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Found 8 results

  1. I got a new meter that detects gluten in the food. I have been testing food at home and in restaurants that supposed to have no gluten but to my surprise most of them still have gluten. Very concerned. What I have found out that even they prepare food with care with no obvious wheat stuff, the seasonings (peppers, chilli etc) have gluten cross contamination. Even at home, I prepared lentils with gluten free massalas, and gluten detector detected gluten. That means, even lentils were cross contaminated in packaging. Yesterday I ate at Moxies and gluten detect detected gluten in the two dishes I ordered from gluten Friendly menu. Any one else has any suggestions on how to deal with such situation
  2. Celiac.com 09/04/2012 - North India has what has come to be referred to as a “celiac belt”, where a greater than average number of people exhibit symptoms of celiac disease. This is partially because more wheat is consumed in this region, but also because the population possesses haplotypes necessary for celiac disease to develop. For this reason, it would make sense that emigrants from the area would also be prone to celiac disease. A study centered in Debyshire, UK investigates celiac disease as it manifests in the North Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi immigrant populations. All celiac disease patients (both Asian and white) who were diagnosed via biopsy in Derbyshire, UK between 1958 and 2008 were identified. Population data from the Office of National Statistics was used to calculate prevalence. Presenting symptoms, adherence to a gluten-free diet and follow up record were also assessed. Asian patients were compared against matched white patients. 1305 eligible celiac disease patients were identified, 82 of whom were Asian. The prevalence of celiac disease in Asians was considerably higher than in white groups. In the white population, celiac rates were 1:356, whereas in the Asian population they were 1:193. Particularly high celiac rates were seen in Asian women between 16 and 60 years of age: 1:116. No cases of celiac disease were reported in Asian men over 65 years of age. A previous study from Leicester has already demonstrated some propensity for Asian populations to develop celiac disease. It is thought that diet plays some role in this tendency. One of the most significant findings of the present study is that no Asian man over the age of 65 was diagnosed with celiac disease. It is possible that celiac disease rarely manifests in this group, but is more likely that cultural or other factors lead to a lack of reporting, preventing diagnosis. Another finding of the study shows that Asians with celiac disease are more likely to be anemic. This tells us that celiac disease should be considered as a diagnosis for unexplained anemia in Asian patients. The study also found that Asians with celiac disease are less likely to adhere to a gluten-free diet. Roughly one third of Asian patients successfully adhered to the diet, whereas nearly two thirds of white patients did. This could be a language issue (an inability to detect gluten-containing foods), or because of family pressure to comply with cultural norms, or because of difficulty adapting cuisine to be gluten-free. In any case, there should be more discussion with Asian immigrant populations to determine the best way to improve gluten-free diet adherence rates. Source: http://fg.bmj.com/content/early/2012/08/10/flgastro-2012-100200.abstract
  3. Asafoetida (hing) is a spice that's often used often in Indian cuisine and it usually has gluten in it. Some restaurant managers don't even know that and unintentionally will serve you gluten so be sure to ask them whether they use it or not.
  4. This recipe comes to us from Arvinder Malhotra. 150 ml tepid milk 275g (10 oz.) rice flour 60 grams tapioca flour ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon gluten free baking powder 2 teaspoons caster sugar 2 teaspoons dried active yeast 2 teaspoons vegetable oil 150 ml plain/natural yogurt 1 egg, lightly beaten 1 teaspoon xanthan gum In a bowl mix tepid milk with 1 teaspoon sugar and the yeast, then sit bowl in warm place for 4-5 minutes. Sift the flours, Xanthan gum, salt, baking powder into a bowl or food mixer. Add remaining sugar, oil, yogurt, egg and mix until smooth. Preheat oven to the highest setting. Make dough into 6 equal sized balls. Roll out balls into a tear shape that is ¼ inch thick (use rice flour if necessary to prevent sticking). Preheat a heavy baking tray in oven. Remove tray and put the naan on it. Return to the oven for 3 mins, or until the naan puffs up and turns light brown. Place tray under the broiler 30 seconds to 1 minute for extra browning.
