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Found 7 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/20/2017 - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) wants drugmakers to provide detailed labeling about gluten in drugs. The agency's recent draft guidance encourages drugmakers to provide clear labeling about whether their product ingredients contain gluten. FDA says the guidance is meant to improve consumer knowledge about the presence of wheat gluten in oral drugs. Unless a drug specifically contains wheat gluten or wheat flour as an ingredient, the agency says it expects most drugs to contain less gluten than a gluten-free cookie. Under the guidance, the "amount of gluten estimated to be potentially present in a unit dose of an oral drug product (less than 0.5mg) is significantly less than the range at which gluten is estimated to be present in a gluten-free diet (5 to 50mg)." The guidance notes that 0.5mg gluten is the high end of its estimated range. FDA also says it is unaware of any currently marketed oral drugs that contain gluten as an intentionally added inactive ingredient, and that drugs that with intentionally added gluten would have to be labeled as such. The guidance encourages manufacturers to include a statement that their drug "contains no ingredient made from a gluten-containing grain (wheat, barley or rye)" when such a statement is "truthful and substantiated" in the description section of the drug's prescribing information. The guidance pertains to all human drugs that pass through the small intestine, including drugs that are taken orally, topical drugs applied on or near the lips and drugs that are applied inside the mouth. The guidance was necessary in part because, according to FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, "because there has been uncertainty about gluten in certain drug products, some patients may be avoiding medications that would otherwise offer a health benefit." Read the full guidance at: FDA.gov
  2. Celiac.com 09/17/2012 - Many aspects of celiac disease simply have not been well studied, so they remain poorly understood. For example, researchers have not done enough study on people with celiac disease to understand if they show any readily available serological markers of neurological disease. To better understand this issue, a research team recently assessed the amount of brain abnormality in patients with celiac disease, along with looking into MR imaging sequences as biomarkers for neurological dysfunction. The study team included S. Currie, M. Hadjivassiliou, M.J. Clark, D.S. Sanders, I.D. Wilkinson, P.D. Griffiths, and N. Hoggard, of the Academic Unit of Radiology at University of Sheffield, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, in Sheffield, UK. For their study, they conducted a retrospective examination of a consecutive group of 33 patients with biopsy proven celiac disease, who had been referred for neurological opinion. The group ranged in age from 19 to 64 years old, with an average of 44±13 years. Researchers divided the group into subgroups based on their main neurological complaints of balance disturbance, headache and sensory loss. They used 3T MR to evaluate variations in brain grey matter density, cerebellar volume, cerebellar neurochemistry and white matter abnormalities (WMAs) between celiac patients and control subjects. The results showed that the celiac patients had a significantly lower cerebellar volume than did control subjects. Celiac patients had 6.9±0.7% of total intracranial volume, compared with 7.4±0.9% for control subjects (p<0.05). Celiac patients also showed significantly less grey matter density in multiple brain regions, both above and below the tentorium cerebelli, compared with the control subjects (p<0.05). The data showed that 12 (36%) patients demonstrated WMAs unexpected for the patient's age, with the highest incidence occurring in the headache subgroup. This group of patients averaged nearly double the number of WMAs per MR imaging session than the subgroup with balance disturbance, and six times more than the subgroup with sensory loss. The MR images of celiac patients who have neurological symptoms show significant brain abnormality on MR imaging, which means that MR imaging may serve as valuable biomarkers of disease in celiac patients. Source: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2012 Aug 20.
  3. Celiac.com 11/26/2014 - Catholics with celiac disease received some hopeful news recently, when the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops voted overwhelmingly in favor of drafting of a revision to the Guidelines for the Celebration of the Sacraments with Persons with Disabilities. The vote was 207 bishops in favor and one against, with one abstention. The bishops voted to change the guideline to accommodate people with celiac disease and others who cannot consume wheat, and have been unable to take full communion. Because churches are required to serve communion wafers that contain wheat, numerous people have been unable to consume the wafers, and have thereby been missing out on what many deem to be a crucial part of communion. Some Catholic churches have tried to accommodate people with celiac disease and gluten sensitivities by offering low-gluten communion wafers. However, even the low-gluten versions approved by the church generally did not meet the FDA standards requiring less than 20 parts per million of gluten, and were thus unacceptable to many with celiac disease or severe gluten sensitivity. For these people, even small amounts of the wheat gluten can cause health problems. Exactly what changes the bishops will make regarding the Eucharistic wafer remain to be seen. Ideally, the new guidelines will permit wafers that are safe for people with celiac disease, and which will permit them to enjoy full communion. How do you feel about this? Is it welcome news? Do you know any catholics who’ve been missing out on communion? Stay tuned for more news on the new guidelines. Here, you’ll find a copy of the November 2014 USCCB General Assembly Agenda Item Vote Results.
