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Found 7 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/02/2019 - Does gluten intake in childhood influence the development of celiac disease later in life? It's a basic question that hasn't had a good answer, until now. That's mainly due to an absence of good data. Looking to change that, a team of researchers recently set out to examine the connection between the amount of gluten intake in childhood and later celiac disease. The research team included Karl Mårild, MD, PhD; Fran Dong, MS; Nicolai A Lund-Blix, PhD; Jennifer Seifert, MPH; Anna E Barón, PhD; Kathleen C Waugh, MS; Iman Taki, BS; Ketil Størdal, MD, PhD; German Tapia, PhD; Lars C Stene, PhD; Randi K Johnson, MPH; Edwin Liu, MD; Marian J Rewers, MD, PhD; and Jill M Norris, MPH, PhD. For their prospective Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young, the team included 1,875 at-risk children with annual estimates of daily gluten intake from age 1 year. From 1993 through January 2017, the team used repeated tissue transglutaminase (tTGA) screening to identify 161 children with celiac disease autoimmunity and persistent tTGA positivity. A total of eighty-five children from this group met the celiac disease criteria of biopsy-verified histopathology or persistently high tTGA levels. The team used Cox regression to model gluten intake in children between ages 1 and 2 years, along with joint modeling of total gluten consumption throughout childhood to estimate hazard ratios adjusted for confounders (aHR). The data showed that children with the highest third of gluten intake between the ages of 1 and 2 years had double the chance of developing celiac disease, and celiac disease autoimmunity, compared with those in the lowest third. The results showed that every daily gram increase in gluten intake in 1-year olds increases the risk of developing celiac disease autoimmunity by 5%. The child's human leukocyte antigen genotype had no influence on the association between gluten intake in 1-year-olds and later celiac disease or celiac disease autoimmunity. Rates of celiac disease rose in direct relation to increased overall gluten intake throughout childhood. This is one of the first studies to show that gluten intake in 1-year-olds can influence the development of celiac disease, and celiac disease autoimmunity, in children at risk for the disease. Obviously, further study is needed, but the main takeaway from this study is that parents of 1-year old children with known risk factors for celiac disease might want to consider reducing the gluten intake in those children. Read more at the American Journal of Gastroenterology: May 09, 2019. doi: 10.14309/ajg.0000000000000255 The researchers in this study are variously affiliated with the Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; the Department of Pediatrics, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Barbara Davis Center, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA; the Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; the Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA; the Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA; and the Department of Pediatrics, Østfold Hospital Trust, Grålum, Norway.
  2. Celiac.com 07/04/2019 - There's been some data to suggest that gluten may play a role in diabetes, but there really isn't much data on the role of gluten in type 1 diabetes (T1D), so a team of researchers recently set out to test whether gluten plays a role in type 1 diabetes onset. Specifically, the team wanted to know if a gluten-free diet can decelerate the decline in beta-cell capacity in newly diagnosed non-celiac children with T1D. The research team included Vít Neuman, Stepanka Pruhova, Michal Kulich, Stanislava Kolouskova, Jan Vosahlo, Martina Romanova, Lenka Petruzelkova, Barbora Obermannova, Ondrej Cinek, and Zdeněk Šumník. They are variously affiliated with Charles University in Prague, and the University of Chemistry and Technology in Prague, Czech Republic. For their non-randomized self-selected intervention trial, the team recruited forty-six children, from about 6-13 years old. One group of 26 began a gluten-free diet, while 20 continued on a standard non-gluten-free diet. Main outcomes were the decline in C-peptide area under the curve (AUC) in mixed-meal tolerance tests and the differences in insulin dose, insulin dose adjusted A1c (IDAA1c) and HbA1c at 12 months. Data were analyzed as intention-to-treat by linear regression models adjusted for baseline parameters. The adherence to a gluten-free diet was tested by immunoreactive gluten in stool. Average decrease in C-peptide AUC was 293 vs.484 pmol/L (p=0.3) at 6 months, and 567 vs. 919 pmol/L (p=0.1) at 12 months in the gluten-free diet and control group, respectively. The group that ate a gluten-free diet had a lower insulin dose by 0.22 U/kg/day, lower IDAA1c by 1.5, and lower average HbA1c by 7.5 mmol/mol (p=0.01) after 12 months. Daily carbohydrate intake between the groups was the same. Researchers found immunoreactive gluten in the stool of just 3 patients. Children with type 1 diabetes who ate a gluten-free diet for their first year after diagnosis lower insulin demand and lower HbA1c, although C-peptide dynamics were similar for each group. This is the first study to provide solid data on the connection between gluten intake and type 1 diabetes. The fact that children who follow a gluten-free diet need less insulin is intriguing. Read more at Diabetes 2019 Jun; 68(Supplement 1).
