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Found 7 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/21/2017 - More Italians are being diagnosed with celiac disease than ever before. According to the Report to the Parliament from the Ministry of Health, 182,858 Italians were diagnosed with celiac disease, compared with less than 172,000 in 2014; an increase of about 6%. Celiac diagnosis are much more common in women, with 129,225 cases, compared with men, who saw 53,633 cases. The regions of Campania and Lombardy saw the highest numbers, with 2268, and 1,867 cases, respectively. Lombardy has the most cases, with 17.7% of the total, or 32,408 citizens with celiac disease, with Campania and Lazio ranking second at 9.7% of the total, or 17,777 cases. In Italy, celiac disease sufferers receive specific gluten-free products free of charge. Costs for that program rose accordingly, from €227,753,844 in 2014 to €241,773,048 in 2015. Source: West-info.eu
  2. Celiac.com 03/20/2017 - Researchers really do not have really good data on rates of celiac disease in the general population of children in the United States. A team of researchers recently set out to estimate the cumulative incidence of celiac disease in adolescents born in the Denver metropolitan area. The research team included Edwin Liu, Fran Dong, MS, Anna E. Barón, PhD, Iman Taki, BS, Jill M. Norris, MPH, PhD, Brigitte I. Frohnert, MD, PhD, Edward J. Hoffenberg, MD, and Marian Rewers, MD, PhD. Their team collected data on HLA-DR, DQ genotypes of 31,766 infants, born from 1993 through 2004 at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Denver, from the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young. For up to 20 years, the researchers followed subjects with susceptibility genotypes for celiac disease and type 1 diabetes for development of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). The team was looking for patients who developed either celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA) or celiac disease, and they defined CDA as persistence of tTGA for at least 3 months or development of celiac disease. Marsh 2 or greater lesions in biopsies or persistent high levels of tTGA, indicated celiac disease. For each genotype, the team assessed cumulative incidence of CDA and celiac disease. To estimate the cumulative incidence in the Denver general population, they weighted outcomes by each genotype, based on the frequency of each of these genotypes in the general population. They found that, of 1.339 patients they studied, 66 developed CDA and met criteria for celiac disease, while 46 developed only CDA. Seropositivity for tTGA resolved spontaneously, without treatment, in 21 of the 46 patients with only CDA (46%). The team estimated the total incidence for CDA in the Denver general population at 5, 10, and 15 years of age was 2.4%, 4.3%, and 5.1% respectively; incidence values for celiac disease were 1.6%, 2.8%, and 3.1%, respectively. This 20-year prospective study of 1.339 children with genetic risk factors for celiac disease showed the total incidence of CDA and celiac disease to be high within the first 10 years. Although more than 5% of children may experience a period of CDA, that is, persistently high celiac autoantibodies, not all of them develop celiac disease or require gluten-free diets. Sources: Gastroenterology.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2017.02.002 gastrojournal.org
  3. Celiac.com 04/29/2013 - In an effort to determine the accuracy of claims that rates of celiac disease are on the rise, a team of researchers recently examined rates of celiac disease in a well-defined US county. The research team included Jonas F. Ludvigsson, Alberto Rubio-Tapia, Carol T. van Dyke, L. Joseph Melton, Alan R. Zinsmeister, Brian D. Lahr and Joseph A. Murray. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology in the Departments of Medicine and Immunology at the College of Medicine of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, USA, and the Department of Pediatrics of Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden. For their population-based study, the team used medical, histopathology, and celiac disease serology records from the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify all new cases of celiac disease in Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA since 2000. They then calculated age- and sex-specific incidence rates for celiac disease and adjusted those rates to the US white 2000 population. The team also assessed clinical presentation of celiac disease upon diagnosis. Overall, they found 249 cases of celiac disease, 92 cases in men and 157 cases in women, in Olmsted County, between 2000 and 2010. Average patient age was 37.9 years. Once adjusted for age and sex, the overall rate of celiac disease within the time studied was 17.4 (95% confidence interval (CI)=15.2–19.6) per 100,000 person-years. That means an increase of over six percent; from 11.1 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI=6.8–15.5) in 2000–2001. The data show the increase leveling off after 2004. The data also show that cases of celiac disease with classical symptoms of diarrhea and weight loss decreased over time between 2000 and 2010 (P=0.044). Overall, rates of celiac disease have continued to rise over the last decade in this North-American population. This study supports the observation that celiac disease rates in America are, in fact, going up. Source: The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 19 March 2013. doi:10.1038/ajg.2013.60
