Jump to content
Celiac Disease FAQ | This site uses cookies GDPR notice. Read more... ×
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'kitchen'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Spring 2019 Issue
    • Winter 2019 Issue
    • Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Summer 2018 Issue
    • Spring 2018 Issue
    • Winter 2018 Issue
    • Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Summer 2017 Issue
    • Spring 2017 Issue
    • Winter 2017 Issue
    • Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Summer 2016 Issue
    • Spring 2016 Issue
    • Winter 2016 Issue
    • Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Summer 2015 Issue
    • Spring 2015 Issue
    • Winter 2015 Issue
    • Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Summer 2014 Issue
    • Spring 2014 Issue
    • Winter 2014 Issue
    • Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Summer 2013 Issue
    • Spring 2013 Issue
    • Winter 2013 Issue
    • Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Summer 2012 Issue
    • Spring 2012 Issue
    • Winter 2012 Issue
    • Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Summer 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2006 Issue
    • Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
    • Lists of Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Addison's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Anemia and Celiac Disease
    • Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Celiac Disease
    • Arthritis and Celiac Disease
    • Asthma and Celiac Disease
    • Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease
    • Attention Deficit Disorder and Celiac Disease
    • Autism and Celiac Disease
    • Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease
    • Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease
    • Candida Albicans and Celiac Disease
    • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) & Celiac Disease
    • Casein / Cows Milk Intolerance and Celiac Disease
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
    • Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Depression and Celiac Disease
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Diabetes and Celiac Disease
    • Down Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Dyspepsia, Acid Reflux and Celiac Disease
    • Epilepsy and Celiac Disease
    • Eye Problems, Cataract and Celiac Disease
    • Fertility, Pregnancy, Miscarriage and Celiac Disease
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Flatulence (Gas) and Celiac Disease
    • Gall Bladder Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Celiac Disease
    • Geographic Tongue (Glossitis) and Celiac Disease
    • Growth Hormone Deficiency and Celiac Disease
    • Heart Failure and Celiac Disease
    • Infertility, Impotency and Celiac Disease
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Intestinal Permeability and Celiac Disease
    • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Kidney Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Liver Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Lupus and Celiac Disease
    • Malnutrition, Body Mass Index and Celiac Disease
    • Migraine Headaches and Celiac Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis Celiac Disease
    • Obesity, Overweight & Celiac Disease
    • Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Bone Density and Celiac Disease
    • Psoriasis and Celiac Disease
    • Refractory Celiac Disease & Collagenous Sprue
    • Sarcoidosis and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma and Celiac Disease
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sepsis and Celiac Disease
    • Sjogrens Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Skin Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sleep Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Celiac Disease
    • Thyroid & Pancreatic Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Tuberculosis and Celiac Disease
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
    • United States of America: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Organizations
    • Outside the USA: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Contacts
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com
    • History of Celiac.com Updates Through October 2007
    • Your E-mail in Support of Celiac.com 1996 to 2006

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 11 results

  1. StoneRose

    Celiac Coach?

    I was speaking with someone, and thinking this could be very helpful for newly diagnosed people. Especially if it's for your child. To figure out what is OK in your kitchen, how to read labels at the supermarket, how to eat at restaurants, kid's parties, schools, travel, etc. I hope the poll works - curious to see what people think. Thanks!!
  2. Newbie mom of 15 yr old DD diagnosed 3 weeks ago. Just purchased brand new Farbwrware, nonstick items. Are these safe to use for her needs? Is it just scratched or oldish Teflon that's not suitable or all Teflon? These will only be used for gluten-free cooking. Trying to learn e as we go.
