Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'increased'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location


First Name


Last Name


City


State


Country


How did you hear about us?

Found 20 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/21/2017 - In previous studies, a team of scientists led by Professor Anette-Gabriele Ziegler had already shown an association between infections in early childhood and the development of type 1 diabetes. In that study, the researchers saw the highest risk for type 1 diabetes in children who experienced repeated respiratory infections in the first six months of life. Recently, Zeigler and another team of colleagues from the Institute for Diabetes Research at Helmholtz Zentrum München, a partner in the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), set out to determine whether infections during infancy are associated with increased risk for celiac disease later on. Their current study shows that the risk of developing celiac disease is particularly high when gastrointestinal tract infections occur during the first year of life. To a lesser extent, an increased disease risk was also seen in connection with early respiratory tract infections. The risk seems to be particularly high for people who experience repeated gastrointestinal infections in the first year of life. Whether the connections with early infections and later celiac risk are causal or are based on changes in the microbiome or specific immune responses is not clear from the data, said first author Dr. Andreas Beyerlein. "However," Beyerlein added, "it seems that the increased risk of celiac disease is associated with a permanent inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract in early childhood and is not caused by a specific viral or bacterial pathogen." The team reached their conclusion after analyzing fully anonymized data provided by the Bavarian Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (Kassenärztliche Vereinigung Bayern) of 295,420 children who were born between 2005 and 2007. Medically attended infections from birth until a median age of 8.5 years were considered in the analysis. A total of 853 children developed gluten intolerance, equivalent to 0.3 percent. Their results appear in the American Journal of Epidemiology. Source: Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health
  2. Celiac.com 08/20/2015 - Celiac disease is frequently mis-diagnosed. Even when patients received endoscopy, celiac disease is often missed or not detected. A team of researchers recently assessed the accuracy of finger prick-based point-of-care tests in the detection of celiac disease, and developed an algorithm for diagnosis. The research team included PD Mooney, SH Wong, AJ Johnston, M Kurien, A Avgerinos, and DS Sanders. They are variously affiliated with the Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, United Kingdom and the University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom. Their team conducted a prospective study of two groups of celiac disease patients evaluated at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield UK from March 2013 through February 2014. In group one, the team evaluated 55 patients at high risk for celiac disease, and who tested positive for endomysial antibody, using the Biocard test (BHR Pharmaceuticals, Nuneaton, UK) and the Celiac Quick Test (Biohit Healthcare UK, Ellesmere Port, UK), which measure antibodies to tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG), and the Simtomax test (Tillotts Pharma, Rheinfelden, Switzerland), which measures deamidated gliadin peptide antibodies (DGP). Group 2 included 508 consecutive patients who received an endoscopy for any reason, received the DGP test, and also were evaluated using a diagnostic algorithm that incorporated results from the DGP test and data on symptoms. For both groups, point-of-care tests were administered at the time of endoscopy, and the results compared against results from histologic analyses of duodenal biopsy specimens from all patients. In group 1, the DGP test identified patients with celiac disease with 94.4% sensitivity, the Celiac Quick Test identified patients with 77.8% sensitivity (P = .03 vs the DGP test), while the Biocard test identified patients with 72.2% sensitivity (P = .008 vs the DGP test). In group 2, the DGP test identified patients with celiac disease with 92.7% sensitivity (95% confidence interval, 83.0-97.3), 85.2% specificity (95% confidence interval, 81.5-88.3), a positive predictive value of 49.2% (95% confidence interval, 40.3-58.2), and a negative predictive value of 98.7% (95% confidence interval, 96.8-99.5). Measurement of serum anti-tTG identified patients with celiac disease with 91.2% sensitivity (95% confidence interval, 81.1-96.4), 87.5% specificity (95% confidence interval, 84.0-90.4), a positive predictive value of 53.0% (95% confidence interval, 43.6-62.2), and a negative predictive value of 98.5% (95% confidence interval, 96.5-99.4). The algorithm identified patients with celiac disease with 98.5% sensitivity, and has the potential to reduce duodenal biopsies by 35%. In this prospective study, the test for DGP identified celiac patients with comparable sensitivity and specificity as standard serologic analysis of anti-tTG. Conducting the DGP test before endoscopy might increase the accuracy of the diagnosis of celiac disease. These results look promising, but further study is needed, in lower-prevalence populations, to more accurately determine the potential benefits of the DGP test in celiac screening. Source: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2015 Jul;13(7):1278-1284.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2015.01.010. Epub 2015 Jan 26.
