Jump to content
Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease Read more... ×
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'kids'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
    • Lists of Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Addison's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Anemia and Celiac Disease
    • Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Celiac Disease
    • Arthritis and Celiac Disease
    • Asthma and Celiac Disease
    • Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease
    • Attention Deficit Disorder and Celiac Disease
    • Autism and Celiac Disease
    • Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease
    • Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease
    • Candida Albicans and Celiac Disease
    • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) & Celiac Disease
    • Casein / Cows Milk Intolerance and Celiac Disease
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
    • Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Depression and Celiac Disease
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Diabetes and Celiac Disease
    • Down Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Dyspepsia, Acid Reflux and Celiac Disease
    • Epilepsy and Celiac Disease
    • Eye Problems, Cataract and Celiac Disease
    • Fertility, Pregnancy, Miscarriage and Celiac Disease
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Flatulence (Gas) and Celiac Disease
    • Gall Bladder Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Celiac Disease
    • Geographic Tongue (Glossitis) and Celiac Disease
    • Growth Hormone Deficiency and Celiac Disease
    • Heart Failure and Celiac Disease
    • Infertility, Impotency and Celiac Disease
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Intestinal Permeability and Celiac Disease
    • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Kidney Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Liver Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Lupus and Celiac Disease
    • Malnutrition, Body Mass Index and Celiac Disease
    • Migraine Headaches and Celiac Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis Celiac Disease
    • Obesity, Overweight & Celiac Disease
    • Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Bone Density and Celiac Disease
    • Psoriasis and Celiac Disease
    • Refractory Celiac Disease & Collagenous Sprue
    • Sarcoidosis and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma and Celiac Disease
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sepsis and Celiac Disease
    • Sjogrens Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Skin Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sleep Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Celiac Disease
    • Thyroid & Pancreatic Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Tuberculosis and Celiac Disease
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2011 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2006 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
    • United States of America: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Organizations
    • Outside the USA: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Contacts
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com
    • History of Celiac.com Updates Through October 2007
    • Your E-mail in Support of Celiac.com 1996 to 2006

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 21 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/31/2018 - Using funds from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Canada Research Chairs Program, researcher Charlene Elliott, PhD, of the Department of Communication, Media, and Film, University of Calgary recently set out to assess the nutritional quality of gluten-free products specifically marketed for children. For her assessment, Elliott bought child-targeted gluten-free food products from two major supermarket chains in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Elliott used the Pan American Health Organization Nutrient Profile Model to compare the nutritional quality of products labeled gluten-free with those not so labeled. A secondary analysis compared the nutritional profile of child-targeted gluten-free products to their non-gluten-free “equivalents.” Elliott’s analysis showed that child-targeted gluten-free products generally had lower amounts of sodium, total fat, and saturated fat, However, those same foods also had less protein and about the same amount of calories from sugar as child-targeted products without a gluten-free claim. According to the Pan American Health Organization criteria, both gluten-free products and "regular" products designed for children can be classified as having poor nutritional quality (88% vs 97%). Compared to their non-gluten-free equivalents, products with a gluten-free claim had similarly high sugar levels, (79% vs 81%). So, the big picture is that gluten-free supermarket foods targeted at children are generally less nutritious than their non-gluten-free counterparts, and both types have alarmingly high sugar content. A gluten-free label is no guarantee of healthier, more nutritious food for kids, and it’s a mistake for parents to buy gluten-free products believing they are healthier than their non-gluten-free equals. The evidence shows that is simply not true. The takeaway here seems to be that, gluten-free or not, supermarket foods aimed at children are generally poor in nutrition and loaded with sugar, and parents should choose wisely when buying food for their children. Source: Pediatrics, July 2018
  2. jetladuke

    Greater Atlanta Celiac Kid?

    HELLO! Anyone out here that has a 10 (+- a year or two) kiddo that would like to meet another kiddo that has celiac disease? My daughter was diagnosed in the past month and we're totally gluten free. She's feeling SO MUCH BETTER, but she would really like to meet other kids that have celiac too. We're considering the camp we can eat it, but might be too late to sign up. thanks! hoping that we can find another kiddo or 2 to meet up at a park or somewhere fun.
  3. A recent chapter of Generation gluten-free started up in Dallas, Here is a info thing from their site and a link to their FB group. Generation gluten-free, a program of the Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG), is designed to build confidence in kids, teens, and young adults, and help develop them into the future leaders of our gluten-free community. Our goal is to provide safe environments where kids don’t have to worry about what they are going to eat and can just enjoy the fun that comes with being a kid. We want to provide families with a resource through which they can have their questions answered and where they can feel more involved with others in their community. Most importantly, we want to create a program that all age groups will embrace and feel happy to say that they are members of Generation gluten-free. Generation gluten-free Groups around the nation have curriculums designed especially for kids, teens, and young adults, addressing the needs and challenges that they face in their every day lives. These groups are using fundraisers, special events, and family nights to raise awareness and promote the gluten-free lifestyle to their communities. We will be building on this support foundation and expanding our outreach even more through the creation of leadership opportunities, adult mentorships, and gluten-free education to our schools. In addition, Generation gluten-free will be working with summer camps across the nation to provide gluten-free kids the chance to have a week of adventure without thinking about the safety of their food. Be sure to visit our Camp page to find out more about these opportunities and to learn more about the possibility of obtaining a camp scholarship from GIG. https://www.facebook.com/GenerationGFDallas/
  4. I'm a college kid new to the gluten free diet and need some recommendations on good baking kits. I used to just buy brownie and cookie mix but its hard for me to find a good quick fix for parties etc.
  5. Celiac.com 07/20/2017 - It is common for school teachers in the United States not to know what student has celiac disease, or allergies of any sort. Most schools don't have formal systems so that the principal, school nurse, teacher, or cafeteria workers know when a child has celiac disease or food allergies. An informal game of roulette is played, where everyone assumes that everything is fine – that is, until a child has a heath reaction. In Montreal, Canada, the Lester B Pearson School Board has taken a different approach to dealing with food allergies and conditions such as celiac disease that their students might have. They regard these health conditions to be so important that how to handle them is present in their official Policy on Safe and Caring Schools. To summarize what they do, at the beginning of each school year parents are sent a form requesting them to inform the principal, homeroom teacher, and other relevant school personnel about health conditions and allergies. This includes children who have celiac disease and gluten issues. If a child changes schools, or if a student in an existing school gets a new health diagnosis or has newly identified health needs, this information should be made known to school personnel. A photograph of the student is taken and put on a card with the health condition so that others in charge may know that a particular child has gluten issues. In the cafeteria, workers have the photos of the children posted in the kitchen where they can see them so that they can know that brown-haired Lucinda in fifth-grade has celiac disease and should be served only foods that are safe for her. Children may not know what foods have gluten in them and which do not, so they may not always be the best informants for identifying which foods being served are safe for them and which are not. Given that additives may vary according who is doing the cooking or what ingredients are used, a food like macaroni and cheese may be made with wheat pasta, making it unsafe, or corn, rice or quinoa pasta, rendering it acceptable. Both may look identical to the naked eye, but they aren't so it is a food service worker's obligation to know whether Lucinda can have the dish or not. Likewise, teachers may be given the photograph and health card so that they remember when Billy brings in cupcakes for his birthday celebration, that there are gluten-free ones available (hopefully!) in the cafeteria freezer that can be pulled out and given to Lucinda so she is not left out. The photograph technique is especially helpful when there are new cafeteria workers or substitute teachers or other personnel who may not know a child's food allergy situation like someone who interacts with the child every day might. The Lester B Pearson schools' Food and Nutrition Policy is based in Canada's Food Guide and Policy on Health Eating and Active Living. All schools in Canada are to adhere to the same set of standards. This means that a celiac child living in Vancouver should be just as safe eating at school as one in Ottawa or one in Halifax. Having national standards that are uniformly enforced helps to make all children safe. Making sure that children's food consumption is safe for all of them, especially in public institutions like schools, is part of their human rights according to the Convention on the Rights of the Child. It is the responsibility of adults who are in local parent organizations to be in charge of the oversight and safety of all children and to think through food risk and safety policies.
  6. My son has been gluten free since birth. I have Celiac's and the recommendations I/pediatrician (with very little experience with celiac's) found were that children with a gluten-free family member should be gluten-free until 3, and then they need to eat 1 serving of gluten every day for 3 months before testing. Does this match anyone else's research? Is it harmful to do it before 3? (He turns 3 in Sept and that is the start of flu season; I'm worried about potentially crashing his immune system that time of year.) Also, if anyone has been in this situation, did your children have reactions immediately? Did it take a while to build up? We are unsure what to expect from a possible positive reaction.
