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Found 12 results

  1. Celiac.com 09/07/2018 - For the first time in one place, here are Celiac.com’s most popular recipes for gluten-free dinner entrees. These recipes have been enjoyed by hundreds of thousands of readers and have anchored more than a few gluten-free dinner tables. They are sure to please even the most hungry gluten-free eaters. Celiac.com’s Twenty Most Popular Gluten-Free Dinner Recipes are: Really Good Gluten-free Beef Stew Recipe Really Good Gluten-Free Chinese-style Fried Rice Recipe Easy Gluten-free Meatloaf Recipe Gluten-free Lobster Mac and Cheese with Truffle Oil Recipe Basic Gluten-Free Cheese Risotto Recipe Easy Gluten-Free Slow Cook Pot Roast Recipe Really Good Gluten-free Shepherd's Pie Recipe Really Good Gluten-Free Chicken Marsala Recipe Really Good Gluten-free Lasagna Recipe Gluten-free Italian-style Meatballs Recipe Gluten-Free Potato Salad Recipe Easy Gluten-Free Ground Beef Tacos Recipe Classic Gluten-Free Mexican-Style Rice Recipe Gluten-Free Chinese-style Lemon Chicken Recipe Celiac.com's Best Ever Gluten-free Thanksgiving Recipe Gluten-Free Corned Beef Recipe Gluten-Free Irish Soda Bread Recipe Easy Gluten-Free Bacon and Cheese Cornbread Recipe Gluten-Free Chicken Vegetable Curry Recipe Easy Gluten-Free Oven-baked Salmon Recipe
  2. Celiac.com 01/18/2017 - Irish food manufacturer Largo, whose snack products include Tayto, has admitted it sold crisps contaminated with high amounts of gluten in a packages that were labeled "Gluten Free." The company has pleaded guilty to breaching food safety regulations. After buying a package of O'Donnell's mature Irish cheese and onion, gluten-free crisps for her 10-year-old son, a mother from Arklow, County Wicklow, reportedly noticed a reaction to the crisps when his ears began turning red. The mother complained to the company and the HSE subsequently brought a criminal case against the food manufacturer. Calling the case a "very serious matter," Judge Grainne Malone noted that the maximum penalty on indictment in the cases at the circuit court was a €500,000 fine and/or three years in prison. However, the judge agreed to the jurisdiction of the district court in the case. Giving evidence, HSE environmental health officer Caitriona Sheridan said that products to be labeled gluten-free were required to contain less than 20 parts-per-milligram gluten. The crisps targeted by the complaint tested at more than 700 ppm gluten. Lab tests on a second control sample of the product showed more than 100 ppm of gluten. Two other people have since filed complaints about high gluten in Largo's gluten-free products. The company responded by withdrawing two pallets of the products, which it said contained the incorrect crisps. Counsel for the company, Andrew Whelan, told the court the issue was identified as a malfunction in the line, and that Largo will now package gluten-fee products in a "totally segregated" production area. Read more at Barfblog.com,
  3. Celiac.com 09/28/2015 - The Irish Daily Star is reporting that more than two dozen inmates at the country's top security Portlaoise Prison are set to protest prison authorities' refusal to give them gluten-free bread and better food. The inmates, including RIRA boss Michael McKevitt, say prison officials have broken an agreement to supply gluten-free bread as part of the prison diet. The availability of gluten-free bread seems to be an issue in what sounds like a larger complaint about the quality of food at the prison. Prisoners can purchase better food at the prison shop, at what prisoners claim are astronomical prices. According to the Daily Star, prisoners have begun stockpiling rubbish in preparation for a "dirty protest" in a bid to get the authorities to change their mind. The Prison Services have declined to comment. There has been no word about a direct connection to celiac disease in regards to the prisoners' demand for gluten-free bread. Earlier this week, republican prisoners group Cogus issued a statement highlighted food as one of the prisoners' main complaints. While that particular statement made no mention of gluten free bread, it read in part: "The food has seriously deteriorated over the last number of months and in general is sub-standard, at times unfit for human consumption, comprising of basic small portions which are totally inadequate." "This has resulted in men having to purchase food with the little money they have through the prison shop which charges extortionate prices. Numerous attempts have been made by the prisoners to resolve this issue but to no avail." Stay tuned for more developments. What do you think? Are prisoners entitled to gluten-free bread? Read more at: The Irish Daily Star
  4. If you want to celebrate St. Patty's Day with an easy, tasty Irish dish that moves away from corned beef and cabbage, then this just might be the ticket. Basically, it's just cabbage cooked in bacon drippings and topped with bacon. If this doesn't make you like cabbage, nothing will. It's a dish that goes great with your favorite gluten-free beer, and is a great dish to bring to a potluck. Ingredients: 1 (12 ounce) package bacon ¼ cup bacon drippings 1 small head cabbage, cored and finely chopped ground black pepper to taste Directions: Cook bacon in a deep skillet over medium heat until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove bacon from skillet and drain on a paper towel-lined plate. Reserve ¼ cup drippings in skillet. Cook and stir cabbage in hot bacon drippings over medium heat until cabbage wilts, 5 to 7 minutes. Crumble bacon over cabbage. Stir and simmer until bacon is warmed, 2 to 3 minutes. Season with black pepper. Serve.
