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Found 8 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/12/2018 - In a step that health officials say could provide immediate relief to the estimated eight million Indians who suffer from celiac disease, the Indian government is assessing a plan to require drugmakers to declare any gluten ingredients on medical labels. India’s chief drug advisory body will discuss the issue at its meeting scheduled in early December, said people with knowledge of the plan. The Drug Technical Advisory Board’s decision to address the issue of gluten-free labels for drugs and medicine comes on the heels of an active recommendation by the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS). In addition to clear gluten-warnings on all medical labels, experts at AIIMS have proposed changing the law to force drug makers to actively avoid gluten-containing ingredients in drugs or medicine. The proposal aligns with guidelines drafted by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2017. Those guidelines call for drug makers to properly label medications that contain gluten. The FDA also recommends that drug makers include a voluntary statement that indicates that the product contains no gluten, or any ingredient made from wheat, barley, or rye. Proper labeling of drugs and medicines is getting a great deal of attention from regulatory bodies over the last couple of years. Look for that trend to continue and for new guidelines to drive new labeling practices for medicines containing gluten ingredients. Overall, this is an extremely positive development for anyone with celiac disease or a medical gluten-sensitivity. Until such new guidelines make it to the pharmacy, be sure to check with your pharmacist about any drug or medicine you think might contain gluten. They are in a strong position to help, and can usually get answers to such questions. Lastly, stay tuned for more news on the official labeling decision by India's Drug Technical Advisory Board. Read more at: LIVEMINT.COM
  2. Celiac.com 10/27/2017 - Cereal maker General Mills has announced that it will no longer label their flagship cereal Cheerios as gluten-free in Canada. Has Canada Changed its Gluten-free Standards? No, the standard for labeling gluten-free foods in Canada remains same, at up to 20 ppm allowable gluten. Such foods are safe for the vast majority of people with celiac disease, according to both U.S. and Canadian regulatory agencies, the EU, celiac researchers and numerous celiac disease support groups. Health Canada, the agency responsible for setting food safety standards in Canada says that gluten levels below 20 ppm are safe for people with celiac disease. That is also the standard for gluten-free products in the United States and the EU. Have Cheerios Changed? No, the Gluten-Free Cheerios sold in the U.S. are the same Cheerios that are sold in Canada now, and the same Cheerios that will be sold in Canada after the labeling change. Cheerios routinely test below 20 ppm, and are currently labeled as gluten-free in both the U.S., and Canada. Cheerios has not been the subject of a mandated recall in with the U.S. or in Canada, which indicates that the product remains safe for the vast majority of people with celiac disease. So, Why is Cheerios Changing its Label in Canada? It comes down to a technicality over oat testing standards. Canadian labeling laws require manufacturers follow a specific testing requirement for products made with oats, such as Cheerios. Under that Canadian testing requirement, oat products with gluten levels above 5 ppm, but under 20 ppm are considered "Investigative," a status under which the agency "notifies the regulated party of the result." They then "follow up with the regulated party to determine the source of the gluten." Moreover, the agency advises "the regulated party, such as General Mills in the case of Cheerios, to review their Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) and process controls." The agency may require "corrective action." As a result, cereal maker General Mills has announced that it will no longer label their flagship cereal Cheerios as gluten-free in Canada. General Mills stands by its testing process and said Cheerios sold in the U.S. will continue to carry the gluten-free label. A statement by General Mills reads: GM: "Each serving of Cheerios products in Canada are gluten free, as defined by the current regulatory standard of containing less than 20 ppm of gluten. General Mills Canada has made the decision to voluntarily remove the gluten-free label from our Cheerios products in Canada until Health Canada and The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) publish a consistent testing protocol for products containing oats. At this time the product is not changing, just the label on the box. We look forward to labeling the Cheerios products in Canada as gluten free once consensus is reached on a consistent testing protocol for products containing oats." Comments made by both General Mills and the CFIA suggest the decision to remove the gluten-free labels from Cheerios stem from an issue around how products containing oats are tested for gluten in Canada. According to CBC News, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirmed that the move by General Mills to remove the