  7. Celiac.com 06/14/2017 - Some data have suggested a connection between celiac disease and eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE)/oesophageal eosinophilia (EE). Any potential relationship has implications for treatment. Should the two conditions be treated together, or separately? To better understand any possible connection, and the implications for treatment, a team of researchers recently set out to characterize children with celiac disease+EE in-depth and assess the contribution of each condition to the clinical presentation and treatment response. The research team included Anne Ari, Sara Morgenstern, Gabriel Chodick, Manar Matar, Ari Silbermintz, Amit Assa, Yael Mozer-Glassberg, Firas Rinawi, Vered Nachmias-Friedler, Raanan Shamir, and Noam Zevit. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Diseases, Schneider Children’s Medical Center of Israel, Petach Tikvah, Israel, the Pediatrics Center at Schneider Children’s Medical Center of Israel, Petach Tikvah, Israel, the department of Pathology at Rabin Medical Center in Petach Tikvah, Israel, and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine at Tel Aviv University in Tel Aviv, Israel. The research team conducted a retrospective review of medical records of children with both celiac disease+EE, or isolated EoE diagnosed between 2000 and 2014. They then compared these records with those of patients with isolated celiac disease or epigastric pain. To calculate the frequency of EE, they used endoscopy results of patients with suspected celiac disease or epigastric pain between 2011 and 2014. They used a telephone questionnaire to gather missing data. At a single large, tertiary pediatric center, the team assessed 17 patients with celiac disease+EE, 46 with EoE, 302 with isolated celiac disease, and 247 with epigastric pain. The patients with celiac disease+EE shared characteristics of both individual conditions. While age at diagnosis, family history of autoimmunity/celiac disease and anaemia were similar to most celiac patients, other characteristics such as male gender, personal/family history of atopy, peripheral eosinophilia and oesophageal white papules more closely resembled those of patients with EoE. Most patients with celiac disease+EE tended to present with celiac-associated symptoms, and 63% went on to develop typical EoE symptoms. In celiac disease+EE patients, only 21% saw their EE resolve after a gluten-free diet; another 21% saw their EE normalize after proton pump inhibitor treatment. The rest required EoE-specific treatment. Patients with celiac disease found to have EE share characteristics similar to both isolated celiac disease and EoE. This study indicates that celiac patients with concurrent EE are actually suffering from two separate conditions, rather than celiac-associated eosinophilia. Therefore, in such patients, doctors should consider treating each condition separately. Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood Published Online First: 12 April 2017. doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2016-311944
  8. Celiac.com 06/05/2017 - Doctors diagnose celiac disease by confirming various clinical, genetic, serologic, and duodenal morphology features. Based on retrospective data, recent pediatric guidelines propose eliminating biopsy for patients with IgA-TTG levels more than 10-times the upper limit of normal (ULN), along with a few other criteria. One retrospective study showed that researchers using levels of IgA-TTG and total IgA, or IgA-TTG and IgG against deamidated gliadin (IgG-DGL) could identify patients both with and without celiac disease. A team of researchers recently set out to validate the positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) of these diagnostic procedures. The research team included Johannes Wolf, David Petroff, Thomas Richter, Marcus KH. Auth, Holm H. Uhlig, Martin W. Laass, Peter Lauenstein, Andreas Krahl, Norman Händel, Jan de Laffolie, Almuthe C. Hauer, Thomas Kehler, Gunter Flemming, Frank Schmidt, Astor Rodriques, Dirk Hasenclever, and Thomas Mothes. Their team conducted a prospective study of 898 children undergoing duodenal biopsy analysis to confirm or rule out celiac disease at 13 centers in Europe. They then compared results from antibody tests with results from biopsies, follow-up data, and diagnoses made by the pediatric gastroenterologists. In all cases, diagnosis was made for celiac disease, no celiac disease, or no final diagnosis. Blinded researchers measured levels of IgA-TTG, IgG-DGL, and endomysium antibodies, while tissue sections were analyzed by local and blinded reference pathologists. The team validated two procedures for diagnosis: total-IgA and IgA-TTG, as well as IgG-DGL with IgA-TTG. Patients whose antibody concentrations for all tests were below 1-fold the ULN were assigned to the no celiac disease category. Those whose antibody concentrations for at least one test were above 10-fold the ULN were assigned to the celiac disease category. All other cases were considered to require biopsy analysis. The team calculated the ULN values using the cut-off levels suggested by the test kit manufacturers. They conducted HLA-typing for 449 participants. To extrapolate the PPV and NPV to populations with lower rates of celiac disease, they used models that accounted for how specificity values change with prevalence. In all, the team found 592 patients with celiac disease, 345 who did not have celiac disease, and 24 with no final diagnosis. The TTG-IgA procedure identified celiac disease patients with a PPV of 0.988 and an NPV of 0.934. The TTG-DGL procedure identified celiac disease patients with a PPV of 0.988 and an NPV of 0.958. Their extrapolation model estimated that PPV and NPV would remain above 0.95 even at a disease prevalence as low as 4%. Meanwhile, tests for endomysium antibodies and HLA type did not increase the PPV of samples with levels of IgA-TTG 10-fold or more above the ULN. Interestingly, the pathologists disagreed in their analyses of duodenal morphology about 4.2% of the time, a rate comparable to the error rate for serologic tests. This study validates the use of the TTG-IgA procedure and the TTG-DGL procedure in lieu of biopsy to diagnose pediatric patients with or without celiac disease. Source: Gastroenterology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2017.04.023 The researchers are variously affiliated with the Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics, Medical Faculty of the University and University Hospital, Leipzig, Germany, the Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics & Epidemiology (IMISE), University of Leipzig, Germany, the Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom, the Translational Gastroenterology Unit, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom, the, University Children's Hospital Halle, Germany, the Medical School, Hannover, Germany, Helios Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Plauen, Germany, the Children's Hospital Prinzessin Margaret, Darmstadt, Germany, the University Children's Hospital Graz, Austria, the Children's Hospital, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany, the University Children's Hospital Leipzig, Germany, the Children's Hospital of the Clinical Centre Sankt Georg Leipzig, Germany, the Clinical Trial Centre, University of Leipzig, Germany, the DKD Helios Children's Hospital, German Clinic for Diagnostics, Wiesbaden, Germany, the University Children's Hospital, Technical University Dresden, Germany, and the Alder Hey Children's National Health Service Foundation Trust, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
  9. Celiac.com 05/30/2017 - Huff Post recently featured a good article on empowering kids with food allergies, including celiac disease. The article, by Miriam Pearl, suggests that parents seek to promote awareness and self-reliance in such children, rather than simply providing for them quietly and looking to protect them from allergens. The basic message is to help kids gain all the skills needed to manage their condition, rather than seeking to rescue them. Pearl writes that "The more practice [children] have managing themselves in the outside world the better they will get at it." She offers a number of useful tips to help parents along. First, she says, start early. It's never too early to let kids know what's going on, and what you're doing to help them maintain their health. Second, work to make the children aware of the things that impact their health. Show them what it's like to shop, cook, and advocate for themselves. Third, strive to show, teach and model everything they must know about safe foods and danger foods. Fourth, take them to the store with you and let them find gluten-free items. Among other benefits, this will help them learn to read labels. Fifth, enlist their help in packing their lunches. Sixth, ask them to listen to whenever and wherever you ask for food that is safe. Seventh, make sure they learn to carry their own snacks, just in case they can't control what food is around them. If they learn to do it early, they might avoid learning the hard way, which happens when you forget to provide snack for them, and they go hungry while everyone else eats. Lastly, when dining out, engage them in your effort to get answers from waiters every time you order food. Helping children to clearly see and understand the challenges of being gluten-free and having food allergies, and what it means to deal with those challenges on a daily level, help prepare them to make the right choices when confronted with unfamiliar or uncomfortable situations involving gluten-free food. This, in turn, helps them lead happier, healthier gluten-free lives. Source: HuffPost.com
  10. Celiac.com 05/16/2017 - A number of studies have indicated that kids with celiac disease face an increased risk for mood disorders, anxiety and behavioral disorders, ADHD, ASD, and intellectual disability. A new study by a team of researchers in Sweden puts it more precisely. They put the increased risk for psychiatric disorders in children with celiac disease at 1.4-fold over kids without celiac disease. The research team assessed the risk of any type of childhood psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, mood, anxiety, and eating disorders, psychoactive substance misuse, behavioral disorder, ADHD, ASD, and intellectual disability, in children aged 18 and younger, along with their siblings. The researchers included Agnieszka Butwicka, MD, PhD, of the department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, and colleagues. For each of the 10,903 children with celiac disease, the research team randomly selected 100 non-celiacs from the general population. These control subjects were then matched by gender and year and country of birth. For each of the 12,710 siblings of celiac disease subjects, the research team randomly assigned 100 healthy control siblings from the general population. These were also matched by gender, year and country of birth of both siblings. Both sets of siblings were required to be free of celiac disease to age 19. The researchers reviewed histological data on patients who showed villous atrophy in small intestine biopsy specimens between 1969 and 2008, and equated villous atrophy with celiac disease. In the main cohort study, the researchers estimated the risk for any psychiatric disease, as well as specific psychiatric disorders (ie, mood, anxiety, eating, and behavioral disorders, as well as neuropsychiatric disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), and intellectual disability) in children with celiac disease, compared with general population controls. They used sibling analyses to assess whether underlying familiar factors could account for the associations. As a comparing factor, they compared the risk for psychiatric disorders in the siblings against the risk in siblings of the general population. The team conducted both univariate and multivariate analyses, adjusting for maternal/paternal age at the child's birth, maternal/paternal country of birth, level of education of highest-educated parent, and the child's gestational age, birthweight, Apgar score, and history of psychiatric disorders prior to recruitment. During follow-up, 7.7% of children were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. A positive association was found in the first univariate analysis between celiac disease and any psychiatric disorder, which remained even after the researchers adjusted for maternal/paternal age at childbirth and country of birth, parental education level, and child's gestational age, birthweight, Apgar score, and previous history of psychiatric disorders. The overall prevalence of psychiatric disease in the entire sample celiac disease patients was about 7% (95% CI, 6.4%-7.4%). That number remained steady in the 10 years after biopsy. However, once the researchers analyzed the findings by cohort, they found that rates of psychiatric disorders had actually increased 8-fold over