  5. Celiac.com 07/20/2010 - Anyone who's tried to maintain a gluten-free diet for celiac disease or other reasons can likely tell stories about the difficulties and challenges they face on a regular basis. Still, very little research has been done regarding the psychological and social challenges faced by people with celiac disease who are attempting to follow a gluten-free diet. Scientists in India recently conducted just such a study. A research team set out to assess psychological and social challenges faced by Indian children with celiac disease who are attempting to follow a gluten-free diet. The research team included Srikanta Basu, J. C. Chauhan, A. K. Dutta, Praveen Kumar, and Arun Kumar from the Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics at Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Kalawati Saran Children Hospital in New Delhi, India. Their goal was to assess dietary compliance to gluten-free diet, to identify barriers to compliance, and to study the impact of diet on the psychosocial behavior of children with celiac disease. For the study, the team looked at children with clinically proven celiac disease, who had been observed for at least 6 months. They then evaluated the children for gluten-free diet compliance. Researchers who were blinded to initial results then interviewed patients using a self-administered questionnaire. The team measured psychosocial parameters using the standard 35-item Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC). To determine what factors might affect dietary compliance, the team compared the results of children who were compliant with their gluten-free diets to those who were not-compliant. They then compared the psychosocial parameters of both groups to those of healthy control subjects. The team measured a total of 70 patients for dietary compliance. They found 53 children to be compliant with a gluten-free diet (75%). They found 13 were non-compliant with a gluten-free diet (18%), while 4 children were likely non-compliant. A total of 64 children completed the full assessment. Final analysis showed that 4 of those children were likely non-compliant. Data for 2 patients with incomplete assessments was dropped. Younger kids showed higher compliance with a gluten-free diet than did teens. 80% of younger kids showed compliance with a gluten-free diet, compared with just 44% of teens. Gluten-free diet compliance was also higher in children with higher maternal education, and in parents with better knowledge and understanding of celiac disease, and in nuclear families. Higher family income raised compliance levels. Children with 2 or fewer siblings did better, with compliance rates of 68.3% and just 23% non-compliance. 72% of kids who were compliant with a gluten-free diet had presented classic symptoms of celiac disease, while only 15% of this group was non-compliant. Adjustment-related challenges, such as difficulty in maintaining diet at school, restaurants, trips, etc. are among the most common problems faced by celiac children. Nearly half (45%) of the children complained that teachers did not adequately understand the challenges of their condition. Researchers established a PSC cutoff point of 4 for children in the dietary non-compliant group. Generally, kids with celiac disease did not show higher levels of symptoms, such as complaints of aches and pains; being irritable/angry; not listening to rules, blaming other for mistakes; teasing others; refusing to share. The study findings show that about 1 in 5 (18%) people with celiac disease fail to comply with their gluten free diet, and that kids who comply with a gluten-free diet have better psychosocial parameters, as measured by PSC score. Also, adolescents, kids in joint families, and kids in larger families tend to have greater non-compliance levels. Successful treatment of celiac disease requires full compliance with a gluten-free diet. Non-compliance increases risk factors for numerous celiac-associated conditions. Knowing which factors are most likely to present challenges for maintaining compliance can provide celiac suffers and clinicians with useful tools for reducing those challenges and increasing compliance. Source: Indian Journal of Pediatrics 2010 Jun;77(6):649-54. DOI 10.1007/s12098-010-0092-3
  6. It has been a while since I’ve tried Tasty Bite products, so when their samples arrived a few days ago I was reminded of just how simple their products are to prepare—most require only 90 seconds in the microwave and they are ready to eat. In addition to being very easy to prepare, most of their products are also gluten-free. This combination makes them an easy choice when you want great gluten-free Indian Cuisine. I picked out the gluten-free Jaipur Vegetables from their other samples because I love this dish, which consists of slow cooked vegetable stew with paneer cheese. In addition to being gluten-free their products also do not contain MSG or preservatives, and are a healthy choice because they contain a wide array of vegetables that are very nutritious. Modern food technology still amazes me—90 seconds after putting the gluten-free Jaipur Vegetables in the microwave it was ready to eat, and it tasted wonderful! The vegetables were remarkably fresh tasting, and were cooked to perfection—this dish really tasted like something that would be served at a high-end Indian restaurant (without the high cost!). I would definitely buy Tasty Bite Jaipur Vegetables on a regular basis, as well as their other outstanding gluten-free Indian meals and side dishes. For more info visit: www.tastybite.com. Note: Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.
  7. This recipe comes to us from Carrie in Canada. 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice 1 ginger root, minced 4 fresh tomatoes, blended until juice (I cut them up into small pieces and use a garlic press) 3 cloves of garlic, minced 5 green onions, diced 1 onion, diced 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon coriander 1 teaspoon turmeric 2-3 tablespoons of honey (add more or less depending on taste) 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil Optional: 1-2 cups of vegetables, shrimp, or other meat. Cook onions, garlic, and ginger root in the oil until done. Add tomato juice, spices, honey, and lime juice. Add vegetables or shrimp and simmer until done. Serve over basmati rice.
  8. This recipe comes to us from “Cams Mom” in the Gluten-Free Forum. Ingredients: 1 package of original Chebe Bread Mix (red bag) 2 eggs 2 tablespoons oil 1-2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese 1/3 Cup of plain yogurt 1-4 cloves of garlic Directions: Make it into soft dough. Split it into 4 pieces, roll them out into pretty thin ovals, then put them on a non greased cookie sheet. Mash up as much garlic as you like then sprinkle it on top of each dough. Drizzle a little olive oil on top and rub it around the top with your fingers. Place in 375F oven for around 20 minutes or until golden brown.