gluten-free label was voluntary, and said the company had "informed" the agency of its plans in August. "This was a business decision made by the company and not a directive from the CFIA," the statement said. The statement from GM continues: "While Gluten-Free Cheerios products comply with the gluten-free standards in Canada and the United States, we have made the decision to remove the gluten-free label from our Cheerios products in Canada until the government agencies publish a consistent testing protocol for products containing oats. At this time the product is not changing, just the label on the box. For nearly a decade, General Mills has served consumers with Celiac disease and gluten sensitivities. Since Gluten Free Rice Chex was launched in 2008, General Mills has grown its portfolio of gluten-free products to more than 1,000 items. It is now the second largest provider of gluten-free foods, including seven varieties of Cheerios, in the U.S. The company has also introduced gluten-free products in more away-from-home food outlets like restaurants and schools, and in new regions such as Canada and Europe." GM spokesperson Mike Siemienas said the company was waiting for "Health Canada and The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) [to] publish a consistent testing protocol for products containing oats," and that General Mills looks forward to labeling the Cheerios products as gluten-free once consensus is reached on a consistent testing protocol." So, while Cheerios will no longer carry a gluten-free label in Canada, Canadian standards for gluten-free products have not changed, and remain the same as American standards, at up to 20 ppm allowable gluten. The Cheerios sold in Canada are no different than Cheerios sold in the United States, where they will still carry a gluten-free label. So, only the Canadian label will change. Cheerios will remain the same. On either side of the border, people with celiac disease can continue to enjoy Cheerios with confidence. Those with oat sensitivity, or who react to high fiber levels, should use their own judgement about Cheerios, as with any other product.
  3. Celiac.com 10/19/2015 - People who must avoid gluten for medical reasons just got a reason to be hopeful that gluten in medicines, which are not regulated under the current FDA law, might soon be labeled by law. U.S. Representatives Tim Ryan (D-OH) and Nita Lowey (D-NY) recently introduced a bill to make it easier for people with gluten-related disorders to identify medications that contain gluten. Their bill, the Gluten in Medicine Disclosure Act of 2015 would change the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act so that the label of any medicine intended for human use must divulge any ingredient, besides sugar alcohol, that is derived from a grain or contains gluten. The bill is intended to help people with Celiac disease avoid gluten. "Americans deserve to know what is in their food and drugs," agreed Lowey. "Providing uniform standards for food and drug labeling will make a world of difference to the quality of life for people with celiac disease. People want medicine labels to provide "the information they need to protect their health and wellbeing," Ryan added. Keep an eye on congress to see how this proceeds, and check back with celiac.com to follow progress on this important issue. Source: CBS News
  4. Celiac.com 09/12/2013 - Good news for consumers of gluten-free foods and other products: The FDA's new standards for the labeling of gluten-free food and other products apply to all foods and products labeled gluten-free, including dietary supplements and vitamins. The FDA rules state that any product declaring the contents to be "gluten-free," "no gluten," "free of gluten" or "without gluten," must meet all parts of FDA's gluten-free definition, including the requirement that the food contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten. People with celiac disease who consume gluten from wheat, rye, or barley risk gradual damage to the intestines, leading to poor absorption of vitamins and minerals and leading to a host of other health problems, including nutritional deficiencies, osteoporosis, miscarriages, and cancer," according to Virginia Cox, Associate Commissioner of FDA's Office of External Affairs. Creating uniform rules and conditions for the use of the term 'gluten-free' in the labeling of foods and other products is "necessary to ensure that individuals with celiac disease are not misled and are provided with truthful and accurate information with respect to foods so labeled, " according to the text of the final rule, which was published last week in the Federal Register. FDA projects the new requirements will yield annual health benefits of roughly $110 million, compared to estimated annual costs (related to testing and relabeling) of $7 million. Manufacturers of gluten-free foods and products will have one year to comply with the FDA's labeling requirements. Source: http://www.naturalproductsinsider.com/news/2013/08/fda-gluten-free-definition-applies-to-dietary-sup.aspx
