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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 05/23/2018 - Yes, we at Celiac.com realize that rye bread is not gluten-free, and is not suitable for consumption by people with celiac disease! That is also true of rye bread that is low in FODMAPs. FODMAPs are Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols. FODMAPS are molecules found in food, and can be poorly absorbed by some people. Poor FODMAP absorption can cause celiac-like symptoms in some people. FODMAPs have recently emerged as possible culprits in both celiac disease and in irritable bowel syndrome. In an effort to determine what, if any, irritable bowel symptoms may triggered by FODMAPs, a team of researchers recently set out to compare the effects of regular vs low-FODMAP rye bread on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and to study gastrointestinal conditions with SmartPill. A team of researchers compared low-FODMAP rye bread with regular rye bread in patients irritable bowel syndrome, to see if rye bread low FODMAPs would reduce hydrogen excretion, lower intraluminal pressure, raise colonic pH, improve transit times, and reduce IBS symptoms compared to regular rye bread. The research team included Laura Pirkola, Reijo Laatikainen, Jussi Loponen, Sanna-Maria Hongisto, Markku Hillilä, Anu Nuora, Baoru Yang, Kaisa M Linderborg, and Riitta Freese. They are variously affiliated with the Clinic of Gastroenterology; the Division of Nutrition, Department of Food and Environmental Sciences; the Medical Faculty, Pharmacology, Medical Nutrition Physiology, University of Helsinki in Helsinki, Finland; the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University, Hospital Jorvi in Espoo, Finland; with the Food Chemistry and Food Development, Department of Biochemistry, University of Turku inTurku, Finland; and with the Fazer Group/ Fazer Bakeries Ltd in Vantaa, Finland. The team wanted to see if rye bread low in FODMAPs would cause reduced hydrogen excretion, lower intraluminal pressure, higher colonic pH, improved transit times, and fewer IBS symptoms than regular rye bread. To do so, they conducted a randomized, double-blind, controlled cross-over meal study. For that study, seven female IBS patients ate study breads at three consecutive meals during one day. The diet was similar for both study periods except for the FODMAP content of the bread consumed during the study day. The team used SmartPill, an indigestible motility capsule, to measure intraluminal pH, transit time, and pressure. Their data showed that low-FODMAP rye bread reduced colonic fermentation compared with regular rye bread. They found no differences in pH, pressure, or transit times between the breads. They also found no difference between the two in terms of conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. They did note that the gastric residence of SmartPill was slower than expected. SmartPill left the stomach in less than 5 h only once in 14 measurements, and therefore did not follow on par with the rye bread bolus. There's been a great deal of interest in FODMAPs and their potential connection to celiac disease and gluten-intolerance. Stay tuned for more information on the role of FODMAPs in celiac disease and/or irritable bowel syndrome. Source: World J Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 21; 24(11): 1259–1268.doi:  10.3748/wjg.v24.i11.1259
  2. Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N

    Can IBS be Reversed?

    Celiac.com 02/23/2017 - IBS, also known as Irritable Bowel Syndrome, is a miserable condition. If you've ever had food poisoning or experienced Montezuma's revenge from travel, you have a good idea of how someone who suffers from IBS may feel. But while your food poisoning passed in a couple of days, imagine what it would be like to live like that each and every day. You have loose bowel movements anywhere from 4 to 20 times per day. And often they are so urgent that making it to the bathroom is not always possible. You don't need to think about that scenario for long to realize why patients with IBS often choose not to venture far from home. They can literally become ‘house bound' by this condition. The chronic diarrhea often switches to constipation for several days before the diarrhea resumes, but they rarely have ‘normal bowel function'. Imagine if you were diagnosed with this condition. You would want to know the treatment and, hopefully, the cure. Most doctors will tell you that there is no cure. They'll also start talking to you about your stress levels. Do you think it's more common for the stress to precede IBS or to be a result of it? Do you think it's at all stressful to never know when you'll next need to ‘dash' to the restroom? Do you think it's at all stressful to constantly have to contemplate what it would be like if you DIDN'T successfully make it to the restroom? Yes, in my experience I do find that in the vast majority of cases the stress is secondary to the condition, not primary. That's my experience, but I also haven't met a case of IBS that I haven't cured – providing the patients were compliant, of course. If you look online, this is what ‘WebMD' has to say about the condition: "Although there currently is no cure for IBS, careful attention to diet and stress management should help keep your symptoms under control and perhaps even prevent them from coming back." "In many people who have IBS, eating may trigger symptoms. But for most people, there is not a particular