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Found 9 results

  1. Celiac.com 01/01/2019 - 2018 was a very good year for people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance. There were a number of notable developments and breakthroughs this year, including major progress on a celiac disease vaccine, the fast-tracking of Timp-Glia, a drug for treating a celiac disease symptoms, and a new blood test that can spot celiac disease without the patient being forced to eat gluten beforehand. 2018 also brought us revelations that homemade yogurt can help to heal irritable bowel symptoms in most people; that people with autism have celiac disease rates twenty-times higher than the general population; that one in three restaurant food labeled ‘gluten-free’ may contain gluten; and that people with celiac disease are bad at judging gluten-exposure. In all, 2018 brought us numerous stories that can help us manage our celiac disease and to make better, smarter, gluten-free food decisions. Here are Celiac.com’s most popular stories of 2018: New Blood Test Will Spot Celiac Disease Without Gluten Consumption Fifteen Symptoms that can Make Celiac Disease Hard to Diagnose Who Makes America's Best Gluten-Free Pizza? Celiac Disease Rates 20 Times Higher in People with Autism 15 Foods People Wrongly Think Are Gluten-Free Starbucks Dumps Gluten-Free Breakfast Sandwich Promising Celiac Vaccine Nexvax2 Begins Phase Two Trials Celiac Disease Treatment TIMP-GLIA Wins Fast Track Status Gluten-Free Halloween Candy List for 2018 Homemade Yogurt Resolves Irritable Bowel Symptoms in Most Patients Gluten Insensitivity? Party City Stumbles with Offensive Pre-Super Bowl Ad Being Too Vigilant About Gluten-Free Diet Causes Stress in Teens and Adults with Celiac Disease Celiac.com’s 25 Most Popular Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes New Study Says One in Three 'Gluten-Free' Restaurant Foods Contain Gluten Celiac Patients Are Bad at Judging Gluten Exposure Based on Symptoms We hope you enjoyed this review of our most popular celiac and gluten-free articles for 2018. We look forward to bringing you more important information and breaking news and stories about celiac disease and gluten-free living in the New Year. Happy Holidays!
  2. 2018 was a very good year for people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance. There were a number of notable developments and breakthroughs this year, including major progress on a celiac disease vaccine, the fast-tracking of Timp-Glia, a drug for treating a celiac disease symptoms, and a new blood test that can spot celiac disease without the patient being forced to eat gluten beforehand. 2018 also brought us revelations that homemade yogurt can help to heal irritable bowel symptoms in most people; that people with autism have celiac disease rates twenty-times higher than the general population; that one in three restaurant food labeled ‘gluten-free’ may contain gluten; and that people with celiac disease are bad at judging gluten-exposure. In all, 2018 brought us numerous stories that can help us manage our celiac disease and to make better, smarter, gluten-free food decisions. Here are Celiac.com’s most popular stories of 2018: New Blood Test Will Spot Celiac Disease Without Gluten Consumption https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-diagnosis-testing-amp-treatment/new-blood-test-will-spot-celiac-disease-without-gluten-consumption-r4328/ Fifteen Symptoms that can Make Celiac Disease Hard to Diagnose https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/journal-of-gluten-sensitivity/journal-of-gluten-sensitivity-spring-2018-issue/fifteen-symptoms-that-can-make-celiac-disease-hard-to-diagnose-r4387/ Who Makes America's Best Gluten-Free Pizza? https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/miscellaneous-information-on-celiac-disease/conferences-publicity-pregnancy-church-bread-machines-distillation-beer/who-makes-america039s-best-gluten-free-pizza-r4318/ Celiac Disease Rates 20 Times Higher in People with Autism https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-amp-related-diseases-and-disorders/autism-and-celiac-disease/celiac-disease-rates-20-times-higher-in-people-with-autism-r4588/ 15 Foods People Wrongly Think Are Gluten-Free https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/miscellaneous-information-on-celiac-disease/additional-celiac-disease-concerns/15-foods-people-wrongly-think-are-gluten-free-r4595/ Starbucks Dumps Gluten-Free Breakfast Sandwich