  4. Celiac.com 08/01/2008 - One of the particularly aggressive and deadly types of cancer associated with celiac disease in adults is known as Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL), which is a T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that develops in the small bowel. So, if you haven’t heard of EATLs, you should know that while current estimates indicate that even though EATLs are rare overall, they are one of the most common causes of death in people with celiac disease. One problem with studying EATLs is that the best statistical information regarding its prevalence is still based on estimates. Until recently, there had been no study made to determine the rate at which EATLs occur in the general population. A team of doctors based in the Netherlands recently set out to conduct such an assessment using the Dutch national network and patient registry of cyto- and histopathology reports (PALGA). The research team included Wieke H. M. Verbeek, Jolanda M. W. Van de Water, Abdulbaqi al-Toma, Joost J. Oudejans, Chris J. J. Mulder & Veerle M. H. Coupé. The team looked at all T-cell lymphomas found from January 2000 to December 2006 that originated in the small bowel, and they computed some basic average rates of EATL occurrence for the Netherlands and worldwide, along with occurrence rates by gender and age. The team also factored in the location of the lymphoma, Marsh categorization for celiac disease, and the means by which the patients’ lymphomas were detected. In people with celiac disease, eating wheat causes the wheat protein to trigger an adverse immune reaction that leads to inflammation of the intestinal lining, which can eventually cause the cells in the inflamed region to become cancerous. Even though celiac disease occurs twice as often in women as in men, men are far more likely to develop EATLs. Out of every 10 people who develop EATLs, only 2 to 5 of them have any obvious symptoms. Also, these statistics apply to untreated celiacs, and those diagnosed as adults, while people diagnosed as children and following a gluten-free diet have about the same rates of EATL as the general population. Adults with untreated celiac disease are nearly 70 times more likely to die from lymphoma than people without celiac disease. Again, since more and more people are being diagnosed with celiac disease as adults, it’s important to get the clearest possible picture of the associated risks, especially when they are as serious as EATLs. The team also noted that most EATLs seemed to be centered in theproximal small intestine, and that diagnosis was generally madesurgically. The team looked at 116 incidents of EATL and found a rate in the general Dutch population of .10/100,000. This is about double the estimated western rate of about .05/100,000. For those over 50 years of age, the Dutch rate of EATL increased by a factor of 10 to 2.08/100,000, while over 60, the Dutch rate was 2.92/100,000. Still, in addition to afflicting almost only those with celiac disease, EATL seems to afflict mostly men. For those over 50, EATL rates were .09/100,000 for women, but nearly 3 times that, 2.95/100,000 for men. One interesting part of the study was the acknowledgment by the doctors that increased cancer rates in celiacs have not been judged “sufficiently large” to warrant screening the general population that way some countries do. Instead, the doctors have adopted a strategy of checking patients with EATL for celiac disease. By their own admission, most patients with EATL have already been diagnosed with celiac disease. In any case, if you have a particularly deadly type of cancer it would seem a little late to test you for celiac disease. We at Celiac.com propose that a better strategy would be to test those with celiac disease for EATLs (and screen the general population for gluten intolerance). This study drives home the importance of diagnosing and treating celiac disease as early as possible, and also reinforces the importance of faithfully following a gluten-free diet and getting regular follow-up biopsies and screening that would reveal an EATL. Article citation: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology Published on July 11, 2008 DOI: 10.1080/00365520802240222
  5. Diabetologia. 2005 Apr 14 Celiac.com 04/29/2005 – According to Italian researchers an improper immune response to wheat may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes. The researchers fed one group of female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice a standard gluten-free diet, while another group of NOD mice was fed a standard gluten-free diet that also included wheat proteins. The researchers then evaluated the small intestinal architecture of the mice and found that the wheat-protein group "showed reduced villous height, increased intraepithelial infiltration by CD3(+) cells and enhanced expression of H2-IA and IFN-gamma mRNA when compared with mice on the gluten-free diet." After 43 weeks the cumulative incidence of diabetes was 65% in the gluten-free group, and 97% in the wheat-protein group. The researchers conclude that the mice that ate wheat proteins had a much higher incidence of diabetes and small intestinal enteropathy that included higher mucosal levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines.
