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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 08/07/2018 - A new drug designed to reduce symptoms of accidental gluten ingestion in celiac disease sufferers has yielded some encouraging data. The drug in question is a monoclonal antibody designed to reduce adverse reactions in celiacs who are accidentally exposed to gluten. The results, presented at Digestive Disease Week, held in Washington DC from 2–5 June 2018, suggest that monoclonal antibodies could provide protection for people with celiac disease. Celiac patients on a gluten-free diet who randomly received six injections of a monoclonal antibody, called AMG 714, over a ten-week period, enjoyed a substantial reduction in intestinal inflammation. Over a ten week study period, celiac patients on a gluten-free diet received six randomly assigned injections of either a placebo, or of AMG 714 at a dose of either 150mg or 300mg. Patients then underwent a dietary gluten challenge from week through until week twelve. As tested, the drug did not reduce damage to intestinal villi for either treatment group, which was the trial’s primary goal, but it did significantly reduce celiac-related inflammation and symptoms in response to gluten consumption. Patients receiving the highest dose of AMG 714 had no clinically active disease at week twelve of the study, and also had a significant improvement in self-reported outcomes, compared with the placebo group. No matter how diligently people with celiac disease follow a gluten-free diet, they can still suffer accidental gluten exposure ingestion. Treatments like AMG 714 could become important adjunct to gluten-free diet in for people with celiac disease, including non-responsive celiac disease. Read more in Pharmaceutical-journal.com
  2. Celiac.com 12/14/2017 - Can enzyme supplements help people with gluten sensitivity, including those with celiac disease? An Australian company is touting the results of a recent randomized, double blind study that supports enzyme supplements might be helpful for celiac patients in certain circumstances. The enzyme supplement was designed for people with celiac disease to use when facing likely or possible exposure to gluten, such as when traveling or eating food prepared outside their direct control. The company is careful to state that "enzyme supplementation won't cure celiac disease, and sufferers still need to avoid gluten." But the evidence from the two most recent studies does suggest that the product does help digest dietary gluten and could make life much easier for many people with celiac disease. The product, called GluteGuard, is based on a papaya fruit enzyme called caricain. This enzyme is shown to be helpful for celiac patients. A 2015 study showed adding caricain to bread dough reduced gluten toxicity to gluten by 90% for celiac patients. GluteGuard was recently evaluated in two clinical studies in Poland. The first study looked at 20 patients with celiac disease who were in clinical remission on a gluten-free diet. In that study, all patients ate one gram of gluten, equal to about one slice of bread, each day for 42 days, with 14 patients also taking GluteGuard and six taking a placebo tablet. Patients noted their symptoms and well-being each day, and received biopsies both before and after the study. Thirteen of the 14 celiac patients (93%) taking GluteGuard showed no adverse changes in clinical symptoms, biopsy results or well-being throughout the 42 day trial. Only one GluteGuard patient withdrew due to celiac-associated symptoms, while 4 of 6 taking placebo withdrew after 14 days due to adverse celiac symptoms. The second Polish study looked at the effectiveness of GluteGuard in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis, a gluten-triggered skin condition common in celiac patients. As with the first study, all patients in these study were in clinical remission. Patients consumed around six grams of gluten daily for seven days, with ten patients also receiving GluteGuard tablets and ten getting a placebo. The GluteGuard showed better results compared with the placebo group, with 81% showing no increase in areas of skin lesions and 71% showing a reduction in the appearance of skin lesions. The GluteGuard group also showed a 38% reduction in skin itchiness. Of the seven patients who withdrew from the study due to gluten symptoms, six were taking placebo. Both clinical trials met high scientific standards. In both studies, participants were randomly allocated to receive the treatment or placebo, and neither the participants nor the researchers knew owhich patient was receiving which intervention. So, yes, enzyme supplements may provide some help for people with celiac disease, especially as a hedge against minor or occasional gluten ingestion. So far though, they are not a magic bullet, and cannot replace a gluten-free diet. Read more at Medicalexpress.com.