  5. One day, I had a couple of packages of gluten-free brownie mix that needed to be used. I also had a good amount of Bailey's Irish Cream Liqueur, and was feeling a bit adventurous. I found a recipe at All Recipes.com for something called Bailey's Irish Cream Brownies. I used my gluten-free mix, and the result was this little bit of gluten-free Irish brownie joy. Ingredients: 2 (20.5 ounce) packages Cravings Place Ooey Gooey Chocolatey Chewy Gluten-Free Brownie Mix 1 cup Irish gluten-free cream liqueur (such as Carolans) ¼ cup vegetable oil 2 eggs Frosting Ingredients: 1 cup unsalted butter, softened 5 tablespoons Irish cream liqueur 4 cups powdered sugar Directions: Heat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Butter the bottom and edges of a 9x14-inch jelly roll pan. Place fudge brownie mix into a large bowl; beat in 1 cup of Irish cream liqueur, vegetable oil, and eggs until the mixture forms a smooth batter. Spread the batter into the prepared jelly roll pan. Bake in the preheated oven until the brownies are set and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, about 20 minutes. Remove pan from oven and allow to cool completely. Add unsalted butter to a large bowl and beat until smooth. Add 5 tablespoons Irish cream liqueur and beat until mixture is creamy. Slowly beat in confectioners' sugar, 1 cup at a time, until frosting is desired stiffness. Make sure brownies are cool, then spread frosting on brownies. Original recipe makes one 10 1/2x15 1/2-inch pan. Get your gluten-free brownie mix here.
  6. Celiac.com 10/19/2012 - Irish citizens with celiac disease will no longer be reimbursed for the gluten-free products they buy, under to a newly announced cutback to their health benefits. The Irish Pharmacy Union (IPU) says that new cuts to health benefits by the Irish health service (HSE) mean that many gluten-free products will no longer be reimbursed by the government, including products purchased by patients with medical cards, and those receiving long-term illness benefits. Gluten-free products that will no longer be covered include baking powder, breads, cornflakes, flour, muesli, pasta, pizza and porridge. People with celiac disease must eat gluten-free foods to avoid suffering from significant health problems. The IPU says this means that celiac patients, who rely on gluten-free products to maintain their health, will no longer receive financial support to help them cover the cost of these products. The HSE announced the controversial €130 million in cuts last spring, but made no mention that gluten-free products would be removed from the list of free items. The HSE announcement said only that 'certain products including' glucosamine, the obesity drug Orlistat, and Omega-3 Triglycerides to protect against heart disease, would be removed from the list of reimbursable products. In confirming the elimination of reimbursements for gluten-free products, an HSE spokesperson said that the agency was choosing to cut products for which there was 'doubt about their clinical efficacy.' What do you think? Are gluten-free products medically questionable for people with celiac disease? Let us know your thoughts by commenting below. Source: Irish Health
  7. This recipe comes to us from Kathy Bennett. Ingredients: ½ pound softened butter 8 ounce softened cream cheese 2 tablespoons vanilla extract 5 tablespoons sweetened condensed milk 3.5 ounce can Baker’s coconut 2 pounds 10x sugar Cinnamon Directions (By Hand): Mix butter and cream cheese Gradually add in vanilla - mix well Gradually add in condensed milk - mix well Gradually add in sifted 10x sugar - mix well Mix in the coconut Scoop out by teaspoonfuls and plop on a cookie sheet Cover with waxed paper and Chill in the refrigerator for 15 minutes Roll into balls Roll in cinnamon Store in the refrigerator
  8. The season of green is upon us once again and a Saint Patrick’s Day celebration wouldn’t be complete without a hearty piece of Irish soda bread. Reminiscent of a large scone, this recipe yields delightfully sweet bread. My Irish friends tell me a good crumbly piece of “Leprechaun Bread” goes great with a sharp cheddar cheese. I think a dab of butter and sprinkle of cinnamon is a nice topper as well. Ingredients: 1 cup brown rice flour ¼ cup tapioca flour ¼ cup potato starch 1 teaspoon xanthan gum 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon unflavored gelatin ½ teaspoon nutmeg ¼ cup buttermilk 6 tablespoons melted butter 1 tablespoon honey 1 egg, beaten ½ cup raisins or currants, soaked in hot water for 10 minutes Directions: Preheat oven to 350° F and line a standard loaf pan or baking dish with parchment paper. In a large bowl, combine all dry ingredients until well-incorporated. In a second bowl, stir together buttermilk, butter, honey, egg and soaked raisins. Hollow out a small well in the dry ingredients and slowly pour in the wet mixture. Stir until combined and sticky. Form into a loaf and transfer to baking pan. Cook for 35-40 minutes until a knife inserted in the middle comes out clean. Let cool and remove from parchment-line dish.