that 10-year period. The siblings of celiac disease patients showed no increased risk for any psychiatric disorder. The study showed that psychiatric disorders "may precede a diagnosis of celiac disease in children." The research team called this finding "important." They write that their study also offers "insight into psychiatric comorbidities in childhood celiac disease over time." The study showed that children with celiac disease definitely faced an elevated risk for specific psychiatric disorders, including mood disorders (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.4), anxiety disorders (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.4), eating disorders (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1- 1.8), behavioral disorders (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.6), ADHD (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.4), ASD (HR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.7), and intellectual disability (HR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.4-2.1). Although the study showed that patients with celiac disease are more likely to have prior psychiatric disorders (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.5-2.1; P The team notes that they have yet to determine "the mechanisms underlying the association between celiac disease and psychiatric orders." The fact that the siblings of celiac disease patients showed no increased risk of psychiatric disorders indicates that these may be an "effect of celiac disease per se rather than common genetic or within-family environmental factors," the researchers add. The researchers conclude that their study "underscores the importance of both mental health surveillance in children with celiac disease and a medical workup in children with psychiatric symptoms." This study offers yet another piece in the complex puzzle that is celiac disease. It emphasizes the need for doctors and parents to remain on the lookout for potential psychiatric issues when dealing with children who have celiac disease. Source: Psychiatry Advisor
  11. Celiac.com 02/28/2017 - It's no secret that psychological symptoms can be associated with celiac disease, but until recently, no one had really done a solid prospective study on children. A research team has now done just that. In this case, they looked at a group of children with celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA), which is defined as persistently positive celiac disease–associated tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). As part of their study, the researchers looked at a screening population of genetically at-risk children. They assessed psychological functioning in children as reported by mothers, and then compared the results with a comparable group of children without celiac disease autoimmunity. They also investigated differences in psychological symptoms based on mothers' awareness of their child's celiac disease autoimmunity status. The research team included Laura B. Smith, Kristian F. Lynch, Kalle Kurppa, Sibylle Koletzko, Jeffrey Krischer, Edwin Liu, Suzanne Bennett Johnson, Daniel Agardh, and The TEDDY study group. The study, titled Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young, followed 8,676 children to identify triggers of type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. Children were tested for tTGA beginning at 2 years of age. The researchers used the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist to assess child psychological functioning at 3.5 and 4.5 years of age. At 3.5 years, 66 mothers who were not aware that their child had celiac disease autoimmunity reported more child anxiety and depression, aggressive behavior, and sleep problems than 3,651 mothers of children without celiac disease autoimmunity. Unaware-celiac disease autoimmunity mothers also reported more child anxiety and depression, withdrawn behavior, aggressive behavior, and sleep problems than 440 mothers aware of their child's celiac disease autoimmunity status. At 4.5 years, there were no differences. At 3½ years-old, children with persistently positive celiac disease–associated tTGA had substantially more reports of child depression and anxiety, aggressive behavior, and sleep problems by mothers who were not aware of their child's celiac disease autoimmunity status. Mothers with knowledge of their child's celiac disease autoimmunity status made fewer reports of psychological symptoms, which indicates that awareness of the child's tTGA test status makes mother's less likely to report symptoms. That the differences seem to disappear by age 4.5 is encouraging, but also puzzling. Why do they seem to disappear? What specifically causes them in the first place? This is the first study to date on this particular aspect of celiac disease and related conditions in children. It will likely not be the last. As we learn more from studies like this one, the ways we test for, monitor, and even treat celiac disease will likely improve. Source: Pediatrics, February 2017
  12. Celiac.com 02/03/2017 - Feeding kids restricted to a "special" diet due to food allergies or sensitivities can be both challenging and expensive. Two Kansas moms turned their experience meeting those challenges with their own children into a full-blown community service, dedicated to helping parents feed kids with food allergies on the cheap. Emily Brown's daughter suffers from allergies to milk, eggs, wheat, soy, and peanuts. Avoiding such common ingredients really pushed up the Brown family's grocery bills. A single loaf of gluten-free bread can exceed $6.99. Such high costs led the women to seek federal assistance, but allergen-free food options in the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program had limited offerings for their children. For example, the program substitutes corn tortillas instead of bread, and rice instead of pasta, which wasn't so appealing to the kids. With that in mind, Brown and her friend, Amy Goode, swung into action and set up the ReNewed Health Food Pantry in Overland Park, Kansas, along with a nonprofit to help low-income families with food allergies. ReNewed is believed to be the first such pantry in the U.S., though a similar community food pantry recently opened in Philadelphia. Read more: fox4kc.com.
  13. Hello everyone, I'm new here, and hoping to get feedback from more experienced celiacs. My 7yr old daughter began complaining of a sore tummy back in July. Aside from saying "mommy, my tummy hurts" she showed no signs of being in pain. She called from school one day after lunch, crying and complaining of the sore tummy, yet when she got picked up, she seemed fine, asked for a snack, and had all kinds of energy to run around and play. The complaints began to occur daily, but only Monday-Friday mornings, which had me thinking she just didn't want to go to school. School drop offs became nearly impossible, as she would cling on to me for dear life, crying and inconsolable - and once she got away with staying home, would immediately relax and appear completely fine (and no more complaints about the tummy). I took her to the doctor, and left with a pamphlet for a psychologist, thinking she is suffering from some form of anxiety. The next morning was much the same, and I gave her an ultimatum - school or blood work. Bless her little heart, she wrote me a letter saying "dear mom, here's how you can help me. Take for my blood test, and keep me home" - so off we went back to the doctor, and got a requisition for lab work. Since we weren't suspecting anything in particular, she ran several tests. The next day, I received a call with results. Her TTG came back at >250. this broke my heart. I'm glad we found out, but prior to this, I was telling her things like "there's nothing wrong with you!" (Because she would be eating, playing, running around, not looking like she was in any pain). Felt like the worst mom fail in the world. I now realize that her anxiety came from anticipating pain, and not having mom or dad around for comfort. my questions - is the high reading on her TTG enough for a definite celiac diagnosis? The doctor said she didn't think a scope would be necessary with such a high number. We have been gluten free since the day we found out. How long till we start seeing results? Because she doesn't "look" like she is in pain, I often have to ask her how her tummy is feeling (she doesn't complain often anymore). She says it still hurts, but not as bad. Her anxiety has persisted, and is preventing her from doing things she loves, like going into her dance classes. She does not want to quit, but is paralyzed when it's time to go in. Back to school was a nightmare for the first couple of weeks, but she seems to be adjusting now. We have been seeing a naturopath, who has given her a few things to help with healing, as well as anxiety, but it feels like slow progress. I just want her to be happy and healthy again. any tips on what could help? thanks in advance for listening
  14. beachbum

    It's Just One Cookie!

    My first blog takes me back 5 years ago when my youngest daughter started her freshman year of high school. She had been diagnosed Celiac for 5 years at this point, by now I was sure my daughter had come to terms with her restrictive diet. She was happy-go-lucky Madeline, ever smiling, always positive, living every day with joy. Little did I suspect that the social acceptance of being a young gluten-free teen was secretly troubling her and it was about to burst forth in a profusion of tears and sudden flight from her classroom. All because of just one cookie! Nobody wants to read the minutiae of a teenager's day, so I will sum up the event. Choir class of 100 students, dozens of cookies left over from an evening event, the class is all offered cookies. A hundred girls each enjoy one delicious cookie while one girl sits among them with nothing. Madeline politely approached the choir teacher and asked if she could get something from the choir store since she couldn't have a cookie, at which the teacher replied, "Madeline it's just one cookie!" [insert gushing tears and dramatic stage right here] Two class periods later, the oldest sister, Claire, enters the choir room. Claire is a gifted singer, little miss detail and unofficial teacher helper…she is also a Celiac. The choir director is concerned about Madeline's meltdown and speaks to Claire asking if her little sister is always so emotional over things as insignificant as "Just One Cookie". Claire's response is spot on. "Sir, you don't understand, its not just one cookie…its one cookie yesterday, one cookie today, one cookie tomorrow, and the day after that and after that and after that…it will never be just one cookie for her!" Four years later at Madeline's graduation party, one of her fellow graduates (also a Celiac) came up and hugged me and said. "Mrs. Wilson I have been looking forward to Madeline's party all week because I knew you would have Gluten-Free cake. This is the only piece of graduation cake I will get to have." Wow! She, too, was longing to fully participate, to have the same experience as everyone else. All I could do was hug her, congratulate her on her graduation, and ask if she would like me to wrap up an extra piece for a rainy day. Over the years I had gone to great lengths to ensure my girls were fully included in sleepovers, cookouts, and pizza parties because sharing food and drink is the most common form of social ritual, an intrinsic part of feeling included. I found that when it comes to a gluten-free lifestyle, its never been about "Just One Cookie".
  15. So my son, who is nearly 4, has been having migratory joint pains for about a year and half. He also gets headaches and aches in his chest area, and of all places, his boy parts. He has unexplained rashes that look sort of like very small hives to me (not itchy). He is very irritable, has disturbed sleep when his symptoms are "flaring", and from time to time runs very high fevers with no explanation (like 105+F). Our doctor thought maybe it was Juvenile Arthritis, and we have had him checked by a pediatric rheumatologist, but there is no sign of arthritis whatsoever. We were back to the drawing board this week with our doctor, who is very supportive, and our next step is to run a Celiac and food allergy panel because I have had joint pains with my own gluten/ other sensitivities (unknown if iI have celiac or NCGS b/c I was originally advised to go on a GFD after positive Anti gliadin antibodies test w/o biopsy. I'm too chicken to do a gluten challenge to find out as my health had become so poor before the GFD.). Our son has never had any GI issues other than lactose intolerance and lots of gas all the time. He does go through periods of being very, very thirsty if that is related, but really, my oldest child has way more GI issues than our little guy. It was the rheumatologist who suggested we test for Celiac. It's all very peculiar to us. I am wondering if anyone else's children have presented with joint pains like this?
