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Found 11 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/21/2019 - Calls are mounting in India to eliminate the term "low-gluten" from food labels, and to push for “zero gluten” labels for foods that are gluten-free. The Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI) is calling for the term "low-gluten" to be eliminated from food labels, and for gluten-free foods to be labelled as "zero gluten," with the idea that the public perceives foods labeled "gluten-free" to include some gluten. Moreover, HFCI is calling for gluten-free food options on all airlines and trains, and in all parties, marriages and restaurants for people who need to avoid gluten for medical reasons. They are also calling for gluten-free options for non-celiac wheat sensitive persons, which includes up to ten percent of the population. HFCI is calling on medical associations to pass resolutions supporting these changes forthwith. The HCFI is also pushing honey water wine, with under 3% alcohol, as a harm reduction alternative to beer. Earlier in 2016, FSSAI had notified the Food Safety and Standards (Food Products Standards and Food Additives) Second Amendment Regulations, 2016, relating to standards for gluten food and low-gluten food. Read more at FBRNews
  2. Celiac.com 11/11/2016 - Do allergen advisory statements for wheat help US consumers with celiac disease make safe food choices? A team of researchers recently set out to review food that were not labeled gluten-free, but which appeared to be free of gluten ingredients based the ingredients list. The product labels indicated that the products contained no wheat, barley, rye, malt, brewers yeast. The research team included T. Thompson, TB Lyons, and A Jones. They are variously affiliated with Gluten Free Watchdog, Manchester, MA, USA; the Department of Clinical Nutrition, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA, and with Mary Rutan Hospital Nutrition, Bellefontaine, OH, USA. Looking for allergen advisory statements noting wheat, gluten or both, the team retrospectively reviewed labeling information for 101 products tested for gluten content. They tested products through the gluten test reporting service Gluten Free Watchdog, LLC in Manchester, MA, USA. The review included all commercially available products tested by Gluten Free Watchdog not labeled gluten-free or low gluten at the time of this analysis. Gluten testing was conducted via Bia Diagnostics in Burlington, VT, USA. Each product sample was tested in duplicate using the Ridascreen Gliadin sandwich R5 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) Mendez method (Ridascreen Gliadin R7001) and extracted with the cocktail solution (Art. No. R7006—official Mendez method) following the kit manufacturer’s directions (R-biopharm, Darmstadt, Germany). Seven of the 14 foods with quantifiable gluten in this assessment are single-ingredient foods, such as oat fiber, spices, and green tea leaves. Many single-ingredient foods are considered by consumers to be naturally gluten-free. However, US grain standards allow certain percentages of foreign material in grains, seeds and legumes. On the basis of this analysis, the current use of allergen advisory statements for wheat or gluten are not useful predictors of whether or not a single or multi-ingredient food product contains 20 or more p.p.m. of gluten. The authors are urging the regulation and standardization of such precautionary statements so that they are helpful to gluten-free consumers. Source: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Sep 14. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2016.155.
  3. Celiac.com 01/25/2017 - The UK's Food Standards Agency (FSA) has initiated a public comment period on gluten-free labeling in England. The FSA is inviting industry feedback on the proposed Gluten In Food (Information for Consumers) (England) Regulations 2017. This regulation enforces the new European Union regulation (Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) No. 828/2014), which standardizes labeling information on products that are gluten-free or very low in gluten. The law does not require any change in formulation, ingredients or the methods for these products, but does mandate new wording for product labels. It also clarifies for consumers the difference between foods naturally free of gluten, and those specially formulated for people with gluten intolerance. The proposed rule applies to England only, not Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland. The rule change is, in part at least, a response to rising numbers of product complaints. According to the FSA, approximately 1% of the UK population (around 600,000 people) suffers from celiac disease, while nearly half a million people remain undiagnosed. Currently, food businesses are permitted to make voluntary gluten-free or low in gluten claims, but this has led to inconsistency and confusion in many cases. Such confusion could cause health problems for those who are gluten-intolerant. Many of these products also fetch a premium price because of their gluten-free claims, stated the FSA. The aim of the English regulation is to standardize the permitted claims about gluten. Manufacturers will be limited to the use of the words "gluten-free" or "very low gluten" along with clear and limited supporting information. No other claims or descriptions are allowed, and products that fail to conform to labeling standards can be fined. The previously accepted phrase "No gluten containing ingredients (NGCI)" can no longer be used on product labels. Enforcement of FSA rules will take effect February 20, 2018.