  9. In the spirit of all things Irish this month, I thought I'd experiment with a twist on an old favorite – Angel Food Cake. IrishCream Liqueur may be made at home or purchased as a manufacturedproduct. It does contain whiskey derived from gluten-containinggrains, but the distillation process removes all gluten, and (lucky forus) renders the drink gluten-free. There are several brandsavailable, but only some that are willing to state that they aregluten-free. Bailey's Irish Cream is not one of them. Despite thefact that there should be no gluten-containing ingredients whatsoeverin Irish cream, Bailey's is unwilling to make any statement that it isgluten-free (despite my repeated attempts to get information from themon the gluten-free status of their product). In stark contrast toBailey's corporate policy, St. Brendan's Irish Cream clearly states onits website that it is gluten-free. Whileit is unlikely that brands such as Bailey's contain any gluten (infact, they state that their whiskey is triple-distilled!), there is noreason to patronize a brand that refuses to take the time to determinewhether or not their product contains gluten. Reward companies whichacknowledge the importance of their gluten-free consumers; go directlyto brands like St. Brendan's if you want to purchase Irish CreamLiqueur. I have also posted a homemade recipe for Irish Cream Liqueurbelow the cake recipe, if you'd like to go head-first into the Irishspirit! You can make this cake as written, or feel free tosubstitute orange or lemon juice for the Irish Cream Liqueur and losethe cocoa if you don't want that either. This recipe is a greatfoundation for whatever taste you're seeking, any time of year! Angel Food Cake - Irish Style Ingredients: 6 eggs, separated 1 cup granulated cane sugar ½ cup confectioners sugar 1 ¼ cup Jules' Nearly Normal gluten-free All Purpose Flour 2 tablespoons cocoa (optional) 3 tablespoons Irish Cream Liqueur ¼ cup boiling water Directions: Preheat the oven to 300 F convection or 325 F static. Sift the All Purpose Flour, cocoa and confectioners sugar together in a small bowl and set aside. Separatethe eggs, beating the whites until stiff peaks form, then set that bowlaside. In another bowl, beat the yolks and the granulated sugar untillight. Add the boiling water and Bailey's next, beating until blended.Finally, stir in the flour-confectioners sugar mixture untilincorporated. Fold the beaten whites into the other mixture bygently stirring with a rubber spatula. When mixed, pour into anungreased 10-inch tube or spring form pan. Bake for 30 minutes, thenincrease the heat to 325 F convection or 350 F static and bake foranother 20-25 minutes, or until a cake tester comes out clean. Invertthe pan and allow to cool before removing the cake by sliding a knifearound the outside of the cake to release the cake from the sides. Glaze (optional): 8 oz. cream cheese (can use fat free or Tofutti Better than Cream Cheese) 1 cup confectioners’ sugar ½ cup heavy cream (can use half & half, but use less than ½ cup or use Soyatoo Soy Whip) Chocolate shavings (optional) Whipthe cream cheese and sugar until smooth, then slowly stir in the creamto make spread-able consistency. Drizzle over cake and sprinklechocolate shavings on top. Recipe for homemade Irish Cream Liqueur Ingredients: 1 ¼ cup Irish whiskey or bourbon 1 can (14 oz.) sweetened condensed milk 4 eggs 2 tablespoons gluten-free vanilla extract 2 tablespoons chocolate syrup ½ teaspoon almond extract 1 tablespoon powdered instant coffee or espresso Directions: Ina blender, blend all the ingredients at low speed until smooth.Refrigerate in a tightly-sealed bottle for up to one month. Shake orstir before serving over ice or in recipes.
