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Found 4 results

  1. Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD

    Cannabis and Gluten

    Celiac.com 04/13/2018 - Is cannabis gluten-free? That is a frequent question I receive now that over 50% of the United States has approved medical cannabis and some states have also included recreational cannabis. Let's begin be describing cannabis as an oral medicine that has been used since the Chinese treatise on pharmacology described Emperor Shen Nung in 2737 BCE using it. In 1850 cannabis was listed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia as a cure for many ailments. By the early 1900's Squibb Company, Eli Lilly and Park-Davis were manufacturing drugs produced from marijuana for use as antispasmodics, sedatives, and analgesics (pain medication). Today, hemp seed and hemp oil products are widely available. They provide CBD or cannabidiol - the non-psychoactive cannabinoid from various Cannabis sativa strains grown for high CBD levels. In order to be legal in the U.S. these products must contain less than 0.3% THC, the psychoactive cannabinoid in cannabis. CBD products can be consumed as capsules, tinctures, "gummy" chewables, lollipops, and numerous edibles like brownies, chocolates, and granola bars. The nutritive value of cannabis is presently described as that of hemp seed since no scientific analysis of Cannabis sativa has been done. Hemp is one of the world's most nutritious foods with high quality protein and essential fatty acids found in its seeds. Hemp contains all eight essential amino acids and can be sprouted for use in salads and shakes. Celiacs with protein allergies to eggs and soy need to be cautious when adding hemp and CBD products to their diet regimes. The major proteins in hemp are albumen and edestin. Hemp is a nut so those celiacs with nut sensitivities need to consider that. Others may be limiting their lectin intake and need to limit CBD products until processing evaluations can indicate levels resulting in the products. CBD oils contain linoleic and linolenic fatty acids which are important in reducing inflammation. They can be used in salad dressings, mashed potatoes and substituted for olive oil in recipes. Since these essential fatty acids must be obtained in the diet, using hemp or cannabis CBD products can enhance health. Cannabis products- particularly CBD- have been overlooked by individuals needing symptom relief from neurological (Parkinson's, ALS, Multiple Sclerosis, migraine), immune (cancer), and gastrointestinal disorders (Crohn's disease, IBS). When choosing cannabidiol-CBD products be sure to check that they have been tested for pesticides, heavy metals, and microbiological contaminants. Today, more hemp is sold to pet owners as bird seed than used by humans. But as more individuals learn of the botanical benefits of cannabis, they should consider adding it to their diet and supplement regime. My book, Cannabis-A Clinician's Guide (CRC Press 2018) reviews the science and clinical uses of cannabis along with how to use it in recipes.
  2. TL;DR Mom is a celiac. Father, Brother are lactose intolerant. Sister has IBS problems as well. I believe I have gluten allergy, even though every doctor test is negative. But I do have geno-type for celiac. Marijuana has become my only solution to stop the pain and get hours of relief. No other medicine works. but pot lets me go to work, without crapping my pants and getting paid to s$#&. Anyone else in my particular situation or does everyone else feel it differently? Hello, My name is Ryan and I am a twenty-four male, 300lbs, 6ft 4in. Ive been haunted by stomach/head aches for almost my whole life. Gaining depression in middle school, which downward spiraled by the time I was 20-21. Ive been diagnosed with Chronic Lyme Disease which is, I guess, controversial among physicians on whether or not it is actually a real thing. My Dr. gave me that diagnosis at 16, after going to him with Lyme for the 8th time. My mom figured out she was a celiac when I was 20 years old, so I then started on a gluten-free diet and felt good, but didnt realize that it was actually helping me. I went back on gluten to have the testing done, but it came back negative. So I said okay, I'm not allergic to gluten it must be my imagination or something else and went on my way. Had two more doctors tell me I probably wasnt Gluten intolerant. I then started to get serious urinary issues, and started to go to urologists. They couldnt find anything wrong, so I went to a GI and they told me nothing was wrong, after doing all the testing over the years, they said I wasnt allergic to Lactose or Gluten, however my most recent GI said I have a Geno-type for it. MFer*** I know its already here. It doesnt take but an hour and I am in gut wrenching pain and cant get off the toilet for sometimes hrs, with breaks in between (4 times on) and the pain and discomfort lasts for hrs. The doctor has put me on every kind of medicine and nothing works. He said well you dont have anything