Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'infection'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location


First Name


Last Name


City


State


Country


How did you hear about us?

Found 12 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/26/2007 - In is known that increased duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) are more common in celiac patients with Helicobacter pylori gastritis (H. pylori) than in those celiacs without Helicobacter pylori. It is also known that the elimination of Helicobacter pylori can reverse this problem. The study was motivated by the following two hypotheses: Celiac patients with Helicobacter pylori might present different clinicopathological profiles from those celiacs without H.pylori. Celiac patients with Helicobacter pylori might show different histopathological responses to a gluten-free diet than those celiacs without H.pylori. The research team compared the duodenal and gastric biopsies of 80 adults who had histologically and serologically confirmed celiac disease. The biopsies were taken both before and after patients had adhered to a gluten-free diet for 12 to 18 months. The team classified and scored gastritis using the Updated Sydney System. They classified duodenal biopsies using both the Marsh-Oberhuber and a simplified classification developed by the team. Three test subjects who were positive for Helicobacter pylori, and 12 who were negative (a total of 15 test subjects), presented with lymphocytic gastritis. Overall, a greater proportion of Helicobacter pylori-negative patients had severe villous atrophy (p Regardless of their initial Helicobacter pylori status, all subjects showed marked improvement of duodenal aspects following a gluten-free diet (p With the exception of the intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL), which returned to normal in two Helicobacter pylori-positive patients, and in ten Helicobacter pylori-positive patients, gastric variables remained unchanged. The study concludes that Helicobacter pylori gastritis is not related to the clinical features of celiac disease, and that a gluten-free diet is equally effective for both groups. The study also notes that the inflammatory and structural changes to the mucosal architecture that are associated with celiac disease might eclipse some of the signs of lymphocytosis induced by Helicobacter pylori gastric infection. The study also further documents the pathogenic connections between celiac disease and lymphocytic gastritis. Am J Gastroenterol. 2006;101(8):1880-1885.
  2. Celiac.com 01/29/2018 - Researchers suspect that certain environmental factors, including infectious agents, might play a role in making celiac disease more prevalent and more widespread. Researchers in the USA and Sweden studying regional variation in the frequency of celiac disease have found similarities in the geographic distribution of Lyme disease, an emerging multisystemic infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete, which invites questions about a possible connection with celiac disease. One research team recently set out to determine if infection with Borrelia contributes to an increased risk of celiac disease. The research team included Armin Alaedini, Benjamin Lebwohl, Gary P. Wormser, Peter H. Green, and Jonas F. Ludvigsson. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY USA; the Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY USA; the Institute of Human Nutrition, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY USA; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY USA; the Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; and with the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. Using biopsy reports, the team identified 15,769 individuals with celiac disease. By linking to the nationwide Patient Register, they were able to compare the rate of earlier occurrence of Lyme disease in the patients with celiac disease to that in 78,331 matched controls. To further assess the temporal relationship between Borrelia infection and celiac disease, they also examined the risk of subsequent Lyme disease in patients with a diagnosis of celiac disease. The team found that twenty-five patients with celiac disease had a prior diagnosis of Lyme disease (0.16%), whereas 79 had a subsequent diagnosis of Lyme disease (0.5%). This showed a modest association between Lyme disease and celiac disease was seen both before and after celiac diagnosis, with celiac risk being highest in the first year of follow-up. So, only a small portion of the celiac disease patients had a prior diagnosis for Lyme disease. The research team asserts that the supposed association between Lyme disease and celiac disease, both before and after the diagnosis of celiac disease, is likely driven by surveillance bias, at least in part. These data show that patients with Borrelia infection do not face a substantially higher risk for developing celiac disease. Source: BMC Med. 2017; 15: 169. doi: 10.1186/s12916-017-0926-1. PMCID: PMC5599869