  3. Celiac.com 04/18/2017 - Even though gluten-free diets are more popular than ever, researchers still don't have much good data on gluten intake and long-term health. A team of researchers recently set out to assess three large cohort studies, the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, n=69,276), the NHSII (n=88,610), and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS, n=41,908), and to estimate gluten intake using a validated food-frequency questionnaire collected every 2-4 years. The research team included Geng Zong, of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Benjamin Lebwohl, Celiac Disease Center, Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY; Frank Hu, Laura Sampson, Lauren Dougherty, Walter Willett, Andrew Chan, and Qi Sun, of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, MA. The team defined incidental Type 2 diabetes as physician diagnosed diabetes, and confirmed with supplementary information. Their results showed that average gluten intake, give or take standard deviation, was 5.83±2.23, 6.77±2.50, and 7.06±2.76 grams/day in NHS, NHSII, and HPFS, respectively. That gluten intake cam, mainly from carbohydrate sources, especially refined grains, starch, and cereal fiber (Spearman correlation coefficients > 0.6). The team confirmed 15,947 Type 2 diabetes cases over 4.24 million years of follow-up time. In all three groups, the team observed an inverse connection between gluten consumption and Type 2 diabetes risk. The multivariate adjustment (table), and hazard ratio (HR, 95% confidence intervals [95%CI]) comparing extreme quintiles were 0.80 (0.76, 0.84; P<0.001). The connection dissipated slightly after adjusting for cereal fiber (HR [95%CI]= 0.87 [0.81, 0.93]), but not for other carbohydrate components. For study participants under 65 years of age, and without major chronic diseases, changes in gluten intake were not associated with weight gain in multivariate adjusted model. Overall, the 4-year weight change (95%CI) was 0.08 (-0.06, 0.22; P=0.25) in NHS, -0.05 (-0.18, 0.08; P=0.43) in NHSII, and 0.36 (-0.24, 0.96; P=0.24) HPFS for each 5 grams increase in gluten intake. These findings suggest that gluten intake likely doesn't cause or promote Type 2 diabetes or excess weight gain. Reducing dietary gluten is unlikely to help prevent Type 2 diabetes, and may actually reduce consumption of cereal fiber or whole grains that help to lower overall diabetes risk. Source: AHA EPI
  4. Celiac.com 03/23/2016 - Can a gluten-free diet help athletes who do not have celiac disease or gluten-intolerance to improve their performance in competition? Yes, says Luke Corey, a dietitian for Exos, which creates sports performance and nutrition training programs at Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota. These benefits are real, Corey says, even though there is no published research indicating a gluten-free diet benefits the general population, athletes who avoid gluten enjoy an overall healthier diet. Corey adds that a gluten-free diet benefits an athlete's health and fitness even if he or she did not have a problem with gluten. "The main thing is the change in the overall diet," said Corey, who has worked with a wide variety of amateur and pro athletes, including players from the NBA, NFL, NHL and Major League Baseball. In most cases, the benefits come not so much by removing wheat, but by removing “…unhealthy, highly processed foods that are not very nutritious and replacing them with foods that are better quality and more nutritious. Corey says that the athletes he treats who eliminate gluten generally avoid highly processed bread, pasta, cookies, desserts and snacks that contain wheat. Major professional athletes who claim to have benefitted from a gluten-free diet, even though they do not have celiac disease, include: Tennis champion Novak Djokovic; New York Yankees' Mark Teixeira; Christie Rampone of the United States women's national soccer team; and Justin Pugh, New York Giants offensive tackle. What do you think? Are athletes who follow a gluten-free diet for non-medical reasons seeing benefits largely from eating healthier, less-processed foods? Is that a bad thing? Souce: thepostgame.com
  5. Celiac.com 06/07/2013 - A number of studies have indicated that people with celiac disease have an inadequate response to hepatitis B vaccination. In an effort to better understand the issue, a team of researchers recently set out to assess hepatitis B vaccination response in relation to gluten exposure status in patients with celiac disease. The research team included F. Zingone, P. Capone, R. Tortora, A. Rispo, F. Morisco, N. Caporaso, N. Imperatore, G. De Stefano, P. Iovino, and C. Ciacci. They are affiliated with the Department of Medicine and Surgery at the University of Salerno in Salerno, Italy. To measure the gluten exposure status at the time of vaccination, they compare three groups of patients, along with a control group. In all, the study included 163 celiac patients. Group A contained 57 patients exposed to gluten, including patients vaccinated as 12-year-old adolescents, for whom celiac disease diagnosis was established after vaccination. Group B contained 46 patients not exposed to gluten, including patients vaccinated as 12-year-old adolescents and on a gluten-free diet at the time of vaccination. Group C was composed of 60 infants, including those vaccinated at birth. Group D included 48 healthy, vaccinated, non-celiac subjects. The researchers then compared the response of celiac patients to hepatitis B vaccination with the response by healthy subjects. They found that 43.9% of patients in group A, 34.8% of patients in group B, 58.3% of patients in group C, and 8.3% of patients in group D showed inadequate response to hepatitis B immunization. Overall, group A versus group D, P less than 0.001; group B versus group D, P = 0.002; group C versus group D, P = 0.001, while they found no significant difference for group A versus group B and group A versus group C. This study suggests that gluten exposure does not influence the response to hepatitis B immunization, and that the human leukocyte antigen likely plays the main immunological role in poor responses to hepatitis B-vaccinated celiac patients. Source: Clin Vaccine Immunol. 2013 May;20(5):660-2. doi: 10.1128/CVI.00729-12. Epub 2013 Feb 27.
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