  5. Celiac.com 04/06/2011 - The Canadian brewing industry caught a break when their products were exempted from new allergy labeling rules that would have required warning labels to declare beer to contain wheat or barley. Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq introduced new packaging requirements which give brewers a temporary exemption from the regulations. Minister Aglukkaq has said that she will first consult with other countries which have introduced similar labeling rules. The decision was at least a temporary victory for the industry, mainly for smaller beer-makers that claimed that the cost of replacing their painted bottles to conform with the new rules would run into the millions of dollars. The industry has also taken the position that every beer drinker knows that beer contains wheat or barley. “Our intent was never to hold up the entire regulations,” said André Fortin, a spokesman for the Brewers Association of Canada, said the industry group was "pleased with the decision to take into account the particular situation for beer.” The beer labels are of particular interest to people suffering from celiac disease, who suffer an auto-immune reaction when exposed the gluten contained in such grains as barley, wheat and rye. The last minute agreement to exempt beer from allergy labeling requirements disappointed some. Laurie Harada of Anaphylaxis Canada, which represents people with food allergies, said her group was “very disappointed by the last-minute decision of the government to pull the regulations for the beer.” Ms. Harada called on the Canadian government to move quickly make a final decision about beer labels. “They can’t give us any idea of the process or the dates right now, so I would still be asking the question: How are you going to deal with this?” But Ms. Harada said she is extremely pleased with the bulk of the new regulations. “It will certainly help to protect a number of people,” she said. The revised regulations require that manufacturers clearly identify food allergens, gluten sources and sulphites either in the list of ingredients or at the end of the list of ingredients. In addition, an allergen or gluten source must be written in commonly used words such as milk or wheat. Experts estimate that 5 to 6 per cent of young children and 3 to 4 per cent of adults suffer from food allergies, while nearly 1 per cent of the general population is affected by celiac disease. In part because of the complexity of the rule changes, and the shelf life of foods, the new regulations will not be enforced until Aug. 4, 2012.
  6. Celiac.com 02/03/2011 - Okay, so Canadians take their beer seriously. Beer being one of the few things that might stoke the passions of some Canadians almost as much as, say, hockey. So, proposed health regulations that would require beer labels to include a warning that beer is made with barley or wheat have the Canadian beer industry in a froth. Major players in the Canadian brewing industry are gearing up opposition over the proposed health regulations that would require just such labels, warning consumers that beer contains barley or wheat; something Canadian brewers liken to warning that ketchup contains tomatoes. The proposed rules are part of a larger set of regulatory changes Health Canada is seeking to make it easier for people with allergies to identify potential allergens in food ingredients. Health Canada statistics indicate that up to six per cent of children and up to four per cent of adults in Canada are believed to be affected by food allergies. People with serious allergies can go into shock or even die if they consume certain ingredients. Beer-label warnings are aimed especially at people with celiac disease. The proposed rules would require beer labels to "clearly and prominently" display a warning that says, "Allergy and intolerance information: Contains wheat." Barley-based beer labels would be required to include a warning that says, "Allergy and intolerance information: Contains barley." Canadian beer companies say the measure is not necessary, pointing out that people with celiac disease represent only about one per cent of the Canadian population, and tend to be well informed about the foods they should avoid. "These people are very well educated," said Andre Fortin, a spokesman for the Brewers Association of Canada, whose members produce 97 per cent of the beer brewed in Canada. "If a Canadian doctor diagnoses you with celiac disease, you're going to know that beer is not ideal for your system." The companies also point out small breweries might be hit especially hard by the labeling regulations. A number of breweries such as Steam Whistle Brewery and Mill St. Brewery sell their beer in vintage-style glass bottles with ceramic paint, which beer stores return to the companies, to clean and refill for reuse. Such companies might have to order new bottles to accommodate such regulations. The move could cost them millions of dollars, they say. However, for people who support allergy labeling requirements, the matter is serious. "This isn't just a bunch of fusspots," said Gwen Smith, editor of Allergic Living, a magazine and website that has long lobbied for the regulations. "This is about, 'How do I feed my children at dinner safely?' 