  6. Celiac.com 11/07/2002 - The results of a recent study conducted by researchers in Sweden indicate that the overall cancer risk of people with celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis is higher than that of the normal population, but lower than other studies have reported. Further, the overall risk is lower in children and higher in adults, and the risk "declined with time and eventually reached unity," presumably because most of the subjects followed a gluten-free diet. Here is the Medline abstract for the study: Gastroenterology 2002 Nov;123(5):1428-1435 Links Askling J, Linet M, Gridley G, Halstensen TS, Ekstrom K, Ekbom A. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute/Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland; Institute of Oral Biology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; and the Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. BACKGROUND & AIMS: Studies of cancer risk in celiac disease (celiac disease) or dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) indicate increased risks for malignant lymphoma and occasionally other neoplasms, but are characterized by small numbers, lack of systematic cancer assessment, and subjects identified from referral institutions. METHODS: By using Swedish population-based inpatient and cancer registry data, we followed-up 12,000 subjects with celiac disease or DH, and evaluated cancer incidence by using standardized incidence ratios (SIR). RESULTS: Adults (but not children and adolescents) with celiac disease had an elevated overall risk for cancer (SIR = 1.3) that declined with time and eventually reached unity. Elevated risks were found for malignant lymphomas, small-intestinal, oropharyngeal, esophageal, large intestinal, hepatobiliary, and pancreatic carcinomas. The excess occurrence of malignant lymphomas was confined to adults, decreased with time of follow-up evaluation, and decreased over successive calendar periods. Decreased risks were found for breast cancer. Subjects with DH had a slightly increased overall cancer risk (SIR = 1.2) owing to excesses of malignant lymphoma and leukemia, but no increases of gastrointestinal carcinomas. CONCLUSIONS: Albeit increased, the relative risks for lymphomas and gastrointestinal cancers in this study are lower (and declining) than in most previous reports. The overall cancer risk is only moderately increased, and non-elevated during childhood and adolescence. PMID: 12404215 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  7. Below is in excerpt from THE SPRUE-NIK PRESS which was sent out on Thursday, 7 Dec 1995 as an Automatic distribution (AFD) of the file CELIAC SPRUENIK. If you would like to get this excellent celiac resource, contact Mike Jones at mjones@digital.net Note that the endomysial test he used correlates well with a damaged mucosa. Less severe forms of gluten intolerance would have an even higher incidence. - Don Wiss Dr. Fasano, from the University of Maryland School of Medicine, began the meeting with some interesting data on celiac research: Over the past 30 years there have been 6,276 papers published on celiac disease and only 10 of these were from the USA. In an effort to quantify the number of celiacs in the USA Dr. Fasano took his own money and purchased 2000 blood samples from the Red Cross. He screened each of the blood samples for celiac disease using the endomysial antibody test. Eight of these samples tested positive. This indicates a potential ratio of 1/250 people in the USA with celiac disease or with the genetic potential to develop celiac disease. If this ratio were to hold true for the entire USA population, it would mean there are over one million celiacs in this country. Remember this is one small study, using samples from the Baltimore area. The point is, we need more studies such as this, using a larger sample size derived from multiple areas around the country, to get a reliable estimate of the incidence of celiac disease in this country. For more information on the incidence of celiac disease see the Research Data On Celiac Disease page.
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