  4. Celiac.com 05/07/2015 - Are chefs are improving their awareness of gluten-related disorders? That's one of the questions addressed in a new 10-year follow-up study in the UK. The study was conducted by a team of researchers headed by I. Aziz of the Department of Gastroenterology in Royal Hallamshire Hospital at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals in Sheffield, UK. The team also included M.A. Karajeh, J. Zilkha, E. Tubman, C. Fowles, and D.S. Sanders. The team set out to measure any changes in awareness of gluten-related disorders among the general public, and among chefs. To do so, they compared results from face-to-face questionnaires on celiac disease and gluten sensitivity on the general public and chefs based in Sheffield, UK. The survey was conducted in 2003, and repeated in 2013. They compared the results from the 265 chefs in 2013 against results from the 322 chefs in 2003. Whereas in 2003 the public were significantly more aware of gluten-related disorders than chefs, by 2013, rates of awareness in the groups were about equal. The 2003 group was 85% male, with a mean age 37.6 years old. The second group was younger at 27.1 years, on average, and more evenly mixed, with 38% women. Overall, the results showed a significant increase in chefs' awareness of gluten-related disorders from the years 2003 to 2013. Awareness of celiac disease had risen from a dismal 17.1% in 2003 to a respectable 78.1% in 2013 (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of 12.5; 95% CI 7.9-19.6). For Gluten Sensitivity, awareness had climbed from a mere 9.3% in 2003 to 87.5% in 2013 (AOR 65.7; 95% CI 35.4-122; P<0.001). The survey also showed that 44% of the public and 40% of chefs (P=0.28) properly recognized the official gluten-free symbol. There has been a marked increase in both the public's and chefs' awareness of gluten-related disorders. Hopefully, this awareness will translate into better, safer gluten free offerings for people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity. Find further reading, including hard numbers from the survey, in the European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Source: Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Nov;26(11):1228-33. doi: 10.1097/MEG.0000000000000166.
  5. Celiac.com 05/28/2010 - Celiac disease research is linking Irritable Bowel Syndrome with gluten intolerance and doctors are recommending IBS sufferers, especially those with diarrhea-predominant IBS, to get tested for gluten issues or celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease. The source of this being gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, often affecting the entire body and manifesting various physical and mental symptoms, and a gluten-free diet is the simple treatment for this disease. New research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine has shown that people with IBS are four times more likely to have celiac disease than those without IBS. Doctors, often uneducated about celiac disease or improperly taught that its symptoms are dramatic, don’t associate the common symptoms of IBS, stomachaches, bloating, fatigue, and diarrhea, with celiac disease or gluten intolerance. In the January 2009 issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology, the American College of Gastroenterology began recommending that doctors screen patients who manifest symptoms of IBS for celiac disease as well. The diagnosis is easy to test for. Simple blood tests detect the disease over ninety percent of the time. The diagnosis is then confirmed by an upper endoscopy. A small, flexible tube is slipped into the mouth of the sedated patient, down his esophagus and stomach and into the first part of the small intestine, where biopsies are taken and then examined for changes seen in celiac disease. After a correct diagnosis is made, people with IBS who are also celiac can begin the rapid road to recovery with a gluten-free diet. As people become more aware of celiac disease and gluten intolerance, gluten-free foods and gluten-free cooking become more and more available. There are now many delicious gluten-free recipes available for favorite foods and desserts such as gluten-free pizza, gluten-free muffins, and gluten-free cupcakes. Adults and children alike who are gluten intolerant can still enjoy a gluten-free balanced diet with a variety of gluten-free choices. In the U.S., a slightly increased rate of celiac diagnosis among adults has already lead to increased support. Gluten-free foods and gluten-free recipes are more readily available than ever. The Gluten-Free Restaurant Awareness Program (GFRAP) assists in the mutually beneficial relationship between people diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten intolerance and restaurants, resulting in an increase in the number of restaurants which can provide service to people following a gluten-free diet while increasing their patronage. Participating restaurants are able to provide gluten-free meals. As more and more people are diagnosed with gluten intolerance, their list of participating restaurants will surely grow. However, the U.S. remains behind in celiac awareness. This probably has something to do with the fact that celiac disease is the only autoimmune disease that the government doesn’t support with research grants. Centers such as Dr. Green’s Celiac Disease Research Center are one-hundred percent dependent on charitable donations or university funds. Even though diagnosis is slightly up for celiac adults, this isn’t enough to raise awareness and bring relief for the three million people who suffer from celiac disease, nearly ninety-seven percent of whom don’t even know the cause of their painful symptoms. With increased diagnosis, we will surely see increased support, and soon the celiac community will be able to enjoy the same quality of life and food and cooking options which is enjoyed by, for instance, the lactose-intolerant community. If you have been diagnosed with IBS or have similar symptoms, make an appointment with your doctor today to get tested for celiac disease or gluten intolerance. It may just bring you the relief you’ve been looking for all these years.