  3. Celiac.com 02/22/2010 - Celiac disease affects approximately 1 in 100 people in the United States. Celiac disease is a genetic disease and the only known cure is a gluten-free diet for life. While most people with celiac disease experience a relief from symptoms while on a gluten free diet, studies are showing an increased mortality rate in patients with the disease compared to the general population. Out of the 21 papers that have been published over the last 25 years addressing the issue of celiac and mortality rates, the studies show conflicting results, ranging from a 0.52% (decrease) to 3.9% (increase) in mortality rates for patients with celiac compared to the general population. The reasons for the conflicting results are based on the fact that the papers vary vastly from each other, and while some studies are location based or population based, others are cohort based. So for the sake of this particular study, celiac patient's have been categorized into four different groups: symptomatic celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis, unrecognized celiac disease and refractory celiac disease. Because these groups of celiac patients differ greatly, it is necessary to analyze their mortality rates individually. Ten papers in five different countries studied mortality in patients with symptomatic celiac, or celiac symptoms that indicate the presence of celiac disease in a patient. All ten papers on the subject came to the same conclusion, patients with symptomatic celiac disease have been shown to have a increased mortality rate. The primary reason for increased mortality in these particular patients was found to be caused by complications from celiac disease like gastrointestinal malignancies such as, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and small bowel cancer. Other conditions that led to increased mortality for these patients included, autoimmune conditions, ischemic heart disease and violence (including suicide and accidents). Dermatitis herpetiformis is a gluten agitating blistering of the skin which has frequently been associated with celiac disease. Four studies have been conducted on the mortality rates of celiac patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and found that mortality rates did not increase for them compared to the general public. Four studies were also conducted to determine the mortality rates of people with unrecognized, and therefore untreated celiac disease. Two of the studies showed no increase in mortality, while the other two (including the United States study) showed a considerable increase in mortality of people with unrecognized celiac disease. The reason for the conflicting evidence can be merited to the difficulty in obtaining non-biased, random subjects for the study. Refractory celiac disease is known as an inexorable form of celiac disease. Symptoms associated with refractory celiac do not improve with a gluten-free diet. Refractory celiac disease is classified into two types: type I and type II. Type II refractory celiac patients are inclined to develop enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma and have a lower survival rate than type I patients. While the 5 year survival rate for type I patients is between 80%-96%, those with type II refractory celiac only had a 44%-58% chance of survival which dropped to 8% in those patients that developed enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Other studies of mortality rates in celiac patients have indicated that there is a actual amount of gluten that one can exceed which will eventually lead to complications with celiac disease. Thus, if a person continually consumes more gluten than can be processed by their body, usually as a result of malabsorption associated with celiac disease, it is more likely to activate refractory celiac disease and lymphoma in some individuals. Overall these studies have aided in proving that compared to the general population, the risk of mortality rates are increased for celiac patients. While mortality rates decreased over time starting from the point of celiac diagnosis, mortality rates tended to increase significantly in patients who did not adhere to a strict gluten free diet. Standard mortality rates doubled for patients who were unlikely to stick to a gluten free diet, and for patients that definitely did not follow a strict gluten free diet, the mortality rate was six times higher. Therefore, if you have celiac disease, early diagnosis and strict adherence to a gluten free diet can be a life-saver, and is very likely to extend and improve your quality of life. Source: Biagi, F. & Corazza, G. R. Nat. Rev. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. advance online publication 2 February 2010; doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2010.2
  4. Celiac.com 06/28/2013 - Celiac disease has been linked to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), but there is very little data from population-based studies on the rates of shared disease among these groups. To get a better picture of the issue, a team of researchers recently set out to conduct a population-based study on rates of celiac disease in people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). The research team included Jonas F. Ludvigsson, Pertti Aro, Marjorie M. Walker, Michael Vieth, Lars Agréus, Nicholas J. Talley, Joseph A. Murray, and Jukka Ronkainen. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine at Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, in Stockholm, Sweden, the Department of Pediatrics at Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden, the Departments of Medicine and Immunology in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, USA, the Department of NVS, Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, the Faculty of Health at the University of Newcastle in Newcastle, Australia, the Institute of Pathology in Bayreuth, Germany, the Primary Health Care Center of Tornio, Finland, and the Institute of Health Sciences at the University of Oulu in Oulu, Finland. For their study, the team conducted endoscopes on a thousand randomly selected adults from the general population. They defined celiac disease as positive serology together with mucosal abnormalities of the small intestine. They defined any eosinophil infiltration of the esophageal epithelium as esophageal eosinophilia and EoE was defined as having at least 15 eosinophils/high-power field in biopsies from the distal esophagus. They used Fisher's exact test to compare the prevalence of GORD, esophageal eosinophilia, and EoE in subjects with celiac disease, and to compare the realists with those of the control group. Of the 400 subjects (40%) with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GORS), 155 (15.5%) had erosive esophagitis, 16 (1.6%) had Barrett's esophagus, 48 (4.8%) had esophageal eosinophilia, and 11 (1.1%) had EoE. They diagnosed celiac disease in eight (2%) of the 400 individuals with GORS, compared to 10 of 600, or 1.7% for the control group (p = 0.81). They also diagnosed celiac disease in 3 of 155 subjects (1.9%) with erosive esophagitis, compared with 15 of 845 (1.7%) of control subjects (p = 0.75); and 2 cases of celiac disease from the 48 (4.2%) individuals with esophageal eosinophilia (controls were 16 of 952 (1.7%), p = 0.21). They found no celiac disease, however, in any of the 16 subjects with Barrett's esophagus, while they did find 18 cases among the 984, or 1.8% of control subjects; p = 1.0. Nor did they find celiac disease in any of the 11 individuals with EoE, compared with 18 cases in the 989, or 1.8% of control subjects; p = 1.0. Because this population-based showed no increased risk of celiac disease among individuals with GORD, esophageal eosinophilia, or EoE, they conclude that there is no need to conduct celiac screening of individuals with GORD, or EoE screening of individuals with celiac disease. Source: Informa Healthcare. doi:10.3109/00365521.2013.792389
  5. Celiac.com 06/27/2012 - If you have celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and also suffer from migraines, you are not alone. In fact, you are part of a growing group of people who suffer migraine headaches along with their celiac disease or inflammatory bowel condition. A recent study found that people who are sensitive to gluten have higher rates of migraine headaches. The study was presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, held from April 21 to 28 in New Orleans. A research team led by Alexandra Dimitrova, M.D., from the Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, studied the association in U.S. patients. The team conducted a survey of 502 individuals. The survey group included 188 people with celiac disease, 111 with IBD, 25 with GS, and 178 controls. Each member of the survey group completed a self-administered survey which included details on medical history, medications, alcohol/caffeine/drug use, method/duration of celiac disease/IBD diagnosis, duration of gluten-free diet, and headache type and frequency. The team diagnosed migraine using the ID-Migraine screen, and assessed severity with the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6). The results indicated that 30 percent of people with celiac disease, 56 percent of those with gluten sensitivity, 23 percent of those with IBD, and 14 percent of control patients reported chronic headache. After the team compensated for confounding variables, patients with celiac disease, GS, and IBD showed significantly higher rates of migraines compared with control subjects, with odds ratios of 3.79, 9.53, and 2.66, respectively. As measured with HIT-6, patients with migraines who had celiac disease suffered from more severe headaches compared with the other groups. "Our findings suggest that migraine is a common neurologic manifestation in celiac disease, GS, and IBD," the authors write. "Future interventional studies should screen migraine patients for celiac disease, particularly those with treatment-resistant headaches." Do you know anyone who has celiac disease, gluten-sensitivity, or IBD and also suffers from migraine headaches? Let them know by sharing this study information. Let us know by commenting below. Source: http://www.doctorslounge.com/index.php/news/pb/28608
  6. Celiac.com 10/10/2012 - Celiac disease is associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D), but little is known about the connection between celiac disease and diabetic retinopathy (DRP) in patients with T1D. A research team recently set out to determine whether celiac disease is associated with a higher risk of diabetic retinopathy (DRP) in patients with T1D. The researchers included Kaziwe Mollazadegan, MD; Maria Kugelberg, MD, PHD; Scott M. Montgomery, PHD; David S. Sanders, MB, CHB, FRCP, MD, FACG; Johnny Ludvigsson; MD, PHD; and Jonas F. Ludvigsson, MD, PHD. They are affiliated with the Pediatric Clinic, and the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine in the Division of Pediatrics at Linköping University in Linköping, Sweden, with St. Erik Eye Hospital, and the Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Pediatrics, and the Clinical Research Centre at Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden, Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Royal Hallamshire Hospital and University of Sheffield, Sheffield, U.K. Their study shows that longstanding celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 1 diabetes. The team conducted a population-based cohort study, in which they used the Swedish National Patient Register to identify 41,566 patients diagnosed with diabetes from 1964 to 2009, and who were 30 years of age or younger at the time of diagnosis. The team defined celiac disease as the presence of villous atrophy (Marsh stage 3) according to small intestinal biopsies performed between 1969 and 2008, with biopsy reports obtained from Sweden’s 28 pathology departments. During follow-up, the team found 947 T1D patients with celiac disease. They used Cox regression analysis with celiac disease as a time-dependent covariate to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) for DRP in patients with T1D and celiac disease, and to compare them with patients with T1D but no celiac disease. The results showed that the longer the patients had celiac disease, the higher their risk of DRP. Once the team adjusted the results by time from celiac disease diagnosis, people with T1D and celiac disease showed a lower risk of DRP in the first 5 years after celiac disease diagnosis (aHR 0.57 [95% CI 0.36–0.91]), followed by a neutral risk in years 5 to Between 10 and 15 years after diagnosis, patients with coexisting celiac disease showed a risk of 2.83 for DRP [95% CI 1.95–4.11. More than 15 years after follow-up, that higher risk rate went up to 3.01 [1.43–6.32]). So, having celiac disease for more than 10 years is a risk factor for the development of DRP in patients with T1D. Therefore, the researchers note, physicians should conduct intense DRP monitoring in patients with long-standing celiac disease and T1D. Source: Diabetes Care
