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Found 11 results

  1. The California Cider Company was founded in Graton, California in 1993. The ACE brands are ACE APPLE, ACE PERRY, ACE APPLE HONEY, ACE BERRY, ACE JOKER, ACE PUMPKIN, ACE PINEAPPLE, ACE BLACKJACK 21 and SPACE. The ciders range from the dry JOKER to the sweeter ACE BERRY and the champagne-like BLACKJACK 21 made with all local Sonoma apples. SPACE is a bloody orange mimosa at 6.9%abv. ACE Ciders are available in 46 states, go to acecider.com for more details. All our styles are all natural, all fruit and gluten-free and vegan. The ciders are unpasteurized but cold filtered 4 times so that they are fresh and clean to the taste. They are a lower calorie , lower alcohol alternative to wine and beer and very refreshing. The California Cider Company is the largest, independent, family owned cidery in the US, with we believe the best range of ciders for all tastes. Visit our site for more info: acecider.com.
  2. Celiac.com 09/13/2016 - A 10-year-old girl allegedly fell ill after eating pizza that was supposed to be gluten-free, but which turned out to be standard pizza. The girl, Sydney Bayle, became violently ill, and ended up in the local emergency room. The attorney for Grotto Pizza says the company has admitted making a "mistake." Now the parents, Samuel and Victoria Bayle, of Edinboro, Erie County, are seeking monetary damages against both Grotto Pizza and Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center in Plains Township, including doctors and nurses. After becoming ill and checking in at the Medical Center's Emergency Room, the parents claim that medical center staff made the Sydney wait for nearly three hours, where she continued to be ill enough to vomit blood. Sydney has suffered from celiac disease from birth, according to the complaint. Read more at: Timesleader.com
  3. Celiac.com 09/19/2016 - At the time of diagnosis, some celiac patients suffer also from what is called celiac hepatitis, which is liver damage in patients with celiac disease that resolves after a gluten-free diet. A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate predictive factors of celiac hepatitis at the celiac disease diagnosis stage. To do so, they conducted a retrospective study that included 46 adult patients with clinically diagnosed celiac disease. The research team included Andreia Albuquerque, Susana Rodriguesa, and Guilherme Macedoa of the Department of Gastroenterology at Centro Hospitalar São João, in Porto, Portugal. Of the 46 patients, eighty-seven percent were women, with an average age of 33 ± 11 years, 87% showed Marsh 3, and 21 patients (46%) had celiac hepatitis. At the time of diagnosis, these patients had average Immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody (TTG-IgA) levels of 208.0 U/ml (p25–p75: 89–1316 U/ml), a mean aspartate aminotransferase of 42 ± 24 U/L, alanine aminotransferase 50 ± 28 U/L, alkaline phosphatase 111 ± 64 U/L. One year after diagnosis, the median average TTG-IgA was 9U/ml (p25–p75: 4.5–30.5 U/ml) and one-third of the patients had normal values. At diagnosis, patients without celiac hepatitis had an average TTG-IgA of 77U/ml (p25–p75: 24–288 U/ml), average aspartate aminotransferase of 23 ± 4 U/L, alanine aminotransferase 20 ± 6 U/L, alkaline phosphatase 69 ± 17 U/L. One year after diagnosis, median TTG-IgA was 6 U/ml (p25–p75: 3–19 U/ml) and nearly half of the patients showed normal values. At diagnosis, patients with celiac hepatitis had higher values of TTG-IgA (p = 0.007). Also, at diagnosis, there was a statistically significant positive correlation between TTG-IgA and alanine aminotransferase (r = 0.324, p = 0.028). For patients with a TTG-IgA level higher than 310 U/ml (OR = 4.8, 95%CI = 1.213–18.781, p = 0.025), the risk of having celiac hepatitis was nearly 5-times higher. From this, the team concludes that higher TTG-IgA levels can help predict celiac hepatitis in adult patients with celiac disease at diagnosis. Source: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology. DOI:10.1080/00365521.2016.1203017
  4. Celiac.com 07/30/2015 - Soundwave is an annual music festival held in major cities around Australia. The festival originated in Perth, Western Australia, before expanding to the other Australian cities in 2007. It features a number of international and Australian music acts, from various genres including rock, metal and punk. After reports of slim gluten-free food pickings at Soundwave 2015, a story by Tom Williams for Musicfeeds quotes festival manager AJ Maddah as promising to make gluten-free food "a massive priority” at Soundwave 2016. Maddah shared his own gluten experience on Twitter saying: Turns out gluten intolerance is real. If you experience constant dull headaches and indigestion, go get it checked out. It'll change your life. When someone replied saying,"It's so hard to find gluten free food at Soundwave,” Maddah quickly responded with,"It'll be a massive priority next year. You can be sure of that.” Replying to a separate Twitter user, Maddah added,"I have suffered for seven years and never suspected bread. After three days on [gluten-free] diet I feel tremendous.” Maddah's comments mean the food trucks of Soundwave 2016, which begins in January, will likely give attendees more gluten-free food options. Meanwhile, Soundwave's 2016 artist lineup has just been announced. Stay up to date with all the latest Soundwave 2016 details at the Music Feeds Soundwave 2016 Lineup Rumours And Info page. View the full series of tweets, at Musicfeeds.com.au.