  10. By Peter H.R. Green, MD Dr. Green is Professor of Clinical Medicine, Director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. This article originally appeared at http://hnn.us/articles/1125.html and is reprinted here by permission of Richard Shenkman. Celiac.com 11/27/2002 - New revelations that have appeared in the New York Times and the Atlantic Monthly, about John F. Kennedys health have raised questions about his physical condition during his presidency. Robert Dallek, in the December Atlantic Monthly, described in The Medical Ordeals of JFK long standing medical problems that started in childhood. In Kennedys adolescence, gastrointestinal symptoms, weight and growth problems as well as fatigue were described. Later in life, he suffered from abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, osteoporosis, migraine and Addisons disease. Chronic back problems, due to osteoporosis resulted in several operations and required medications for chronic pain. He was extensively evaluated in major medical centers including the Mayo Clinic and hospitals in Boston, New Haven and New York. Among the multiple diagnoses were ulcers, colitis, spastic colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, and food allergies. His medications included corticosteroids, antispasmodics, Metamucil and Lomotil. However it is not clear that his physicians obtained a definitive diagnosis. Review of this medical history raises the possibility that JFK had celiac disease. Celiac disease is caused by ingestion of gluten, which is the main protein component of wheat and related cereals, rye and barley. The small intestine develops villous atrophy that results in difficulties in the absorption of nutrients. Diarrhea and abdominal pain are common symptoms. Elimination of gluten from the diet results in resolution of the inflammatory condition in the intestine and the associated symptoms and prevention of the complications of the disease. A life-long gluten free diet is then required. People with celiac disease, providing they adhere to the diet have normal longevity. Celiac disease can present at any age. In infancy and childhood it may cause chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, and growth, behavioral and development problems. In older individuals the presentation of celiac disease is frequently due to the development of complications of the disease. These include anemia, osteoporosis, skin rashes or neurological problems. The neurological problems include neuropathy, epilepsy, ataxia (balance disorders) and migraine. While the disease is more common in females, men are affected as well. Osteoporosis is common in patients with celiac disease, men often are more severely affected than women. Gastrointestinal symptoms in celiac disease persist for many years prior to diagnosis and are often attributed to an irritable bowel syndrome or spastic colitis. Patients typically see many physicians prior to the diagnosis of celiac disease. Autoimmune disorders occur more frequently in patients with celiac disease than the general population by a factor of ten. Frequently the autoimmune disorder assumes greater clinical significance than the celiac disease and as a result is diagnosed first. The associated autoimmune disorders include thyroid dysfunction, psoriasis, dermatitis herpetiformis (an intensely itchy skin rash), Sjogrens syndrome, and Addisons disease. Relatives of patients with celiac disease have a greater risk, not only of celiac disease, but also of other autoimmune diseases. THE IRISH CONNECTION Celiac disease was formally considered a rare disease of childhood. It is now recognized as being very common in those of European descent, one of the most common genetically determined conditions physicians will encounter. Recent studies have demonstrated the country with the greatest prevalence to be Ireland. In Belfast one in one hundred and twenty two have the illness. The prominent familial association of the disease indicated by the occurrence in one of ten first degree relatives and in 80 percent of identical twins points to a genetic component of the disease. However the actual genes responsible for the disease have not been discovered though there are many groups working on the problem. It is known that there is a strong association with specific HLA genes that are required for the disease to occur, but are themselves not sufficient for the disease to be manifested. Kennedys Irish heritage, long duration of gastrointestinal complaints (since childhood), diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome and migraine, presence of severe osteoporosis, and the development of Addisons disease all lead to a presumptive diagnosis of celiac disease. Kennedy was given steroids for his problems. Steroid use is associated with the development of osteoporosis and Addisons disease. However steroids were initially used in clinical practice in the 1930s and 1940s for many indications, not considered appropriate now. In the case of Kennedy, if he did in fact have celiac disease, the steroids would have suppressed the inflammation in the intestine and reduced his symptoms, making diagnosis of celiac disease less likely to be established. The occurrence of Addisons disease in his sister, however, argues for a familial cause of his Addisons disease, rather than an iatrogenic one. Could celiac disease have been diagnosed in Kennedy during his lifetime? Possibly. The disease was first recognized in 1887 as well as its treatment with an elimination diet. It was recognized to occur at all ages. However, it was not until the 1950s that the shortage of bread during the Second World War and its subsequent reintroduction in Holland prompted recognition of the role of wheat as a cause of this malabsorption syndrome. While it was in the 1970s that physicians became aware of the more subtle presentations of the disease. The diagnosis of celiac disease initially requires consideration that it may be present in an individual patient, even now many physicians do not consider the diagnosis. It would however be possible to diagnose celiac disease in JFK now, if biopsies taken during his life, or autopsy material of the small intestine had been archived and was now made available. Frozen blood samples could also provide diagnostic material for there are serologic tests now available that are sensitive and specific for the condition.. A diagnosis of celiac disease, if it had been made could have been treated by diet alone. This would have prevented all the manifestations of the disease and its complications. Because of the strong genetic component of celiac disease, Kennedys family may well be interested in obtaining the diagnosis as well.