  3. Celiac.com 01/17/2018 - People with celiac disease face a higher risk of infections like tuberculosis, influenza, and pneumococcal pneumonia, but researchers don't know how this might apply to risk of Clostridium difficile infection in those patients. A team of researchers recently set out to identify celiac disease patients using biopsy data from all pathology departments in Sweden over the 39-year period covering July 1969 through February 2008. They compared the risk of Clostridium difficile infection, based on stratified Cox proportional hazards models, among patients with celiac disease versus a control group of patients without celiac disease--matched by age, sex, and calendar period. The research team included Benjamin Lebwohl MD, MS, Yael R Nobel MD, Peter H R Green MD, Martin J Blaser MD, and Jonas F Ludvigsson MD, PhD. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine, Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA; the Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA; the New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, USA; the Department Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; and with the Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. In all, they isolated 28,339 celiac patients, along with 141,588 control subjects. None of the celiac patients or control subjects had any history of Clostridium difficile infection. Celiac patients showed a Clostridium difficile infection rate of 56 cases per 100,000 person-years, compared with a rate of 26 cases per 100,000 person-years among control subjects, yielding an overall hazard ratio (HR) of 2.01. Compared with control subjects, celiac patients in their first 12 months after diagnosis showed the highest risk. However, the risk remained high up to 5 years after celiac diagnosis. The researchers found antibiotic data for 251 of the 493 patients with Clostridium difficile infection; they found no significant differences in previous antibiotic use between patients with celiac disease and control subjects. This large population-based cohort study showed that celiac patients had substantially higher rates of Clostridium difficile infection than did control subjects. The results of this study match prior studies that confirm higher infection rates in celiac patients, and indicate that celiac patients may suffer from altered gut immunity and/or microbial composition. Source: The American Journal of Gastroenterology (2017) 112, 1878–1884 (2017). doi:10.1038/ajg.2017.400
  4. Celiac.com 04/17/2017 - A team of researchers recently set out to test this hypothesis and to gain insights into mechanisms underlying virus-induced loss of tolerance to dietary antigens. To do so, they developed a viral infection model that makes use of two reovirus strains that infect the intestine, but which differ in their immunopathological outcomes. The research team included Romain Bouziat, Reinhard Hinterleitner, Judy J. Brown, Jennifer E. Stencel-Baerenwald, Mine Ikizler, Toufic Mayassi, Marlies Meisel, Sangman M. Kim, Valentina Discepolo, Andrea J. Pruijssers, Jordan D. Ernest, Jason A. Iskarpatyoti, Léa M. M. Costes, Ian Lawrence, Brad A. Palanski, Mukund Varma, Matthew A. Zurenski, Solomiia Khomandiak, Nicole McAllister, Pavithra Aravamudhan, Karl W. Boehme, Fengling Hu, Janneke N. Samsom, Hans-Christian Reinecker, Sonia S. Kupfer, Stefano Guandalini, Carol E. Semrad, Valérie Abadie, Chaitan Khosla, Luis B. Barreiro, Ramnik J. Xavier, Aylwin Ng, Terence S. Dermody, and Bana Jabri. Reoviruses usually infect humans and mice without overt physical symptoms. Prior research by Bouziat et al., has shown that immune responses to two gut-infecting reoviruses take different paths in mice, as noted in the Perspective by Verdu and Caminero. Both reoviruses triggered protective immune responses. However, when one of the reoviruses occurred in the presence of a dietary antigen, such as gluten or ovalbumin, tolerance to the dietary antigen disappeared. This was because this strain blocked the formation of tolerogenic T cells. Instead, it promoted T helper 1 immunity to the dietary antigen through interferon regulatory factor 1 signaling. Moreover, celiac disease patients also showed elevated levels of antibodies against reovirus. Reovirus is an avirulent pathogen that elicits protective immunity, but these researcher have shown that it can also cause a disruption of intestinal immune homeostasis at inductive and effector sites of oral tolerance by suppressing peripheral regulatory T cell (pTreg) conversion, and promoting TH1 immunity to dietary antigen. TH1 immunity to dietary antigen depended on interferon regulatory factor 1, and was unconnected to suppression of pTreg conversion, which was mediated by type-1 interferon. This study provides important scientific support for the idea that this seemingly mild reovirus plays a major role in the development of celiac disease. Clearly further study is needed to determine the exact nature of the role of reovirus in celiac disease, and to determine if these connections might prompt any changes in celiac diagnosis and treatment. Source: Science 07 Apr 2017: Vol. 36, Issue 6333, pp. 44-50. DOI: 10.1126/science.aah5298 The researchers are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine, the Department of Pathology, and the Committee on Immunology at the University of Chicago in Chicago, IL, USA; the Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, the Department of Pediatrics, and the Elizabeth B. Lamb Center for Pediatric Research at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN, USA; the Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Section of Pediatrics, University of Naples Federico II, and CeInGe–Biotecnologie Avanzate, Naples, Italy; the Laboratory of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam-Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, Netherlands; the Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; the Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Gastrointestinal Unit and Center for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA; the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; the Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; the Department of Microbiology, Infectiology, and Immunology, University of Montreal, and the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Sainte-Justine Research Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; the Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; the Stanford ChEM-H, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA; the Department of Genetics, CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; the Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; the Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; and the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