  16. Danna Korn founded R.O.C.K. in 1991 after her son, Tyler, was diagnosed with celiac disease. It has grown to international proportions, helping families all over the world deal with the unique challenges of raising a child on a gluten-free diet. When children are diagnosed with celiac disease at an early age, they usually have a severe intolerance to gluten, and are often extremely sick when ultimately diagnosed. Most parents share horror stories of visiting several doctors before finally arriving at a diagnosis, and are frustrated, exasperated, and angry, yet relieved to finally have a direction in which to turn. Sometimes it helps to talk about it, and it always helps to have some guidance when initially diving into the gluten-free diet. Raising Our Celiac Kids is a support group for parents, families and friends of kids with celiac disease or gluten intolerance. We welcome families of autistic kids involved in a gluten-free/casein-free dietary intervention program. We concentrate on dealing with the unique challenges that we have, including: Finding "fun" gluten-free treats for kids Menu ideas for school lunches, quick dinners, and sports snacks Helping the kids to take responsibility for reading labels, cooking and planning/preparing food How to prepare for unexpected birthday parties and food-oriented activities at school, church, and elsewhere Halloween, Easter, and other special days - how do we include our kids safely? Educating day-care providers and teachers - without burdening them Dealing with grandparents, babysitters, and "helpful" friends who offer gluten-containing foods to our kids Ensuring our kids won't cheat, and what to do WHEN they do Sending kids away to camp, friends' houses, and other times when we're not around to help The psychological impact of growing up with celiac disease (peer pressure, teenage years, and more) What do R.O.C.K. chapters do? R.O.C.K. chapters have R.O.C.K. parties! How often you meet will be up to you and your chapter members, but we suggest meeting every two months to start; you can judge from that point whether you'd like to meet more or less often. We'd like to eventually have a chat room, where local chapters can talk to each other or with other chapter members. (In the meantime, people can chat at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CeliacKids). What goes on at a R.O.C.K. party? R.O.C.K. parties are for the kids and the adults. The kids enjoy gluten-free food and play, while the parents exchange new-product information, questions and concerns, and anything that they feel is pertinent. You may invite speakers (child psychologists, pediatricians, pediatric gastroenterologists, dietitians), and even provide entertainment (clowns, face painters, toys) for the kids. Remember your community centers - they often have teenagers who will entertain the kids - for free! Remember, you may have just a few families at first, but "build it and they will come" - keep it in mind! Should I start a R.O.C.K. chapter or do something on my own? I don't personally profit from any R.O.C.K. activities, so it doesn't benefit me either way. My vision for R.O.C.K. is to provide accurate, supportive information to families of gluten-free kids to make their lives easier and their kids' lives more enjoyable. The more cohesive we are, the more credible we are to new members, vendors, and the gluten-free community as a whole. If you decide to pursue a group on your own, I sincerely wish you the best of luck and hope you'll ask me for help in setting up your group if you need it. If there isn't a R.O.C.K. chapter in your area yet and you're interested in starting one, please contact Danna Korn at danna@dannakorn.com. R.O.C.K. Chapters in the United States Alabama Support Group - Mobile Contact: Marilyn Taylor ROCK’n Mobile, Alabama Tel: (251) 633-3528 E-mail: Taylor6211@bellsouth.net Slocomb - Support Group Contact: Nichole Alexander E-mail: mamma_hen3@hotmail.com Tel: (334) 886-7150 Alaska Chugiak - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - ROCK'n Alaska Contact: Debbie Saddler Chugiak, AK 99567 Tel: (907) 688-6879 E-mail: alaskadebbie@gmail.com Arizona Gilbert - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Gilbert Chapter Contact: Deanna Frazee Gilbert, AZ Tel: (480) 641-8821 E-mail: deannafrazee@hotmail.com Phoenix - Support Group Greater Phoenix R.O.C.K. Contact: Lisa Potts Email: phoenixceliackids@gmail.com FB Page: facebook.com/PHX.ROCK Phone: (858) 442-5956 E-mail: lisa.potts4911@gmail.com Internet: www.phoenixrock.org Tucson - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Tucson Chapter Contact: Liz Attanasio Tel: (520) 877-9181 Tucson - ROCK'n Tucson Contact: Shelli Hanks Tucson, AZ 85750 Email: TucsonROCK@comcast.net Tel: (520) 577-0774 Arkansas Fayetteville, AR Melanie Faught Fayetteville, AR 72704 Tel: (479) 582-9232 E-mail: melaniefaught@cox.net California Conejo Valley - Support Group ROCK'n Conejo Valley Contact: Melissa Riches Westlake Village, CA 91361 Tel: (818) 706-0197 E-mail: melissa.riches@sbcglobal.net Danville - Support Group Contact: Ann Reigelman Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Danville Chapter Danville, CA E-mail: areigelman@yahoo.com Lake Balboa - Support Group Contact: Melissa Gray Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Lake Balboa Chapter Tel: (818) 510-0534 E-mail: Melissagray808@gmail.com Los Angeles - Support Group Contact 1: Amy Harley Tel: (818) 249-2432 E-mail: harleyhome@earthlink.net Contact 2: Cheryl Cohen Tel: (818) 784-4516 E-mail: cohencheryl@yahoo.com Moreno Valley - Support Group Contact: Kellee Shearer Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Moreno Valley Chapter 10034 Snipe Circle Moreno Valley, CA 92557 Tel: (951) 242-8448 E-mail: Treshearer@aol.com Orange County - Support Group Contacts: Randi Leinen Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Orange County Chapter E-mail: RMLeinen@aol.com ROCK’n Orange County, CA Contact: Drew Grant Tel: (949) 257-6349 E-mail: orangecountyrock@gmail.com Palo Alto - Support Group Contact: Kelly Velez or Debbie Duncan Bay Area ROCK E-mail: kellyvelez@comcast.net Tel: (650) 303-8409 E-mail: debbie@debbieduncan.com Tel: (650) 494-6959 San Diego - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - San Diego Chapter Contact: Brenda McDowell E-mail: sdrockchapter@gmail.com San Francisco - Support Group Contact: Lisa Palme Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - San Francisco Chapter E-mail: palmer@smccd.net Sebastopol - Support Group ROCK North Bay Chapter Contact: Jennifer Iscol Sebastopol, CA 95472 Tel: (707) 824-5830 E-mail: iscol@aol.com Visalia (Central) - Support Group Contact: Shannon Williams Tel: (559) 741-1671 Visalia, CA Colorado Peyton - Support Group ROCK’n Peyton, CO Crystal Brauer Tel: (719) 494-8590 E-mail: Brauer.family@yahoo.com Connecticut Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K) Fairfield County CT Contact: Karen Loscalzo/ Monika Lazaro/ Carolyn Caney E-mail: rockfairfieldcounty@gmail.com Internet: www.ROCKFairfieldCounty.com Simsbury - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids - R.O.C.K. - Simsbury Chapter Contact: Mark & Tracy Saperstein Tel: (860) 651-4857 E-mail: mtbahs@comcast.net Waterford - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids - R.O.C.K. - Waterford Chapter Contact: Donna Kensel Waterford, CT E-mail: CtCeliacKids@aol.com District of Columbia (Washington D.C.) District of Columbia - Support Group Contact: Linda Hickman Northern VA/Washington DC R.O.C.K. Tel: (410) 290-5224 E-mail: hickman68@verizon.net Florida Apopka - Support Group Contact: Deborah Pfeifle Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Apopka Chapter Apopka, FL 32712 Tel: (407) 880-6104 E-mail: dpfeifle@earthlink.net Coral Springs/Palm Beach - Support Group Contacts: Janna Faulhaber and Stacey Galper Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Coral Springs/Palm Beach Chapter Tel: (954) 255-7855 E-mail: Staceynagel@paxson.com Odessa (Tampa) - Support Group Contact: Terri Willingham Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Odessa Chapter Orlando - ROCK'n Celebration - Support Group Contact: Rose Parvaz Celebration, FL 34747 E-mail: rose.parvaz@celebration.fl.us Palm Beach gardens - Support Group ROCK'n Palm Beach Gardens Contact: Kimberly Wade Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 E-mail: tkcrw@comcast.net Tel: (561) 625-9005 Tampa - Support Group Contact: Melissa Ransdell Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Tampa Chapter 14521 Nettle Creek Rd. Tampa, FL 33624 Tel: (813) 265-8105 Georgia Atlanta - Support Group Contact: Jeff Lewis, M.D. Children's Center for Digestive Health Care Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Atlanta Chapter E-mail: jlewis@ccdhc.org Illinois Chicago - Support Group ROCK'n Chicago Contact: Alexandra Vavouliotis Tel: (847)-962-7244 E-mail: alexvav24@mac.com Dekalb - Support Group Contact: Audrey O'Sullivan Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Stillman Valley Chapter Dekalb, IL Tel: (815) 756-2606 E-mail: Audrey08@aol.com ROCKn DuPage & Cook County Aleksandra de Leon -DuPage County E-mail: aleksandra.deleon@gmail.com Tel: 630-745-7429 Ilene Harris- Cook County E-mail: isf27@yahoo.com Tel: 847-222-9950 Moline - Support Group Contact: Lesley Lamphier ROCK'n Illinois (Moline) Moline, IL 61265 Tel: (309) 736-1507 E-mail: celiackids@mchsi.com Springfield - Support Group Land of Lincoln Celiac Support Group Contact: Joyce Hall Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Springfield Chapter Springfield, IL Washington - Support Group Heart of Illinois Celiac Kids Contact: Samantha Young E-mail: info@hoiceliackids.com Indiana Henryville - Support Group Contact: Kristie Williams ROCK'n Indiana (Henryville) Henryville, IN 47126 Tel: (812) 294-1179 E-mail: kristiewilliamsrn@hotmail.com