  7. Celiac.com 05/07/2012 - People with celiac disease face a higher risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in the early years after their celiac disease is diagnosed, according to a new report from Sweden. The report appears in the The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. A team of researchers recently set out to examine the risk of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in people with celiac disease. The researchers included Dr. Jonas F. Ludvigsson, Olle Kämpe, Benjamin Lebwohl, Peter H. R. Green, Shonni J. Silverberg and Anders Ekbom. They are affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics (J.F.L.) at Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden, the Clinical Epidemiology Unit (J.F.L., A.E.) of the Department of Medicine at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Medical Sciences (O.K.) at Uppsala University and University Hospital in Uppsala, Sweden; and Celiac Disease Center (B.L., P.H.R.G.), and Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine (S.J.S.) at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York city, USA. At least one other study has suggested an association between celiac disease and primary hyperparathyroidism. For their study, Dr. Jonas F. Ludvigsson from Orebro University Hospital and colleagues examined the risk of PHPT among 17,121 patients with biopsy-verified celiac disease. They found that patients with celiac disease faced a 1.91-fold increased risk of PHPT compared to 85,166 matched controls. Ignoring the first year, due to a risk of ascertainment bias, the team found that the risk level for PHPT increased 3.29-fold through 60 months, and disappeared after that period. The decrease in risk level over time may be due to the beneficial effect of the gluten-free diet, the team noted. For every per 100,000 person-years at risk, the absolute risk level from one to five years of follow-up was 61 cases in patient, compared with just 22 cases in controls. The overall risk level was even greater, by 2.53 times, when the outcome was restricted to PHPT with an adenoma diagnosis in the National Cancer Registry. A review of the data show that the increased risk of PHPT persisted after restricting the analysis to 1987 or later, which post-date changes in ICD coding. The risk for PHPT was slightly higher for women diagnosed with celiac disease after menopause than for women diagnosed earlier in life. Their study does not "provide any insight into the nature of the association between celiac disease and PHPT," the authors admit. They are unsure whether the association is causal or whether celiac disease and PHPT might be tied another unidentified condition. Because most patients with untreated celiac disease have vitamin D and calcium deficiencies, the team expected to find a "constellation of celiac disease and elevated parathyroid hormone levels," but that they did not expect to see a connection between celiac disease with hypercalcemia and PHPT. The team calls for future studies to focus on thoroughly investigating the connection, so that researchers can understand all possible aspects of the link between these two conditions. Source: J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2012
  8. Celiac.com 12/20/2011 - There has been some controversy surrounding the idea that there is a higher prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease in people with infertility, with some studies finding it but others not. Most of these studies have been performed in Europe; only two to date have taken place in the United States. Peter Green’s group at Columbia recently tried to establish the actual prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease in the infertile population in the United States, to determine if it would make sense to routinely screen a subgroup of infertile patients for celiac disease. Their results are published in The Journal of Reproductive Medicine. Study participants were recruited from the population who came to Columbia’s Center for Women’s Reproductive Care to deal with their infertility issues, which they had been coping with for at least a year. One hundred eight-eight women, ages 25-39, volunteered to participate in the study. They underwent serological screening for tissue transglutaminase (tTG IgA) and endomysial antibodies (EMA IgA), and measurement of total IgA and both IgA and IgG antigliadin antibodies was done to control for the potential IgA deficiency in some individuals. Four of the 188 patients enrolled in the study were diagnosed with celiac disease, making the prevalence of celiac disease in this population 2.1%. Yet a subgroup analysis of the prevalence of celiac disease in women with unexplained fertility revealed a prevalence of 5.9%, which achieves statistical significance. All four women reported suffering from gastrointestinal symptoms before their diagnosis, and they had a significantly increased prevalence of Irritable Bowel Syndrome as well. The authors admit that this is quite a small sample, and because screening was voluntary, it is also a selected population. But even so, they suggest that physicians should inquire about GI symptoms when patients present with infertility, and that screening for celiac is appropriate in those with unexplained infertility who complain of gastrointestinal distress. They even go so far as to posit that all women with unexplained infertility be screened for celiac, even if they don’t have gastrointestinal trouble. All four women conceived within ten months after starting on a gluten free diet, two naturally and two with help. And all of them went on to deliver healthy babies. Source: Choi JM, Lebwohl B, Wang J, Lee SK, Murray JA, Sauer MV, Green PH. Increased prevalence of celiac disease in patients with unexplained infertility in the United States. J Reprod Med. 2011 May-Jun; 56(5-6):199-203.