  4. Celiac.com 02/02/2016 - General Mills seems to be having a hard time catching a break lately, especially when it comes to their new gluten-free options. After some minor good news that their new gluten-free versions of Cheerios breakfast cereal was driving a small increase in an otherwise falling cereal market, the company has found itself on the receiving end of several lawsuits. In the latest lawsuit, a Kentucky woman is suing the cereal producer over what she claims are misleading labels on their gluten-free products, including gluten-free Cheerios. In her class-action lawsuit filed Dec. 18 in the Eastern District of California, Jacklyn Haddix, on behalf of herself and all others similarly situated, alleges that General Mills, General Mills Sales, General Mills Operations, and Does 1-50, engaged in "unjust enrichment, breach of express warranty, negligence and violations of Kentucky and California consumer protection laws." The suit states that after General Mills began to advertise and distribute its gluten-free Cheerios products throughout the U.S., in September, the Food and Drug Administration received consumer reports of adverse reactions from people who had eaten gluten free-labeled Cheerios. On Oct. 5, after FDA tests of 36 Cheerios samples that certain samples contained gluten levels well above the mandated limit for products labeled gluten-free. General Mills subsequently recalled 1.8 million boxes of Cheerios. Two days later, the company revealed finished product testing had not been performed on the recalled Cheerios, according to the suit. Haddix and others in the suit seek "compensatory, exemplary, punitive, and statutory damages, plus return of purchase prices, interests, reimbursement, disgorgement, and attorney fees and costs" exceeding $5 million. Stay tuned for more developments on this and other gluten-free product lawsuits. Source: legalnewsline.com
  5. Hello, all. I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease a couple of days ago after an upper GI endoscopy. My husband and I have bought a few gluten-free products to get me started, but I'm concerned about the manufacturing and cross contamination. Can I eat a product if the label says "gluten-free" and none of the ingredients contain gluten or do I have to go as far as research the manufacturing process? If a label doesn't include information about manufacturing, is it safe? If the label states the product was produced in a facility that also process wheat-containing products, is it automatically out for me, or is that a CYA statement? I'm wondering if I should stick with products that have various gluten-free "seals of approval" such as those from Celiac organizations. Sorry for so many questions in one post. I am very concerned for my health and want to do everything right. Thanks!!
  6. Hi. Newly diagnosed Celiac here, male, 48 years old . . . just looking for direction. The diagnosis came very fast - in December. I saw my new PCP, he ordered blood tests, I had a TTGiGA blood confirmation, and a subsequent GI appt / upper endo intestinal biopsy (and colonoscopy) done and a confirmation of Celiac - all in the space of about 4 weeks! My head has been spinning ever since. My biopsy showed marsh 3, villous atrophy. I’m still just trying to let this diagnosis settle in my brain. I just got the confirmation on Jan 8th. I never even knew what Celiac was, but given my symptoms, I should have known. I knew something wasn’t right for sure. What I’m concerned about now is eating the right foods, and trying to figure out how to work the maze of all the “gluten-free” food out there . . . and what actually still has trace amounts of gluten!! I know for people dieting it’s no big deal to have trace amounts of gluten, but for me, that’s no good. Right? And, I guess, what ingredients do you need to steer clear of when reading packaging?
