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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/07/2016 - Even though doctors know a lot more about celiac disease than they did just a few years ago, and even though they are learning more all the time, there are still very few detailed clinical descriptions of large groups of celiac patients. Recently, a team of researchers reviewed a large Dutch cohort of celiac patients to create an overview that focused on symptom presentation, co-occurrence of immune mediated diseases and malignancies. The research team included M Spijkerman, IL Tan, JJ Kolkman, S Withoff, C Wijmenga, MC Visschedijk, and RK Weersma. They are variously associated with the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Groningen and University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen; the Department of Genetics, University of Groningen and University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands, and with the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands. To create their overview, the team performed a retrospective study in a Dutch university and a non-university medical hospital that included only patients with biopsy proven (≥Marsh type 2 classification) celiac disease. The team selected 412 patients from 9,468 small-bowel biopsy pathology reports and financial codes. About a third of the group showed classical celiac symptoms, including diarrhea (37.4%), fatigue (35.0%), weight loss (31.6%), abdominal pain (33.3%). Around 10% showed atypical symptoms, including constipation (10.4%) and reflux (12.4%), while nearly 12% were diagnosed without any reported symptoms. About one in four patients also had immune-mediated diseases, most commonly type 1 diabetes mellitus (4.9%), microscopic colitis (4.9%), and immune mediated-thyroid disease (4.1%). Celiac patients who also had immune-mediated diseases were significantly older at the time of diagnosis, compared to those without (P=0.002). A total of 53 patients (12.9%) had malignancies, eight of whom suffered from Enteropathy Associated T-cell Lymphomas. This is the first Dutch study to describe a group of celiac patients in such detail. The study highlights the wide range of clinical variables in celiac disease, as well as the importance of screening for celiac patients for concomitant diseases. Source: Dig Liver Dis. 2016 Jan 18. pii: S1590-8658(15)30028-1. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2016.01.006. [Epub ahead of print]
  2. Celiac.com 08/17/2011 - Gluten-free eating is playing a key role in the diets of major A-list celebrities. Among them, Lady Gaga, Russell Crowe, and Jennifer Esposito all have made gluten-free eating a major part of their health and diet routines. Russell Crowe has reportedly dropped more than 16 pounds by following a strict exercise regime and eating a diet that is largely gluten-free. In mid-June, Crowe, 47, launched a 105 day plan to tone up and shed weight. He has made gluten-free food a major part of that effort and seems well on his way to dropping the 41-pounds he hopes to lose. Crowe's Twitter page contains this update on his success: '220lbs this morning, started at 236.4 lbs. 45 min walk, 12 mins eliptical, weighted objects 40 mins, walk 25 mins. 2400 cal a day maximum, all meals & all beverages. Where possible gluten free.' Catch up on the latest gluten-free news for Russell Crowe. Meanwhile, speaking of the usual food spread for Lady Gaga and her dancers, Lady Gaga’s choreographer and creative director, Laurieann Gibson says “It’s like gluten free, tuna, protein. There’s no M&M’s, there’s no gummy bears. There’s cheese, there’s water, there’s fruit, there’s vegetables – the only indulgence might be the cheese and grape platter. But other than that, it’s like wheat crisps.” Let's hope she means gluten-free 'wheat' crisps. Gibson goes on to say that Lady Gaga doesn’t just focus on her own diet, but that she expects her dancers to follow her regimen as well. Lady Gaga, Gibson adds, is a workaholic, and "doesn’t want gluten and bread bloating or weighing down her dancers." “All the dancers are now gluten free,” Gibson tells OK! - including gluten free desserts. In case you're wondering if the gluten-free diet alone is enough to keep Lady Gaga's body in peak form, it is not. In addition to eating a healthy, gluten-free diet, the singing star works out for hours, including dancing or doing yoga to keep her body toned. So maybe all of us who are already proudly gluten-free just need our own personal trainer to turn that last corner to stardom. Read more about Lady Gaga's gluten-free diet. Also, actress Jennifer Esposito recently detailed the story of her own battles with gluten-intolerance and her ultimate victory by adopting a gluten-free diet. Read the whole story of Jennifer Esposito's gluten-free story. These are just a few of the Hollywood celebrities who have found benefit in going gluten-free. One thing these stories help to reinforce is that many people, famous and not-famous alike, are sensitive to gluten, and those who are sensitive benefit tremendously adopting a gluten-free diet.
