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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/26/2013 - There are a number of highly specific and sensitive blood tests that can be used in diagnosing celiac disease; however histological examination of a biopsy taken by endoscopy remains the gold standard for celiac diagnosis. However, not every patient wants to undergo an endoscopy, and many will happily undergo additional blood tests to avoid or delay endoscopy. In an effort to help clinicians make accurate celiac diagnosis without endoscopy and biopsy, the company Nestec S.A. of Vevey, Switzerland, a research and testing subsidiary of Nestlé has obtained U.S. Patent No. 8,409,819, entitled "Methods to predict risk for celiac disease by detecting anti-flagellin antibody levels." The inventors have shown that a subset of at risk patients had elevated anti-CBir1 antibodies and that this correlated with HLA-DQ2.5 and HLA-DQ8 genotypes. The inventors showed that a group at risk patients have elevated anti-CBir1 antibodies that correlate with HLA-DQ2.5 and HLA-DQ8 genotypes. Their patent contains two independent claims, numbers 1 and 9, each of which describes a method to aid in predicting whether a patient who is EMA positive, or who has a relative with celiac disease, is at risk for developing celiac disease. Each method relies on the CBir1 flagellin antigen, specifically the N-terminal residues 1-147, to determine whether or not a sample from an at-risk patient contains anti-CBir1 flagellin antibodies. Flagellin is a part of what makes up bacterial flagella, the molecular mechanism that drives the propeller-like motion in bacteria. The inventors theorize that individuals at risk for celiac disease may have an aggressive immune response to resident bacterial proteins, in this case flagellin. This method for predicting celiac disease risk may help clinicians to diagnose patients who wish to avoid endoscopy, or who wish additional tests before doing so. The new patent also notes that the method might help to identify patients at risk of developing celiac disease before any symptoms are present.
  2. Celiac.com 08/27/2012 - Because so many patients are now overweight upon diagnosis for celiac disease, and so fee present as classically underweight, doctors are revising the clinical presentation guidelines for celiac disease diagnosis. That being said, some researchers have voiced concern that some patients might gain further weight while on a gluten-free diet. Recently, a team of researchers conducted a study to assess the impact of a gluten-free diet on body mass index (BMI) in a nationwide group of celiac patients and to isolate any variables that might help to predict favorable or unfavorable BMI changes. The research team included Anniina Ukkola, Markku Mäki, Kalle Kurppa, Pekka Collin, Heini Huhtala, Leila Kekkonen, and Katri Kaukinen. They are affiliated variously with the School of Medicine, University of Tampere, and the Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery at Tampere University Hospital, both in Tampere, Finland. To assess weight and disease-related issues, the researchers looked at 698 newly detected adults who were diagnosed with celiac disease by classical or extra-intestinal symptoms or by screening. The researchers measured BMI upon celiac diagnosis and after one year on a gluten-free diet. They then compared the results against data for the general population. Study data showed that 4% of patients were underweight at celiac diagnosis, 57% were normal weight, 28% were overweight and 11% were obese. On a gluten-free diet, 69% of underweight patients gained weight, while 18% of overweight and 42% of obese patients lost weight. BMI remained stable for the other patients. Both symptom- and screen-detected celiac patients showed similar results. The patients with celiac disease showed a more favorable BMI pattern than the general population. The most favorable BMI changes were seen in patients with self-rated gluten-free diet expertise, along with those who were younger upon diagnosis. Dietary counseling did not seem to impact . The initial method of detection does not seem to matter for people with celiac disease who are following a gluten-free diet. Both screen-detected and symptom-detected celiac disease patients who followed a gluten-free diet showed similar improvements in body mass index (BMI). Source: European Journal of Internal Medicine Volume 23, Issue 4, Pages 384-388, June 2012