  11. This recipe comes to us from Pat Mazza. 3 cups of gluten-free(Betty Hagman) Flour Mix ** 1 egg 1 tablespoon gluten-free baking powder 2 cups of buttermilk 1/3 cup of sugar ¼ cup melted butter 2 ½ teaspoons of xanthan gum 1 teaspoon of salt 1 teaspoon of gluten-free baking soda ½ cup raisins Preheat oven to 325F. Grease a loaf pan. Sift dry ingredients together. Whisk milk and egg together, and then add to dry ingredients. Add butter and mix until combined, do not over mix. Add more buttermilk if it seems too dry. Put in prepared pans and bake 50-55 minutes. Check to see if done wit a toothpick and the top is brown. Put pats of butter on top while still hot, if desired. **The gluten-free mix is from the Betty Hagman books: 2 parts white rice flour or 6 cups or 3 cups 2/3 parts potato starch flour or 2 cups or 1 cup 1/3 part tapioca flour or 1 cup or ½ cup
  12. Celiac.com 06/10/2010 - New research is currently underway in Ireland, as researchers test "pseudo-cereals" to determine the quality of replacements for glutenous grains such as, wheat, rye and barley. Many celiacs, especially those with delayed diagnosis', suffer from malabsorbtion and malnutrition. It is therefore more important for celiacs to ingest grains that are vitamin fortified than it is for non-celiacs. Researchers at Teagasc Food Research Ashtown are attempting to address the nutritional concerns for gluten-free products. They are working to formulate gluten-free bread products that are tasty, and have higher nutritional properties. Doctor Eimear Gallagher, of Teagasc Food Research Ashtown, is leading the current research project which primarily focuses on using “pseudo-cereals” such as amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat, to replace gluten containing grains, also known as wheat, rye and barley. Dr. Gallagher suggests that the demand for new and improved gluten-free bread products is growing rapidly due to greater public awareness of celiac disease, and the rise in positive celiac diagnoses'. Celiac affects approximately 1 percent of the population. Which means that 1 percent of the population must look for alternatives to favored grain products such as bread, pizza and cereals to name a few. While there is a large variety of gluten-free products on the market, many gluten-free products are described as being crumbly, brittle, bland and often rendered inedible. Gluten-free products are not only considered inferior in texture and taste to their wheat counterparts, but they are also criticized for having inferior nutritional value. Most mainstream breads and grains are vitamin fortified and therefore contain many essential nutrients, vitamins, and fiber. However, most gluten-free grains are typically made with starches and refined flours such as rice, corn and potato starches, which are low in nutrients and are not usually fortified. Dr. Gallagher and researchers are studying characteristics of pseudo-cereals to replace wheat in grain products. Amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat are naturally high in nutritional values with high levels of protein and dietary fiber, which make them excellent grain alternatives for celiacs. Dr. Gallagher's findings showed that all of the pseudo-cereal breads revealed a significant increase in antioxidant and polyphenol activity, compared to the gluten-free control group. Teagasc food researchers are also working hard to create a dairy-based ingredient that can produce the same properties in bread as gluten does. So far researchers have discovered that casein aggregates and forms a protein network which can retain gas in gluten-free dough. The reactions are similar to gluten containing wheat dough, but this is a work in progress and more studies are needed. Dr. Gallagher's studies have revealed significant information on ingredients, formulations and technologies used to make gluten-free products, which will help provide edible and healthy alternatives to gluten-free products. Source: ScienceDaily (May 26, 2010)
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