  3. A team of researchers has announced what they are calling a 'pivotal advance' regarding the differential influence of bifidobacteria and gram-negative bacteria on immune responses to inflammatory triggers in celiac disease. Their study provides strong evidence that various intestinal bacteria in celiac patients can influence inflammation, and that dietary probiotics and prebiotics can help improve the quality of life for patients with celiac and other associated diseases, such as type 1 diabetes and various autoimmune disorders. To conduct their study, they the team used cultures of human peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as in vitro models. This was possible because blood monocytes constantly replenish intestinal mucosal monocytes, and accurately represent an in vivo situation. To duplicate the intestinal environment surrounding celiac disease, researchers exposed cell cultures to Gram-negative bacteria and bifidobacteria they had isolated from celiac patients, both alone and in the presence of disease triggers. They then assessed the effects on surface marker expression and cytokine production by PBMCs. Gram-negative bacteria induced higher pro-inflammatory cytokines than did bifidobacteria. The Gram-negative bacteria also up-regulated expression of cell surface markers involved in inflammatory aspects of the disease, while bifidobacteria up-regulated the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Research team still need to confirm the results in clinical trials on people, but the findings offer the first support for new treatment options that may change how celiac disease is treated and possibly prevented. In the same way the certain foods may contribute to poor health, notes Louis Montaner, D.V.M., M.Sc., D.Phil. Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, "others can have positive effects. For people with celiac disease, this opens a line of research into new therapies that may be as accessible as a grocer's shelf." SOURCE: Journal of Leukocyte Biology. 2010;87:765-778.
  4. Celiac.com 11/28/2014 - According to a new study, obesity plays a major part in triggering and prolonging autoimmune diseases, such as celiac disease, Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis. The study appeared recently in Autoimmunity Reviews by Prof. Yehuda Shoenfeld, the Laura Schwarz-Kipp Chair for Research of Autoimmune Diseases at Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Head of Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases at Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer. According to the research, obesity erodes the body's ability to protect itself, triggering a pro-inflammatory environment that promotes the development of autoimmune diseases, hastens their progression, and impairs their treatment. For some time now, says Professor Shoenfeld, researchers have been aware of the “negative impact of contributing disease factors, such as infections, smoking, pesticide exposure, lack of vitamins, and the like. But in last five years, a new factor has emerged that cannot be ignored: obesity.” According to the World Health Organization, about one-third of the global population is overweight or obese, nearly a dozen autoimmune diseases are now associated with excess weight, which now impact nearly 5-20% of the global population. That is why, according to Shownfeld, it is “critical to investigate obesity's involvement in the pathology of such diseases." The main culprit is not fat itself, but adipokines, compounds secreted by fat tissue, which impact numerous physiological functions, including the immune response. In tandem with their own study, Shoenfeld and his colleagues reviewed 329 studies from across the globe that focused on the connections between obesity, adipokines, and immune-related conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, type-1 diabetes, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriatic arthritis, and Hashimoto thyroiditis. "According to our study and the clinical and experimental data reviewed, the involvement of adipokines in the pathogenesis of these autoimmune diseases is clear," says Shoenfeld. "We were able to detail the metabolic and immunological activities of the main adipokines featured in the development and prognosis of several immune-related conditions." One of the team’s more interesting findings was that obesity also promotes vitamin D deficiency, which, “once corrected, alleviated paralysis and kidney deterioration associated with the disorder… [and] improved the prognosis and survival of the mice.” Source: Science Daily, November 10, 2014