  5. all of my life I have suffered from migraines. Even as far back as a toddler. At age 15 I was falling alseep in class due to how tired I was and Bc my headaches were hurting me so bad. I recall every evening coming home, excited to lay in a dark room Bc there was never a day my head wasn't absolutely busting. At age 18 they began lasting 5 days and felt like my brain was on fire. At age 20 I began complaining of feeling like I was running a fever constantly, as well as still suffering from the migraines. At 21 my doctor prescribed a seizure medication that supposedly helps migraines. I was hesitant Bc I don't have seizures... So I waited months to try it, but finally caved out of desperation.It didn't help, it just made me stupid Bc I was unable to think clearly. At age 22 I was missing months of my life, laying in the dark, sweating, tossing and turning all with an ice pack on my head, since the headaches still felt like my brain was on fire. I would tell my doctor about this and I was told it was depression. I would say "I would not be depressed if my life wasn't like this." He still insisted it was my thoughts doing this to me. He later prescribed anti depressants. Nothing changed. I missed that entire year of my life. Totally debilitated by these headaches.. Except now they consisted of the room spinning. A nauseous feeling that felt like the worst food poisoning as well as cold sweats. I remember the night I prayed "God just show me what it is. I'm tired of praying to be healed just show me what it is." as fate would have it, I went gluten free on accident that next month. I remember unloading my groceries and realizing everything I had bought was gluten free and laughing about it. I had no idea what gluten even was ! Lol. So that was definitely an answered prayer ! 3 weeks of being unintentionally gluten-free I recall discussing w my mom that my headaches had pretty much subsided, and telling that I wondered if it had anything to do w the fact that I had quit drinking pop. Shortly after that, I ate something that contained gluten. I couldn't even finish it. I felt odd. My heart was beating fast and I felt that inner fever begin to simmer again. And the old headache I had once lived so long with, came back with a vengeance. I some how fell asleep, Still clueless that this was caused by gluten. the when I woke up, i was greeted with a feeling that felt like the worlds worst stomach virus along with food poisoning. When I say I puked... It feels like an understatement lol. I puked until I puked a bile/infection-like looking substance which smelled like infection too!! (Gross I know but, I have to be truthful) This attack lasted for around 25 hours or more. After wards it was like I had fought a war. then as I was laying there...it was like a light bulb hit me... "Gluten ! I ate gluten! what even is gluten ? " so I googled gluten allergy. And I was amazed !! I went gluten free immediately and sense,the Terrible migraine/puking episodes have disappeared ! Unfortunately I didn't know you had to be tested for celiac while you we're eating gluten, so I've never been able to be tested for it. Therefore I only claim to have the allergy. However I suspect it's celiac Bc so much more happens to me than just fatigue and brain fog. I nearly die. I am not exaggerating. I'm someone with a high pain tolerance. I've broke my back and walked home ! lol. But these attacks literally have me begging for mercy!!! I have been gluten-free for 5 months now. This week I was glutened twice ! so as you can imagine I'm a mess. The first time was from a little bit of gluten containing alcohol (Smirnoff was falsely advertised as gluten-free. Don't ever make that mistake of believing their website!!) you guys, I literally couldn't take care of myself. And This was 15 hours after drinking so it wasn't due to being drunk. Once again, I puked till I had nothing else to puke except for green/yellow infection. I puked almost half a small bucket full of that stuff alone! :/ My mom had to come take care of me and I am 23. I couldn't even go get myself a cold rag due to how dizzy I was. It truly feels like the room is spinning! The second time i was glutened, was two days after that. I assumed that all Soda was gluten free, by mistake .(I rarely drink soda, so I shouldn't have assumed that, but needless to say, I paid for it.) I took maybe 3 sips of mr. Pibb and felt that fire headache spread across my head. I immediately googled and found out its one of the sodas that aren't gluten-free. Just my luck lol. I didn't puke bile that time Bc I'm assuming I didnt consume enough for it to be that bad, thank God. But now my stomach doesn't want to hold food. I feel sooo worn out and every time I eat I nearly fall asleep. I did a liquid diet for a few days to let my gut heal but it's still thrown off. I feel so out of wack and emotional !! I've only been glutened 4 times in 5 months but the last two was this passed week. I've never been contaminated so close together but I'm telling you guys, I don't know what I'm going to do. I so badly want to be diagnosed with celiac so then Atleast I'm taken seriously by my doctor . But as of right now I just sound like a hypochondriac :/ thankfully my family finally believes me. But it still bothers me not to know for sure. I'm sorry if I bored you guys but I guess I just needed to vent lol. I was also wondering, do u all think I have Celiac or am I just gluten sensitive?? can gluten sensitivity be that intense? Thank you for taking the time to read about my story. I wish you all health and many blessings ❤️❤️❤️Kayla