https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/miscellaneous-information-on-celiac-disease/additional-celiac-disease-concerns/starbucks-dumps-gluten-free-breakfast-sandwich-r4454/ Promising Celiac Vaccine Nexvax2 Begins Phase Two Trials https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-diagnosis-testing-amp-treatment/promising-celiac-vaccine-nexvax2-begins-phase-two-trials-r4615/ Celiac Disease Treatment TIMP-GLIA Wins Fast Track Status https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-diagnosis-testing-amp-treatment/celiac-disease-treatment-timp-glia-wins-fast-track-status-r4338/ Gluten-Free Halloween Candy List for 2018 https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/journal-of-gluten-sensitivity/journal-of-gluten-sensitivity-autumn-2018-issue/gluten-free-halloween-candy-list-for-2018-r4589/ Homemade Yogurt Resolves Irritable Bowel Symptoms in Most Patients https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-amp-related-diseases-and-disorders/irritable-bowel-syndrome-and-celiac-disease/homemade-yogurt-resolves-irritable-bowel-symptoms-in-most-patients-r4325/ Gluten Insensitivity? Party City Stumbles with Offensive Pre-Super Bowl Ad https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/miscellaneous-information-on-celiac-disease/additional-celiac-disease-concerns/gluten-insensitivity-party-city-stumbles-with-offensive-pre-super-bowl-ad-r4335/ Being Too Vigilant About Gluten-Free Diet Causes Stress in Teens and Adults with Celiac Disease https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-gluten-intolerance-research/being-too-vigilant-about-gluten-free-diet-causes-stress-in-teens-and-adults-with-celiac-disease-r4356/ Celiac.com’s 25 Most Popular Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/gluten-free-cooking/celiaccom’s-25-most-popular-gluten-free-dessert-recipes-r4543/ New Study Says One in Three 'Gluten-Free' Restaurant Foods Contain Gluten https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/miscellaneous-information-on-celiac-disease/additional-celiac-disease-concerns/new-study-says-one-in-three-gluten-free-restaurant-foods contain-gluten-r4593/ Celiac Patients Are Bad at Judging Gluten Exposure Based on Symptoms https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-gluten-intolerance-research/celiac-patients-are-bad-at-judging-gluten-exposure-based-on-symptoms-r4627/ We hope you enjoyed this review of our most popular celiac and gluten-free articles for 2018. We look forward to bringing you more important information and breaking news and stories about celiac disease and gluten-free living in the New Year. Happy Holidays!
  3. Celiac.com 09/13/2016 - Six times from 2003 – 2005, I had a mysterious full-bodied, itchy, blistery rash that landed me in the emergency room the first time, where seven doctors shook their heads. The ER physicians agreed that it was a "systemic chemical reaction" and tried to identify what I could have been exposed to. A dairy allergy was ruled out immediately since I have been completely dairy-free for twenty years. For the next three years, between hiding from the world for the ten days of intense itching and for the six weeks it took my skin to heal after an outbreak, I saw numerous dermatologists, internists, gastroenterologists, allergists and chiropractors. No one could figure out what was causing this miserable rash. I finally met the "best diagnostician" according to Denver's 5280 Magazine who told me he would figure out what was causing my plight, but that it wouldn't be fun. At that point, I was willing to take any test to identify what my enemy was. I endured ninety-eight needle sticks (who's counting?) eight skin biopsies, invasive scopes and tests for allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, thyroid disease and a host of other procedures. The skin biopsies erroneously concluded that I had scabies. Scabies are biting mites that leave bumps on the skin. It couldn't have been mites, because my husband, who lives in the same environment, didn't have a bump on his body. There was only one test that I did not pass – elevated levels of IgG antibodies in my blood. My doctor suggested that the rash could be correlated with gluten consumption and recommended that I try a gluten free diet. After being vigilant for several months, five out of seven long-term chronic complaints, including the rash, gradually went away. Here's my understanding of the DH lifecycle. An intestine that cannot break down the protein gluten leaks it out of the intestine and into the bloodstream. The blood sees this as a foreign protein and over-produces the immunoglobulin