  3. Celiac.com 08/13/2012 - Research has indicated that giving small amounts of wheat-rich food to people with celiac disease, who are on a gluten-free diet, will trigger interferon (IFN)-γ-secreting T cells in the bloodstream. These T cells react to gluten, and can be easily detected. However, very little is known about how this procedure might be reproduced in the same patient groups that underwent two, or more, gluten challenges. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the reproducability of this short wheat challenge method for detecting immune an response to gluten. The research team included A. Camarca, G. Radano, R. Di Mase, G. Terrone, F. Maurano, S. Auricchio, R. Troncone, L. Greco, C. Gianfrani. They are affiliated with the Institute of Food Sciences-CNR, Avellino Department of Paediatrics and European Laboratory for the Investigation of Food-Induced Diseases, University of Naples, Naples, Italy. They evaluated fourteen celiac patients in remission who consumed wheat bread for 3 days, along with thirteen patients who underwent a second gluten challenge after 3-10 months on a strict gluten-free diet. The team then analyzed the immune reactivity to gluten in peripheral blood by detecting IFN-γ both before and 6 days after patients began a a gluten-inclusive diet. They found that gliadin-specific IFN-γ-secreting CD4(+) T cells increased significantly by day 6 of the first challenge. These cells arose as prevalently human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ restricted and with a phenotype of gut homing, as suggested by the expression of β7-integrin. They also saw a reaction to gliadin after the second wheat consumption, although the responses varied by individual at each challenge. The study showed that a short wheat challenge offers a non-invasive approach to investigate the gluten-related immune response in peripheral blood of people who are sensitive to gluten. Moreover, the study showed that the procedure can be reproduced in the same subjects after a gluten wash-out of at least 3 months. The results of this study mean that we can likely expect this procedure to find its way into clinical practice in the future. Source: Clinical and Experimental Immunology. 2012 Aug;169(2):129-36. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2249.2012.04597.x.
  4. Celiac.com 07/30/2007 - A study published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology suggests that a newly proposed system of classifying duodenal pathology on celiac disease provides an improved inter-observation than the less Marsh-Oberhuber classification, and offers an advance towards making a simpler, better, more valid diagnosis of celiac disease. Celiac disease is presently classified according to the Marsh-Oberhuber system of classifying duodenal lesions. Recently, a more elementary method has been suggested. That method is based on three villous morphologies—non-atrophic, atrophic with villous crypto ratio <3:1, and atrophic, villi idnetectable—combined with intraepithelial counts of >25/100 enterocytes. The study team chose a group of sixty people to be part of the study. Of the 60 patients the team studied, 46 were female and 14 were male. The average age was 28.2 years with a mean range of 1-78 years. 10 people had celiac disease, 13 had celiac disease with normal villi, but a pathological increase in epithelial lymphocytes >25/100 & hyperplastic crypts. 37 patients had celiac disease with villous aptrophy. Patients were given biopsies, with at least 4 biopsies were taken from the second part of the duodenum. Biopsies were fixed in formalin and processed according to standard procedures, with cuts at six levels, and stained with hematoxylin resin. The slides were sent randomly to 6 pathologists who were blind to one another. The results showed that this new method of classification yielded better inter-observer agreement and more accurate diagnosis that the more difficult Marsh-Oberhuber system. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2007;5:838–843 health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.
  5. J Pediatr. 2004 May;144(5):632-6 Celiac.com 05/10/2004 - Italian researchers compared the serum samples from 39 celiac disease patients who were diagnosed with celiac disease after their first biopsy with 32 controls who had normal duodenal mucosa and 32 healthy volunteers. Salivary transglutaminase autoantibodies were detected in 97.4% of the patients who had celiac disease, and in 100% of their corresponding serum samples. All of the 32 healthy volunteers tested negative for both serum and saliva transglutaminase autoantibodies. The researchers conclude "This study demonstrates that it is possible to detect salivary transglutaminase autoantibodies in celiac disease with a non-invasive, simple to perform, reproducible and sensitive method."
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