  3. Celiac.com 07/10/2015 - Ready for a revolution in healthy fast food? Amy's Kitchen thinks so. Looking to be more than just a frozen food company, food-maker Amy's Kitchen is staking a bet on healthy fast food by opening a healthy all vegetarian drive-thru restaurant in Rohnert Park, California. Amy's Drive-Thru will offer vegetarian burgers, burritos, pizzas, salads, macaroni and cheese, as well as milkshakes and vegan non-dairy shakes," according to the official company press release. Each menu item can be ordered vegan or gluten-free and every ingredient is non-GMO. Nearly all products are organic, and most ingredients are locally sourced. All meals are made from scratch, in under three minutes. "The heart of the Drive Thru menu is The Amy, a veggie burger the company developed over the course of over a thousand recipe taste tests," Amy's said in a press release. The restaurant opens in July, and will serve lunch and dinner, with plans to eventually serve breakfast. Diners will have a choice of meals that are gluten-free or dairy-free, and the pizza comes in either a rice or wheat crust. More than 95 percent of the products are organic, with many locally sourced. Source: FOOD WORLD NEWS
  4. My Celiac Disease is causing really stressful family drama. This has been an issue since I was diagnosed, but has gotten worse lately. The problem is with my dad. He and my mom live in the same town as I do and I often eat there. Because I am so sensitive to gluten, my mom has tried to keep their house 100% gluten-free. But my dad keeps bringing in bread and then gets bread crumbs around the kitchen. He tries to be careful, but he slips up and uses the butter to butter the bread and therefore gets the butter contaminated. He has used this butter to fry eggs and many other things. So the butter gets in the dishes, the utensils and the sponges. Despite being on a strict gluten-free diet for nearly 5 years, my antibodies are still slightly elevated at this point. I don't even eat out in restaurants at all because of cross-contamination. I have to cook all my food myself. However, I'll eat at my parent's house sometimes and they will cook for me. I have trusted them to make safe meals for me (and they have read many books about Celiac Disease and are very familiar with cross-contamination). My mom doesn't want any gluten in the house, but my dad keeps bringing in bread. We have tried to talk to him about this problem but every time we bring it up, he gets very defensive and takes it personally. I have told him that I am afraid I can't eat any meals that they prepare because of possible cross-contamination. My mom spent nearly a week cleaning the entire kitchen but he keeps bringing in bread. She is extremely frustrated with him, as am I. It's very perplexing because my dad is a very kind and loving person. But I think he is behaving selfishly when it comes to this. He'd rather bring bread home and eat it and therefore put my health at risk. But he doesn't see it that way. He thinks my mom and I are overreacting. However, he is getting old and forgetful. He can be very absent minded at times and doesn't seem to remember the correct protocols for dealing with cross-contamination. Last year, I was a guest in someone's house and the kitchen was dirty and full of crumbs. I ended up getting exposure even though I prepared my own food and using my own dishes. I was having panic attacks and other symptoms for almost 2 weeks afterward. He saw what I went through. But I think he's in denial when he sets his kitchen up to be a similar risk. This has lead to a lot of tension between him and my mom. I have thought about giving him 2 choices: either he stops bringing in bread and I will eat their meals OR he continues to bring in bread and I will not eat any of their meals. I hate to think that my disease causes so much stress and drama in my family. Fortunately, they are a lot more understanding than a lot of families, but my dad has his pitfalls. This is really stressing me out and I think it's causing unnecessary drama. Any suggestions?
  5. If you're a fan of granola, you'll want to try this unique product. Each 10 ounce bag is freshly made using organic honey, three different kinds of nuts, sunflower and pumpkin seeds, olive oil, and sea salt. The most unique thing about this granola is that is is grain-free. It's so good, I have never tasted anything like it. This granola also comes in four different flavors and lasts up to six months when refrigerated. I love it that chef Jason Kahn has created a product that is healthy and absolutely delicious! For more information visit: www.KahnsKitchen.com.
  6. This article originally appeared in the Winter 2004 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. Celiac.com 09/25/2014 - Every year, life seems to get more hectic. There is never enough time to get the things done on the ever-growing “to-do” list, let alone find time to relax. Then you are diagnosed with celiac disease and suddenly realize you can no longer stop at Subway for a hoagie sandwich on your way home. You get a sinking feeling in the pit of your stomach as you acknowledge that you will have to actually cook most of your own meals at home! There is no need to panic. There are many shortcuts that can help you get in and out of the kitchen faster. Here are just a few: Make a list of all the items you buy at the grocery store. Make your list very specific, organized by aisles at the store. Print off multiple copies. As you run out of things during the week, put a check mark next to the item on your list. When it is time to go shopping, most of your list will already be done. Keep a “basic pantry.” These are items you should always have on hand. Not only does this include spices, household cleaners, paper products, and canned goods, but a back-up pantry meal is always good to stock as well. This can be anything from cans of beans for a bean salad, gluten-free