Indianapolis - Support Group Contact: Kelly Kurzhal ROCK’n Indianapolis Indianapolis, IN 46217 Tel: (317) 697-4933 E-mail: kellykurzhal@hotmail.com Mooresville - Support Group Contact: Cindy Holder Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Mooresville Chapter 375 E. Countyline Rd. Mooresville, IN 46158 Tel: (317) 831-9871 E-mail: Holders2@comcast.net Iowa Des Moines - Support Group Contact: Lindsay Amadeo Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Des Moines Chapter Des Moines, IA E-mail: llamadeo@yahoo.com Maryland ROCK'n Maryland Contact: Steffani Mykins Tel: (410) 626-1958 E-mail: stfine@comcast.net ROCK’n Maryland Contact: Lindsay Moe Mt. Airy, MD 21771 (443) 799-3432 E-mail: lindsaymoe@ymail.com Massachusetts Longmeadow - Support Group ROCK'n MA Contact: Christie Freda Longmeadow, MA 01106 E-mail: cfreda126@comcast.net Tel: (413) 567-5748 Somerset - Support Group Contact: Stacey Nasrallah ROCK'n Somerset (MA) Somerset, MA 02726 Tel: (508) 674-6211 E-mail: info@somersetrock.org Internet: http://www.somersetrock.org Michigan Ann Arbor - Support Group Contact: Anne MacDougald ROCK’n Michigan E-mail: anniemacdougald@gmail.com Macomb Township - ROCK'n MI Support Group Contact: Kimberly Fanelli Macomb Township, MI 48044 Tel: (586) 226-8480 E-mail: kfanelli@mac.com West Bloomfield - Support Group Contact: Gail Smoler Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - West Bloomfield Chapter 4358 Strathdale Court West Bloomfield, MI 48323 Tel: (248) 851-9451 E-mail: GailS63@aol.com Minnesota Minneapolis/St. Paul Support Group Contact: Lynda Benkofske Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - ROCK-Minneapolis/St. Paul Chapter 15470 County Rd. 35 Elk River, MN 55330 Tel: (763) 263-7679 E-mail: ljbenkof@ties2.net Mississippi Columbia - Support Group Contact: Beth Broom Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - South Mississippi Chapter 50 Wilks Road Columbia, MS 39429 E-mail: sbroom@dixie-net.com Missouri O'Fallon - Support Group Contact: Beth Anne Miller 7264 Sweetcider Lane O'Fallon, MO 63366 Tel: (636) 294-2037 E-mail: Frankbethm@aol.com Montana Billings - ROCK'n Montana Support Group Billings, MT 59102 Contact: Perrin Grubbs E-mail: perrin@bresnan.net Tel: (406) 655-7897 Nevada Reno - Support Group Contact: Carrie Owen Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Reno Chapter Tel: (775) 857-2708 E-mail: Renorockgroup@yahoo.com New Hampshire Manchester - Support Group Contact: Michelle Ouellette ROCK'n New Hampshire Manchester, NH 03102 Tel: (603) 627-1831 E-mail: rocknh2006@gmail.com New Jersey Blairstown - Support Group Contact: Marla Benson Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Blairstown Chapter Blairstown, NJ MBenson890@aol.com (808) 362-7752 Freehold - Support Group Contact: Elissa Carlin Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Freehold Chapter Marlboro, NJ 07746 Tel: (732) 252-8309 E-mail: ElissaC75@aol.com Morristown - Support Group ROCK'n New Jersey Contact: Andrea Kitzis Smith Morristown, NJ 07960 Tel: (201) 965-7309 E-mail: akitsm@att.net Short Hills - Support Group Contact: Ellie Fried Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - North Jersey Chapter Tel: (973) 912-0253 New Mexico Albuquerque - Support Group Contact: Traci Shrader Tel: (505) 450-1156 E-mail: tashrader@msn.com New York Auburn - Support Group R.O.C.K.'n Auburn Contact: Nicki Hai Tel: (315) 252-2764 E-mail: jnhai@roadrunner.com Glens Falls Region - Support Group Contact: Lisa Fox Lake George, NY 12845 Tel: (518) 668-5838 E-mail: fox_lisa@hotmail.com ROCK’n Hudson Valley, NY Contact: Terresa Bazelow Thompson Ridge, NY Tel: (845) 609-7432 E-mail: HVNYROCK@aol.com Long Island - Support Group Contact: Christine Lauria East End Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) E-mail: eastendrock@yahoo.com Internet: www.rockli.com Nassau County- Support Group Contact: Angela Silverstein Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Lynbrook Tel: (516) 593-2904 E-mail: venusangmm1@optonline.net Nassau/Suffolk - Support Group Contact: Randi Albertelli Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Long Island Chapter E-mail: rsquared31@optonline.net Contact 2: Jill Schneider Tel: (516) 551-4564 E-mail: jahms@verizon.net Rockland, NY - Bergen, NJ Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Rockland, NY - Bergen, NJ Chapter Contact: Gabrielle Simon Telephone: (646) 342-6960 Email: nynjrockmom@yahoo.com Rome - Support Group Mohawk Valley R.O.C.K. (upstate New York) Contact: Rebecca Madeira Rome, NY Tel: (315) 337-7671 Upstate - Support Group ROCK'n Upstate New York Contact: Karen Dorazio Jamesville, NY 13078 Tel: (315) 469-8154 E-mail: kdorazio@twcny.rr.com Vestal, NY ROCK’n Vestal, NY Contact: Razi Lissy E-mail: raziher@gmail.com Western New York - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Western New York Chapter Buffalo / Niagara Falls NY Contact: Jeanette Yuhnke Tel: (716) 625-8390 Internet: http://www.glutenfreeinwny.com/WNYCeliacKids.php Westchester, NY ROCK’n Westchester, NY Contact: Erica Peltz E-mail: Eps2104@gmail.com Tel: (917) 612-4676 North Carolina Charlotte, Support Group Contact: Nikki Everett Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Charlotte Chapter Huntersville, NC 28078 Tel: (704) 804-4090 E-mail: haircolorexpertise@hotmail.com Harrisburg - Support Group Contact: Linda Witherspoon 5018 Wynford Ct. Harrisburg, NC 28075 Tel: (704) 957-6100 E-mail: Linda.witherspoon@aol.com Stantonsburg - Support Group ROCK’n North Carolina Contact: Carrie Forbes Stantonsburg, NC 27883 Tel: (252) 238-3132 E-mail: gingerlemongirl@gmail.com North Dakota Fargo - Support Group Contact: Stacey Juhnke Tel: (701) 237-4854 E-mail: DSJuhnke@yahoo.com Ohio Akron - Support Group Contact: Sue Krznaric Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Akron Chapter Akron, OH Tel: (330) 253-1509 E-mail: skrznaric@cs.com Akron - Support Group Contact: Therese Semonin Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Akron Chapter CSA Chapter 111, S.O.S. Save Our Stomachs Cincinnati - Support Group Contact: Beth Koenig Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Cincinnati Chapter Cincinnati, OH E-mail: BethKoenig@cinci.rr.com Tel: (513) 923-4435 Cleveland - Support Group ROCK’n Cleveland Contact: Tracey Lavine Solon, OH 44139 Tel: (216) 533-1285 E-mail: Tracey95@aol.com Toledo - ROCK'n Toledo Support Group Contact: Amy Kinkaid Toledo, OH 43615 E-mail: kinkaida@bex.net Tel: (419) 509-6913 Oregon Salem - Support Group Contact: Kristen Klay Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Salem Chapter Tel: (503) 581-3884 E-mail: kristenklay@yahoo.com Pennsylvania Greenville - Support Group Contact: Fiona Garner Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Greenville Chapter Greenville, PA Glenside - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Glenside Contact: Wilhelmina Green Glenside, PA 19038 Tel: (215) 756-2708 E-mail: Wilhelmina.green@gmail.com Greensburg - Support Group Contact: Martin Martinosky, Jr. Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Greensburg Chapter Greensburg, PA Tel: (724) 834-3435 E-mail: ROCKchapter@aol.com Hanover - Support Group ROCK’n Hanover Contact: Melissa Panzer Hanover, PA 17331 Tel: (717) 633-1667 E-mail: Glutenfree4life@live.com Harrisburg - Support Group Gluten Intolerance Group of Harrisburg Harrisburg, PA Tel: (717) 520-9817 Lancaster/York - Support Group Contact: Janelle Gregory Tel: (717) 687-8586 E-mail: janellegregory@verizon.net Lansdale - Support Group ROCK Bucks Montgomery Contact: Holly and Steve Staugaitis Lansdale, PA 19446 Tel: (215) 997-2706 E-mail: hollystaugaitis@gmail.com South Carolina Charleston - Support Group Contact: Cathy Leeke Lowcountry R.O.C.K. Tel: (678) 637-3277 E-mail: cwleeke@yahoo.com Clover - Support Group Contact: Lauretta McInnis Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Clover Chapter Tel: (803) 222-5143 E-mail: laurettamcinnis@gmail.com Easley - Support Group Contact: Laura Armstrong Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Easley Chapter Easley, SC Tel: (864) 850-0344 Lexington - Support Group Contact: Gail Fox Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Lexington Chapter Lexington, SC 29072 Tel: (803) 957-7658 E-mail: gailfox@sc.rr.com Tennessee Nashville - Support Group Contact: Janet Lowery Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Nashville Chapter Tel: (615) 758-2674 Woodlawn - Support Group Contact: Shantal Green Woodlawn, TN Tel: (931) 648-2289 Texas Austin - Support Group Contact: Frances Kelley ROCK'n Austin - Alamo Celiac GIG Austin, TX 78739 E-mail: fkelley@austin.rr.com Tel: (512) 301-2224 Dallas/FortWorth - Support Group Contact: Kelly LeMonds, Leader Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Wylie Chapter 1821 Spinnaker Way Drive Wylie, Texas 75098-7855 Tel: (972) 442-9328 E-mail: leader@dallasrock.org Internet: http://www.dallasrock.org Dallas/FortWorth - Support Group Contact: Diane McConnell Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Dallas/FortWorth Chapter Tarrant County, TX Tel: (817) 849-8646 E-mail: fortworthrock@swbell.net Houston - Support Group Contact: Janet Y. Rinehart, Chairman Houston Celiac Sprue Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Houston Chapter 13722 Ashley Run Houston, TX 77077-1514 Tel: (281) 679-7608 E-mail: txjanet@swbell.net Internet: http://www.csaceliacs.org/ Houston - Support Group Contact: Faye Sallee Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Houston Chapter 14830 Sagamore Hills Houston, TX 77082 Tel: (281) 496-9166 Houston - ROCK'n Houston Support Group Comtact: Monica Ryan Houston, TX 77025 Tel: (713) 667-1963 E-mail: Mwryan@ipa.net Lubbock - Support Group Contact: Beth Trostle ROCK'n Lubbock Tel: (806) 794-5917 E-mail: calvintrostle@nts-online.net San Antonio - Support Group Contact: Rose and Michael