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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 09/25/2013 - People with celiac disease have higher rates of lymphoproliferative malignancy. Currently, doctors just don't know whether risk levels are affected by the results of follow-up intestinal biopsy, performed to document mucosal healing. A team of researchers recently tried to find out if overall risk for lymphoproliferative malignancy in people with celiac disease is connected with levels of mucosal healing. The research team included Benjamin Lebwohl, MD, MS; Fredrik Granath, PhD; Anders Ekbom, MD, PhD; Karin E. Smedby, MD, PhD; Joseph A. Murray, MD; Alfred I. Neugut, MD, PhD; Peter H.R. Green, MD; and Jonas F. Ludvigsson, MD, PhD. The are variously affiliate with the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York; Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota; and Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden. For their population-based cohort study, the team looked at data from all 28 pathology departments in Sweden. They evaluated at data for 7625 patients with celiac disease who received follow-up biopsy after initial diagnosis. Measurements: They used expected rates to assess risk for LPM, compared with that of the general population. They then used Cox regression to compare rates of LPM in patients with persistent villous atrophy against rates for patients with mucosal healing. Of the 7625 patients with celiac disease and follow-up biopsy, 3308 (43%) showed persistent villous atrophy. Overall risk levels for LPM were higher for celiac patients who had received biopsy (standardized incidence ratio [sIR], 2.81 [95% CI, 2.10 to 3.67]) than for the general population. LPM risk levels were higher for celiac patients with persistent villous atrophy (SIR, 3.78 [CI, 2.71 to 5.12]) than for those with mucosal healing (SIR, 1.50 [CI, 0.77 to 2.62]). Compared with mucosal healing, persistent villous atrophy was associated with an increased risk for LPM (hazard ratio , 2.26 [CI, 1.18 to 4.34]). Risk for T-cell lymphoma was higher (HR, 3.51 [CI, 0.75 to 16.34]), but not for B-cell lymphoma (HR, 0.97 [CI, 0.21 to 4.49]). One limitation of the study is that it gathered no data about patient adherence to a gluten-free diet. Higher risk for LPM in celiac disease is connected with follow-up biopsy results, with a higher risk among patients with persistent villous atrophy. Follow-up biopsy may be an effective way to classify celiac disease patients by risk for subsequent LPM. Source: Ann Intern Med. 2013;159(3):169-175. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-159-3-201308060-00006
  2. Am J Med. 2003 Aug 15;115(3):191-5 Celiac.com 09/03/2003 - The results of a study conducted by Dr. Peter Green and colleagues at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City indicate that, despite a gluten-free diet, people with celiac disease still have an elevated risk of getting non-Hodgkins lymphoma. The good news is that the risk of getting other types of cancers like small intestinal adenocarcinoma, esophageal cancer and melanoma were reduced in patients who adhered to a gluten-free diet, as was the overall risk of getting non-Hodgkins lymphoma. The study looked at 381 celiac disease patients, out of which 43 were diagnosed with cancer (11%). The vast majority—34—were diagnosed at or before their celiac disease diagnoses, so it is safe to say that they were not following a gluten-free diet. The results of this study emphasize the importance of adhering to a strict gluten-free diet, and of getting regular checkups by your doctor. Cancer screenings may also be advised, especially in cases where unexplained symptoms continue after going gluten-free. There is currently, however, no specific test for non-Hodgkins lymphoma, so one must learn about its warning signs and be on the lookout for any symptoms. - Scott Adams Here is the abstract of the study: Risk of malignancy in patients with celiac disease. Green PH, Fleischauer AT, Bhagat G, Goyal R, Jabri B, Neugut AI. Departments of Medicine (PHRG, RG, AIN), College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, USA Studies from Europe have demonstrated an increased risk of malignancy, especially non-Hodgkins lymphoma, in patients with celiac disease. However, there are no data on the risk for similar patients in the United States. Our aim was to estimate the risk of malignancy in a cohort of patients with celiac disease compared with the general U.S. population and to determine if a gluten-free diet is protective. Patients with celiac disease seen between July 1981 and January 2000 at a referral center were included. Standardized morbidity ratios (SMRs) (ratio of observed to expected) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated, using data from the National Cancer Institutes Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. Forty-three (11%) of 381 celiac disease patients had a diagnosis of cancer; 9 were after the diagnosis of celiac disease, 7 were simultaneous (during same month of admission), and 27 were before the diagnosis. The standardized morbidity ratio for all cancers combined was 1.5 (95% CI: 0.3 to 7.5), with significantly increased values for small bowel cancer (SMR = 34; 95% CI: 24 to 42), esophageal cancer (SMR = 12; 95% CI: 6.5 to 21), non-Hodgkins lymphoma (SMR = 9.1; 95% CI: 4.7 to 13), and melanoma (SMR = 5.0; 95% CI: 2.1 to 12). Following the diagnosis of celiac disease, patients were at increased risk of non-Hodgkins lymphoma only (SMR = 6.2; 95% CI: 2.9 to 14), despite adherence to a gluten-free diet. The non-Hodgkins lymphoma included both T-cell and B-cell types and occurred in both gastrointestinal (n = 5) and extra intestinal sites (n = 4). In this cohort of patients with celiac disease, we observed increased risks of small intestinal adenocarcinoma, esophageal cancer, melanoma, and non-Hodgkins lymphoma. The risk of non-Hodgkins lymphoma persisted despite a gluten-free diet.