G to attack it. The antibodies build up, and purge out through the skin causing the rash. Completely avoiding gluten eliminates the antibody buildup, and the rash. One clue that might have streamlined my diagnosis is the knowledge that the DH rash is symmetrical. If it appears on one elbow, it will appear on the other, etc. In my case, it appeared on both sides of my entire body from the neck down. Please understand, I am not a doctor and the following is not to be considered medical advice. I am sharing this to pass along a few things I've learned from personal experience, research and lectures on the subject with the hope of helping others who suffer from a chronic, pervasive, itchy rash. Initial Testing Since I had the eight skin biopsies, I've learned that immunofluroescent biopsies should have been taken of the healthy skin near the rash rather than of the actual bumps. I was never given this test. After all those tests, the elevated IgG was the only indication that gluten is the culprit. I endured what was considered the "gold standard" for diagnosing celiac disease, the upper GI scoping, and my gastroenterologist did not find any damage. I have since learned that the upper GI scoping is no longer thought to be the "gold standard" diagnostic process by many celiac experts because it is too random. If the doctor doesn't biopsy the intestines in exactly the right place, you may be deemed to be celiac-free when you actually have considerable intestinal damage several inches away from the biopsy site. Furthermore, people with DH may or may not experience damage to their small intestine. A study done in 2010 found that 67 percent of the time people with DH only have elevated IgG-TGA levels (1). My doctor divulged that there simply are not yet 100 percent conclusive tests for celiac disease. He said that the best way to be sure of the diagnosis is to observe that the chronic symptoms disappear over time by vigilantly following a gluten free diet. Residual Rashes Residual rashes can reappear for up to five years even though the person is following a gluten free diet. The accumulated antibodies purge in a histamine response (the rash) periodically through the skin. Horrible as an outbreak is, the rash is actually how the body cleanses itself of the antibodies. The good news is, rashes diminish in time with strict adherence to a gluten free diet. Ongoing Testing I've learned that the best way to monitor the healing process is to have the IgG antibodies tested once a year until they are in the normal range. The number should decline each year, which implies compliance to the gluten free diet and that residual rashes will diminish. Mine took several years to finally reach the normal range. Having IgGs in the normal range does not mean that I can ever go back to eating gluten. DH is a life-long condition controlled by a gluten-free, and often, a dairy-free diet. Some studies talk about a spontaneous remission. This is very rare. Other Triggers People who have a propensity to develop rashes need to be aware of other triggers. Iodine triggers the rash in people with DH. Seaweed, shellfish, especially shrimp and lobster should be avoided. Sushi wrapped in Nori seaweed has caused me to have an outbreak before. Watch out for thyroid medicine and water filters because both can contain iodine. Sunburns can cause rashes. If your skin is sensitive enough to get a rash, chances are, sun will irritate it and could trigger an outbreak. Stay in the shade, wear translucent zinc oxide sunscreen and avoid too much exposure. An overgrowth of Candida (yeast) can cause an outbreak. Candida is naturally present in the body. To avert an overgrowth, eliminate simple sugars from the diet. According to a study done at Rice University, 70 percent of the population have an overgrowth of Candida somewhere in their body(2) due to over-exposure to antibiotics, steroids and hormones. Women who are "estrogen dominant" may not be producing progesterone. This can happen during perimenopause and in menopause. According to the book What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause by John R. Lee and Virginia Hawkins(3), estrogen dominance causes autoimmune and histamine reactions in some people. This could be the reason that women who have eaten gluten for years without symptoms are suddenly are plagued when they are in their 40's or 50's. Pharmaceuticals can trigger rashes in people with DH. If there is a choice of two drugs and one says a side effect may be a rash, and a similar drug doesn't, opt for the one that doesn't say "rash" for