we test for, so I'm just going to say you have IBS. Which still makes sense, because there is times, I know I havent touched gluten ( I dont think, I'm not a very good label checker) or cheese and I'm still in the BR. I am currently on 50MG Amytriptaline (spelling) for the depression, urinary issue and intestinal inflammation(whether its there or not, the gastro put me on it, and it keeps the other two things at bay, so I cant go off it. However, it doesnt do too much for the stomach problem. The only solution I have found is Marijuana, which I have only recently started (1yr), but man does it make a difference. Now I can have a full time job, but I have to smoke to go to work. Which isnt my most favorite thing to do , but Ive gotten used to it and it helps me tremendously. So its become my catch all illness defeater. However, it only puts my intestines on hold(how long depending on how much pot, but usually a small amount keeps my stomach at bay for about 6-8 hrs. I can suffer the last hr at work, but at least I'm not in the bathroom for my whole shift. Which is great, its an amazing feeling to be at work without something plaguing you. I still dabble in gluten, like 1 slice of pizza, here and there (bc im supposed to be not gluten intolerant) but the devil strikes every time. Im sure Ive missed some stuff, but would like some feedback on the route I should take, get some insight, my wife said I should go to a holistic doctor, which has amazing reviews near us, but its 500 dollars cash to get the evalution and its not covered by insurance. She thinks I'm allergic to soy, which I guess is in both lactose and gluten?? But ive never been tested for that. I want some light to follow. Thanks Is it typical to feel an attack so fast? It happens between 15 minutes to 2 hrs, giving the span, but usually an hour. Does everyone react the same way to gluten? - I dont get diarrhea or constipation, I get a little of both, its loosely packed and hard to pass with excruciating pain. Other times ( I think this is the IBS part), it'll just come out of no where, but its not super painful, but I cannot hold it at all. Could all of my problems be Gluten/Lactose...or just part of it/none of it? Has anyone else gotten a negative test, but still said hell with it, Gluten Free? Are there any good, well organized mega threads for stuff to not touch if you're allergic to gluten, especially lesser known things (to avoid oops moments)
  3. Celiac.com 01/04/2017 - Ever since I was a young girl I have always had a bad stomach. Last year, when I was 16, I decided to move to London. Circumstances became difficult, and I ended up becoming physically and mentally ill, which included anorexia nervosa and then onset depression and trauma, as well as almost crippling anxiety. Things led to me getting so ill that I went to a doctor who noticed that I had serious mouth ulcers—and this is what finally led them to diagnose me with celiac disease, after what seemed to be months of suffering. At the time my diagnosis seemed to make a lot of sense because of the stomach pains I had, especially after eating certain foods. My symptoms included much confusion, dire pains, and resulted in my having a phobia of food. As most celiacs know, currently there is no medicine available to treat celiac disease, and the only treatment is a strict gluten-free diet. I got diagnosed in late January 2016, and have been on a strict gluten-free diet ever since, and although I believe this has helped me a lot, more than nine months later, I still often have the same symptoms. They vary in levels and are sometimes uncomfortable and very painful. Sometimes I have migraines, stomach bloating, churning, etc., all of which are not very nice. Let me explain a little about what celiac is. It is an autoimmune disease where the immune system kills off tissue in the small intestine in response to ingesting gluten. This can make eating more difficult, and a lot of the time I am left in pain with nothing to do but sit in agony and wait for it to stop. But what if there was something else out there that could help with ongoing symptoms? I recently discovered that thousands are being helped by using cannabis to treat their celiac disease symptoms. Marijuana is gluten-free and for some, can ease the painful symptoms. Special note: This approach is NOT meant as a substitution for a guten-free diet, but for some people, like myself, it can offer additional symptom relief for those who need it. Reset.me has this posted: "Marijuana 'cools the gut,' in which it slows down the muscle contractions that move food through the stomach and intestines and reduces the secretion of liquid into the intestines associated with diarrhea (one of the most severe symptoms of the disease)," Deno writes. "Marijuana also controls the muscle spasms associated with diarrhea. It also increases appetite and can offset the inefficiency in the Celiac's ability to absorb nutrients from the food you eat." "People with celiac in some states in America are able to get access to to medical marijuana