  5. Celiac.com 09/29/2014 - Can a gluten-free diet lead to dramatic improvement of Parkinsonian symptoms in patients with celiac disease? In the January issue of the the Journal of Neurology, researchers Vincenzo Di Lazzaro, Fioravante Capone, Giovanni Cammarota, Daniela Di Giuda, and Federico Ranieri report on the case of a man who saw a dramatic improvement of Parkinsonian symptoms after gluten-free diet. The researchers are affiliated with the Department of Neurosciences at the Institute of Neurology, Campus Bio-Medico University in Rome, Italy. This case is interesting because it supports a growing body of research that indicates that, in some cases, gluten toxicity might adversely impact the nervous system, producing symptoms identical to classical Parkinson’s disease. The man in question was a 75-year-old Parkinson’s disease patient with silent celiac disease saw major improvements in his symptoms after a 3-month long gluten-free diet. Noting the positive results in this patient, and the fact that celiac disease often manifests with only neurological symptoms, even in older patients, the researchers are calling for a deeper exploration to determine if there are higher rates of celiac disease in people afflicted with Parkinson’s disease, or the related multi-factorial neurodegenerative condition known as Parkinsonism. Source: J Neurol. 2014 Feb;261(2):443-5. doi: 10.1007/s00415-014-7245-7. Epub 2014 Jan 25.
  6. Celiac.com 03/13/2014 - Two recent articles in Bloomberg Businessweek offer some excellent lessons for companies seeking to introducing gluten-free products at the retail level. Both articles are by associate Bloomberg Businessweek editor Venessa Wong. The first article is titled Can You Trust Gluten-free Restaurant Items? The article describes the gluten-free missteps of a few companies that got their gluten-free efforts wrong, at least at first. Companies mentioned in the article include California Pizza Kitchen, which rolled out pizzas made with a gluten-free crust late in 2010. Many customers became angry when they realized gluten was present in other parts of the pizza, and that the pizzas, as eaten, were not gluten-free. After about six months of the uproar, California Pizza Kitchen quickly pulled the pizzas off the menu, and then spent more than a year working to revamp its kitchen operations and train employees. Domino's pizza recently took a similar approach by rolling out a highly touted, much marketed gluten-free pizza crust, when their final product was not gluten-free. In fact, When many people within the gluten-free community expressed outrage over what they claimed was misleading at least, and possibly a classic bait-and-switch, Domino's tried to quell the the uproar by claiming that they never intended their pizzas to be for people with celiac disease or serious gluten-sensitivity. Those disclaimers did not go over well. It is important to remember that the latest ruling by the FDA requires restaurants to use the term "gluten-free" in the same way as commercial food producers. That is, they can only use the term gluten-free if the product contains no gluten ingredients and tests below 20 parts per million. The second article is titled Why the Long Wait for Dunkin's Gluten-free Donuts? Ostensibly an article about why Dunkin' Donuts has taken its time in bringing gluten-free donuts to its customers, works as a loose guide for companies looking to get it right. In the end, Dunin' Donuts decided not to go to market with a gluten-free product at this time. Companies that successfully introduce gluten-free products at the retail level strictly control and monitor every step of the gluten-free process, from supply to production to preparation and final delivery to the customer. These companies also invest in training their workers at all level of the process to achieve uniform results. Companies that approach gluten-free food as a medical issue, and which set their sights on offering celiac-friendly gluten-free food, seem to do best in the long run. Companies that have difficulty in introducing gluten-free products at the retail level either fail to strictly control and monitor every step of the gluten-free process, or they do not design such a comprehensive process in the first place. Many failed efforts involve companies offering products that incorporate gluten-free ingredients, such as Domino's gluten-free pizza crust, but which are not part of a truly gluten-free final product. Companies that approach gluten-free food as a trendy issue, and tout food with gluten-free ingredients, but which can harm people with celiac disease seem to run into troubles. So what do you think? Can you name some other bad rollouts of "gluten-free" products?