Stevens Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - San Antonio Chapter San Antonio, TX Tel: (210) 495-7757 E-mail: info@kidceliac.com Internet: http://www.kidceliac.com Victoria - Support Group Contact: Julie Bauknight Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Victoria Chapter Victoria, TX 77901 Tel: (361) 572-9252 Utah Holladay - Support Group Contact: Cathy Snowball ROCK’n Utah Holladay, UT 84121 E-mail: kileyannsmom@hotmail.com Ogden - Support Group Contact: Eileen Leatherow Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Ogden Chapter Ogden, UT Virginia Ashburn - Support Group Keith Bird Tel: (703) 348-7607 rock@birdmk1.plus.com Bristow - Support Group ROCK’n Bristow Contact: Michael and Elizabeth Brown Bristow, VA 20136 Tel: (703) 753-9161 E-mail: 2xx1xy@comcast.net Fredericksburg - Support Group ROCK’n Fredericksburg Contact: Kathy Paz-Craddock Tel: (703) 507-0609 E-mail: kalalilys@gmail.com Paeonian Springs - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Paeonian Springs Becky Shore Tel: (571) 252-0036 E-mail: zoo2u@comcast.net Virginia Beach - Support Group Contact: Cynthia Olson E-mail: glutenfreemom@hotmail.com Washington Bellingham - Support Group Contact: Jean McFadden Layton ROCK'n Washington Bellingham, WA 98229 Tel: (360) 734-1659 E-mail: glutenfreekids@yahoo.com Bothell, WA - Support Group Contact: Lynn Crutcher Rock'n Washington Bothell, WA 98011 Tel: (425) 205-1327 E-mail: gfkids1@yahoo.com Poulsbo - Support Group Contact: Tim & Dawn Simonson Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Poulsbo Chapter Poulsbo, WA 98370 Tel: (360) 779-9292 E-mail: timsimonson@csi.com Seattle - Support Group Contact - Irina Risuhina Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Seattle Chapter E-Mail: iris510@hotmail.com Spokane - Support Group Contact: Jennifer Fancher ROCK'n Spokane, WA Spokane, WA Tel: (509) 891-7250 E-mail: nelsonfancher@live.com Vancouver - Support Group Contact: Theressa Rachetto Vancouver, WA 98662 Tel: (360) 713-1504 E-mail: theressarachetto@gmail.com Yakima - Support Group ROCK’n Yakima, WA Contact: Shanta Gervickas Tel: (509) 965-1130 E-mail: Shanta@network7.com West Virginia Hurricane - Support Group Contact: Karen Daniel Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Hurricane Chapter 340 Green Acres Dr. Hurricane, WV 25526 Tel: (304) 757-0696 E-mail: krdaniel@suddenlink.net Wisconsin DePere - Support Group Contact: Pam Rourke Tel: (920) 339-7867 E-mail: mrourke@new.rr.com Jackson - Support Group Contact: Yvonne Schwalen Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Jackson Chapter E-mail: trainman280@netzero.net R.O.C.K. Chapters in Canada Alberta ROCK 'n Olds Olds, Alberta, Canada Amy Smart 403-415-5789 asmart@telus.net
  17. massagemamaof3

    Just Diagnosed

    My 11 year old daughter had her endoscopy today. When the Dr. came to talk to me, even without the biopsy results, could tell she has Celiac Disease. I've been doing research and preparing myself since the blood work came back in October. Now that its "real" I'm so overwhelmed I don't even know where to start! I want the whole family to be gluten free or mostly gluten free (vodka and beer) I just can't wrap my mind around it. Shes never really had any symptoms, it was her small stature, she's 4'3" and 60 pounds, that prompted the trip to the endocrinologist that prompted the trip to the gi Dr. (its a little like the house that Jack built lol). Any suggestions would be great. Thanks!
  18. My 13 yo son was tested 4 months ago. The test came back with very high numbers for celiac: Deamidated Gliadin IgA 105 & IgG 154; t-transglutaminase IgA >100 & IgG 8, Endomysial Antibody IgA positive. Pediatrician was amazed at how high the numbers were and GI called them very impressive. They followed with endoscopy and biopsy that was positive for celiac . We were completely unfamilar with Celiacs disease and the rest of the family tested negative including his twin brother and 2 other siblings. Strangely he has never had any GI symptoms. He is quite small for his age, but so is his brother and father. His symptoms were fatigue, back pain, sore throat and general malaise also affecting his ability to function well in school. Doctors said all this was related to celiac. I asked to test for vitamin deficiency and/or for referral to nutritionist and told it wasn't necessary. Doctors referred us to a website and said go gluten free! Fast forward four months and his symptoms have only improved marginally, although he did gain about 7 lbs. We are gluten-free and my son has been super vigilant- bless him. He really wants to have the energy to go back to playing sports etc. I've gotten calls from other moms, "Is it true that your son can't eat a burger if it just touched the bun?" Back to GI today who said he would do blood work to check, but that his symptoms do not appear to be related to Celiacs disease. I guess 4 months ago they were all so excited about the 'amazing' numbers they weren't listening to us. Doctor says he has Celiac, but probably just asymptomatic. Doctor thinks we should see Rheumatologist and Endocrinologist. So now I am wondering what the.... Could these test results have been a mistake? But I thought endoscopy was definitive although I don't have the actual biopsy results in my hand (going to request a copy asap). And I still have a sick 13 yo boy. Does anyone know if fatigue, back pain, sore throat and inability to concentrate in school could be related to Celiac. Should I go to Rheumatologist? We live an hour from Columbia Univ Center for Celiac Disease. Thinking of just taking him there for some definitive answers first before I get back on the doctor carousel. I would appreciate any advice or feedback. Thanks!!!
  19. My friends' daughter is 7 or 8 I think. Whenever I come over now she puts a snack in my face, usually a cupcake or something and is like "Here you go!" And I am always like No thank you! We tried to explain to her, nothing with wheat or dairy but she doesn't understand really what that means. We also said I mostly eat fruits and vegetables too. Her parents also feel guilty that they couldn't find anything in their kitchen that I can eat ( take out, tv dinners and cereal) and she might have caught onto that. Its an interesting situation, since even adults are clueless about wheat ( "can u still have white bread?") so explaining my condition to a small child is especially challenging. Anyone else went thru this?
  20. Here is the problem I need advice on: My 7 yr old is getting very jealous of my recently diagnosed 3 yr old. Why? Because whenever we go to a birthday party of family dinner I always bring my 3 yr old, dinner and dessert. But my 7 yr old often would rather eat what I brought my 3yr old because it is better than what we are being served at the party/family gathering. So, what is fair? Do I let my 7yr old be jealous/mad (reminding her that she still gets to enjoy lots of things her younger sister doesnt, ie, hot lunch at school, dinner/dessert when at a friend's house for a sleepover, snack at the concession stand, etc) or do I bring her dinner and dessert as well?
  21. Danna Korn founded R.O.C.K. in 1991 after her son, Tyler, was diagnosed with celiac disease. It has grown to international proportions, helping families all over the world deal with the unique challenges of raising a child on a gluten-free diet. When children are diagnosed with celiac disease at an early age, they usually have a severe intolerance to gluten, and are often extremely sick when ultimately diagnosed. Most parents share horror stories of visiting several doctors before finally arriving at a diagnosis, and are frustrated, exasperated, and angry, yet relieved to finally have a direction in which to turn. Sometimes it helps to talk about it, and it always helps to have some guidance when initially diving into the gluten-free diet. Raising Our Celiac Kids is a support group for parents, families and friends of kids with celiac disease or gluten intolerance. We welcome families of autistic kids involved in a gluten-free/casein-free dietary intervention program. We concentrate on dealing with the unique challenges that we have, including: Finding "fun" gluten-free treats for kids Menu ideas for school lunches, quick dinners, and sports snacks Helping the kids to take responsibility for reading labels, cooking and planning/preparing food How to prepare for unexpected birthday parties and food-oriented activities at school, church, and elsewhere Halloween, Easter, and other special days - how do we include our kids safely? Educating day-care providers and teachers - without burdening them Dealing with grandparents, babysitters, and "helpful" friends who offer gluten-containing foods to our kids Ensuring our kids won't cheat, and what to do WHEN they do Sending kids away to camp, friends' houses, and other times when we're not around to help The psychological impact of growing up with celiac disease (peer pressure, teenage years, and more) What do R.O.C.K. chapters do? R.O.C.K. chapters have R.O.C.K. parties! How often you meet will be up to you and your chapter members, but we suggest meeting every two months to start; you can judge from that point whether you'd like to meet more or less often. We'd like to eventually have a chat room, where local chapters can talk to each other or with other chapter members. (In the meantime, people can chat at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CeliacKids). What goes on at a R.O.C.K. party? R.O.C.K. parties are for the kids and the adults. The kids enjoy gluten-free food and play, while the parents exchange new-product information, questions and concerns, and anything that they feel is pertinent. You may invite speakers (child psychologists, pediatricians, pediatric gastroenterologists, dietitians), and even provide entertainment (clowns, face