  3. Celiac.com 01/03/2009 - Recently on a gluten-free forum, I found a post asking for advice on what to do after a woman had accidentally consumed a large amount of gluten. After unknowingly eating from her daughter’s takeout box, the woman had realized her mistake and was simply devastated to have broken her diet and subjected herself to the old, too-familiar symptoms that were on their way. It was interesting reading the various responses, which resulted in a debate over whether or not to induce vomiting, drink pineapple juice, take enzymes or engage in a certain illegal activity. In all the debate, the woman eventually disappeared off the forum, which probably meant that she took some action or another, though I never heard the final result. This whole subject inspired some research on my part. I first consulted my extensive gluten-free library, which led me to one solitary, repetitive answer: do not eat gluten. In a world where doctors and authors alike are so concerned that their advice on the subject will lead people with gluten sensitivities to forgo a gluten-free diet in favor of a “band aid” of sorts, that finding a documented recommendation is near impossible. These experts are right to reinforce the importance of maintaining a gluten free lifestyle, and the fact that there is no “cure” for gluten intolerance and celiac disease (other than complete avoidance of gluten from wheat, barley and rye). But mistakes do happen, and from time to time people do get "glutened,” and when they do, which action is best? No matter what the size is of the offending dose of gluten, all experts agree, inducing vomiting is too dangerous and disruptive to the body to be considered. But there is one option that at least two noted experts in field of celiac research agree upon: enzymes. When I contacted the renowned Dr. Kenneth Fine of EnteroLab, and asked him if perhaps a dose of enzymes that are designed to break down gluten might help, he had this to say: “The good news is that everyone will survive and recover from the gluten exposure. The enzymes you mention might help, but not completely, unless they consumed at the same time (as the gluten) for best results.” And like all good doctors, he did go on to warn, “Avoidance is still the best policy.” Shari Lieberman, PhD, CNS, FACN and author of The Gluten Connection very humbly admits that “gluten slips happen.” She also devotes a couple of pages in her book to research conducted using digestive enzymes to help manage those occasions when gluten does make its way into your diet, citing a research example in which “The study demonstrates that enzyme therapy can substantially minimize symptoms in people with celiac disease who are exposed to gluten.” The enzyme used in this study does not seem to be currently available, but other gluten enzymes are at your local health food store. I contacted one company in regard to their product, which according to them helps to reduce inflammation caused by the introduction of gluten in an individual with celiac disease or gluten intolerance. According to them their enzymes will not prevent all damage, but may reduce some inflammation and help the body to better digest the protein. Ultimately, gluten sensitive individuals should recover from one accidental “gluten slip” here and there, and keeping some digestive enzymes handy to help cope with such an accident is not a bad idea. But do keep in mind that repeated offenses, even the most minute, will damage your body and prevent it from healing. Enzymes help treat the symptoms, but only complete avoidance of gluten can treat the disease.
  4. Yesterday night, by accident, I ingested gluten. I am very bloated and have water retention especially my face (looks very bloated) and my tummy. What are the best remedies for water retention please?
  5. Scand J Gastroenterol 1999 Sep;34(9):909-14 AW Morrow Gastroenterology and Liver Centre, Dept of Histopathology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. SPECIAL NOTE: European Codex Alimentarius quality wheat starch was used in this study. (Celiac.com 06/25/2000) BACKGROUND: It is expected that in patients with coeliac disease the small bowel mucosal mucosa will return to normal if they adhere to a gluten-free diet (GFD). However, in many this is not the case. This study aims to determine whether this persistent villous atrophy (VA) could be due to continued ingestion of the trace amounts of gluten in gluten-free foods, as defined by the WHO/FAO Codex Alimentarius. METHODS: Duodenal biopsy specimens from 89 adults with long-standing coeliac disease were examined, and the findings correlated with their form of gluten-free diet. RESULTS: In 51 subjects the duodenal specimen was normal, whereas in 38 there was villous atrophy (partial, 28; subtotal, 8; total, 2). There was no relationship between the presence or absence of VA and ingestion of either a GFD as defined by the Codex Alimentarius (Codex-GFD; 39 patients) or a GFD that contained no detectable gluten (NDG diet: 50 patients). Intraepithelial lymphocyte counts were higher, and lactase levels lower, in subjects with an abnormal biopsy specimen than in those in whom it was normal. However, within each of these biopsy groups there was no difference in these variables between patients on a Codex-GFD and those on an NDG-GFD. IgA antigliadin antibody was detected in 4 of 29 patients on a Codex-GFD and in 3 of 13 on a NDG-GFD (NS). CONCLUSION: The persistent mucosal abnormalities seen in patients with coeliac disease on a GFD are not due to the ingestion of trace amounts of gluten. The consequences of these abnormalities have yet to be determined.
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