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Found 7 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/26/2013 - Do people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease die younger than people with T1D who do not have celiac disease? Do celiac patients without T1D live longer than those with T1D? Currently, not much is known about how celiac disease might influence mortality rates in people with T1D. A team of researchers recently set out to examine rates of death in patients with both T1D and celiac disease. The researchers include K. Mollazadegan, D.S. Sanders, J. Ludvigsson, and J.F. Ludvigsson. The are variously affiliated with the Clinical Epidemiology Unit of the Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, and with St. Erik Eye Hospital, Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden. The research team set out to examine mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease. For their study, the team used biopsy reports to identify all people diagnosed with celiac disease between 1969 and 2008, within all 28 pathology departments in Sweden. They defined T1D as a diagnosis of diabetes recorded in the Swedish National Patient Register between 1964 and 2009 in individuals aged ≤30 years. Their follow-up showed 960 patients with both T1D and celiac disease. For each individual with T1D and celiac disease, they selected up to five subjects with T1D alone (no celiac disease) as a reference group of 4608 individuals. They then matched all reference individuals for sex, age and calendar period of diagnosis. The team used stratified Cox regression analysis with celiac disease as a time-dependent covariate to estimate the risk of death in patients with both T1D and celiac disease compared to those with T1D alone. The results showed that celiac disease was not a risk factor for death in patients with T1D in the first 5 years after celiac disease diagnosis [hazard ratio (hazard ratio) 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.43-1.73]. However, with the passage of time, that reality changed, and mortality risk rose in direct relation to follow-up time (5 to In the end, for people with T1D, having a celiac disease diagnosis for at least 15 years was associated with a 2.80 times greater risk of death (95% CI 1.28-6.12). Source: J Intern Med. 2013 May 23. doi: 10.1111/joim.12092.
  2. Celiac.com 12/14/2015 - Recently, several studies have set out to determine how intake of gluten during infancy influences later risk of celiac disease. One such study, conducted in Sweden, investigated whether gluten intake before 2 years of age increases the risk for celiac disease in genetically susceptible children. The research team included Carin Andrén Aronsson, Hye-Seung Lee, Sibylle Koletzko, Ulla Uusitalo, Jimin Yang, Suvi M. Virtanen, Edwin Liu, Åke Lernmark, Jill M. Norris, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Digestive Health Institute, Children's Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado, the Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Campus, University of Colorado Denver in Aurora, Colorado, the Department of Clinical Sciences at Lund University and Skåne University Hospital in Malmö, Sweden, with Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, Germany, the National Institute for Health and Welfare, Nutrition Unit in Helsinki, Finland, the School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland, the Research Center for Child Health, Tampere University and University Hospital, Science Center of Pirkanmaa Hospital District, University of Tampere, Finland, and with the Health Informatics Institute, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. The research team conducted a case-control study of 436 pairs of children, generated from a Swedish database of 2525 children with genetic susceptibility to celiac disease, matched for sex, birth year, and HLA genotype from September 2004 to February 2010. The children were screened each year for celiac disease using an assay for tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGAs). To confirm celiac disease, the team conducted intestinal biopsy on children who tested positive for tTGA. The team also calculated gluten intake from 3-day food records collected when the children were 9, 12, 18, and 24 months old. The results showed that the duration of breastfeeding, lasting 32 weeks, on average, and average age at first introduction to gluten of 22 weeks was basically the same for the target group and the tTGA-negative control group. At the visit prior to tTGA seroconversion, the target group reported a larger intake of gluten, 4.9 grams a day, compared to 3.9 grams a day for controls (odds ratio [OR], 1.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13–1.46; P = .0002). More of the target group consumed amounts of gluten in the upper third tertile (ie, >5.0 g/d) before they tested positive for tTGA seroconversion compared to control subehects (OR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.70–4.13; P < .0001). Interestingly, this increased risk was similar for children homozygous for DR3-DQ2 (OR, 3.19; 95% CI, 1.61–6.30; P = .001), heterozygous for DR3-DQ2 (OR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.08≥4.62; P = .030), and for children not carrying DR3-DQ2 (OR, 2.43; 95% CI, 0.90–6.54; P = .079). Intake of gluten before 2 years of age at least doubles the risk of celiac disease in genetically susceptible children. This association was uniform among HLA-DR3-DQ2 haplotypes. These findings may be taken into account for future infant feeding recommendations. So, basically, if kids have a genetic susceptibility to celiac disease, regardless of their genetic haplotypes, then parents should wait until after 2 yearss of age to introduce gluten into the child's diet. This study, taken together with another recent study that shows that introduction of gluten after six months of age might promote an increased risk of celiac disease, might help provide some guidance for parents looking to introduce gluten to their children's diets. The earlier study, the children did not have a genetic predisposition to celiac disease. That means that, according to research, the best window for optimal gluten introduction is after two years, especially for children with genetic predisposition, and before six months, regardless of genetic status. SOURCE: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, October 07, 2015. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2015.09.030
  3. Celiac.com 09/14/2015 - People with celiac disease have slightly higher risk for contracting pneumonia, especially in the first year after diagnosis. The study was conducted a team that included Joe West, MD, an epidemiologist and honorary consultant gastroenterologist at the University of Nottingham. The study found that people with celiac disease who are unvaccinated against pneumococcus are about 30% more likely to develop community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) than are unvaccinated people without celiac disease. Dr. West says the increased risk is likely due to weakened spleen function in people with celiac disease. This elevated risk was not seen in vaccinated celiac patients, or people over 65 years of age. The results of the study suggest that clinicians be extra vigilant about vaccinating celiac patients, and health officials in the United Kingdom are now recommend that people with celiac disease receive pneumococcus vaccinations. Source: Pharmacy Practice News