a side effect. Inadvertent gluten consumption can also cause the rash. Gluten is in nearly every processed food, and in many cosmetics and drugs. Some mushrooms are even grown on gluten! Transglutaminase enzymes are used to revive aging fish and meats – to extend their shelf life and to make them look appetizing. Grocers do not have to declare that they add these enzymes because they are naturally occurring in the human body. Dr. Peter Green mentioned at a Gluten Intolerance Group conference that people with celiac disease develop antibodies to tissue transglutaminase, and that the addition of those enzymes may be causing people who are already sensitive to get sicker. The point is that even foods that are supposedly gluten free can contain small amounts of it. To be safe, test products with ELISA test strips. ELISA test strips are available at http://www.elisa-tek.com/ez-gluten/. Since these strips are so expensive, this is also a website for everyone who uses them to post their results. I have learned a lot by reading this forum. Day-to-Day Life The longer I have been gluten free, the less tolerant my body has become. I've heard this anecdotally from others following the gluten-free diet. My DH is so severe, I react to even the most minor infractions. It makes eating out very difficult because cross-contamination is common and waiters are not always aware. I have a little test for waiters to decide whether to trust them to bring me a ‘safe' meal. I order a club soda with lemon before I order food. If the soda comes with lime, I know this waiter is not listening, and will be more likely to bring me something that could contain gluten. In restaurants that flunk my club soda test, I play it safe and order salad, a fruit plate or steamed vegetables. I've been to restaurants that tout a gluten free menu, only to be presented with a laminated disclaimer saying they are not liable for cross-contamination or inadvertent gluten after I order. How can anyone enjoy a meal with that kind of disclaimer? Not to mention the disruption of the conversation with your meal-mate when presented with a disclaimer card. It can be a little embarrassing! The most frustrating aspect of living with this is when accidental infractions occur. In November 2011, I wasn't feeling very well, so I took an aspirin and went to bed. Ten days later, the rash started appearing. It was a very bad rash, and I had to wear gloves to cover my hands that had doubled in size. I could not figure out what I had consumed that had gluten in it. My home is gluten free! I thought perhaps a product that I habitually used changed ingredients, so I read all the ingredients of everything in my house. Using the ELISA test strips, I tested 44 different products – foods, pharmaceuticals, over-the-counter drugs, cosmetics – everything that came in contact with my skin, or that I ate. Nothing I tested contained gluten. Then I remembered taking the aspirin. I tested it, and it contained gluten! I read the ingredients, the label said "Inactive ingredient: starch." It did not say what kind of starch. This happens in binders in pharmaceuticals too. The ingredients of pharmaceuticals will say "starch #3," and further investigation reveals this can alternate between wheat, tapioca, corn or potato. This means every time a prescription is refilled, it must be tested to be sure that particular batch wasn't made with wheat starch. I was in a car wreck and had to be taken to the emergency room. My sternum was broken, and I needed pain medication. The nurse offered me a pill and I asked if they would please make sure that it was gluten free. The nurse said, "pharmaceuticals are gluten free." (I've had pharmacists tell me this too – but as mentioned above, it is not true!) I said, "The reaction I get from consuming gluten is worse than the pain of this broken bone. Would you mind checking?" The nurse came back 30 minutes later and told me the pill did, indeed contain gluten. I went home in the middle of the night without any pain medication. I found a website the next morning that lists all gluten free pharmaceuticals, and asked my doctor to call in the specific brand of pain medication. The website is http://www.glutenfreedrugs.com. I have learned to keep a bottle on hand at home, and when I travel in case something like that ever happens again. I really wanted to eat the gluten free oats, so in 2009, I decided to go completely grain free for three months to cleanse myself for the "oat challenge." Then I made some oatmeal cookies with the gluten free oats. I took one bite, and