  9. Celiac.com 09/19/2011 - Rates of end-stage renal disease are rising globally, and even though doctors often see elevated levels of celiac disease autoantibodies in renal disease, they do not yet fully understand the role of biopsy-verified celiac disease as a risk factor for end-stage renal disease. To gain a gleaner picture of possible connections, a team of researchers based in Sweden conducted a study of end-stage renal disease in individuals with celiac disease. The research team included A. Welander, K. G. Prütz, M. Fored, J. F. Ludvigsson. They are affiliated with the Department of Medicine at the Karolinska Institutet of the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. To identify individuals for their population-based prospective cohort study, the team used small-intestinal biopsy reports. They found data on 29,050 individuals with celiac disease (Marsh III) obtained between July 1969 and February 2008 in Sweden's 28 pathology departments. The team defined end-stage renal disease as the need for renal dialysis or renal transplant in accordance with the international classification of disease and procedure codes in Swedish patient registers. They used Cox regression to compare the risk of end-stage renal disease in individuals with celiac disease against the risk for age- and sex-matched reference individuals. They found that, on follow-up, 90 individuals with celiac disease had developed end-stage renal disease, compared with a projected number of 31. This means that people with celiac disease face an end-stage renal disease risk estimate of 2.87 (95% CI 2.22 to 3.71, p<0.001). Adjusting for diabetes mellitus lowered that risk estimate only slightly, to 2.52 (95% CI 1.92 to 3.31). When the team excluded people with prior urinary/renal disorders, the risk estimate for end-stage renal disease in people with celiac disease was 2.47 (95% CI 1.80 to 3.40). However, once the team restricted the outcome measure to end-stage renal confirmed by independent data from the Swedish Renal Registry (SRR), the overall risk estimate increased to 3.20 (95% CI 2.39 to 4.28). The results of this study show that people with biopsy-verified celiac disease face a higher risk of developing end-stage renal disease. Source: Gut. 2011 Aug 3.
  10. Celiac.com 03/04/2011 - Celiac disease is similar to the inflammatory bowel diseases, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, in the obvious sense that all are chronic inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. But more than that, they all also present daily psychological and social challenges to patients’ lifestyles. In a recent study reported in the European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, researchers in the United Kingdom examined the prevalence of GI symptoms in patients with these diseases and correlated the incidence of these symptoms with quality of life (QoL). Not surprisingly, they found that increased severity of reflux and irritable bowel syndrome were associated with a diminished QoL. Patients with celiac disease had worse symptoms and QoL than those with ulcerative colitis, but they were better off than people with Crohn’s disease. This cross-sectional study was performed by sending patients surveys through the mail. One thousand and thirty-one people were included; 225 patients with celiac, 228 with ulcerative colitis, 230 with Crohn’s disease, and 348 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. As this was a postal survey, there is a potential inclusion bias – it is possible that those patients faring the worst would be most likely to send back the questionnaires. Seventy one percent of the celiac patients reported adhering to a gluten-free diet, but this was not corroborated endoscopically. One of the surveys assessed physical and mental QoL and another considered depression and anxiety. Participants were also asked to report and rate GI symptoms they had experienced over the past month, including reflux, heartburn, regurgitation, belching, dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), and retrosternal pain. Barrat et al. found that the celiac patients had higher rates of belching and dysphagia than inflammatory bowel diseases sufferers in this study and also than reported previously. They highlight that despite the high (71%) degree of adherence to the gluten-free diet, 22% of celiac patients still reported severe enough IBS symptoms to affect their QoL. They infer from this finding a couple of noteworthy things. First, that the gluten-free diet may not adequately control IBS symptoms in celiac patients. But also, that doctors are perhaps not inquiring about reflux and IBS during consultations, or patients are under-reporting their prevalence. The authors thus suggest that QoL might be improved for these patients if doctors were more diligent in assessing them for reflux and irritable bowel syndrome. Source: European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology: February 2011 - Volume 23 - Issue 2 - p 159–165
  11. Celiac.com 06/01/2010 - A clinical research team recently examined the increased expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha in celiac disease. The team included A. Vannay, E. Sziksz, A. Prókai, G. Veres, K. Molnár, D. Nagy Szakál, A. Onódy, I. R. Korponay-Szabó, A. Szabó, T. Tulassay, A. Arató, and B. Szebeni. They are affiliated with the First Department of Pediatrics at Semmelweis University, and with the Department of Gastroenterology-Nephrology of Heim Pal Children's Hospital, both in Budapest, Hungary. They are also involved with the Research Group for Pediatrics and Nephrology, a joint project between the two institutions. The team set out to follow-up on the hypothesis that hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1 signaling may play a key role in maintaining the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium in cases of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In their 2008 article, "The human side of hypoxia-inducible factor," which appeared in the British Journal of Haematology, Smith, Robbins and Ratcliffe define Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) as transcription factors that respond to changes in available oxygen in the cellular environment, specifically, to decreases in oxygen, or hypoxia. The team wanted to characterize the variation of HIF-1alpha and related genes in celiac disease, where the importance of the barrier function is well understood. To accomplish their goal, they gathered duodenal biopsy specimens from 16 children with untreated celiac disease, 9 children with treated celiac disease, and 10 control subjects. They