  6. Celiac.com 11/03/2009 - Many infants, toddlers and young children are either born with or develop a variety of protein allergies with symptoms including anaphylaxis, intolerance or sensitivity to milk, egg, shellfish, crustacean, peanuts, nuts, sesame seeds, soy and gluten. These symptoms can manifest themselves in a variety of ways including coeliac (celiac) disease (gut damage), eczema, shock, migraines, headaches, crankiness, aggression, depression, listlessness, chronic fatigue, irritable bowel, wind, flatulence, diarrhea, bloating, fluid retention, poor growth patterns, feeling vaguely and sometimes seriously unwell: a general failure to thrive.Unfortunately, we do not understand all the reasons. There are nutritional, neurological and hormonal implications, which often go unconsidered, to many of the foods we eat. In some instances, with babies, the problems are transmitted via the mother’s breast milk and there are many instances of babies, for example plainly uncomfortable at being entirely covered in a painful rash due to their reactions to gluten and other foods in their mother’s diets. Such problems are more common where there is a history of asthma, colic, gluten sensitivity and other immune system issues in the family. In other instances, the problems may be caused by too early an introduction of solid foods and food types and in some cases by simple over exposure to particular food categories. These issues require awareness and careful observation on the part of the mother to try and relate/identify the problem foods to the problems in the child. In some instances, these problems may also overlap with lactose intolerance, fructose malabsorption and other fermentable sugar issues. There can also be cumulative issues with preservatives and the histamines in chocolate/cocoa and orange juice. Histamines and gluten, either singly or in combination, can both contribute to headache, migraine and behavioral problems. I recall one young mother, the wife of a colleague, who found that her normally happy and contented baby son reacted negatively to the coffee, cabbage, curry, chocolate, pasta and occasional alcohol in her diet – all foods his mother enjoyed, particularly the chocolate - by becoming red in the face, grizzly, plainly uncomfortable and often with diarrhea. Fortunately, she was perceptive enough to relate these incidents to her diet and chose to abstain from consuming the offending foods for the duration of the breast-feeding period. We had spent some time discussing and theorizing about the underlying reasons.With the coffee we suspected the caffeine. With the cabbage we suspected the nitrogenous (high protein) fertilizers used in growing the vegetable and the sugar content. With the pasta we suspected the gluten and possibly the fructose content of the garlic and perhaps the garlic as an irritant. The curry and chili plainly had an irritant effect and we suspected the histamines in the chocolate. Michael, now in his late teens, eats all these foods sparingly but is pleased to avoid them where possible. He thrives on plain, simple meals with careful food combinations. Although not a celiac he is not fond of bread, biscuits and cakes etc and appears to instinctively avoid them. He likes his fruit and, particularly, his vegetables. He prefers to avoid spicy foods, deep fried foods, meat pies and the like where he struggles to digest the combination of meat and pastry: of protein and carbohydrate. He also prefers to avoid consuming orange juice in combination with toast and breakfast cereals: the combination of acid and carbohydrate. He deliberately avoids cucumber, garlic, onion, soft drinks, coffee and alcohol due to sugar fermentation and acidity issues. An intelligent, fun loving and well adjusted young man who towers over both his parents and enjoys robust good health, he has learned, with his mother’s support, to select and develop a diet which suits him and upon which he obviously thrives. He is living proof of the adage “that one man’s meat is another man’s poison”: that a single diet does not suit everyone. A lesson many people have yet to learn. Recently, via my blogs and Youtube videos I have made “friends” with three young men in their early twenties: one of Hispanic background from California and two from Melbourne. All are coeliacs (celiacs) with diabetes and thyroid complications overlapping with their gluten induced gut damage. All I suspect the result of long term poor food choices exacerbated by having to fend for themselves in early adulthood without the parental support, awareness and perception enjoyed by Michael. Interestingly, one of these young men from Melbourne has come to the conclusion that, unless he urgently does something to help himself, he will seriously compromise both his longevity and quality of life if he continues going down the path he has pursued to date. He has come back several times for reassurance, to seek further information and to express his determination to reach 80 years of age in good health. He is slowly, painfully and somewhat belatedly trying to go down the path pursued by Michael and his mother since Michael was a baby: that of finding the diet that suits his individual nutritional and health needs. He is making solid progress with the occasional setback like a recent bout of Ataxia (poor co-ordination, a classic symptom of