waited ten days. Sure enough, the rash appeared on my legs. Through this experiment, I learned that I am not tolerant of even some "gluten free" foods. Through my studies of alternative diets and trying to discover the optimal way to eat to improve health, I have learned that a diet centered on eating vegetables, fruits, beans and some nuts and seeds improve the autoimmune system. Once the immune system is restored, (after strict adherence for several years), I've been told that it may be possible to undergo gluten desensitization under doctor's supervision. Locating a credible doctor to do this may be tricky, and deliberately exposing myself to gluten would take a lot of courage. However, I am considering this down the road with the hope that if I am inadvertently exposed to tiny amounts of gluten, I won't suffer through another rash. Since my reaction is so severe, I asked my doctor to write an undated letter on his letterhead "To Whom It May Concern" that states my reaction to gluten. I take this with me whenever I travel, just in case I was ever hospitalized, I could show the staff a letter from a bona fide medical doctor stating the severity of my situation. Without a letter, I am not sure if anyone would adhere to the strict gluten free guidelines I need to follow. Rash Remedies In those dismal three years before I was diagnosed, I was given mega doses of steroids, antibiotics, antihistamines, countless prescription creams, gels, histamine blocks, anti-viral drugs, anti-fungals and offered Dapsone. Since it took years to diagnose, well-meaning doctors offered a smattering of drugs to see what might work. Most of the drugs listed above were not the right medicine for DH. Steroids proved ineffective. Antivirals and antifungals did not work either. Dapsone is commonly given to people with DH who are not able to adhere to a gluten free diet. It is a strong drug originally given to lepers and has severe side effects. I'd rather live the gluten free lifestyle than take Dapsone. Once diagnosed, the two drugs that worked for me to ease symptoms for outbreaks were Zantac and liquid Hydroxizine. I am told that Zantac is a histamine block. It helped to reduce the number of itching days from ten to eight. I was also told to take it as precaution, if I felt I had inadvertently eaten gluten to thwart off an outbreak. I took the liquid hydroxizine around 4:00 o'clock in the afternoon when the histamines are highest, to ease the itching through the night. An un-exotic over-the-counter remedy that works is the clear calamine lotion from Walgreen's. There were days that I dreamed of taking a bath in that wonderful stuff! Another remedy recommended by a DH friend is a product made by Bayer called Domeboro Astringent Solution. It is a powder that is mixed with water and applied with a cloth to the affected area. It is said to give relief from the itching for several hours. Fluocinonide gel .05 percent is another remedy I have heard helps with the extreme itching. Fortunately, I have not had an outbreak since I learned about this remedy. Ever Onward Though my doctor recommended the gluten free diet, he didn't tell me how to do it, and I found there was a lot to learn! Luckily, during that time in the midst of outbreaks, I was attending cooking school. The school was not gluten free, but I took all of the methods and lessons home and converted everything I learned to be allergy free. The diagnosis and certification from the school launched me on an epicurean adventure and changed the course of my life. I started the Alternative Cook to help others who want to eat safe, delicious foods. If you are suffering with an incredibly itchy, pervasive rash, or know someone who is, consider that gluten could be the offender. Celiac disease is much more prevalent in this country than once thought. If you need moral support with DH, I'd love to hear from you. Sources: Dahlbom, Ingrid, Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R, Kovacs, Judit B, Szalai, Zsuzsana, Maki, Markku, Hansson, Tony. "Prediction of Clinical and Mucosal Severity of Coeliac Disease and Dermatitis Herpetiformus by Quantification of IgA/IgG Serum Antibodies to Tissue Transglutaminase." Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. Vol. 50(2), February 2010, P 140-146. "Biologists ID Defense Mechanism of Leading Fungal Pathogen. Psych Central. June 25, 2004. http://psychcentral.com/news/archives/2004-06/ru-bid062504.html. Lee, John R., Hawkins, Virginia. What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause. Mass Market Paperback. September, 2004.