assessed HIF-1alpha, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1), ecto-5-prime nucleotidase (CD73) and multi-drug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) mRNA and HIF-1alpha protein expression by real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. They assessed localization of HIF-1alpha by immunofluorescent staining. The team observed increased HIF-1alpha and TFF1 mRNA and HIF-1alpha protein expression in the duodenal mucosa of children with untreated celiac disease compared to either the control subjects, or those with treated celiac disease (p<0.05). Children with untreated celiac disease showed HIF-1alpha staining in cytoplasmic and nuclear region of the villous enterocytes. Children with treated celiac disease showed increased mRNA expression of CD73 and MDR1 versus control subjects (p<0.01 and 0.05, respectively). The results of increased mucosal HIF-1alpha expression in children with celiac disease suggests influences from this signaling pathway in the pathological mechanisms of celiac disease. Source: Pediatr Res. 2010 May 5. PMID: 20453713
  12. Celiac.com 03/23/2010 - Introducing gluten to a baby's diet during a period of infection does not increase the risk of the child developing celiac disease later on, according to a study by Swedish researchers. The team of researchers, led by Dr. Jonas F. Ludvigsson of Sweden's Karolinska Institute, used data from the population-based All Infants in Southeast Sweden study to search for independent associations of childhood infections with the risk of developing celiac disease. The team had parents chronicle their children's diet and infectious diseases in their first year of life, including breastfeeding start and stop dates, and dates the babies first ate gluten-containing foods. They enrolled a total of 9,408 children, and logged a total of 42,826 reports of infectious disease in the first year of life, including 4,003 episodes of gastroenteritis. Of 2,528 children who suffered infection at the time of gluten introduction, 18 developed celiac disease, while 26 of 6,880 children without infection developed celiac disease; for a total of 44 biopsy-proven cases of celiac disease after the children's first birthday (p = 0.035). 167 children suffered from gastroenteritis during gluten introduction, but just one child developed celiac disease, compared to 43 of 9,241 with no gastroenteritis during gluten introduction (p = ns). Once adjusted for age at gluten introduction, age at breastfeeding termination, and age at infection, the results showed no significant connection between infection or gastroenteritis at the time of gluten introduction and the later development of celiac disease. The team pointed out that they lack data on specific infection types, which limits the scope of their conclusions, and that further study is warranted. "We cannot rule out the possibility that specific pathogens constitute risk factors for celiac disease, because risk estimates for infection at the time of gluten introduction were of borderline significance," they said, noting that the study design precluded identification of subclinical infections. The added that "because celiac disease is increasingly diagnosed in adulthood, screening...and a longer follow-up period would be required for complete elucidation of the possible relationship between infections and [the development of] celiac disease." Source: Pediatrics 2010;125:e530-e536.
  13. Celiac.com 03/05/2010 - A team of researchers recently studied therelationship between increased levels of antigliadin antibodies andintestinal barrier gene variants. The research team included V.M. Wolters, B. Z. Alizadeh, M. E. Weijerman, A. Zhernakova, I. M. vanHoogstraten, M. L. Mearin, M. C. Wapenaar, C.Wijmenga, M. W. Schreurs.They are affiliated with the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology,UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Numerous genes may affectintestinal barrier function, including MAGI2, MYO9B, and PARD3, whichhave a close association with celiac disease. Gauging intestinalpermeability is tough to do, so researchers can test indirectly byusing antibodies against gliadin and Baker's yeast (anti-Saccharomycescerevisiae antibodies). The goal of the study was to determinewhether intestinal permeability, represented by antibodies againstgliadin, was connected to MAGI2, MYO9B, and PARD3. The teamanalyzed patients with Down syndrome, a population with suspectedincreased intestinal permeability. The team examined connectionsbetween AGA and ASCA. The team genotyped 126 Down syndromepatients for six single-nucleotide polymorphisms in MAGI2 (rs1496770,rs6962966, rs9640699), MYO9B (rs1457092, rs2305764), and PARD3(rs10763976). They then performed an allele dosage associationof these risk genes and AGA levels. They also found a strongcorrelation between AGA and ASCA (p < 0.01). Subjects withone or more risk genotypes showed lower average AGA levels (trend testp = 0.007) and made up a larger number of patients with normal AGAlevels (p = 9.3 x 10(-5)). Celiac-associated risk genotypesare associated with lower AGA values rather than higher AGA values.This all means that, regarding the increased prevalence of elevated AGAin patients with Down syndrome, there are other immunologic factors atplay. These may involve altered induction and/or maintenance oftolerance. Source: Hum Immunol. 2010 Feb 3.
  14. Am J Med 2004;116:312-317. Italian researchers have concluded that as many as 73% of patients with untreated celiac disease have at least one brain region that is hypoperfused (the blood vessels are damaged), although the condition is rare in the non-celiac and treated celiac disease populations. Dr. Giovanni Addolorato, from the Catholic University in Rome, and colleagues looked at 15 untreated and 15 treated (on gluten-free diets) celiac disease patients and compared them with 27 healthy controls. They found that 11 (73%) of the untreated celiac disease patients exhibited hypoperfusion in at least one cerebral region, when only one treated patient and no controls had the problem. Additionally they found that in 7 of the 26 brain regions that they looked at, blood flow was significantly lower in untreated patients than in controls, and no blood flow differences were detected between the treated group and the control group. According to the researchers the cause of the vascular brain damage in celiac disease is unclear at this point, but it may be related to the increased intestinal blood flow, and/or endothelial inflammation caused by the autoimmune disease, perhaps involving antigliadin antibodies or unidentified neurotoxic antibodies.