  5. Celiac.com 07/20/2012 - Many of the millions of Americans who suffer from celiac disease and gluten-intolerance are eagerly awaiting the FDA's forthcoming standards for gluten-free product labeling. Until then, different agencies may apply differing standards, often with confusing results. The recent dust-up between Widmer Bros. brewing of Oregon, one of many breweries crafting gluten-free beers, and the Treasury Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau ("TTB") over the ingredients in Widmer's gluten-free brew, provides a good illustration of the confusion that can arise when different sets of standards and rules govern what can and cannot be called 'gluten-free.' Widmer Bros. is a division of Craft Brew Alliance (CBA), the nation’s ninth’s largest brewing company, and recently unveiled two new gluten-free beers, Omission Gluten Free Lager and Omission Gluten Free Pale Ale. Unlike most gluten-free beers, which are brewed from sorghum and usually taste very different than traditional beers, Omission is made using traditional ingredients, including barley--which contains gluten. Widmer then uses enzymes to reduce the gluten in both beers to a level that is well below the 20 parts per million (ppm) gluten threshold set by the World Health Organization for gluten-free products; the very standard likely to be followed soon by the FDA. Professional testing show gluten levels for Omission beers at just 5-6 ppm. Meanwhile, those familiar with the final products say they taste very much like traditional beers. However, it is not the gluten levels in the beer that seems to be at issue, but the fact that Widmer begins their brewing process with barley and other traditional ingredients. According to the TTB, wine, beer or distilled spirits made from ingredients that contain gluten cannot be labeled as ‘gluten-free.’ Certainly the commonly accepted European standard of 20 ppm means that the vast majority of products labeled 'gluten-free' still contain measurable levels of gluten, a good deal of those likely above the 5-6 ppm of Widmer's beers. For beer drinkers with celiac disease, finding a gluten-free beer that tastes like a traditional beer is like finding the Holy Grail. Given that Omission beers supposedly taste closer to traditional beers than most gluten-free beers currently on the market, and given that they come in well below the standard for products to be labeled gluten-free, there are undoubtedly a number of people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance that are hoping Widmer will prevail in their battle against the TTB. What do you think? Should the gluten-free standard be based on scientifically established gluten levels of the final product, or on the gluten levels in the ingredients originally used to create it? Should Widmer be allowed to label and sell their Omission beers as 'gluten-free?' Source: KXL.com
  6. Celiac.com 01/04/2010 - The practice of using antibody testing to diagnose celiac disease has led to an explosion in the number of cases detected among children, coupled with a rise in median age at diagnosis, a new study suggests. European studies have shown that celiac disease is a multi-system disorder, affecting 0.3% to 1.0% of all children. A team of researchers recently set out to examine the impact of serological testing on childhood celiac disease in North America The research team consisted of Kelly E. McGowan, BHSc, Derek A. Castiglione and J. Decker Butzner, MD with the Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. Serological testing makes it easier to spot children with atypical or extra-intestinal symptoms or with conditions associated with celiac disease. Serological testing has resulted in a huge increase in celiac disease cases; it has tripled incidence levels, quadrupled diagnosis age, and brought about a greater understanding of the wide variety of presentations of celiac disease in North America. Younger children are more likely to develop classic celiac disease, whereas older children seem more likely to show atypical presentations. The goal of the study was to determine the effects of immunoglobulin A endomysial antibody testing on the incidence and clinical presentation of childhood celiac disease. Researchers compared the incidence and clinical presentation of celiac disease in two groups of patients. Both groups were under a pretesting group of patients under 18 years of age in 1990–1996 and compared with a testing group of patients under 18 years of age in 2000–2006. Average age at diagnosis was 2 years (95% confidence interval: 2–4 years) in the pretest group (N = 36), compared with 9 years (95% confidence interval: 8–10 years) in the test group (N = 199; P < .001); female/male ratios (1.6:1) were similar (P = .982). Incidence of celiac disease increased from 2.0 cases per 100,000 children in the pretest group to 7.3 cases per 100,000 children in the test group (P = .0256). Frequency of classic celiac disease decreased from 67% in the pretest group to 19% (test group; P < .001), but the incidence of classic celiac disease did not change (0.8 vs 1.6 cases per 100000; P = .154). In the test group, researchers uncovered 13 previously unnoticed clinical presentations in 98 children, including 35 with family history, 18 with abdominal pain, and 14 with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The frequency of Marsh IIIc lesions decreased from 64% in the pretest group to 44% in the test group (P = .0403). In the test group, classic celiac disease was most common, making up 67% of cases in young children under 3 years, whereas atypical gastrointestinal and silent presentations were more common in older children. Overall, the contribution of serological testing to the diagnosis of celiac disease has been enormous. Antibody testing for celiac disease has tripled the incidence of celiac disease and quadrupled the average age at diagnosis, thus offering millions of children a higher quality of health. Source: Pediatrics, December 2009.
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