  4. Celiac.com 04/21/2017 - Adults who have gluten sensitivities cohabitating with non-gluten sensitive adults may have a lot of unanswered questions that need to be asked. Dramatic changes in one family member's diet can have profound effects on a household (Bacigalupe & Plocha, 2015). Numerous studies document how parents and children handle everyday living when the child has food intolerances, but very few studies focus on adults living with food sensitivities. Wouldn't you like to know how other adults with food sensitivities adapt and manage over the long haul? Questions like: Does the person with the sensitivity live in fear of cross-contamination? Does the household employ methods to ensure s/he is safe? If so, what are those methods? Do the non-sensitive members of the household feel resentment? Or have they grown weary of compliance over the long haul? How adherent is the sensitive adult? Is it worth a little risk for a little pleasure once in a while? What do these cohabitating adults do to exist gracefully? These questions will be asked in a forthcoming study (on Celiac.com), and the results will be shared with viewers/readers. Food allergies affect 15 million Americans (FARE, 2015), which means that adults with food sensitivities have gone from being rare to more commonplace as the population ages (Norling, 2012). Dietary restrictions due to disease will soon become common in many households and this can be problematic because severe dietary constraints are positively associated with diminished family social activities (Komulainen, 2010). Studies indicate that adults cohabitating, when one has food sensitivities and others do not, could potentially result in problems between members of the household creating feelings of uncertainty and potentially less adherence to the diet. Regimented dietary requirements affect the quality of life when virtually every bite of food must be scrutinized before consumption. For some households, compliance may fall on the shoulders of the person who cooks. The cook in the household, caregivers, and everyone sharing the same kitchen, must be actively involved in protecting the person with the sensitivities keeping gluten-containing crumbs off the counter, out of condiment jars, thoroughly cleaning utensils, etc. (Crowley, 2012; Bollinger, 2005; Merras-Salmino et al., 2014). Of course, those living with sensitivities know there is a lot more to staying "clean and safe." Family members who share a home with someone with pervasive food sensitivities must express empathy to ensure harmony and compliance (Komulainen, 2010). However, compliance comes with a price -- every meal must be planned and cooked using alternative ingredients to avoid accidental ingestion. This takes diligence, education and ability to accomplish meal after meal (Jackson et al., 1985) especially when allergies are to ubiquitous foods such as dairy, soy, gluten or corn. Dietary restrictions can cause misgivings on the part of the other family members, who may feel deprived of their favorite foods, compromised with recipe adaptations, or forced to unwillingly comply with the other person's diet. On the contrary, the person with food sensitivity may feel pressure not to comply with the diet in order to conform to the other adult's culinary demands. In the Jackson et al. study, forty percent of people with Celiac disease did not comply with the diet because it was too difficult (1985). The relationship between the cohabitating adults may be further complicated as trust issues develop between the sensitive adult and the cook, if the sensitive adult suspects foods that make them sick are creeping into their diet. Other food-sensitive adults report non-adherence because it is "too much trouble" and causes "social isolation" (Coulson, 2007). Non-adherence for those with sensitivities can lead to reactions, anaphylactic shock and even to death (Lee et al., 2003). Even those who do not react immediately risk long-term illness with non-compliance. In my twelve years experience working with people in this arena, I have observed that dietary adherence in the household seems to go through phases. The first phase is what I'm calling the "transition" stage when a person is newly diagnosed, and everyone in the household is learning the new rules. The second stage is the "status quo" stage where cohabitants understand, and hopefully comply. Finally, the third stage is what I'm terming as 'turbulent' when other adult household inhabitants are feeling weary of compliance, may have doubts about the other's sensitivities, or even rebel. This stage may be triggered by an event that disrupts the "status quo", such as a holiday where traditional foods are expected, and where their gluten-free substitutions may not be as satisfying to the other household members. It may be triggered when the food sensitive adult decides they may be reacting to different foods than they thought before, and want to experiment with dietary changes. Dynamics between cohabitants may become turbulent during these times. After the event, the household adjusts back to equilibrium until the next triggering event, which throws them into a different part of this phase-cycle, where they may cheerfully welcome a "transition," or react with "turbulence." This cyclical pattern seems to continue as cohabitants move in and out of phases as life-events occur. One of the goals of this survey will be to determine the validity of this cycle. I also want to test the hypothesis that a component of household compliance may also be associated with the status of the adult who has the dietary restrictions – whether the head of the home enjoys full household compliance, or if a subordinate adult must comply while others are eating the foods s/he are sensitive to. Another factor that may affect compliance is how the sensitive adult was initially diagnosed. Did a medical doctor conduct tests? Or did they read an article, and notice that they had symptoms consistent with gluten sensitivity and decide to go "gluten free?" Does the diagnostic process affect the compliance of the other adult members of the household? There are many factors that need to be assessed in order to help those of us who have food sensitivities who are living with other adults. This survey/study will focus on family interactions when dealing with dietary restrictions, with the potential to increase family member's compliance. It will seek to gain insight on the impact food restrictions for one adult has on the rest of the family. This study has social significance because family unity in the future may rely on developing constructs for compliance to address this emerging social problem. I'll collect data for this study and then share it with Celiac.com and the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity readers in order to create awareness by thoroughly examining the lifestyle of food sensitive people, shedding light on how social influences affect dietary adherence. As a PhD student at the University of Denver, and an adult with Celiac disease and a lifetime of other food allergies, living with another adult who has no food sensitivities, I know first-hand that it takes cooperation and commitment from everyone to ensure my health. I hope the study can help others improve their quality of life with the insight gained from conducting this study. I'll be launching this study on Celiac.com. Thank you to Scott Adams for allowing this study to be conducted on Celiac.com.