  15. Celiac.com 01/03/2008 - It’s pretty well documented that HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 sereotypes are closely associated with celiac disease. Patients who test positive for both sereotypes are at much greater risk for developing celiac disease. Celiac disease is closely associated with the presence of HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, and has also been tied to variations in the MY09B gene on the 19th chromosome. Homozygosity is the condition of having two identical genes, of many possible combinations, on a single chromosome site. HLA-DQ2 homozygosity means that a person has inherited the HLA-DQ2 gene from both parents. In addition to having a much higher risk of developing celiac disease in general, people with HLA-DQ2 homozygosity have a much higher risk of developing refractory celiac disease type II, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Refractory celiac disease is a rare type of celiac disease in which a gluten-free diet fails to eliminate symptoms and to reverse celiac-associated damage. Eneteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma is a type of cancer that often develops in people with advanced intestinal damage such as commonly found in celiac patients. A team of Dutch doctors recently set out to determine if the presence of the MY09B gene carries an elevated risk of refractory celiac disease type II, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. The research team evaluated 62 people who were confirmed to have both refractory celiac disease type II and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. They also evaluated 421 people with simple celiac disease, along with a control group of 1624 people without celiac disease. The team conducted genotyping of MY09B along with molecular HLA-DQ2 typing on all of the patients. The tests showed that one nucleotide variation in MY09B was substantially different in the refractory celiac group than in either the simple celiac or the control group. The allele in question is known as the rs7259292 T allele, and the results of the tests showed that it occurs far more frequently in patients with refractory celiac and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma than in either the control group or the group with simple celiac disease. In fact, the halpotype that carries the rs7253292 T allele occurs in 11% of the patients with refractory celiac disease type II, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma compared with just 2% of the control group and 3% or patients with regular celiac disease. Additionally, the results showed that patients who carry the MY09B rs7259292 allele or who showed HLA-DQ2 homozygosity faced similarly high risk levels for refractory celiac disease type II, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma compared to patients with simple celiac disease. The results did not show any connection or interaction between the MY09B rs7259292 allele and HLA-DQ homozygosity. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology; 2007: 5(12): 1399-1405
  16. Celiac.com 12/06/2007 - Celiac is an autoimmune disease triggered by consumption of gluten in genetically predisposed people. The only treatment for celiac disease is a diet free of gluten, a group of proteins found in some grass-related grains such as wheat, rye, and barley. A healthy gluten-free diet is typically rich in unprocessed foods like fruits, vegetables, and meats; previous studies have established the high relative cost of such a diet. Researchers from the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University sought to further understand the economic burden of a gluten-free diet by focusing on the gluten-free substitutes for naturally gluten-containing foods. Using data from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) about typical household food consumption, researchers assembled “market baskets” of regular and gluten-free foods. The availability and the difference in price between the 11 regular and gluten-free items in the market basket were compared according the type of store and the region in which the items were purchased. Researchers surveyed local grocery stores, upscale grocery stores or regional chains, health food stores, and 4 online sites. Regions of the country were represented by New York City and Westchester County, Portland OR, Atlanta GA, Rapid City SD, and Chicago IL. The researchers found that health food stores and online sites had the largest selection of gluten-free foods, carrying 94% and 100% of the market basket items respectively, compared to availability of 41% in upscale markets and 36% in local grocery stores. Although local grocery stores generally carried the smallest selection of gluten-free foods, Portland’s stores were unique with a relatively high availability of 82%. However, when considering availability in all types of stores, gluten-free foods were most available in the New York area (i.e., 73%). In general, the price of the gluten-free foods was about 79% greater than their normal counterparts. gluten-free cereals were the exception with a small and statistically insignificant increase in cost compared to the non-gluten-free cereals. The internet appears to be the most expensive place to buy gluten-free foods, followed by health food stores and upscale markets. However, these differences were not statistically significant due to the small number of stores and internet sites surveyed. Interestingly, even though availability of gluten-free foods varied widely among the geographic locations, cost did not. The economic burden of a gluten-free diet has important implications for people with celiac disease. Compliance with a gluten-free diet is made more difficult by the low availability and relatively high cost of packaged gluten-free foods. Noncompliance with a gluten-free diet is associated with an increased mortality rate and worse quality of life. Resources Lee, A., Ng, D., Zivin, J., and Green, H. (2007) Economic burden of a gluten-free diet. J. Hum. Nutr. Diet. 20, 423-430.