  6. Celiac.com 03/30/2015 - Researchers are calling for an overhaul of cleaning and decontamination procedures in the face of a study showing that three out of 20 flexible gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopes (15%) pose an infection risk, because they are contaminated with unacceptable levels of human biological matter. The researchers are part of the 3M Infection Prevention Division, which recently conducted an assessment of endoscopes at five major hospitals. For their study, the researchers analyzed 275 flexible duodenoscopes, gastroscopes, and colonoscopes and found that 30 percent, 24 percent, and 3 percent respectively harbored unacceptable levels of human biological matter. The results surprised the team, as 15% constitutes an "unexpectedly high number of endoscopes failing a cleanliness criterion," says Marco Bommarito, PhD, lead investigator and lead research specialist, 3M Infection Prevention Division; adding that, ideally, no endoscopes would fail a cleanliness rating. Because such endoscopes are used for routine screening, and are reused on different patients, sterilization is crucial to preventing infection. The 3M team presented their findings in an abstract at the 40th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2008 guidelines for cleaning endoscopes, contaminated endoscopes are linked to more healthcare-associated outbreaks than to any other medical device. Even so, illnesses and reports of improperly cleaned endoscopes are on the rise at healthcare facilities across the country. In the face of their findings, the researchers concluded that "cleaning protocols for flexible endoscopes need improvement, such as guidelines tailored to the type of scope or identifying if there is a critical step missing in the manual cleaning process, and documented quality control measures." Source: Infectioncontroltoday.com
  7. Celiac.com 06/15/2010 - A clinical team conducted a functional analysis of celiac risk loci, and found that SH2B3 offers protection against bacterial infection. The team included Alexandra Zhernakova, Clara C. Elbers, Bart Ferwerda, Jihane Romanos, Gosia Trynka, Patrick C. Dubois, Carolien G.F. de Kovel, Lude Franke, Marije Oosting, Donatella Barisani, Maria Teresa Bardella, the Finnish Celiac Disease Study Group, Leo A.B. Joosten, Paivi Saavalainen, David A. van Heel, Carlo Catassi, Mihai G. Netea, and Cisca Wijmenga. Celiac disease has a fairly high morbidity, yet it is prevalent in Western populations at rates of of 1%–2%. So far, scientists don't understand why the celiac disease phenotype is so common despite its obvious negative impact on human health. This is especially true when one considers that doctors only developed a gluten-free diet to treat celiac disease in the 1950's. The research team scientists hypothesize that the high prevalence of celiac disease might suggest that the process of natural selection favors genes that trigger celiac disease, and thus, that the gene may convey some evolutionary advantage to those who inherit them. The study group included 8,154 controls from four European populations, and 195 individuals from a North African population. By examining haplotype lengths using the integrated haplotype score (iHS) method, the team looked at selection signatures for ten confirmed celiac-associated loci in several genome-wide data sets. They found consistent indications of positive selection for celiac-associated derived alleles in three loci: IL12A, IL18RAP, and SH2B3. For the SH2B3 risk allele, they also found a variation in allele frequency distribution (Fst) between HapMapphase II populations. Functional investigation of the effect of the SH2B3 genotype in response to lipopolysaccharide and muramyl dipeptide showed that carriers of the SH2B3 rs3184504*A risk allele provided more robust triggering of the NOD2 recognition pathway. This suggests that SH2B3 plays a role in protection against bacteria infection, and it provides a possible explanation for the selective sweep on SH2B3, which occurred sometime between 1,200 and 1,700 years ago. Source: AJHG - 2010, 04 May. doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2010.05.004
  8. Has anyone had trouble with UTIs/cystitis? I've been getting them since I got sick with Celiac Disease. I'm doing well otherwise but I get UTIs and then cystitis. FYI, I tend to get them after intercourse. How do you treat cystitis that's non bacterial? Thanks for your help,
  9. I personally have noticed that when eating gluten I get numerous urinary tract infections. I had a ridiculous number of UTI's this year and I never had them before (literally have never had a UTI before this year). Now that I am 10 days into my gluten challenge I have yet another one. Does anyone else get this symptom from gluten? Does anyone know why this happens, any scientific explanation? Miserable bladder and GI over here.