if they have chronic pain. The rest of us [celiacs] are left with buying illegally or simply avoiding this one plant that may be the most effective celiac treatment of all!" HelloMD.com states: "Inflammation can be suppressed by activating the cannabinoid receptors, CB2, on immune cells. Though there have not yet been clinical human trials, this study opens up new avenues to investigate as possible treatment options for autoimmune diseases. Though this study only looked at THC, CBD is also known to help the immune system. CBD helps repair the bodies [sic] ability to recognize the difference between normal internal body functions and foreign entities, keeping the body from attacking itself." Remember, Marijuana is not a cure, but is a natural anti-convulsant and can suppress seizure activity. It is also anti-inflammatory, and has helped people with other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and many others. I smoked cannabis even before I was diagnosed, and I always found that it settled my stomach. I have since spoken to many other people with celiac disease online and face to face, and I've done a fair amount of research to find out if there are other celiacs who experience the same relief from their symptoms. While doing my research, I came across an interesting post on Medhelp.org by Betherie Mommi about a girl with celiac who also suffers with IBS and has a history of chronic pain, nausea and, just like me, eating disorders. With such a weak stomach it's always hard to eat things without discomfort. She goes on to say that she uses medical marijuana becuase the meds that the doctors gave her have not helped with the pain and side effects of the medications, and the marijuana has also helped her appetite. She goes on to give one of the best descriptions of stomach pains, which I also get, but had difficulty explaining: "like velcro made out of razor blades being pulled apart in certain parts of your belly." She goes on to say that it also gave a sense of community back to her life, as you do sometimes feel excluded as a celiac, because there's a lot you have to miss out on. Betherie Mommi was a medical marijuana patient. I really notice the effects it has on me, and how it relieves my stomach pains, including providing relief from the confusion and anxiety that I've experienced. I feel that other people shouldn't have to go through what I've had to experience, and I really do believe that this is an exceptional way forward for some people. You can find CBD only "vapes", liquids, and waxes, which are also supposed to help, but in my case the THC, even if it is a low dosage, was essential to get rid of the pain. What I have described in this article is only what has helped me, after much suffering, and I urge all celiacs to do their own research and speak to their doctors before making a decision. I really believe that this approach could be helpful to so many others, but I also realize that it may not be for everyone. Sources: Cannabis May Cure Celiac Disease Can Cannabis Help Autoimmune Disease Sufferers? Medhelp.org
  4. Celiac.com 03/28/2014 - Great news for some celiac and gluten-intolerant folks in Colorado! Legal marijuana sales began in Colorado on Jan. 1, 2014, and new shop owners have been surprised to find a strong the market for marijuana edibles. More and more, makers of these edibles are including gluten-free selections. In some ways, it seems both natural and inevitable that the rising retail market for gluten-free good and the rising retail market for edible cannabis products should overlap. That is what is happening now in Colorado. As marijuana retailers such to meet the demand for weed, they are also rushing to meet the demand for edible cannabis products. This, in turn, has many manufacturers across Colorado racing to bake, inject, spray and infuse marijuana into nearly every kind of edible form, with many taking steps to include gluten-free items among their products. Once relegated to regular marijuana ground up into cookies or brownies, the manufacture of edibles now entails bakers using concentrated extracts of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol, marijuana's active ingredient), usually suspended oil, and then incorporated into foods ranging from cookies to mints and candies, olive oil, granola bars, chocolate truffles, spaghetti sauce, and marijuana-infused sodas in flavors like sparkling peach and sarsaparilla. Experts say edibles tend to give consumers a slightly different "high," because, instead of entering the lungs and moving directly into the bloodstream, the THC is first processed by the stomach and absorbed via the digestive system. The high takes longer to begin, is usually less intense, and longer lasting than with smoked cannabis. All edibles sold in Colorado's marijuana retail outlets are produced in commercial facilities. Many are labeled for potency. Commercial gluten-free products must follow FDA labeling guidelines for purity. Source: Firstcoastnews.com
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