type of food that triggers symptoms." "Increasing the amount of fiber in your diet can help control constipation. High-fiber foods include fresh fruits (raspberries, pears, apples), fresh vegetables (peas, brussels sprouts), wheat bran, and whole-grain breads and cereals. Beans such as kidney, pinto, and garbanzo are also high-fiber foods, but they should probably be avoided if gas is one of your symptoms." "You can take steps to reduce the possibility that certain foods will cause symptoms, such as avoiding or limiting gas-producing foods (including beans and cabbage), sugarless chewing gum and candy, caffeine, and alcohol." Okay. So according to them you should eat wheat bran, but you should avoid beans and cabbage. To say I disagree would be an understatement. I personally have not met a single person with IBS who wasn't gluten intolerant and I have never found anyone with this ailment who couldn't eat some beans and cabbage. Gas is a result of poorly digested food. The cause isn't typically the ‘gassy' food, but rather a food intolerance that is creating stress on the small intestine, resulting in a compromised ability to produce enzymes and properly digest food. Gassiness is an easy symptom to cure, but avoiding beans and cabbage is not typically the answer. Let's look at some recent research that shines some light on this topic: Just last month Gastroenterology published an article entitled ‘A Controlled Trial of Gluten-Free Diet in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome-Diarrhea: Effects on Bowel Frequency and Intestinal Function'. This study was performed by a team of doctors at the Mayo Clinic. Their goal was to discover whether IBS patients with diarrhea as their predominant symptom could benefit from a gluten-free diet. They performed genetic testing for celiac genes on 45 IBS patients who fit their criteria. Twenty-two patients were put in the gluten containing diet group, while twenty-three were put into the gluten-free group. In each group, 50% had the celiac genes and 50% of the group did not. Bowel function (number of bowel movements) and permeability, as well as the production of inflammatory chemicals were measured. Those on the gluten containing diet had more bowel movements per day, with the greater number seen in those positive for the celiac gene. So too was intestinal permeability (leaky gut) more prevalent in those consuming gluten and positive for the celiac gene. While effects of gluten were certainly stronger in those with the celiac gene, even those without the gene were affected when compared to the gluten-free group. The authors' conclusion was that gluten alters bowel barrier function in IBS patients with predominant diarrhea, particularly among those who carry the celiac gene. They concluded with this statement: "These findings reveal a reversible mechanism for the disorder." Did those who reacted to gluten suffer from gluten sensitivity? Is that why they still reacted negatively to gluten despite not carrying the gene for celiac? It would be interesting to find out. In my clinical experience, it is often the case that a patient suffers from IBS but does not have celiac disease. We find them to be gluten sensitive. The treatment of avoiding gluten is still the same, but these patients do not carry the celiac gene. It seems that while a gluten-free diet isn't the answer for 100% of IBS patients, it is definitely a component in enough people suffering from IBS that it would be a shame to not test for it. Do you agree? It seems to be a better course than recommending eating gluten and avoiding beans, while stating there is no cure. I'm sorry if my comments seem caustic, but it is upsetting to see such advice given that, in my opinion, does next to nothing to improve the lives of those who are suffering. If you have IBS or know of someone who does, do consider getting testing for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Remember that these tests aren't perfect. Even if you test negative, it would do no harm to try a 30 day gluten elimination diet. Let me know how it goes and please contact me should you have any questions. Our destination clinic treats patients from across the country and internationally, so you don't need to live locally to receive help. You can call us for a free health analysis at 408-733-0400. Reference: Gastroenterology. 2013 Jan 25. pii: S0016-5085(13)00135-2. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.01.049. A Controlled Trial of Gluten-Free Diet in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome-Diarrhea: Effects on Bowel Frequency and Intestinal Function. Vazquez-Roque MI, Camilleri M, Smyrk T, Murray JA, Marietta E, O'Neill J, Carlson P, Lamsam J, Janzow D, Eckert D, Burton D, Zinsmeister AR.
  3. Recently, over the past few years I have had to take some steroids to control what has yet to be diagnosed as dermatitis or psoriasis, test results coming soon from biopsy. Also recently i have been diagnosed with diverticulitis. I have always had issues with stomach, pain, IBS, diarrhea, and heightened levels of anxiety and panic attacks. I am wondering if there is a connection with Gluten intolerance. Has anyone had any experience with anxiety and Celiac. Profuse sweating on palms, under arms and groin areas. With these i have also just started getting yeast/fungal infections in groin area, psoriasis/dermatitis on scalp, folds between buttocks and scrotum. Thinking all these symptoms are pointing to Celiac, any ideas or info is greatly appreciated.