pork and beans or a can of tuna fish, to gluten-free spaghetti and gluten-free spaghetti sauce. Make extras. If you are making soup, chili, spaghetti sauce, marinated chicken breasts, cookie dough, etc., make two or three times the quantity you need; freeze the extra portions so you have meals that just need to be popped into the microwave on the days you don’t have time to cook. Use disposable foil cookware for those really messy recipes. Also, dish out dinners in the kitchen, from pot to plate; that way, you won’t have serving dishes to wash. Soak whole potatoes in hot water before baking them—they will cook much faster. When potatoes need peeling, peel them after they are cooked when they are cool enough to handle and the skins will slip right off. Use leftovers to make a different meal. Open a bag of ready-to-use lettuce and top it with last night’s leftover corn, taco filling, diced tomatoes, and sprinkle with gluten-free cheddar cheese. Or top the salad with thin slices of the leftover roast beef, diced leftover asparagus spears…you get the idea. You can also chop leftovers into bite-sized pieces and place them in a resealable freezer bag, and the next time you have leftovers toss them in. When the bag is full, open a large can of gluten-free chicken or beef broth, add the contents of the bag, and voila—you have Recycled Soup! Save the crusts. If you can’t get the kids to eat their crusts, trim them from their bread and store them in a resealable freezer bag (gluten-free bread is too expensive to buy and too time-consuming to make to throw out the crusts!). When the bag is full, let the crusts dry out for 24 hours, then run them through a food processor or blender, adding spices like dried parsley, garlic powder, paprika, and/or Italian seasoning, and make breadcrumbs. Use a crock pot. There are many meals that can be made in crock-pots, such as the recipe that follows. Cut up your leftover veggies and meat from the night before. You can also cut up potatoes ahead of time and soak them in cold water in the refrigerator. In the morning, layer everything in the crock pot, add some liquid (gluten-free barbecue sauce, gluten-free spaghetti sauce, tomato sauce, gluten-free broth, or salsa), turn the temperature to low or slow cook, and eight hours later your meal is ready. With a little practice and planning, you can enjoy healthy, quick, gluten-free meals. Planning ahead is the key to saving time. Plan your meals for the week, including how you are going to use up the leftovers. There definitely is time for “life after cooking” on a gluten-free diet. You can find more quick meal ideas in my book, Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults.
  7. I just found out that I likely have celiac disease, and I was on a gluten-free diet when I got a positive blood test so obviously cross-contamination is a huge issue for me. My husband and I are in the process of going through our kitchen and making the necessary changes to ensure I am not ingesting any gluten. I am wondering if others, when you found out you were celiac, threw out your cutting boards and colanders? Or is there a way to disinfect them? We have a very nice wooden cutting board and nice metal colanders and I hate to throw them out. Any suggestions? Also, what about wooden and plastic kitchen utensils? Do you throw them out? Thank you!
  8. learning2cope

    Wow Huge Shocker Here!

    I am surprised! Mom had been not really all that willing to help me go gluten-free. She was saying "you'll be fine" in regards to cross contamination. I had sent her 2 emails to maybe spark her willingness to help out. Here is what I included in the first email: Here is what I included in the second email: Just copied and pasted from celiac.com I think those emails helped her to understand this is real and this is a real lifestyle change for me and hopefully them at home. I don't care if they eat glutened foods but I do hope we can keep the kitchen as gluten-free as possible. Mom bought some good food to try out. We have 2 bread mixes to try and a basic baking flour. I'm not sure if we'll use it very often mainly because it's expensive but also because it may not taste very good. I just ate a sandwich with gluten-free corn tortillas. It wasn't altogether bad. It was chewier than I expected. After the first 2 bites it was pretty good. It reminded me of yummy mexican food Plus I had pepper jack cheese on it so that was good, too. Well I'm having intestine issues right now. It's been probably about 1/2 hour since eating that sandwich. Everything was brand new, supposedly gluten-free. My guess is my intestines are not happy right now so everything I eat is causing problems. Plus I was glutened by a prescribed medication today, a few hours ago. I had to take a generic Phenergan and it totally took away the nausea, bloating, intestine burning, etc. I think I took that around 7:30 or 8pm. I can't remember as I didn't write it down. Well, I had taken my Gabapentin at the same time I took Excedrin for my headache. So I’m not really sure if it was the Gabapentin or the Excedrin that caused the problems. Tomorrow I will take the Gabapentin without any thing else and well after I last ate or took anything. Hopefully I can narrow it down and see which medication caused it. I did look up both medications but couldn’t find an answer for Excedrin Extra Strength tablets. I went to drugs.com and looked up my specific Gabapentin profile and it doesn’t list any obvious gluten, BUT it does list corn starch and I think I’ve read that corn starch is usually contaminated with gluten if not specifically considered “gluten-free.” All I know is that reaction I had was BIG. There was no question I was glutened. I’m feeling less stressed trying to become completely gluten-free. I already checked and my toothpaste is gluten-free. though I am not sure about Listerine yet. I haven’t checked that out - so I haven’t used it.
