacterium which is found in the large intestines of humans. The medicinal properties of B. lactis include: production of hydrogen peroxide killing pathogenic bacteria, modulation of local immune responses, production of vitamins B, K and folic acid, prevention of colon cancer. h. Lactococcus lactis is a Gram-positive bacterium used in the production of buttermilk and cheese. The medicinal properties of L. lactis include: production of lactic acid supporting good bacteria in the gut, prevention of colon cancer, fermentation of lactose and reduction of symptoms of lactose intolerance. i. Saccharomyces boulardii is a probiotic strain of yeast first isolated from lychee and mangosteen fruit. Upon consumption, S. boulardii remains within the gastrointestinal lumen, and maintains and restores the natural flora in the large and small intestine. There are numerous randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled studies showing the efficacy of S. boulardii in the treatment and prevention of various gastrointestinal disorders. Potential indications for use of Saccharomyces boulardii in humans include: 1) diarrhea/traveler’s diarrhea/antibiotic-associated diarrhea, 2) infection with Clostridium difficile/pseudomembranous colitis, 3) irritable bowel syndrome, 4) ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, 5) partial IgA deficiency, 6)peptic-ulcer disease due to Helicobacter pylori. Published data also indicate that enzymes produced by S. boulardii can digest alpha-gliadin and related molecules. j. Bacillus coagulans, also known as Lactobacillus sporogenes, is a gram-positive, spore-forming probiotic which is characterized by the increased survival in acidic gastric environment and in bile-acid-associated duodenal environment as compared to the commonly used probiotic microorganisms. Bacillus coagulans do not adhere to the human intestinal epithelium and is completely eliminated in four to five days unless chronic administration is maintained. Once in the intestines, Bacillus coagulans is activated and releases anti-inflammatory molecules or acts indirectly to eradicate organisms in the gut responsible for the inflammatory immune response. Activated Bacillus coagulans produces bacteriocins and lowers local pH by producing L(+) lactic acid that, along with competition for sites of mucosal adherence, works to dislodge and eliminate any antagonizing microbes that may be contributing to an inflammatory response. Bacillus coagulans also produces short-chain fatty acids such as butyric acid, a compound known to support the health and healing of cells in the small and large intestines and to contribute to modulation of the mucosal immune system. To achieve therapeutic responses, the daily dose of the probiotics should be at least 25 billion CFUs (colony-forming units) and above. We recommend taking probiotics on an empty stomach either 20-30 minutes before breakfast or one-two hours after dinner with plenty of fluids. In those taking antibiotics, the time of the probiotic administration needs to be spaced out from that of antibiotics for at least several hours. References: Papista C, Gerakopoulos V, Kourelis A, Sounidaki M, Kontana A, Berthelot L, Moura IC, Monteiro RC, Yiangou M. Gluten induces coeliac-like disease in sensitised mice involving IgA, CD71 and transglutaminase 2 interactions that are prevented by probiotics. Lab Invest. 2012 Feb 13. doi: 10.1038/labinvest.2012.13. Sanz Y, De Pama G, Laparra M. Unraveling the ties between celiac disease and intestinal microbiota. Int Rev Immunol. 2011 Aug;30(4):207-18. de Vrese M, Schrezenmeir J. Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics. Adv Biochem Eng Biotechnol. 2008;111:1-66. Lindfors K, Blomqvist T, Juuti-Uusitalo K, Stenman S, Venäläinen J, Mäki M, Kaukinen K. Live probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis bacteria inhibit the toxic effects induced by wheat gliadin in epithelial cell culture. Clin Exp Immunol. 2008 Jun;152(3):552-8. Raffaella Di Cagno, Maria De Angelis, Ilaria De Pasquale, Maurice Ndagijimana, Pamela Vernocchi, Patrizia Ricciuti, Francesca Gagliardi, Luca Laghi, Carmine Crecchio, Maria Elisabetta Guerzoni, Marco Gobbetti, Ruggiero Francavilla. Duodenal and faecal microbiota of celiac children: molecular, phenotype and metabolome characterization. BMC Microbiology 2011, 11:219.