  4. Hi! I was hoping some of you might be able to tell me if my symptoms seem like good reason to be tested for celiac disease... I actually asked my doctor to test me (years ago) and she told me she would not test me because the test is expensive... However, I am now desperate to figure out how to manage my health issues and am willing to find a doctor that WILL test me if my symptoms seem to point to celiac...Here they are: I have been diagnosed with all of the following over the last 12 years (I am 22 years old, and have always been a healthy weight/slightly underweight, and quite active): Irritable Bowel Syndrome Fibromyalgia Anorexia (started when I was 10, I have been mostly recovered since I was 14) Depression Anxiety Panic Attacks Horrible mood swings (from suicidal to totally fine in a matter of minutes) Chronic constipation and bloating Acne HOWEVER, no one in my family has been diagnosed with celiac....am I wrong to think I have it??
  5. A little history...I am 39 years old. I've had belly issues for as long as I can remember. I was diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome in my early 20's. My symptoms: Nausea (I don't always feel awful, but I never feel good. This is daily. Something I unfortunately considered normal for me. It's all I've known for over 20-25 years). Abdominal cramping Constipation and diarrhea (less C and more D) Stool contains a lot of mucous, floats (fatty stool?) Frequent headaches Fatigue/sleepiness Numb/tingly hands and feet (most intense after eating) Brain fog (feels like "medicine head") I had my gallbladder removed three years ago. I have another autoimmune disorder that caused six miscarriages (I now am the mom to three nine year olds as a result of INVITRO. They administered IVIG and heparin to sustain pregnancy). My numb/tingly hands started just a few months before I had my gallbladder removed. I saw a doctor at that time to discuss the numbness (I had an MRI to rule out MS and stroke, bloodwork and EKG to rule out heart issues). When that came out all normal, he said he didn't know what else could be causing it. He said the fatigue was due to being the mom of three kids. This kind of ticked me off. I get that it's tiring, but there is a difference between being exhausted from life, and SLEEPY all the time. My headaches he attributed to three children as well. Sigh. My constipation and diarrhea due to ibs, and for my nausea, suggested I give up dairy to see if I was possibly lactose intolerant. I gave it up for about two weeks. No change. Perhaps I didn't give it long enough. I was so happy to have MS ruled out, I let it go. I blame myself for not being proactive in getting to the bottom of what was wrong with me. Nausea and these weird numb hands and feet were my new normal. I'm not the person I used to be. I used to be fun, cheerful. I feel like I'm just this lump of grumpy because I never feel good. I guess I could add irritability as a symptom, but I feel of course I'm irritable, I feel like crap! Zoom to now. I've gained 30 pounds the past two years. I can't lose weight. No matter what I eat, how much I exercise, the scale doesn't move. If it does, it moves up. I was playing around online seeing what I could do, and why I wasn't losing. It kept leading me to gluten and celiac. I read the symptoms...nausea, headaches, etc are symptoms to almost all ailments it seems. Then I got to the numbness and miscarriages...and a lightbulb went off. I saw a new doc . She said it could be thyroid, vitamin B deficiency, or celiac. Thyroid and VB came back normal. She did one blood test for celiac (iGa?). It came back negative, but she said it is not uncommon for false negatives, so she recommend I go in for a biopsy to confirm or rule it out. I had my biopsy this morning. I'm frustrated because the GI doc seemed totally aggravated that I was having a biopsy done. He said that since my bloodwork came back negative, I do NOT have celiac. He said the numbness has nothing to do with celiac...unless of course I was malnourished, which I didn't appear to be (yes, I am overweight), and my bloodwork didn't reflect that. He said when it comes back negative (not if, when), we can meet again to look into getting meds to help with my IBS. Good news is that even though he gave me attitude, he did perform the biopsy. I should get results early next week. I told him that if it turns out negative, I still plan to eliminate gluten to see if that helps rid me of my symptoms. He looked at me like I was out of my kind and said dryly, "if you don't have celiac, you don't have problems with gluten." Fine. Whatever. I didn't argue with him. What does it hurt to try? I'm happy I got my biopsy. I'm hoping it gives me answers. If any of this sounds like your experience. If you could give me any advice. I really appreciate it!
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