  7. Celiac.com 04/09/2013 - A legislator in Missouri, Rep. Vicky Englund is pushing a bill that requires manufacturers and wholesalers of hygiene products like shampoo and conditioner to clearly state on the product label whether or not the product contains gluten. According to CBS St. Louis, Rep. Englund was moved to act after hearing from a constituent who suffers from gluten intolerance. The woman had got gluten "out of her diet completely, but was still very ill and almost died,” Englund said. After considerable detective work, the woman eventually discovered that her shampoo contained gluten. A study by the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center and another by George Washington University show that many commercial health and beauty products contain gluten. The latter study, done in 2012 showed that people gluten sensitivity could react negative reactions to ingredients such as the wheat germ oil often used to produce Vitamin E. Englund’s bill is currently pending before the state’s House Health Care Policy Committee. What do you think? Is this a good idea? Let us know what you think about mandating gluten status on shampoo and conditioner labels by sharing your comments below.
  8. Hey all, i was just diagnosed with celiac and was looking at candy and some other foods that contain wheat and or they are processed on things that contain wheat. Such as m&ms they have a pretzel m&ms, have twix and kit kat bars they all contain wheat but they don't say they have wheat in them or that they were processed on the same machines or in the same facility as a facility that processes wheat but they do say contain peanuts or may contain peanuts Why do candies and other things not have to say contain wheat or may contain wheat? What should I do? I've been staying away from the things that don't have a warning but since not all gluten free items say gluten free then I just read then carefully. Please help me!
  9. Celiac.com 08/31/2012 - Since August 4th, 2012, Canadian Food Allergen Labeling Regulations require all food products containing gluten, or any of ten other major allergens, to clearly state their presence on the label. This change marks an important step in consumer safety that will benefit the estimated three million Canadians with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity, as well as others with sensitivities to major food allergens. For people with celiac disease, consuming gluten can cause anemia, nutritional deficiencies, a blistering skin rash, and an increased risk of other autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 diabetes. It can also lead to some cancers of the gut. One major problem for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity is that, unless clearly stated on the label, it can be difficult to tell whether or not gluten is present in foods they may buy. A 2009 Health Canada survey of approximately 7,000 people revealed that 96.1% of individuals read every ingredient on all food products to figure out whether the product contains gluten. Nearly eighty percent of those surveyed said that their greatest challenge was with incomplete labeling. For people who are sensitive to gluten and/or other major allergens, this new labeling rule will remove much of the guesswork from grocery shopping, and substantially reduce the risk to individuals sensitive or intolerant to gluten or other allergens. Those risks include an estimated 14,000 emergency hospital wards each year that are the result of reactions to gluten and other allergens, which carry a projected $5 million in extra health care costs. Source: PRWeb
  10. Celiac.com 07/24/2001 - In an effort to make food ingredient labels easier for everyone to understand, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is currently revising its food labeling laws. If Congress passes the current proposed legislation it will make life much easier for those with food allergies and intolerance. The Food Allergy Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN) spearheaded the yearlong label revision project and worked with 18 food companies to create voluntary guidelines for food labels that will help consumers avoid foods that could trigger an allergic reaction. The current recommended FAAN guidelines will identify the top eight allergens that cause 90 percent of food allergies, and will also avoid the use of technical food language in favor of easier to understand terms. For example, instead of using simply natural flavors on labels, the new labels would include the source of the ingredient: natural peanut or milk flavor. According to the guidelines common allergens such as peanuts, tree nuts like walnuts and pecans, fish, shellfish, eggs, milk, soy, and wheat should be clearly identified on all labels. On a positive note, the new FAAN guidelines have been voluntarily adopted by certain companies within the food industry for the benefit of the allergic consumer. Numerous consumer complaints and calls from the 6-7 million people in the USA with food allergies, not to mention the fear of lawsuits from the 150-200 people that die each year from them, were certainly motivating factors for them taking this important step. In any case, any change in food labeling practice would have to be an improvement over the present situation. The new FAAN guidelines, however, amount to only recommendations at this point, although Kelloggs and General Mills and several other companies have already adopted them. Legislation incorporating the FAAN guidelines has been proposed by representative Nita M. Lowey (D-NY) , which, if passed, would make them federal law in the USA. To encourage a stronger version of the proposed new labeling laws, contact your representatives now about this important issue!
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