  3. I was thinking of looking for a good soluble fiber source, I'm not sure what I will be able to tolerate. but It just got me thinking, maybe people on here have found natural methods of improving digestion and the overall experience of the daily "passing"
  4. Celiac.com 05/20/2013 - A team of researchers recently looked at the influence of various proteins on the quality of gluten-free bread formulas. Specifically, the team looked at the influence of different concentrates or isolates of protein on the structure, properties and aging of gluten-free bread. The research team included Rafał Ziobroa, Teresa Witczakb, Lesław Juszczakc, and Jarosław Korusa. They are affiliated with the Department of Carbohydrates Technology, the Department of Engineering and Machinery for Food Industry, and the Department of Analysis and Evaluation of Food Quality, at the University of Agriculture, in Krakow, Poland. For their study they made gluten-free breads from dough that included albumin, collagen, pea, lupine or soy protein. They then analyzed the rheological properties of the dough, and found that bread made with added test proteins showed major differences in its visco-elastic properties. Different flours had different effects on specific volume of the loaves. Soy protein and collagen reduced bread volume, while lupine and albumin significantly increased bread volume. In each case, the added proteins had a noticeable impact on the color and textural properties of bread crumbs. Most of the protein preparations significantly decreased hardness and chewiness of the crumb compared to the control sample. Overall, the dough that contained pea protein yielded bread with the most acceptable qualities. The study demonstrated that pea protein created the most acceptable flavor, color, smell and bread crumb in the final product. Soy protein proved to be the least acceptable of those tested, as it produced loaves with smaller volume and a compact structure. The results of this study show that adding pea protein can improve bread quality, and help to slow staling of starch based bread. Source: Science Direct
  5. Celiac.com 05/10/2010 - Celiac is a genetic autoimmune disease which affects 1 in 100 people worldwide, making it one of the most common food intolerance's in the world. Celiac disease is triggered by the ingestion of gluten proteins, and for those sensitive to gluten, digestion of gluten grains results in an immunological response in the small intestine, destroying mature absorptive epithelial cells on the surface of the small intestine, and creating side effects ranging from severe illnesses, to no obvious symptoms what-so-ever. Regardless of your symptoms, if left untreated, celiac disease can be life-threatening. There is no medication to cure or alleviate celiac disease, and the only cure is complete gluten abstinence for life. Avoiding gluten, means avoiding wheat, rye and barley; which when entirely avoided can lead to recovery from celiac disease symptoms, and result in significant improvement of the intestinal mucosa and its absorptive functions. There is great controversy among most people who are gluten sensitive over the current market for gluten-free products, especially breads and cereals. Most people who avoid gluten agree that gluten-free bread leaves much to be desired. Most gluten-free breads are dry, bland, and can only be tolerated when toasted and covered with lots of jam. However, Healthgrain, a European Union project is working hard to strengthen the scientific formulas for a new generation of cereals and breads for those looking for healthy, tasty gluten-free options. New methods are being created by Healthgrain, and conducted by the research team of Professor Elke Arendt, University College Cork, Ireland and the team of Professor Jan Delcour, KU Leuven, Belgium, to improve the overall quality of gluten-free products. One new method Healthgrain is exploring is the use of special Lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria has innate properties such as anti fungal activity, which has been shown to improve the quality and shelf-life of gluten-free breads. Texture is another big complaint most gluten-free people have when it comes to gluten-free products. Healthgrain has been experimenting with the effect different enzymes such as transglutaminase, glucose oxidase and protease play on the texture of gluten-free cereals. The enzymes showed that they in fact have an essential role in improving the construction of gluten-free bread, although the enzymes also showed varying reactions to the array of different gluten-free breads. Another technique introduced to improve gluten-free products is something called, 'high pressure processing' (HP). The impact of HP on the major polymers found in gluten-free flours, were also investigated by Healthgrain. The results of the impact of HP on gluten-free grains reveled that starch gelatinisation and protein network formation occurred at pressures greater than 350 MPa. However a weakening of protein structures was discovered at lower pressures. Adding HP treated gluten-free batters to bread showed an improvement in volume and decreased staling with pressure less than 200 MPa. We live in a great time to be gluten-free and the scientific studies of the Healthgrain project offers more hope to gluten-free folks looking for more gluten-free products that don't taste gluten-free. Source: New Improved Gluten-Free Foods Developed for Patients with Celiac Disease