  10. Hi, I had a bad accidental glutening incident recently. I purchased a box of chocolate in Poland which looked safe to eat. Stupidly, I assumed if there were gluten ingredients, that would be called out in the allergen warning. That turned out not to be the case, and I had a reaction. My typical symptoms are usually a kidney or bladder infection, depression, anxiety, memory problems, issues with focusing and concentration. All of which I have been experiencing since I ate the chocolate. I'm not sure which ingredient is the culprit, but I'm guessing that a cheap, not fully distilled alcohol was used. Normally, I have no problems with distilled grain alcohols. Just wanted to pass my experience along and hopefully save someone else from the same mistake. I've listed the ingredients below. -Marie Ingredients listed as follows: sugar, corn syrup, cocoa mass, cocoa butter, alcohol, stabilizer (invertase), emulsifiers (soy lecithin, polyglycerol, polyricinoleate, and sorbitan tristearate), artificial flavors. Allergen warning states that it contains soy, and may contain traces of egg or milk.
  11. Hey everyone! Sorry I'm new to everything here so I'm looking for some advice for you more seasoned pros. About 10 months ago I went to the Dominican on a service trip and ended up getting a severe stomach flu or cholera. Since then, I haven't felt normal. Symptoms started with stomach churning and bloating all the time, most often at night or after I ate. It kind of feels like when you drink a lot of water and you can feel it sloshing around-- but it happens to me all the time. It also is SUPER loud. I also was experiencing constipation. So I went to gastroenterology and they did a whole bunch of blood tests (including celiac) and all came back negative and normal. Then I got an endoscopy-- also normal. They told me I had post-infectious IBS, and that I just had to wait it out. So after months of waiting and still feeling sick I went back to the doctor. We did more tests (thyroid, food allergy) and all came back normal. My constipation had gotten worse at this point and I was still experience the churning/bloating all the time. Again they told me to wait. After 10 months I decided to get a second opinion. The doctor mentioned gluten sensitivity but said the topic was very controversial and there was no way to test for it. He also explained that my chronic headaches (since I was 14) and skin eczema (specifically on my scalp) could also be symptoms of gluten sensitivity. Unfortunately he said he didn't know enough about the subject to tell me any more. So after doing my own research I decided to try going gluten free on my own. The first two days I felt pretty good, the churning eased off a bit and my bathroom experiences weren't so bad. Day four however hit me hard. The churning was so bad it made me nauseous and I was so tired I couldn't do anything all day. Day 5 started with significant stomach churning/bloating, more constipation, and a migraine. I'm starting to question my self diagnosis. Am I way off track here? Is it possible I'm not gluten sensitive at all? The day I started to feel sick I had a starbucks raspberry latte and some movie theater popcorn (as well as some stuff I cooked myself). Is it possible that one of those things had gluten in it and it's affecting me this severely? Sorry for the long post, I'm just frustrated and looking for some answers. I'm new to this and I'm worried I'm doing it all wrong or I'm wrong in my diagnosis in the first place. Any similar experiences or help would be very VERY much appreciated. Sheri
  12. Celiac.com 03/23/2010 - Introducing gluten to a baby's diet during a period of infection does not increase the risk of the child developing celiac disease later on, according to a study by Swedish researchers. The team of researchers, led by Dr. Jonas F. Ludvigsson of Sweden's Karolinska Institute, used data from the population-based All Infants in Southeast Sweden study to search for independent associations of childhood infections with the risk of developing celiac disease. The team had parents chronicle their children's diet and infectious diseases in their first year of life, including breastfeeding start and stop dates, and dates the babies first ate gluten-containing foods. They enrolled a total of 9,408 children, and logged a total of 42,826 reports of infectious disease in the first year of life, including 4,003 episodes of gastroenteritis. Of 2,528 children who suffered infection at the time of gluten introduction, 18 developed celiac disease, while 26 of 6,880 children without infection developed celiac disease; for a total of 44 biopsy-proven cases of celiac disease after the children's first birthday (p = 0.035). 167 children suffered from gastroenteritis during gluten introduction, but just one child developed celiac disease, compared to 43 of 9,241 with no gastroenteritis during gluten introduction (p = ns). Once adjusted for age at gluten introduction, age at breastfeeding termination, and age at infection, the results showed no significant connection between infection or gastroenteritis at the time of gluten introduction and the later development of celiac disease. The team pointed out that they lack data on specific infection types, which limits the scope of their conclusions, and that further study is warranted. "We cannot rule out the possibility that specific pathogens constitute risk factors for celiac disease, because risk estimates for infection at the time of gluten introduction were of borderline significance," they said, noting that the study design precluded identification of subclinical infections. The added that "because celiac disease is increasingly diagnosed in adulthood, screening...and a longer follow-up period would be required for complete elucidation of the possible relationship between infections and [the development of] celiac disease." Source: Pediatrics 2010;125:e530-e536.
×
×
  • Create New...