  9. I am moving in with my boyfriend and I need some advice. He is a gluten eater but is going to go gluten and soy free for me as I am very sensitive. I have celiac as well as a soy allergy. Well when I moved into my current apartment I spent almost a week straight cleaning and recleaning the kitchen and dishwasher, oven etc to try to sanitize it as best as humanly possible to reduce my chances of cross contamination. So what I would like to know is: 1. what are the best ways to absolutely scrub the living hell out of the kitchen that was full of gluten so it's safe for me? 2. best way to really clean the dishwasher? When I lived with my parents I was constantly very ill from cross contamination from the dishwasher, so is there a cleaner or something I can run through there to really strip it of anything dangerous to me? What about the silverware rack if it has nicks and cuts from knives? The one in my current apartment was like that so I completely tossed it so I wouldn't even have the risk. But I would hate to do that to him if I could just deep bleach it or something. I just want to get everything as safe as I possibly can because CC is something that really hits me and I cannot afford to live with that.
  10. Celiac.com 07/19/2013 - Those diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten intolerance need to give their kitchens a thorough inspection and take some precautions to ensure that they will not be exposed to gluten in their homes. Even if you are just cutting gluten out of your diet because of personal preference, reconsidering your food preparation environment is essential if you really want to keep gluten out of your food and avoid allergic reactions or celiac disease symptoms. Learning what goes into a gluten-free kitchen takes a bit of research. Since you might overlook certain precautions, consider the following list of ways to ensure your kitchen is gluten-free. Thorough cleanings – When you first decide to make your kitchen gluten-free, give your kitchen a good cleaning and set up an appropriate food storage system. If you live by yourself, get rid of food products that contain gluten and wash any dishes or containers that held gluten products. If you share your home with others who will continue to eat gluten-containing products, properly label items and keep gluten-free products separate at all times to avoid cross-contamination. After this initial cleaning, regularly clean any surfaces where you have placed gluten-containing foods before you place gluten-free products on them. Toaster – When you have to switch to a gluten-free diet, buy a new toaster and use it only for gluten-free foods. Take care to remind everyone in your home that breads and products that contain gluten are not to be placed in the new toaster. Inventory – Obviously, the products on your kitchen shelves are going to have to change dramatically when you begin your gluten-free regime. Take a detailed inventory of what gluten-free products you already have and determine what you need to buy. Do some research to figure out how you are going to meet your nutritional needs and eat the foods you enjoy while still avoiding gluten. Research manufacturers of gluten-free foods and find out where gluten-free products are available locally. Although it might take some effort, you should be able to find a gluten-free equivalent for all of your favorite foods. Education – Now that you are eating gluten-free, some grains are available to enjoy and some must be avoided. Familiarize yourself with what you can and can't eat. Examples of gluten-free grains include amaranth, millet, oats, corn, and buckwheat. Grains to avoid include wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten-free mixes – A variety of gluten-free mixes are available that allow you to prepare your own baked products. Preparing baked goods such as breads and cakes from gluten-free mixes is a good introduction into the world of gluten-free cuisine. Cookbooks – Unfortunately, you may have to toss out many of the recipes in your old cookbooks, so buy a new cookbook that contains a variety of gluten-free recipes. Buy at least one and browse through it to get an idea of what goes into a gluten-free kitchen. Once you have set up your gluten-free kitchen, you will be able to once again cook, eat, and bake to your heart's content without worrying about your celiac disease or gluten intolerance. Part of what goes into a gluten-free kitchen is vigilance and attention to detail. Keep yourself as healthy as possible by doing everything you can to keep gluten out of your foods and out of your body.
  11. Celiac.com 09/05/2011 - The rise in celiac disease awareness and the explosion of foods for people who must eat gluten-free is generally a good thing. However, when companies rush products into the gluten-free market without a well-practiced and comprehensive plan, they can easily make mistakes. Consider the case of California Pizza Kitchen. In June, the company proudly announced the debut of a gluten-free pizza crust. Then, in August, the restaurant chain quietly pulled the crust from its menu, in what appears to be a re-evaluation of its gluten-free preparation process. This is a good thing, since numerous customers complained of symptoms of gluten-contamination, and the company itself acknowledged that their preparation process allowed possible cross-contamination from their standard pizza crusts. Many in the celiac community have pointed out that even though the crust is gluten-free, it is being prepared in the same areas as the gluten-containing crusts. So the pizza could be cross-contaminated with wheat, which has adverse health effects for people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity. On the California Pizza Kitchen Twitter feed, the company said that it is reviewing its preparation procedures, while leaving open the possibility that it might once again offer gluten-free pizza. Efforts by companies like Walt Disney, and more recently by Subway, show that it is possible to consistently deliver a safe and satisfying gluten-free dining experience to large numbers of people. However, it takes awareness of needs of the gluten-free community, and a comprehensive preparation and delivery plan to do it consistently well. Ideally, California Pizza Kitchen will learn and grow from this experience, and return from the drawing board with a plan to deliver safe, gluten-free versions of their unique and much-loved pizzas. Until then, stay tuned...
×