painters, toys) for the kids. Remember your community centers - they often have teenagers who will entertain the kids - for free! Remember, you may have just a few families at first, but "build it and they will come" - keep it in mind! Should I start a R.O.C.K. chapter or do something on my own? I don't personally profit from any R.O.C.K. activities, so it doesn't benefit me either way. My vision for R.O.C.K. is to provide accurate, supportive information to families of gluten-free kids to make their lives easier and their kids' lives more enjoyable. The more cohesive we are, the more credible we are to new members, vendors, and the gluten-free community as a whole. If you decide to pursue a group on your own, I sincerely wish you the best of luck and hope you'll ask me for help in setting up your group if you need it. If there isn't a R.O.C.K. chapter in your area yet and you're interested in starting one, please contact Danna Korn at danna@dannakorn.com. R.O.C.K. Chapters in the United States Alabama Support Group - Mobile Contact: Marilyn Taylor ROCK’n Mobile, Alabama Tel: (251) 633-3528 E-mail: Taylor6211@bellsouth.net Slocomb - Support Group Contact: Nichole Alexander E-mail: mamma_hen3@hotmail.com Tel: (334) 886-7150 Alaska Chugiak - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - ROCK'n Alaska Contact: Debbie Saddler Chugiak, AK 99567 Tel: (907) 688-6879 E-mail: alaskadebbie@gmail.com Arizona Gilbert - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Gilbert Chapter Contact: Deanna Frazee Gilbert, AZ Tel: (480) 641-8821 E-mail: deannafrazee@hotmail.com Phoenix - Support Group Greater Phoenix R.O.C.K. Contact: Lisa Potts Email: phoenixceliackids@gmail.com FB Page: facebook.com/PHX.ROCK Phone: (858) 442-5956 E-mail: lisa.potts4911@gmail.com Internet: www.phoenixrock.org Tucson - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Tucson Chapter Contact: Liz Attanasio Tel: (520) 877-9181 Tucson - ROCK'n Tucson Contact: Shelli Hanks Tucson, AZ 85750 Email: TucsonROCK@comcast.net Tel: (520) 577-0774 Arkansas Fayetteville, AR Melanie Faught Fayetteville, AR 72704 Tel: (479) 582-9232 E-mail: melaniefaught@cox.net California Conejo Valley - Support Group ROCK'n Conejo Valley Contact: Melissa Riches Westlake Village, CA 91361 Tel: (818) 706-0197 E-mail: melissa.riches@sbcglobal.net Danville - Support Group Contact: Ann Reigelman Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Danville Chapter Danville, CA E-mail: areigelman@yahoo.com Lake Balboa - Support Group Contact: Melissa Gray Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Lake Balboa Chapter Tel: (818) 510-0534 E-mail: Melissagray808@gmail.com Los Angeles - Support Group Contact 1: Amy Harley Tel: (818) 249-2432 E-mail: harleyhome@earthlink.net Contact 2: Cheryl Cohen Tel: (818) 784-4516 E-mail: cohencheryl@yahoo.com Moreno Valley - Support Group Contact: Kellee Shearer Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Moreno Valley Chapter 10034 Snipe Circle Moreno Valley, CA 92557 Tel: (951) 242-8448 E-mail: Treshearer@aol.com Orange County - Support Group Contacts: Randi Leinen Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Orange County Chapter E-mail: RMLeinen@aol.com ROCK’n Orange County, CA Contact: Drew Grant Tel: (949) 257-6349 E-mail: orangecountyrock@gmail.com Palo Alto - Support Group Contact: Kelly Velez or Debbie Duncan Bay Area ROCK E-mail: kellyvelez@comcast.net Tel: (650) 303-8409 E-mail: debbie@debbieduncan.com Tel: (650) 494-6959 San Diego - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - San Diego Chapter Contact: Brenda McDowell E-mail: sdrockchapter@gmail.com San Francisco - Support Group Contact: Lisa Palme Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - San Francisco Chapter E-mail: palmer@smccd.net Sebastopol - Support Group ROCK North Bay Chapter Contact: Jennifer Iscol Sebastopol, CA 95472 Tel: (707) 824-5830 E-mail: iscol@aol.com Visalia (Central) - Support Group Contact: Shannon Williams Tel: (559) 741-1671 Visalia, CA Colorado Peyton - Support Group ROCK’n Peyton, CO Crystal Brauer Tel: (719) 494-8590 E-mail: Brauer.family@yahoo.com Connecticut Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K) Fairfield County CT Contact: Karen Loscalzo/ Monika Lazaro/ Carolyn Caney E-mail: rockfairfieldcounty@gmail.com Internet: www.ROCKFairfieldCounty.com Simsbury - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids - R.O.C.K. - Simsbury Chapter Contact: Mark & Tracy Saperstein Tel: (860) 651-4857 E-mail: mtbahs@comcast.net Waterford - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids - R.O.C.K. - Waterford Chapter Contact: Donna Kensel Waterford, CT E-mail: CtCeliacKids@aol.com District of Columbia (Washington D.C.) District of Columbia - Support Group Contact: Linda Hickman Northern VA/Washington DC R.O.C.K. Tel: (410) 290-5224 E-mail: hickman68@verizon.net Florida Apopka - Support Group Contact: Deborah Pfeifle Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Apopka Chapter Apopka, FL 32712 Tel: (407) 880-6104 E-mail: dpfeifle@earthlink.net Coral Springs/Palm Beach - Support Group Contacts: Janna Faulhaber and Stacey Galper Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Coral Springs/Palm Beach Chapter Tel: (954) 255-7855 E-mail: Staceynagel@paxson.com Odessa (Tampa) - Support Group Contact: Terri Willingham Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Odessa Chapter Orlando - ROCK'n Celebration - Support Group Contact: Rose Parvaz Celebration, FL 34747 E-mail: rose.parvaz@celebration.fl.us Palm Beach gardens - Support Group ROCK'n Palm Beach Gardens Contact: Kimberly Wade Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 E-mail: tkcrw@comcast.net Tel: (561) 625-9005 Tampa - Support Group Contact: Melissa Ransdell Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Tampa Chapter 14521 Nettle Creek Rd. Tampa, FL 33624 Tel: (813) 265-8105 Georgia Atlanta - Support Group Contact: Jeff Lewis, M.D. Children's Center for Digestive Health Care Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Atlanta Chapter E-mail: jlewis@ccdhc.org Illinois Chicago - Support Group ROCK'n Chicago Contact: Alexandra Vavouliotis Tel: (847)-962-7244 E-mail: alexvav24@mac.com Dekalb - Support Group Contact: Audrey O'Sullivan Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Stillman Valley Chapter Dekalb, IL Tel: (815) 756-2606 E-mail: Audrey08@aol.com ROCKn DuPage & Cook County Aleksandra de Leon -DuPage County E-mail: aleksandra.deleon@gmail.com Tel: 630-745-7429 Ilene Harris- Cook County E-mail: isf27@yahoo.com Tel: 847-222-9950 Moline - Support Group Contact: Lesley Lamphier ROCK'n Illinois (Moline) Moline, IL 61265 Tel: (309) 736-1507 E-mail: celiackids@mchsi.com Springfield - Support Group Land of Lincoln Celiac Support Group Contact: Joyce Hall Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Springfield Chapter Springfield, IL Washington - Support Group Heart of Illinois Celiac Kids Contact: Samantha Young E-mail: info@hoiceliackids.com Indiana Henryville - Support Group Contact: Kristie Williams ROCK'n Indiana (Henryville) Henryville, IN 47126 Tel: (812) 294-1179 E-mail: kristiewilliamsrn@hotmail.com Indianapolis - Support Group Contact: Kelly Kurzhal ROCK’n Indianapolis Indianapolis, IN 46217 Tel: (317) 697-4933 E-mail: kellykurzhal@hotmail.com Mooresville - Support Group Contact: Cindy Holder Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Mooresville Chapter 375 E. Countyline Rd. Mooresville, IN 46158 Tel: (317) 831-9871 E-mail: Holders2@comcast.net Iowa Des Moines - Support Group Contact: Lindsay Amadeo Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Des Moines Chapter Des Moines, IA E-mail: llamadeo@yahoo.com Maryland ROCK'n Maryland Contact: Steffani Mykins Tel: (410) 626-1958 E-mail: stfine@comcast.net ROCK’n Maryland Contact: Lindsay Moe Mt. Airy, MD 21771 (443) 799-3432 E-mail: lindsaymoe@ymail.com Massachusetts Longmeadow - Support Group ROCK'n MA Contact: Christie Freda Longmeadow, MA 01106 E-mail: cfreda126@comcast.net Tel: (413) 567-5748 Somerset - Support Group Contact: Stacey Nasrallah ROCK'n Somerset (MA) Somerset, MA 02726 Tel: (508) 674-6211 E-mail: info@somersetrock.org Internet: http://www.somersetrock.org Michigan Ann Arbor - Support Group Contact: Anne MacDougald ROCK’n Michigan E-mail: anniemacdougald@gmail.com Macomb Township - ROCK'n MI Support Group Contact: Kimberly Fanelli Macomb Township, MI 48044 Tel: (586) 226-8480 E-mail: kfanelli@mac.com West Bloomfield - Support Group Contact: Gail Smoler Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - West Bloomfield Chapter 4358 Strathdale Court West Bloomfield, MI 48323 Tel: (248) 851-9451 E-mail: GailS63@aol.com Minnesota Minneapolis/St. Paul Support Group Contact: Lynda Benkofske Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - ROCK-Minneapolis/St. Paul Chapter 15470 County Rd. 35 Elk River, MN 55330 Tel: (763) 263-7679 E-mail: ljbenkof@ties2.net Mississippi Columbia - Support Group Contact: Beth Broom Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - South Mississippi Chapter 50 Wilks Road Columbia, MS 39429 E-mail: sbroom@dixie-net.com Missouri O'Fallon - Support Group Contact: Beth Anne Miller 7264 Sweetcider Lane O'Fallon, MO 63366 Tel: (636) 294-2037 E-mail: Frankbethm@aol.com Montana Billings - ROCK'n Montana Support Group Billings, MT 59102 Contact: Perrin Grubbs E-mail: perrin@bresnan.net Tel: (406) 655-7897 Nevada Reno - Support Group Contact: Carrie Owen Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Reno Chapter Tel: (775) 857-2708 E-mail: Renorockgroup@yahoo.com New Hampshire Manchester - Support Group Contact: Michelle Ouellette ROCK'n New Hampshire Manchester, NH 03102 Tel: (603) 627-1831 E-mail: rocknh2006@gmail.com New Jersey Blairstown - Support Group Contact: Marla Benson Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Blairstown Chapter Blairstown, NJ MBenson890@aol.com (808) 