'How do I feed myself?'" In addition to beer, new rules will apply to allergens derived from a wide range of foods, including almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, pecans, pistachios, sesame seeds, eggs, milk, soybeans, crustaceans, shellfish and fish. A review conducted nearly a decade ago for Health Canada estimated that implementing the proposed regulations would cost the Canadian food industry $102 million over two years, with annual costs of $13 million. The department expects the changes will cost the Canadian Food Inspection Agency $3 million annually, and Health Canada about $1 million per year. Health officials say that the cost of the implementing the proposed rules could be offset by some cost savings for the health-care system, since people with allergies would require less treatment. The department says the regulations are similar to those already in place in the United States, Europe, Australia and New Zealand. A spokesman said that after publication of the final version of the regulations, the food industry will have 18 months to comply. "The new labeling regulations are designed to ensure that consumers have the information they need to make appropriate choices and that this information is provided in a clear and consistent manner," the department said in a statement. Read more: Canada.com
  7. Celiac.com 05/17/2010 - Finding gluten-free food is hard enough without having to worry if your "gluten-free" labeled food is really gluten-free. For those of us that become increasingly ill from ingesting a small amount of gluten, improper food labeling can be a matter of life or death. Since 2007, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been contemplating potential revisions for the current “gluten-free” labeling of foods by food manufacturers. As the FDA requirements currently stand, there is very little protection for celiacs and gluten sensitive sufferers. However the new law, if approved, will require companies labeling their products as “gluten-free” to guarantee that their product is completely free of wheat, rye, barley, and oats and any crossbred hybrids or fillers containing wheat, rye or barley or oats, that do not test at less than 20 ppm for gluten. Meanwhile as we gluten-sensitive American's continue to wait patiently for a final resolve for the FDA requirements for gluten, Canadians are actively revising their labeling regulations for gluten-free. Health Canada has proposed changes in the current labeling regulations for gluten-free. According to the Canadian Food and Drug Regulations, “No person shall label, package, sell or advertise a food in a manner likely to create an impression that it is a gluten-free food unless the food does not contain wheat, including spelt and kamut, or oats, barley, rye or triticale or any part thereof.” Additionally the words, “gluten-free” is not permitted on any packaged foods containing oats; even if the oats are uncontaminated. Health Canada is now seeking input from Canadian citizens and shareholders on the proposed labeling regulations to help share information which will aid in the development of proposed changes. The Health Canada website is open to the public for comments from May 13, 2010 until July 11, 2010. For more information on the proposed revisions of Canadian gluten-free labeling, please visit the Health Canada website at: Health CanadaSource: Marketwire
  8. Celiac.com 02/06/2009 - The European Union’s Food Standards Agency (FSA) has issued new rules for foods carrying the ‘gluten-free’ label. Under the new rules, foods labeled ‘gluten-free’ must have less than 20 parts of gluten per million. This new standard represents a ten-fold reduction over the prior rules, which set the gluten limit at 200 parts per million. The FSA also established a separate labeling category for cereals that have been specially processed to reduce gluten to levels below 100 parts per million. These foods may not be labeled ‘gluten-free,’ but must carry some other label such as ‘gluten-reduced,’ or ‘very-low gluten.’ The FSA indicates that the exact labeling for such products should be undertaken at the national level. Foods that are naturally gluten-free and acceptable for a gluten-free diet cannot be labeled as ‘gluten-free,’ or ‘special-diet,’ but may say that they are ‘naturally gluten-free.’ The rules require the term ‘gluten-free’ or ‘very-low gluten’ to appear prominently on the package label in a way that indicates the “true nature of the food.” These rules are designed to help people with celiac disease make more informed decisions about the gluten content of the food they eat. The new rules provide strict definitions for gluten and related grains and proteins, and gluten-free foods, and mandates standards for testing and measuring gluten levels in food. They also mandate that quantitative determination of gluten in foods and ingredients be based on an immunologic method or other method providing at least equal sensitivity and specificity, and that all testing done on equipment sensitive to gluten at 10 mg gluten/kg or below. The rules cite the Enzyme-linked Immunoassay (ELISA) R5 Mendez method as the officially sanctioned qualitative analysis method for determining gluten presence in food. European food makers can voluntarily adopt the new labeling system any time. Compliance becomes mandatory for all EU food makers on Jan. 1, 2012. Regarding the three-year delay, the FSA cited a need on the part of some manufacturers for time to make formulation and packaging changes. * Sources: Food Standards Agency: New rules for 'gluten free' foods
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