  7. Celiac.com 09/28/2010 - Buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads taste better than regular gluten-free breads, and have properties that may benefit people with celiac disease, according to a new study. Moreover, buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free flour could be used to create high quality, antioxidant rich bread products that benefit people with celiac disease and offer new market possibilities, says the team behind the study, M. Wronkowska, D. Zielinska, D. Szawara-Nowak, A. Troszynska, and leader M. Soral-Smietana of the Polish Academy of Sciences. Soral-Smietana notes that buckwheat's mineral content and antioxidant activity make it ideal for new buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads. Buckwheat flour contains high-quality proteins, and is rich in antioxidants and minerals such as, flavonoids, phenolic acids, B vitamins , and carotenoids. Because of these properties, Buckwheat has recently caught the attention of food scientists. In their study, the research team found that enriching gluten-free flour with 40 per cent buckwheat flour creates gluten-free bread “with more functional components and higher anti-oxidative and reducing capacities,” in addition to offering health benefits to people with celiac disease. To produce their buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads for the study, the team replaced between ten and 40 per cent of corn starch with flour made from common buckwheat Fagopyrum esculentum Moench. Corn starch is a common ingredient in gluten-free breads. They found that gluten-free bread enhanced with 40 per cent buckwheat flour had the highest antioxidant capacity and reducing capacity, and this was positively correlated with their total phenolic contents. The 40 per cent enhanced bread also demonstrated the highest overall sensory quality when compared to a gluten-free bread control. The team found that higher buckwheat concentrations made for higher levels of magnesium, phosphorus and potassium. From their results, they concluded that gluten-free bread formulated with 40 per cent buckwheat flour could be developed and dedicated to those people suffering from celiac disease. In addition to being healthier than current gluten-free breads, such bread would also likely taste better, because the “…overall sensory quality of buckwheat enhanced breads was significantly higher than that obtained for gluten-free bread.” Source: International Journal of Food Science and Technology - doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2621.2010.02375.x
  8. Celiac.com 03/16/2012 - It's official! After an international conference to address gluten-sensitivity, fifteen experts from seven countries have announced the development of a nomenclature and classification system making gluten-sensitivity a distinct and separate condition from celiac disease. Their work on establishing universal medical terms for gluten-sensitivity may serve as a guide to improve the diagnosis and treatment of gluten-related disorders. The experts have published their conclusions and recommendations in "Spectrum of Gluten-Related Disorders: Consensus on New Nomenclature and Classification," which includes a diagnostic roadmap for clinicians. The new consensus appears in the journal BMC Medicine. The conference was co-chaired by Alessio Fasano, M.D., professor of pediatrics, medicine and physiology and director of the University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research (CFCR) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, along with Carlo Catassi, M.D., M.P.H., co-director of CFCR and professor of pediatrics at the Universita Politecnica delle Marche in Ancona, Italy, and Anna Sapone, M.D., Ph.D., of the Seconda Universita of Naples. Gluten sensitivity, a condition causing gastrointestinal distress and other clinical symptoms, has been identified by the international panel of experts as a distinct entity on the spectrum of gluten-related disorders that includes wheat allergy and celiac disease. “For the first time," says Dr. Catassi, "we have provided an accurate diagnostic procedure for gluten sensitivity. We have confirmed that to correctly diagnose gluten sensitivity, we need to exclude celiac disease and wheat allergy with the appropriate diagnostic tests.” Whereas about 1 in a hundred or so people has celiac disease, Dr. Fassano estimates about "60 to 70 percent" of the people coming to his clinic for treatment actually suffer from gluten sensitivity. Overall, an estimated six percent of people of European descent may be affected by gluten sensitivity, which would make it of the most common pathologies in the world today.
  9. Last night I made macaroni & cheesefor dinner using Riega Yellow Cheddar Cheese Sauce Mix. The saucecame out perfect, and was creamy, cheesy, and flavorful. Our wholefamily loved it, and what I really liked about it was being able touse my favorite gluten-free macaroni noodles, as I am very pickyabout my pasta. This is one of the best gluten-free cheese saucesthat I've tried, and it was quick and easy to prepare. This familyfavorite is always welcome for a quick hot lunch, or a dinnertimeside dish, and I will keep these on hand from now on. Visit their site at: riegafoods.com Note:Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Food & SpecialtyProduct Companies" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. Formore information about this seeour AdvertisingPage.
  10. I recently had the opportunity to try a gluten-free, sugar-free and starch-free cookie called "Cocoa-licious," which is manufactured by “Yes! To cookies.” I have to be honest when I asked myself, “how good can a gluten, carb and sugar free cookie taste?” When I opened the package, the smell of rich cocoa spilled out, and I discovered that each cookie was topped with a type of glaze that made it appealing to the eye as well. I no longer found myself hesitant to try these cookies, and now I'm glad that I did. Each cookie was soft, moist and had a rich cocoa flavor. I did notice a slight aftertaste which I can only best describe as the same type of taste I get after I take a vitamin, but due to their uniqueness, I have to give these Cocoa-licious cookies a thumbs up. I had no idea that there was such a thing as a sugar, carb and gluten-free cookie, but I can say that this cookie far exceeded my expectations. It would be a great gluten-free snack for anyone who is watching their carbohydrate and sugar intake, and would satisfy a craving for something sweet. For more info visit their site: yestocookies.com Note:Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section of this site are paidadvertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.
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