  5. Celiac.com 07/22/2016 - Some of us have the luxury of living in a household that is completely dedicated to being gluten-free. However, many of us don't have that luxury. So, there are certain precautions you must take, in order to avoid cross contamination. Now, here is a list of helpful tips to keep in mind for your kitchen: Always wear gloves or wash your hands thoroughly, especially if you have dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), when you are wiping down counter tops, tables and stove tops. Using paper towels would be a beneficial because you can throw it directly in the trash. As for hand towels, have a separate one for your hands. Having a dishwasher or even a counter top dishwasher, if possible, reduces your worries. Otherwise, be sure to have different sponges when washing because they are very porous and absorbs gluten. For your kitchenware, having glass, metal, stainless steel and ceramic would be best because plastic and wood absorb gluten as well. Just think about your flour sifters, colanders and cutting boards. As for appliances, have separate toasters, baking mixers, convection ovens, blenders, etc. Keep cabinets and refrigerator shelves separate, especially from foods like cakes, cookies, breads and crackers. Basically, anything that can cause a lot of crumbs. Also keep your flours and wheat flours in labeled, air tight containers, so they are completely sealed shut. You do not want flour flying everywhere. When reheating your food, cover all your plates in the microwave. Lastly, if you are following all of these instructions correctly and consistently, your celiac disease should stay under control. However, it might be best if you get your antibody levels tested at least once or twice a year by your gastrointestinal (GI) physician. That way you can see, in black and white, that all your antibodies are in range. That will prove you're keeping yourself perfectly healthy. References: http://strengthandsunshine.com/the-quick-dirty-guide-to-cross-contamination-prevention/ http://www.theceliacdiva.com/10-tips-to-prevent-cross-contamination/
  6. Living Without Magazine - A lifestyle guide for people with food and chemical sensitivities. Description: A health, food and lifestyle guide for people with allergies and food sensitivities. Living Without is published 6 times a year by Belvoir Media Group, LLC. 800 Connecticut Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06854-1631. For subscription information, call 800-474-8614 or visit www.LivingWithout.com. Editor: Alicia Woodward, LCSW Publisher: Philip L. Penny Medical Advisors: Stefano Guandalini, MD; Shelley Case, BSc,RD; Christine Doherty, ND; Joseph Murray, MD Advisory Board: Cynthia Kupper, CRD (Executive Director, Gluten Intolerance Group); Elaine Monarch (Founder/Executive Director, Celiac Disease Foundation) Visit www.livingwithout.com.
  7. This cookbook is a delightful collection of more than 150 gluten-free recipes covering breakfast to dinner and everything in between. Each section is written by a chef who has special dietary needs. Are you ready to start your day with Quinoa Porridge with Cherry Sauce and end it with the zestful Chilli Pepper Brownies? At the beginning of each chapter are favorite quotes and some biographical information about each chef. I personally enjoyed reading about their individual interests and passions. For example, in Chapter 1, Matthew Kadey talks about infusing his recipes with a panoply of whole foods. He says “in their whole-food state, gluten-free items are nutritional bell ringers that contribute to our long-term well being.” Wow. Before reading his recipes for breakfast and brunch, my breakfast consisted of cereal and a glass of milk. Never again. Whole foods that are naturally gluten-free are a new option for me. At the end of the book there are excellent resources including "Substitution Solutions" and a shopping list of gluten-free products. If you are looking for creative gourmet gluten-free recipes that are easy to make, you'll want to add this cookbook to your collection. For more information, visit their Web Site. Review written by Patricia Seeley.