  4. Celiac.com 06/15/2011 - A duodenal biopsy during endoscopy is the gold standard for diagnosing celiac disease. Because the histopathological features suggesting celiac disease , specifically villous atrophy, can vary in severity throughout the length of the small intestines, the American Gastroenterological Association Institute recommended in 2006 that at least 4 specimens be taken for examination. Yet the degree of adherence to this recommendation has not been assessed, and neither has its impact on diagnoses. A recent study by Benjamin Lebwohl at the Columbia University Celiac Disease Center concludes that most physicians are not following the guidelines, but they should be; doing so doubles the diagnosis of celiac disease. Dr. Lebwohl and colleagues collated the specimens sent to Caris Life Sciences, a specialized GI pathology laboratory that receives samples from endoscopy centers in forty-three states plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. They looked at 132, 352 patients who had endoscopies for various indications between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2009. From these endoscopies, only 35% followed the recommendation of submitting at least four specimens. There was a slight increase once the guidelines were proposed, in 2006; but by the end of 2009 adherence to the guidelines was still a low 37%. Interestingly, the number of specimens submitted could be directly correlated with the probability of a positive diagnosis of celiac disease. Adherence varied by indication, with the highest rates (43.9%) among patients undergoing endoscopies for diarrhea and the lowest rates (30.0%) among those having endoscopies because of heartburn. Among patients having endoscopies for malabsorption or suspected celiac disease adherence was only 38.5%. Adherence to the guidelines also decreased with the age of the patient. The researchers did not have access to socioeconomic or racial data regarding the patients, so could not determine if that factored into adhering to the guidelines. The proportion of patients diagnosed with celiac doubled when at least four biopsy specimens were submitted. This increase varied by indication; it was most apparent in those undergoing endoscopy because of malabsorption and suspected celiac disease, but was present for the other indications as well. This study validates those recommendations; hopefully the slight increase in adherence since they have been proposed will continue to grow. Source: Lebwohl B, Kapel RC, Neugut AI, Green PHR, and Genta RM. Adherence to biopsy guidelines increases celiac disease diagnosis. Gastrointest Endosc. 2011 May 19.
  5. Celiac.com 09/22/2008 - People diagnosed with celiac disease in adulthood face a slightly higher risk of developing a severe infection called pneumococcal sepsis, according to the results of a study published in the August issue of the journal Gut. A Swedish research team led by Dr. Jonas F. Ludvigsson, of Orebro University Hospital, Sweden reviewed data gathered from the Swedish National Inpatient Register to assess the risk faced by people with celiac disease of developing sepsis. The researchers looked at 15,325 patients with a diagnosis of celiac disease, 14,494 inpatient reference subjects, and as many as five reference individuals per case from the general population. People diagnosed with celiac disease as adults developed sepsis at slightly higher levels than inpatient reference patients (HR = 1.5, p = 0.006). The elevated risk for sepsis was also seen when celiac disease patients were compared with reference subjects from the general population (HR = 2.6, p < 0.001). Celiac disease patients diagnosed in childhood showed a slightly elevated increased risk of sepsis when compared to the general population (HR = 1.8, p = 0.003). According to Dr. Ludvigsson’s team, this elevated risk of developing pneumococcal sepsis faced by people with celiac disease might be due to a condition called hyposplenism, but the study’s small size, and it’s lack of data on spleen size made it impossible to make a firm conclusion as to the cause. Gut 2008;57:1074-1080.
  6. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2006;18:187-194. Celiac.com 04/10/2006 - According to findings by Dutch researchers, celiac disease increases the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma—but to a lower level than once believed. Past celiac disease studies have indicated that there is a 30 to 40-fold increased risk of enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma, however, Dr. M. Luisa Mearin and colleagues in The Netherlands investigated the frequency of celiac disease in two large European populations—one was a control group and the other was a group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients—and found that 1.2% of the non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients had celiac disease compared to 0.5% of the controls. After adjusting for age and sex differences between the two groups they found that celiac disease patients had a 2.6-fold increase risk of getting non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and this increased risk was only associated with patients who had been diagnosed prior to the study, and not in those with “silent” celiac disease which was found during the study. The odds of T-cell type small bowel lymphoma in celiac disease patients was estimated to be 28 times higher than for other localizations. The researchers conclude that celiac disease patients have a significantly increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but the association is lower than previously thought. Celiac disease is mainly associated with T-cell small bowel lymphoma which is, in general, a rare condition.
  7. Gastroenterology, Volume 129, Issue 2, Pages 454-463 (August 2005) Celiac.com 08/11/2005 - A large study by Swedish and American researchers has determined that untreated celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of adverse fetal outcome. In contrast to several small studies that have been done in the past that produced conflicting results, this study looked at 2,078 births to women who were diagnosed with celiac disease—1,149 were diagnosed prior to their child’s birth, while 929 were diagnosed after. The researches employed a national register-based cohort study (1964-2001) that was restricted to women between 15-44 years old who had a single live birth. The researchers measured intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, very low birth weight, preterm birth, very preterm birth and birth by caesarean section for each child in the study. The results of the study indicate that undiagnosed celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of intrauterine growth retardation (OR = 1.62; 95% CI: 1.22-2.15), low birth weight (OR = 2.13; 95% CI: 1.66-2.75), very low birth weight (OR =2.45; 95% CI: 1.35-4.43), preterm birth (OR = 1.71; 95% CI: 1.35-2.17), and caesarean section (OR = 1.82; 95% CI: 1.27-2.60). In contrast, those diagnosed with celiac disease before their births were not at increased risk for these adverse fetal outcomes. The researchers conclude that undiagnosed celiac disease increases the risk of unfavorable fetal outcomes—a risk that is reduced in those with diagnosed celiac disease, presumably because they have been treated with a gluten-free diet.
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