  3. BMJ. 2004 Jul 21 Celiac.com 08/09/2004 – In a study designed to quantify the malignancy and mortality risks associated with celiac disease, British researchers examined 4,732 celiac disease patients and compared them to 23,620 matched controls. The researchers found that 134 (2.8%) of those with celiac disease had at least one malignancy, and 237 (5.0%) had died. In the general population, the overall hazard ratios were as follows: for any malignancy 1.29 (95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.55), for mortality 1.31 (1.13 to 1.51), for gastrointestinal cancer 1.85 (1.22 to 2.81), for breast cancer 0.35 (0.17 to 0.72), for lung cancer 0.34 (0.13 to 0.95), and for lymphoproliferative disease 4.80 (2.71 to 8.50). The researchers conclude that there is a modest increase in the rates of malignancy and mortality during the first year following a diagnosis of celiac disease. After one year, however, most of that increase quickly diminishes to a level that is only slightly higher than that of the normal population, presumably due to the effects of a gluten-free diet. In an unexpected finding the researchers also found a significant reduction in incidence of breast cancer in those with celiac disease, which warrants further study, as it could provide insight into the cause of the disease.
  4. QJM, May 1, 2003; 96(5): 345 - 353 Celiac.com 05/29/2003 – A survey was recently conducted by Professor P.D. Howdle, St. Jamess University Hospital (UK), et al, to estimate the frequency in the UK of small bowel malignancy, and its relationship to celiac disease. Data were collected from 1,327 clinicians on a monthly basis between June 1998 and May 2000. The clinicians were asked to report all cases of newly diagnosed primary small bowel malignancy, and whether or not the patients reported also had celiac disease. Normally malignancies of the small intestine are rare, and they only account for less than 2% of all gastrointestinal cancers. Results: "Clinico-pathological data were ascertained for 395 cases, including 175 adenocarcinomas, 107 lymphomas and 79 carcinoid tumors. In 13% of adenocarcinoma cases and in 39% of lymphomas, there was a diagnosis of celiac disease. Survival rates at 30 months for adenocarcinomas, lymphomas and carcinoid tumors were 58%, 45% and 78%, respectively. Prognosis of all tumors was inversely related to stage at presentation, and lymphomas associated with celiac disease were associated with a poorer prognosis." This study provides more evidence that those with celiac disease run a greater risk of getting adenocarcinoma of the small bowel, as well as lymphoma. Because of the high rate of metastatic disease in the patients studied, there appears to be a long time from the onset of symptoms to diagnosis, which is a concern. Unfortunately this study does not address when celiac disease was diagnosed in these patients, and whether or not they were treating it with a gluten-free diet. Other studies have shown that cancer risk decreases to that of the normal population in patients who are on a gluten-free diet for at least five years.
  5. Holmes GK, Prior P, Lane MR, Pope D, Allan RN Gut 1989 Mar;30(3):333-8 Gastroenterology Unit, General Hospital, Birmingham. PMID: 2707633, UI: 89212172 Two hundred and ten patients with coeliac disease previously reported from this unit were reviewed at the end of 1985 after a further 11 years of follow up. The initial review at the end of 1974 could not demonstrate that a gluten free diet (GFD) prevented these complications, probably because the time on diet was relatively short. The same series has therefore been kept under surveillance with the particular aim of assessing the effects of diet on malignancy after a further prolonged follow up period. Twelve new cancers have occurred: of which one was a carcinoma of the esophagus and two lymphomas. Thirty nine cancers developed in 38 patients and of 69 deaths, 33 were the result of malignancy. A two-fold relative risk (RR) of cancer was found and was because of an increased risk of cancer of the mouth and pharynx (RR = 9.7, p less than 0.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.0-28.3), esophagus (RR = 12.3, p less than 0.01, CI = 2.5-36.5), and of non-Hodgkins lymphoma (RR = 42.7, p less than 0.001, CI = 19.6-81.4). The results indicate that for coeliac patients who have taken a GFD for five years or more the risk of developing cancer over all sites is not increased when compared with the general population.
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