  17. Celiac.com 08/14/2007 - It has long been documented that there is a connection between celiac disease and neoplasm. In fact, in the 1960s, a population-based study reported a 100-fold increase in risk of non-Hodgkins lymphoma in patients with celiac disease. It has also been shown that people with celiac disease are at greater risk for developing small bowel adenocarcinoma. Also, studies have shown an increased mortality rate from cancer among celiac patients, and there is mounting, but not conclusive evidence that a gluten-free diet provides a measure of protection against the development of malignancies. Strangely, several studies have documented a lower risk of breast cancer among celiac patients. However, to date, very little is known about the associated factors, particularly with regard to the development of gastrointestinal malignancies and their corresponding risk levels. A study recently published in BMC Gastroenterology documents the efforts of a team of Italian doctors to evaluate the risks of developing various types of gastrointestinal neoplasms associated with delayed diagnosis of celiac disease and the resulting consumption of gluten over time. The team was made up of doctors Marco Silano; Umberto Volta; Anna Maria Mecchia; Mariarita Dessì; Rita Di Benedetto; and Massimo De Vincenzi. The team studied a group of 1,968 celiac patients from 20 GE referral centers between 01 January 1982 & 31 March 2005. Study Shows Higher Rates of Gastrointestinal Malignancy that Increase with Age in Patients with Delayed Diagnosis of Celiac Disease According to the results of the study celiac patients have an increased risk of developing cancer which corresponds directly with the age of diagnosis of celiac disease. This increased risk applies to gastro-intestinal malignancies. An accurate screening for tumors should be performed in patients diagnosed with celiac disease in adulthood. On average, the mean age of celiac patients who developed a neoplasm, either sooner or later, was 47.6 +/- 10.2 years, compared with 28.6 =/- 18.2 years in those did not develop neoplasm. BMC Gastroenterology 2007, 7:8 (9 March 2007) health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.
  18. Gut 2005;54:54-59. Celiac.com 01/20/2005 - A link between untreated celiac disease and a rare enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETTL) has been well established by several studies. According to Dr. Karin Ekstrom Smedby of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and colleagues, there is also an increase in the prevalence of other types of lymphomas in those with celiac disease, such as B cell and non-intestinal lymphomas. In their study the researchers reviewed and reclassified 56 cases of malignant lymphomas that occurred in 11,650 hospitalized celiac disease patients in Sweden. The observed numbers of lymphoma subtypes were compared with those expected in the Swedish population. The researchers discovered that a majority of the lymphomas were not intestinal T-cell lymphomas, but were B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In addition, 44% of the patients with B cell NHL had a history of other autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. As expected, the relative risks for T-cell NHL and primary gastrointestinal lymphomas were markedly increased. According to the researchers: "Most lymphomas complicating coeliac disease are indeed related to the disease and are not of the ETTL-type. There was a remarkable aggregation of autoimmune/inflammatory disorders, female sex, coeliac disease, and B cell lymphoma."
  19. Celiac.com 03/07/2007 - A recent study conducted in Sweden shows that individuals with celiac disease apparently face a significantly greater risk of contracting tuberculosis, possibly due to mal-absorption of vitamin D, according to a report in the January 2007 issue of Thorax. Researchers found that people with prior tuberculosis are 2.5 times more likely to get celiac disease than those with no prior tuberculosis. According to lead investigator, Dr. Jonas F. Ludvigsson, of Orebro University Hospital, this indicates that celiac disease is fairly common in individuals who have tuberculosis. It also appears that tuberculosis is in fact more common in those with celiac disease than in those without. Dr. Ludvigsson and a team of colleagues compared the risk of tuberculosis in more than 4000 patients with celiac disease to that of 69,000 matched individuals in a general population-based study. The study showed the presence of celiac disease corresponded to about a 3-to-4 times greater risk of subsequent tuberculosis. Similar results were found when the study population was grouped by their gender and age at the time of diagnosis for celiac. The researchers concluded that celiac disease could affect the action of tuberculosis medication. Further studies are likely warranted, as the study involved a fairly small number of cases, and only 24 celiac patients had contracted tuberculosis. Subsequent confirmation of these findings would likely warrant making it standard practice to do serological testing for celiac disease in tuberculosis patients with gastrointestinal symptoms or with apparent drug resistance. Thorax 2007;62:1-2,23-28. health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.
  20. BMJ 2004;328:438-439 (21 February) Celiac.com 02/27/2004 – The following report is interesting, but I believe that serological studies done on those with schizophrenia would be a far better way to conduct such a study. Also, the use of such a small control group cannot accurately predict the actual incidence of schizophrenia in those with celiac disease. –Scott Adams According to a Danish study published in the British Medical Journal, people with celiac disease may have an increased risk of developing schizophrenia. Previous studies have also suggested an association between these two disorders. The study identified 7,997 people over age 15 who were admitted to a Danish psychiatric unit for the first time between 1981 and 1998 and were diagnosed with schizophrenia. The researchers selected 25 random controls and matched their year of birth and sex, and identified any history of celiac disease, ulcerative colitis or Crohns disease in both groups, and in their parents. A "moderately strong risk relation between coeliac disease and schizophrenia" was discovered in the data, and the researchers stress that these findings only reflect a small proportion of cases, as both disorders are rare. The prevalence of celiac disease among schizophrenics was 1.5 cases per 1,000 compared to 0.5 cases per 1,000 in the larger control group, which means that there is a three times greater risk of schizophrenia in those with celiac disease. Interestingly Crohns disease and ulcerative colitis were not associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia. According to Dr. Eaton: More research is needed to understand the link between celiac disease and schizophrenia. The most important question is whether treatment for celiac disease, in the form of a gluten-free diet, would benefit the small proportion of individuals with schizophrenia who are genetically prone to celiac disease but have not been diagnosed with it."
×
×
  • Create New...