gluten sensitivity, in addition to his severe gut damage) resulting from the eating of potato chips deep fried in gluten contaminated oil: an all too frequent occurrence. In some instances the child may outgrow the problem but in many others the problems or tendencies may be lifelong, for example, in the case of coeliac disease and many forms of gluten sensitivity and as in the case of Michael, recounted above, where many of the food sensitivities of early childhood remain into adulthood. In some other health problems, the degree of exposure to a particular food or food additive may be the issue. A small amount is OK but too much may lead to eczema, mucus, arthritis or headache problems etc. The consumption of such a food needs to be managed carefully. It is my belief that it is often better to eat a small amount of as many foods as possible – to build some tolerance to them - rather than to go down the road of the total exclusion of every offending food. Often, this approach is not only socially desirable but sometimes a necessity where there is limited opportunity to organize the food. In these circumstances, it is important for the dietary challenged individual to be selective and to know and understand their dietary limits and the consequences of exceeding those limits. I am a firm believer in the old adage of moderation and diversity in the diet and of gentle shifts in dietary regimes if making any changes. It is possible, for example, and often desirable to reduce the intake of sugar, salt, coffee, milk etc., in the diet and these changes are all best done gradually over a few weeks to enable the body, digestive system and the taste buds to acclimatise to the new regime. The same applies to the introduction of a new food. A gradual introduction of any new food is often more beneficial and pleasant than a sudden change in diet as this allows the body to adjust without adverse and off-putting reactions.
  7. Celiac.com 05/08/2007 - For people with celiac disease, accurate and comprehensive information on maintaining a healthy, high-level quality of life can be difficult to find. Research is particularly sketchy with respect to factors that have a negative impact on health and quality of life for adults with celiac disease. Factors that have a negative impact on health and quality of life are often modifiable through changes in diet, or adjustments in treatment. Thus researchers are motivated to identify which celiac patient groups are at risk of being impacted in a negative way, and to determine which adjustments might bring positive results. In an effort to refine treatment approaches and improve the lives of patients with celiac disease, clinical researchers in Gastroenterology have become increasingly interested in health-related quality of life issues as primary or secondary endpoints in their studies. A recent study published online in Medscape Today suggests that, in addition to physical and mental co-morbidities, a failure to sustain a gluten-free diet and disappointment with doctor-patient communication are also important factors associated with health-related quality of life concerns in people with celiac disease. Motivated by inconsistencies in available data, a team of German researchers made up of Drs. W. Häuser, A. Stallmach, W. F. Caspary, and J. Stein, set out to evaluate the various predictors for reduced health-related quality of life in adult patients with celiac disease. Using logistic regression analysis, the researchers catalogued responses to medical and socio-demographic questionnaires by 1000 adult celiac disease patients who were members of the German Coeliac Society. The subjects responded to the following three survey questionnaires, which were administered by post: 1) the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36); 2) the Celiac Disease Questionnaire; 3) the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The results showed that physical co-morbidities (ß = -0.41; OR = 0.66, P < 0.001) and mental disorder (ß = 0.88; OR = 2.4, P = 0.03) were associated with a reduced physical summary score of the SF-36 Scale. Mental disorder (ß = 2.5; OR = 11.9, P < 0.001), physical co-morbidities (ß = -0.26; OR = 0.77, P = 0.004) and younger age at diagnosis (ß = -0.10; OR = 0.91, P = 0.05) predicted a reduced mental summary score of the SF-36 Scale. Mental disorder (ß = 0.90; OR = 2.5, P = 0.03), non-compliance with gluten-free diet (ß = 0.44; OR = 1.6, P = 0.009), active medical co-morbidities (ß = -0.28; OR = 0.76, P = 0.007) and dissatisfaction with doctor–patient communication (ß = 0.55; OR = 1.7, P = 0.03) were associated with reduced Celiac Disease Questionnaire scores. In adult patients with celiac disease, the following factors were associated with reduced health-related quality of life: female gender, younger age at diagnosis, newly diagnosed patients, latency of diagnosis, failure to follow a gluten-free diet, anxiety and somatic and psychiatric co-morbidity. Until this study, attempts to measure health status in patients with celiac disease relied on generic health-related quality of life methods, rather than validated, disease specific instruments, and thus the relative predictive value of these variables had not been fully assessed. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2007;25(5):569-578.
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