  6. Celiac.com 03/26/2010 - Mass screening studies among the general population for celiac disease show a prevalence of approximately 0.5-1.0% in adults and in children. Yet, despite the growing numbers of newly diagnosed celiac disease patients, most cases still remain undiagnosed and therefore, untreated. In part, the masses of misdiagnosed or undiagnosed celiac disease patients are a result of the variety of disguises celiac disease can have. Celiac disease can manifest into a multitude of symptoms including, but by no means exclusive to, malabsorption syndrome, diarrhea, anemia, infertility and osteoporosis. It has been demonstrated that there is a clear advantage to early testing for celiac disease. Early testing can aide in avoiding the irreversible damages that come from diagnosis later in life, such as stunted growth and organ damage. It is also faster for children to heal from intestinal lesions caused from undiagnosed celiac disease, when diagnosed early on. New evidence shows that 10 years after being diagnosed with celiac disease, 66% of the children diagnosed exhibited improvement in their health and overall quality of life; indicating that mass screening at an early age is critical. This study was based on a previous study performed by mass screening for celiac disease by a group of scientists in the Netherlands between 1997 and 1998, who studied 6,127 asymptomatic children between the ages of two and four. Using endomysial antibodies (IgA EmA) testing, the children were screened for celiac disease. 57 seropositive children were then given biopsies. The scientists compared different testing methods for celiac disease, evaluated their serological persistence over time, and determined optimum cut-off points for the testing. Using serological samples obtained at biopsy, EmA and tTGA was assessed for each subject studied. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing was obtained from 55 children; 26 of those had normal biopsies and were genetically predisposed for celiac disease and 29 of the children had small-bowel alterations known to be distinctive traits for celiac disease. Of the 26 children with normal biopsies, 4% of them tested positively for HLA-DQ8, and the other 96% tested positive for HLS-DQ2. Of the 29 children diagnosed with celiac disease, all of them tested positive for HLA-DQ2. However, a proportionately large number of children who tested EmA-positive and were diagnosed with celiac disease, had normal biopsies and were thus regarded as false positives. The results of this test confirmed that celiac disease antibody levels may fluctuate in children who are genetically predisposed for celiac disease. While the reason for the transient antibodies is still not known, it has been suggested that children who are seropositive but have normal small-intestine biopsies, potentially have celiac disease, and are susceptible to developing gluten sensitive enteropathy as they get older. Future testing is needed to establish results for this hypothesis. However, children with histological alterations in their small-intestine biopsy indicative of celiac disease, had considerably higher antibodies for EmA than those without celiac disease. The tTGA levels were significantly higher and occurred with more frequency in children with celiac disease than in children without celiac disease. EmA persisted in all celiac disease children, but only in 50% of the non-celiac disease children. tTGA was evident in 83% of celiac disease children, and 15% in non-celiac disease children. Additionally, increasing the cut-off points provided a reduction of false positives, but resulted in lowering test sensitivity. While optimization of standard cut-off points reduced unnecessary biopsies by 50%-96%, it also reduced test sensitivity. In conclusion, celiac disease antibodies are proven to be transient in children genetically predisposed to celiac. It is therefore crucial for medical providers to reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies. As this study has demonstrated, to reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies by 85%, serological mass screening methods may be improved by repeating EmA and/or tTGA in children who test seropositive after 6 months, and before continuing to biopsy. Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20047580
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