  8. Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD

    Living With Celiac Disease & Diabetes

    This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2010 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. Celiac.com 05/09/2011 - Living with celiac disease and diabetes can be a challenge, but it is not impossible. You can travel the world, eat out and enjoy life but assertiveness is important to maintaining good blood glucose management and digestive health. Individuals with diabetes may notice an elevation of their blood glucose after overeating gluten-containing foods at a party, sleep-over, or birthday celebration. The usual rationalization is that too many calories and/or carbohydrates were consumed. However, it may be a wake-up call for you to try and control blood glucose levels by reducing or excluding gluten-containing foods. When eliminating wheat is first proposed as an alternative for controlling blood glucose, a frequent response is to express how “nutritious” wheat is. As the nutritional comparison of flours in my book Living Gluten-Free (Charles C. Thomas, Publisher, 2008) illustrates, rice flour is comparable to wheat flour, and superior in Vitamin B6, Pantethenic Acid, Zinc, Copper, Manganese and many other vitamins and minerals. Gluten sensitivity may affect as many as 1 in 25 Americans. It is also becoming better recognized as a primary cause of inflammation. Celiac disease or gluten intolerance can masquerade as many other diseases, including diabetes. Many people given steroid medications for bowel inflammation can also develop diabetes as a side-effect of the steroid medication. Once a gluten-free diet has been started, it is not necessary to “go back on wheat” to get a diagnosis of celiac disease. A simple blood test can reveal whether one has the predisposing genes for gluten enteropathy, and therefore whether it is a cause of blood glucose problems. Far too many people are told by gastroenterologists that a small intestinal biopsy is the “gold standard” for diagnosis. A HLA-DQ2/DQ8 blood test is less invasive, more precise and more cost-effective than the “gold standard”. Genetic predisposition for celiac disease has been described by Alessio Fasano, MD and illustrates how celiac disease is not one disease. In addition, genetic sequencing has reported that both celiac disease and diabetes are located on Chromosome 6, along with Crohn’s Disease. For managing diabetes, a gluten-free, carbohydrate-controlled diet can be a healthier alternative than eating whole wheat. Ten years ago gluten-free products such as prepared muffins, cookies, pizza crust, etc. were not available. Rice cakes were the norm and homemade bakery products added variety to the diet. Today, there are aisles of gluten-free products in the supermarket and health food stores. Even major convenience bakery mix producers like General Mills, Minneapolis, MN offer gluten-free cookie brownies and cake mixes. The advantage of choosing recipes in Living Gluten-Free is that sugar and carbohydrate levels are reduced compared to the mixes and prepared frozen bakery products available. This is important for individuals with diabetes who must limit carbohydrates. If prepared products are used in the diet, remember to divide the sugars total on the nutrition label by 4 to calculate how many teaspoons of sugar are in a serving (Example: chocolate chip cookie 1= sugars 13g divided by 4g = 3 teaspoons sugar per cookie). The only therapy currently available to treat gluten intolerance is removal of gluten from the diet. Since gluten is a component of many common foods and widely available in so many convenience foods, avoidance can be challenging. Here are two menu ideas for a gluten-free diabetic diet. More menus are available in Living Gluten-Free. Day 1 Breakfast: Grits, Scrambled Eggs, Orange Juice Lunch: Taco Salad & Corn Chips Dinner: Rib-eye Steak, Baked Potato, Spinach, Tomato Salad Snack: Grapes Day 2 Breakfast: Turkey Sausage, Blueberry Muffin*, Apple Lunch: Sliced Ham on Rice Bread, Fresh Fruit Dinner: Baked Chicken, Sweet Potato, Roasted Cauliflower, Carrot Raisin Salad Snack: Rice Flour Brownie
  9. I just received a copy of Living Without’s Gluten-Free Holiday Guide and am very impressed with both the quality and the content of the magazine. This special holiday issue contains cooking tips as well as gluten and casein-free recipes that cover Thanksgiving, Christmas dinner, and New Year’s. It also has a nice section on how to successfully entertain guests over the holidays who might have food allergies or celiac disease, and another that covers allergy-friendly gift ideas. This magazine was a first for those with food allergies or gluten sensitivity, and I am very impressed with how it has evolved over the years into such a comprehensive publication. For more info visit: www.LivingWithout.com. Note: Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.
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