362-7752 Freehold - Support Group Contact: Elissa Carlin Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Freehold Chapter Marlboro, NJ 07746 Tel: (732) 252-8309 E-mail: ElissaC75@aol.com Morristown - Support Group ROCK'n New Jersey Contact: Andrea Kitzis Smith Morristown, NJ 07960 Tel: (201) 965-7309 E-mail: akitsm@att.net Short Hills - Support Group Contact: Ellie Fried Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - North Jersey Chapter Tel: (973) 912-0253 New Mexico Albuquerque - Support Group Contact: Traci Shrader Tel: (505) 450-1156 E-mail: tashrader@msn.com New York Auburn - Support Group R.O.C.K.'n Auburn Contact: Nicki Hai Tel: (315) 252-2764 E-mail: jnhai@roadrunner.com Glens Falls Region - Support Group Contact: Lisa Fox Lake George, NY 12845 Tel: (518) 668-5838 E-mail: fox_lisa@hotmail.com ROCK’n Hudson Valley, NY Contact: Terresa Bazelow Thompson Ridge, NY Tel: (845) 609-7432 E-mail: HVNYROCK@aol.com Long Island - Support Group Contact: Christine Lauria East End Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) E-mail: eastendrock@yahoo.com Internet: www.rockli.com Nassau County- Support Group Contact: Angela Silverstein Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Lynbrook Tel: (516) 593-2904 E-mail: venusangmm1@optonline.net Nassau/Suffolk - Support Group Contact: Randi Albertelli Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Long Island Chapter E-mail: rsquared31@optonline.net Contact 2: Jill Schneider Tel: (516) 551-4564 E-mail: jahms@verizon.net Rockland, NY - Bergen, NJ Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Rockland, NY - Bergen, NJ Chapter Contact: Gabrielle Simon Telephone: (646) 342-6960 Email: nynjrockmom@yahoo.com Rome - Support Group Mohawk Valley R.O.C.K. (upstate New York) Contact: Rebecca Madeira Rome, NY Tel: (315) 337-7671 Upstate - Support Group ROCK'n Upstate New York Contact: Karen Dorazio Jamesville, NY 13078 Tel: (315) 469-8154 E-mail: kdorazio@twcny.rr.com Vestal, NY ROCK’n Vestal, NY Contact: Razi Lissy E-mail: raziher@gmail.com Western New York - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Western New York Chapter Buffalo / Niagara Falls NY Contact: Jeanette Yuhnke Tel: (716) 625-8390 Internet: http://www.glutenfreeinwny.com/WNYCeliacKids.php Westchester, NY ROCK’n Westchester, NY Contact: Erica Peltz E-mail: Eps2104@gmail.com Tel: (917) 612-4676 North Carolina Charlotte, Support Group Contact: Nikki Everett Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Charlotte Chapter Huntersville, NC 28078 Tel: (704) 804-4090 E-mail: haircolorexpertise@hotmail.com Harrisburg - Support Group Contact: Linda Witherspoon 5018 Wynford Ct. Harrisburg, NC 28075 Tel: (704) 957-6100 E-mail: Linda.witherspoon@aol.com Stantonsburg - Support Group ROCK’n North Carolina Contact: Carrie Forbes Stantonsburg, NC 27883 Tel: (252) 238-3132 E-mail: gingerlemongirl@gmail.com North Dakota Fargo - Support Group Contact: Stacey Juhnke Tel: (701) 237-4854 E-mail: DSJuhnke@yahoo.com Ohio Akron - Support Group Contact: Sue Krznaric Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Akron Chapter Akron, OH Tel: (330) 253-1509 E-mail: skrznaric@cs.com Akron - Support Group Contact: Therese Semonin Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Akron Chapter CSA Chapter 111, S.O.S. Save Our Stomachs Cincinnati - Support Group Contact: Beth Koenig Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Cincinnati Chapter Cincinnati, OH E-mail: BethKoenig@cinci.rr.com Tel: (513) 923-4435 Cleveland - Support Group ROCK’n Cleveland Contact: Tracey Lavine Solon, OH 44139 Tel: (216) 533-1285 E-mail: Tracey95@aol.com Toledo - ROCK'n Toledo Support Group Contact: Amy Kinkaid Toledo, OH 43615 E-mail: kinkaida@bex.net Tel: (419) 509-6913 Oregon Salem - Support Group Contact: Kristen Klay Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Salem Chapter Tel: (503) 581-3884 E-mail: kristenklay@yahoo.com Pennsylvania Greenville - Support Group Contact: Fiona Garner Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Greenville Chapter Greenville, PA Glenside - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Glenside Contact: Wilhelmina Green Glenside, PA 19038 Tel: (215) 756-2708 E-mail: Wilhelmina.green@gmail.com Greensburg - Support Group Contact: Martin Martinosky, Jr. Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Greensburg Chapter Greensburg, PA Tel: (724) 834-3435 E-mail: ROCKchapter@aol.com Hanover - Support Group ROCK’n Hanover Contact: Melissa Panzer Hanover, PA 17331 Tel: (717) 633-1667 E-mail: Glutenfree4life@live.com Harrisburg - Support Group Gluten Intolerance Group of Harrisburg Harrisburg, PA Tel: (717) 520-9817 Lancaster/York - Support Group Contact: Janelle Gregory Tel: (717) 687-8586 E-mail: janellegregory@verizon.net Lansdale - Support Group ROCK Bucks Montgomery Contact: Holly and Steve Staugaitis Lansdale, PA 19446 Tel: (215) 997-2706 E-mail: hollystaugaitis@gmail.com South Carolina Charleston - Support Group Contact: Cathy Leeke Lowcountry R.O.C.K. Tel: (678) 637-3277 E-mail: cwleeke@yahoo.com Clover - Support Group Contact: Lauretta McInnis Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Clover Chapter Tel: (803) 222-5143 E-mail: laurettamcinnis@gmail.com Easley - Support Group Contact: Laura Armstrong Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Easley Chapter Easley, SC Tel: (864) 850-0344 Lexington - Support Group Contact: Gail Fox Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Lexington Chapter Lexington, SC 29072 Tel: (803) 957-7658 E-mail: gailfox@sc.rr.com Tennessee Nashville - Support Group Contact: Janet Lowery Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Nashville Chapter Tel: (615) 758-2674 Woodlawn - Support Group Contact: Shantal Green Woodlawn, TN Tel: (931) 648-2289 Texas Austin - Support Group Contact: Frances Kelley ROCK'n Austin - Alamo Celiac GIG Austin, TX 78739 E-mail: fkelley@austin.rr.com Tel: (512) 301-2224 Dallas/FortWorth - Support Group Contact: Kelly LeMonds, Leader Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Wylie Chapter 1821 Spinnaker Way Drive Wylie, Texas 75098-7855 Tel: (972) 442-9328 E-mail: leader@dallasrock.org Internet: http://www.dallasrock.org Dallas/FortWorth - Support Group Contact: Diane McConnell Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Dallas/FortWorth Chapter Tarrant County, TX Tel: (817) 849-8646 E-mail: fortworthrock@swbell.net Houston - Support Group Contact: Janet Y. Rinehart, Chairman Houston Celiac Sprue Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Houston Chapter 13722 Ashley Run Houston, TX 77077-1514 Tel: (281) 679-7608 E-mail: txjanet@swbell.net Internet: http://www.csaceliacs.org/ Houston - Support Group Contact: Faye Sallee Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Houston Chapter 14830 Sagamore Hills Houston, TX 77082 Tel: (281) 496-9166 Houston - ROCK'n Houston Support Group Comtact: Monica Ryan Houston, TX 77025 Tel: (713) 667-1963 E-mail: Mwryan@ipa.net Lubbock - Support Group Contact: Beth Trostle ROCK'n Lubbock Tel: (806) 794-5917 E-mail: calvintrostle@nts-online.net San Antonio - Support Group Contact: Rose and Michael Stevens Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - San Antonio Chapter San Antonio, TX Tel: (210) 495-7757 E-mail: info@kidceliac.com Internet: http://www.kidceliac.com Victoria - Support Group Contact: Julie Bauknight Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Victoria Chapter Victoria, TX 77901 Tel: (361) 572-9252 Utah Holladay - Support Group Contact: Cathy Snowball ROCK’n Utah Holladay, UT 84121 E-mail: kileyannsmom@hotmail.com Ogden - Support Group Contact: Eileen Leatherow Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Ogden Chapter Ogden, UT Virginia Ashburn - Support Group Keith Bird Tel: (703) 348-7607 rock@birdmk1.plus.com Bristow - Support Group ROCK’n Bristow Contact: Michael and Elizabeth Brown Bristow, VA 20136 Tel: (703) 753-9161 E-mail: 2xx1xy@comcast.net Fredericksburg - Support Group ROCK’n Fredericksburg Contact: Kathy Paz-Craddock Tel: (703) 507-0609 E-mail: kalalilys@gmail.com Paeonian Springs - Support Group Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Paeonian Springs Becky Shore Tel: (571) 252-0036 E-mail: zoo2u@comcast.net Virginia Beach - Support Group Contact: Cynthia Olson E-mail: glutenfreemom@hotmail.com Washington Bellingham - Support Group Contact: Jean McFadden Layton ROCK'n Washington Bellingham, WA 98229 Tel: (360) 734-1659 E-mail: glutenfreekids@yahoo.com Bothell, WA - Support Group Contact: Lynn Crutcher Rock'n Washington Bothell, WA 98011 Tel: (425) 205-1327 E-mail: gfkids1@yahoo.com Poulsbo - Support Group Contact: Tim & Dawn Simonson Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Poulsbo Chapter Poulsbo, WA 98370 Tel: (360) 779-9292 E-mail: timsimonson@csi.com Seattle - Support Group Contact - Irina Risuhina Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Seattle Chapter E-Mail: iris510@hotmail.com Spokane - Support Group Contact: Jennifer Fancher ROCK'n Spokane, WA Spokane, WA Tel: (509) 891-7250 E-mail: nelsonfancher@live.com Vancouver - Support Group Contact: Theressa Rachetto Vancouver, WA 98662 Tel: (360) 713-1504 E-mail: theressarachetto@gmail.com Yakima - Support Group ROCK’n Yakima, WA Contact: Shanta Gervickas Tel: (509) 965-1130 E-mail: Shanta@network7.com West Virginia Hurricane - Support Group Contact: Karen Daniel Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Hurricane Chapter 340 Green Acres Dr. Hurricane, WV 25526 Tel: (304) 757-0696 E-mail: krdaniel@suddenlink.net Wisconsin DePere - Support Group Contact: Pam Rourke Tel: (920) 339-7867 E-mail: mrourke@new.rr.com Jackson - Support Group Contact: Yvonne Schwalen Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) - Jackson Chapter E-mail: trainman280@netzero.net R.O.C.K. Chapters in Canada Alberta ROCK 'n Olds Olds, Alberta, Canada Amy Smart 403-415-5789 asmart@telus.net
×